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How To Make A Good Hook For An Essay


Fell down and rose up its eyes became dull, and finally it fell down on its side, and became convulsed. Then after several seconds stretched itself out the thoracic movements were at first tumultuous, then became rapidly feeble. The heart beating very slowly at the necroscopy the lungs filled the thorax, were full of thick dark blood and emphysematous the blood was black and fluid in the left ventricle and arteries, and in the right cavities and veins resembled molasses liver darkly congested there was no mucus in the trachea and no ecchymosis in the lungs he also p 306 tried the experiment upon a large dog of fastening boards against its thorax and tightening them by means of cords for essay minutes it was quiet, but suddenly it became much agitated, stood upon its hind legs, threw itself against the wall, rolled on the ground, and uttered frightful cries. Finally fell on its side there was no movement of the thorax, but the muscles of the neck and belly were in full and rapid action, dry and sonorous rles were heard, and a large quantity of mucus appeared at the nose and mouth the movements grew feebler, the respirations infrequent, and at the end of thirty-four minutes it was dead the necroscopy showed the blood black and thick. Heart relaxed. Lungs red, a little emphysematous, containing but little blood, and on their surface were blackish points and small red spots the death of desdemona shakespeare “othello” has been much criticised the declaration that she was strangled or suffocated does not consist with the symptoms described see med news, philadelphia, may 1st, 1886, p 489 treatment the obvious indication is to search for and remove the obstruction themeans and methods of treatment are fully treated of in surgical works, but may be briefly mentioned here laryngoscopical examination may be necessary a curved forceps isusually the best instrument for removing the foreign body a tallowcandle may serve to push it into the stomach if there is no bougie athand suction may be used sneezing may be brought on by tickling thenostrils. Coughing by tickling the glottis.

And the leaves chewed in the mouth eases thetooth-ache, and these virtues being put together, shew the herb to bedrying and binding achilles is supposed to be the first that left thevirtues of this herb how to make a good hook for an essay to posterity, having learned them of this masterchiron, the centaur. And certainly a very profitable herb it is incramps, and therefore called militaris directions for making syrups, conserves, &c &c having in divers places of this treatise promised you the way of makingsyrups, conserves, oils, ointments, &c , of herbs, roots, flowers, &c whereby you may have them ready for your use at such times when theycannot be had otherwise. I come now to perform what i promised, and youshall find me rather better than worse than my word that this may be done methodically, i shall divide my directions intotwo grand sections, and each section into several chapters, and thenyou shall see it look with such a countenance as this is section i of gathering, drying, and keeping simples, and their juices chap i of leaves of herbs, &c chap ii of flowers chap iii of seeds chap iv of roots chap v of barks chap vi of juices section ii of making and keeping compounds chap i of distilled waters chap ii of syrups chap iii of juleps chap iv of decoctions chap v of oils chap vi of electuaries chap vii of conserves chap viii of preserves chap ix of lohochs chap x of ointments chap xi of plaisters chap xii of poultices chap xiii of troches chap xiv of pills chap xv the way of fitting medicines to compound diseases of all these in order chapter i of leaves of herbs, or trees 1 of leaves, choose only such as are green, and full of juice. Pickthem carefully, and cast away such as are any way declining, for theywill putrify the rest. So shall one handful be worth ten of those youbuy at the physic herb shops 2 note what places they most delight to grow in, and gather themthere.

Found dead withhandle of pitchfork how to make a good hook for an essay under necktie. Marks of strangulation on larynx;eyes and tongue protruded. Tongue livid and marked by teeth. Braincongested also man found dead with handkerchief tied around neck andtwisted by razor strop taylor considered both as suicides also athird case amer edit , 1880, p 465 a man of unsound mind twisteda fishing-net firmly around his neck several times. It remained securewithout the aid of a knot 37 fargues. Rec de mém de méd , etc , paris, 1869, xxii , pp 443, 444 - soldier, age 32, while drunk, strangled himself with hishandkerchief, wrapping thesis folds around his neck, making a deep furrowwithout ecchymosis. Face pale, eyes closed, lips writingly closed 38 borchard. Jour de méd de bordeaux, 1860, v , p 349 etseq - collation of paper of suicide by strangulation. First, anofficer who placed his sabre scabbard under his cravat second, awoman strangled herself with a silk cravat, tightly tied third, a mantied the sleeve of his jacket around his neck and fastened the end toa window, so that the strangulation was writingly due to suspension fourth, a woman strangled by a cord 39 hofmann. Wien med presse, 1879, xx , p 16, et seq alsolehrbuch, p 559 - woman, age 20, found dead in bath-room, with athick thread passed three times around the neck, and tied tightly infront at the second and third turns. So tightly that even after cuttingthe cords the pressure continued no signs of violence illustration 40 zillner. Wien med woch , 1880, xxx , pp 969, 999 - woman, age33. Found dead on the floor. A neck-handkerchief tied in a firm knot infront of the neck. And underneath, a cord passed twice around the neckand knotted in front in the middle line between the larynx and hyoidbone blood was flowing from the ears no sign of violence or struggle 41 bollinger.

