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How To Do A Compare And Contrast Essay


Nordoes the latter undertake to use the how to do a compare and contrast essay highest possible degree of skill, as there may be persons of higher education and greater advantagesthan himself. But he undertakes to bring a fair, reasonable andcompetent degree of skill and in an action against him by a patient, the question for the jury is whether the injury complained of must bereferred to a want of proper degree of skill and care in the defendant, or not hence he is never presumed to engage for extraordinary skill, or for extraordinary diligence and care as a general rule, he whoundertakes for a reward to perform any work is bound to use a degreeof diligence, attention and skill, adequate to the performance of hisundertaking. That is, to do it according to the rules of the art;spondet peritiam artis and the degree of skill arises in proportionto the value and delicacy of the operation but he is in no caserequired to have more than ordinary skill, for he does not engage formore ”physician must instruct patient how to care for himself, etc - acorollary of these rules is, that the physician must give properinstruction to his patient how to take care of himself, how to manage adiseased or injured member, when and how to take any medicines that maybe prescribed, what diet to adopt, and that in case the physician failsto give these instructions he is liable for any injuries that resultfrom this failure carpenter v blake, supra patient must inform physician fully concerning his case hiscommunications privileged - on the other hand, as we have alreadystated, the patient owes the duty to his physician of informing himfully of all the varied symptoms of his disease, or the circumstancesattending his injury, and to freely and with due confidence answerall questions concerning his past history which would tend to throwany light upon his present condition to battle with the occultforces which play so important a writing in determining the course orconsequences of disease, it is absolutely essential that the physicianshould know all that is possible to be known of the patient history, and of the history of the patient family as we shall see later on, all such communications are, in most of the states of the union andelsewhere, by statutory enactment made privileged, and without theconsent of the patient the physician or surgeon is absolutely forbiddento divulge any communication or information which he receives in orderto enable him to prescribe this rule applies equally whether thephysician or surgeon is acting for hire or is treating the person as acharity patient, and it has been extended by construction by the courtsin essay states, so as to include examinations made by jail physiciansor other physicians sent by the prosecuting officials of the state toexamine a prisoner, for purpose of giving evidence, but who allowedthe prisoner to suppose that they were there simply to treat him intheir professional capacity people v murphy, 101 n y , 126 atthe same time the courts have been careful to make an exception in thecase of advice given for the purpose of enabling the person receivingthe advice to commit a crime, and of any information received by thephysicians while the persons asking for it were engaged in a criminalattempt all of these interesting questions will be examined andtreated of at length hereafter 166conditions of contract between physician and patient furtherconsidered - it has been observed that the contract between thephysician and patient may be conditional or unconditional by this itis meant that limitations upon the reciprocal obligations between themmay be imposed, or extensions of such obligations made, by specialagreement the physician may contract to cure, and may make the curea condition precedent to receiving any reward for his services ormedicaments, and a breach of such a contract will be enforced bythe courts as a bar to an action for services rendered or medicinesfurnished the patient may agree to come to the physician home or toa hospital or other place agreed upon between them, for the purpose ofbeing treated, or of being operated upon by a surgeon, and a failureto perform such an agreement on the writing of the patient absolves themedical man from carrying out his agreement to treat the patient in the case already suggested of a request by the medical man forinformation as to the patient past history, or that of the patientfamily, or the circumstances concerning the injury or symptoms ofthe disease, if the patient should give false information, or shouldwilfully neglect to give true information, the physician would have aright, upon giving reasonable and due notice, and opportunity to employessay one else, as already intimated, to decline to proceed further withhis care of the case, and might sue and recover pay for the servicesrendered physicians cannot contract that they shall not be responsible forwant of ordinary care and skill - an important and salutary exceptionto the general rule that all writingies may contract freely as betweenthemselves stipulations measuring their reciprocal obligations, doubtless applies to the relations between physician and patient it is an exception which has been applied to the contract relationsexisting between a common carrier and a shipper or a passenger this isthat persons contracting to perform services which are to a certainextent public in their nature, and which, as in the case of the commoncarrier or in the case of the physician or surgeon, are foundedupon conventional relations, and affect the public welfare, are notpermitted, from reasons of public policy, to contract for a release orescape from liability arising out of their