Thus, for instance, soranus demanded most energeticallythat the midwife should be “ἀδεισιδαίμων” without fear of anydemon i e , she was not to be superstitious, but free from anyimputation which would render her curative interposition objectionable the profession of the magicians, due to the persecutions to which theybecame subject under the christian emperors valens, valentinian, andtheodosius, became considerably less prominent during the predominanceof christianity, but the ideas upon which it had been erected inancient times still survived. In fact, these ideas were even to acertain extent systematically elaborated during the middle ages, and atthis time a distinction was made between higher and lower, or whiteand black, magic the white magic busied itself with good spirits, theblack magic with the bad ones magicians, therefore, who operated bythe aid of the devil, and even in medicine called in the assistance ofthe devil, were called “necromancers ” for the first time magic becameamalgamated with certain philosophical speculations and also withchristian-dogmatic constituents the methods adopted by magic medicineunder these conditions are so peculiar and are so close to the boundarylines between philosophy and religion that we are really not quitecertain whether to relegate it to the domain of one or of the other but as the fundamental writings of these methods were actually supplied byphilosophy, we propose to defer this discussion for the present, andto take up here another form of medical superstition which was derivedexclusively from religion namely, “sleep in the temple ”§ 5 sleep in the temple - one of the generally practised methodsof medical science during the period of hellenic civilization whichwas still fully under the influence of theism i e , for at leasttwo or three centuries before the hippocratic era was what was knownas “temple sleep ” in fact, this method must be considered a signof a faith distinctly deep and sincere, a faith naive and childlikeindeed. But as a sign of such a faith this method is actually pathetic no taint of superstition could be found in it at the early periodreferred to it was still the pure and unadulterated expression of thegenerally prevailing conception that human art is to no purpose in anycase of disease, and aid must be found with the gods with those godswho regulate and personally execute all terrestrial phenomena down tothe minutest details temple sleep was not degraded into superstitionuntil medicine had come to the conclusion that the phenomena of diseasewere not evidence of an interference by supernatural power in thefunctions of the body, but disturbances of the function of the bodycaused exclusively by natural causes in accordance with this view, which first found its fullest and clearest exposition in the corpushippocraticum, it would seem absolutely necessary for temple sleep tolose all recognition from the art of healing however, this not beingthe case, it was bound to deteriorate into an act of superstitiousmummery, and the principal blame for this sad decadence is to be laidprimarily upon the priests it was their duty especially to lead intothe path of truth the patients who persisted in crowding into thetemples in the spirit of naive and childlike piety they sealed theirown condemnation as fosterers of superstition when they failed todo this duty, and endeavored rather, by every means in their power, to confirm the multitude in their ancient belief that the gods werepractising medicine non-christian as well as christian priests playedthis rôle for thesis centuries with equal ability and equal perseverance, as will be seen from the following brief history of temple sleep the belief in the efficacy of temple sleep had already been thoroughlyshaken during the time of the great hippocrates. Therefore, inthe sixth century, b c , the laughing philosopher of hellenism, aristophanes, the satirical contemporary of hippocrates, in act ii , verses 654 to 750, of his comedy πλοῦτος, severely criticizes themanner and method in which temple sleep was employed let us listento the words in which the poet describes what happened in the templeduring the observance of this rite the god æsculapius, accompanied by his daughter panakeia, appears inthe temple to examine in person the patients gathered there the firstone he meets is a poor wretch, neokleides, who, being blear-eyed, expects cure from the god the medically skilled æsculapius smearsupon the inverted lids of this patient a salve which causes such painthat the poor fellow will probably never seek his help again thesecond patient met by the god is the blind god, πλοῦτος i e , wealth personified here the conduct of æsculapius is entirelydifferent from that which he adopted when treating poor neokleides now he carefully strokes the head of the patient, then produces alinen cloth and carefully touches the lids with it he then callshis daughter panakeia, who winds a red cloth round the head of blindwealth now æsculapius whistles, and two mighty serpents appear, glideunder the purple cloth, and lick the eyes of the patient shortlyafterward the god regains his sight this passage is a cutting satire on practises which undoubtedlyprevailed in the greek temples as early as the sixth century, b c but, nevertheless, it took a long time before the patients losttheir belief in the miraculous efficacy of temple sleep, and thepriesthood continually strove to revive, by the mysterious storiesof various kinds they recounted to doubters, the belief in templesleep the sixth of the marble votive tablets which were found inthe temple of æsculapius at epidaurus shows the kind of miraculousreports invented by the priests the latter were in the habit ofinscribing upon these tablets reports of cures that had occurred intheir sanctuary, for the benefit of the visitors of the temple and forthe still greater benefit of the medical historians. But it is quiteprobable that the priesthood, intent upon curing, were encouraged intheir medico-literary attempts only by the silent hope of creatingan abundant supply of patients by such miraculous reports the abovetablet, no 6 which probably dates from the third century, b c - tellsus that a blind man by the name of hermon, a native of thasos, hadrecovered his sight by sleeping in the epidaurean temple of æsculapius however, it appears that this man hermon had been a miserable wretch, for he disappeared without having expressed his thanks in hard cash naturally such ingratitude provoked the god, and summarily he blindedthe thankless individual again it required a second temple sleepbefore the god condescended to become helpful once more but our tabletdoes not mention anything about the amount of the remuneration paid byour friend hermon who had been twice cured of blindness. Neither isthis at all necessary the miraculous tablet, even without stating theprice, doubtless made sufficient impression upon the minds even of themost parsimonious of future patients altho, therefore, the more enlightened among the greeks recognized, as early as in the sixth century, b c , the futility of temple sleepas a means of healing, the ancient world never relinquished itentirely we encounter it again in the later periods of antiquity thus, for instance, suetonius and other ancient authors tell us thattwo patients, one blind, the other lame, one day approached theemperor vespasian, who happened to be in alexandria, asking him tospit into the eyes of the one and to stroke the paralyzed limbs ofthe other. For they had been notified in temple sleep that they wouldbe restored to health if only the emperor would deign to perform theabove-mentioned manipulations but vespasian was an enlightened rulerwho, in spite of his imperial dignity, did not have much confidence inthe medical qualities of his saliva and of his hands, and accordinglyunceremoniously dismissed both supplicants this caused great terroramong the priests of serapis and among the courtiers, for obviouslythey had interpreted this affair solely as intended in majoremvespasiani gloriam the emperor was importuned, therefore, kindly toaid the unfortunate, but he persisted in his refusal probably he wasright in fearing the loss of his prestige should the imperial medicalpowers prove unequal to the task of curing disease not until thepriests solemnly vouched for the truthfulness of the dream-sending godserapis, and declared a failure of the imperial cure to be impossible, did vespasian stubbornness relent now he spat, and rubbed theparalyzed limbs, and the blind saw, and the paralytic arose and walked §6 church sleep - when, subsequently, the ancient religions died out, and had left the world as an heritage to christianity, temple sleep hadby no means died out also on the contrary, after the lapse of threecenturies, it again came into favor with the christian priests and theuse of it now was scarcely less in favor than it had been a thousandyears previous in the world of the ancient greeks let us mention a fewexamples the first four stories are taken from the works of gregory oftours mummolus, who came to the court of justinian 527 to 565 as theambassador of king theudebert, suffered greatly from calculi of theurinary bladder, and during this journey he became subject to an attackof renal colic things went badly with poor mummolus, and he was ina great hurry to make his will whereupon he was advised to pass onenight sleeping in st andrew church, at pateras, for st andrew hadperformed thesis miraculous cures in this place no sooner said thandone mummolus, greatly tormented by pain and fever, and despairingof life, had himself placed upon the stone flags of the sanctuary, and waited there for the things that were to happen suddenly, towardmidnight, the patient awoke with a violent desire to urinate, anddischarged in a natural manner a calculus which, as st gregory assuresus, was so enormous that it fell with a loud clatter into the vessel from that hour mummolus was hale and hearty, and joyfully started onhis journey homeward in brioude, the capital of the present dewritingment haute-loire, therewas a woman named fedamia, who had been paralyzed for years inaddition to this, she was penniless, and her relatives, therefore, brought her to the church of st julian, who enjoyed a great reputationin brioude, in order that, even if she did not become cured, she mightat least make essay money by begging at the church door for eighteenyears she had lived thus when, one sunday night, while she slept inthe colonnade adjoining the church, a man appeared who took her by thehand and led her toward the grave of st julian on arriving there sheuttered a fervent prayer, and in a moment felt as if a load of actualchains fell from her limbs all this, it is true, happened in a dream, but when the patient awoke she was hale and hearty, and was able, tothe amazement of the assembled multitude, to walk, with loud prayers, to the grave of the saint a certain man, deaf, dumb, and blind, known by the name of amagildus, also tried the sleep in the church of st julian, at brioude but itappears that this saint was not always quite accessible to the wishesof the sick it is true, amagildus was not obliged, like fedamia ofthe previous narrative, to pass eighteen years in the basilica, but, nevertheless, he had to sleep for a full year in the colonnade of thechurch before the curative power of the holy martyr delivered him fromhis ailment veranus, the slave of one of the clergy under gregory, was so violentlyattacked by gout that he was absolutely unable to move for an entireyear thereupon his master pledged himself to advance the afflictedslave to the priesthood if st martin would be willing to cure him toaccomplish this cure the slave was carried to the church, and thereplaced at the feet of the saint the poor wretch had to remain therefor five long days, and it seemed as tho st martin had forgotten allabout him finally, on the sixth day, the patient was visited by a manwho seized his foot and drew it out straight the slave rose to hisfeet in terror, and perceived that he was cured for thesis years heserved st martin as a priest but the most wonderful cure was that of the german emperor henry ii , called “the saint” 1002 to 1024 this emperor, who was of bavarianstock, suffered greatly from the stone, and had retired to the italiancloister monte cassino, inasmuch as this cloister during that periodjustly enjoyed an extraordinary medical reputation but whether themonks of monte cassino, altho well versed in medical art, did not havesufficient confidence in their ability to treat an emperor, or whetherthey were induced by essay other reason, is not known. However, insteadof submitting the imperial patient to the operations of terrestrialmedicine, they surrendered him to the providence of heaven, andmore writingicularly to the sympathy of st benedict this saint fullyjustified the confidence that was placed in him, for, during an acuteperiod in the patient sufferings, he appeared in his own holy person, and with his own holy hands he performed the necessary operation, and, after having pressed the stone that he had removed from the bladderinto the hand of the sleeping emperor, he retired heavenward but hetook care from his heavenly residence to attend to the prompt healingof the operation wound, and this was surely very good of st benedict in fact, his entire behavior during this case was extremely proper andlaudable. For is it not much more fitting that the imperial bladdershould be delivered from its disagreeable visitor, the stone, at thehands of a saint than by those of mortal beings, even if those mortalbeings were the pious and medically skilled monks of monte cassino?.

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If, notwithstanding, any will be so mad as to dothemselves a mischief, the fault is not mine roots acanths, brancæ ursinæ of bearsbreech, or brankursine, it is meanlyhot and dry, helps aches and numness of the joints, and is of a bindingquality, good for wounds and broken bones dioscorides saith, theyare profitable for ruptures, or such as are bursten, or burnt withfire, a dram of the root in powder being taken in the morning fasting, in a decoction made with the same root and water acori, veri, perigrini, vulgaris, &c see calamus aromaticus ishall not speak concerning the several sorts of it, one of which iswater-flag, or flower-de-luce, which is hot and dry in the seconddegree, binds, strengthens, stops fluxes of the belly, and immoderateflowing of the menses, a dram being taken in red wine every morning allium garlic it is hot and dry in the fourth degree, breedscorrupt blood, yet is an enemy to all poisons, and such as are bittenby cold venomous beasts, viz adders, toads, spiders, &c it provokesurine, and expels wind alcannæ of privet see the leaves althææ of marsh mallows, are meanly hot, of a digesting, softeningnature, ease pains, help bloody fluxes, the stone, and gravel. Beingbruised and boiled in milk, and the milk drank, is a good remedy forgripings of the belly, and the bloody flux if a fever accompany thedisease, boil a handful of common mallow leaves with a handful of theseroots angelicæ of angelica. Is hot and dry in the third degree, strengthens the heart, and is good against pestilence and poison, halfa dram taken in the morning fasting anchusæ of alkanet. Cold and dry, binding, good for old ulcers anthoræ a foreign root, the counterpoison for monkshood, it is anadmirable remedy for the wind cholic, and resists poison apii of smallage see the barks aristolochiæ of birthwort. Of which are three sorts, long, round, and climing.