own negligence or wrong inshort, a physician or surgeon cannot contract with a patient that thepatient shall waive any claim for damages growing out of his want ofordinary care and skill nevertheless, the physician or surgeon mayfrankly inform his patient of his want of knowledge and experience asto the writingicular kind of treatment required by any special and unusualdisease or injury if after full information on this point, and fullopportunity to employ essay one else, the patient insists that thephysician or surgeon go on with such treatment as he is able to giveto the case, and injuries result which a more skilful and experiencedpractitioner might have avoided, it is probable that the courts wouldhold that the practitioner was not liable under such circumstances, or that such circumstances could be pleaded in mitigation of damages but it would be the duty of the practitioner in such a case to beexceedingly careful in performing any surgical operations, and notadminister any powerful drugs with the strength and medicinal qualitiesof which he was not acquainted if he should assume to perform suchoperations or administer such drugs instead of confining himself tomodifying the ravages of disease by the use of well-known simpleremedies, or protecting against the consequences of severe injury bythe use of ordinary antiseptic dressings and treatment, he would nodoubt be liable for any resulting damage, and could not recover pay forhis service experiments not to be tried on patients this rule applies to charitypatients - for like reasons of public policy it has been held that aphysician has no right to try experiments on his patient 167 in thisrespect a charity patient will be protected by law and compensated fordamages received from experiments on his health and person, just asmuch as a person from whom a large fee could be expected humanity andpublic policy both forbid that experiments should be tried upon oneclass of patients any more than another however this may be, in acase of extreme danger, where other resorts have failed and everythingelse done that could reasonably be required, and if the patient andhis family consent after full information of the dangerous characterof the operation, or the unknown qualities and powers of the drug tobe administered, the practitioner would be justified and protected ifessay new methods of treatment not entirely developed or known to theprofession, but supposed to be efficacious, should be adopted, althoughthe result might prove unfavorable in such a case, however, it wouldbe extremely perilous for the physician to stand upon his own judgmentalone he should consult the best talent in his profession available, and abide by the judgment of his colleagues or a fair majority of them;and even then should apply to his course of action the maxim when indoubt run no risks. Better let a patient perish from disease or injury, than while attempting uncertain experiments with the surgeon knifeor the use of dangerous drugs the safe rule is to take no chances, unless there is a consensus of judgment of several physicians itmay be objected that if no experiments are tried no new medicines orsurgical devices could be discovered, or their effects observed theanswer to this objection is that vivisection, and other experimentsupon live animals, permit of experimentation to a considerable degree, and often effectually point out the proper course of treatment of thehuman subjects in the case of drugs and medicines the practice is wellknown of physicians trying the effects thereof upon their own persons, in their zeal and anxiety to give to the world new discoveries but, as heretofore observed, the law does not recognize the right of themedical or surgical practitioner to tamper with his patients’ health bythe use of untried experiments, without imposing upon the practitionerliability for all injuries proximately resulting from their use allof such matters will, however, fall more properly under considerationwhen the liability of the physician and surgeon for malpractice isconsidered chapter iv of the legal right of physicians and surgeons to recover compensationfor services liability to pay for services - an important matter for physiciansand surgeons is the question as to who is responsible, or liable to payfor their services if there is an express contract this question doesnot arise.

He fixed a cork in the trachea at first the dog was quiet. It then extended its neck, writinged its jaws, and made efforts as if to vomit. Then tried to walk, but its gait was uncertain. Fell down and rose up its eyes became dull, and finally it fell down on its side, and became convulsed. Then after several seconds stretched itself out the thoracic movements were at first tumultuous, then became rapidly feeble. The heart beating very slowly at the necroscopy the lungs filled the thorax, were full of thick dark blood and emphysematous the blood was black and fluid in the left ventricle and arteries, and in the right cavities and veins resembled molasses liver darkly congested there was no mucus in the trachea and no ecchymosis in the lungs he also p 306 tried the experiment upon a large dog of fastening boards against its thorax and tightening them by means of cords for essay minutes it was quiet, but suddenly it became much agitated, stood upon its hind legs, threw itself against the wall, rolled on the ground, and uttered frightful cries. Finally fell on its side there was no movement of the thorax, but the muscles of the neck and belly were in full and rapid action, dry and sonorous rles were heard, and a large quantity of mucus appeared at the nose and mouth the movements grew feebler, the respirations infrequent, and at the end of thirty-four minutes it was dead the necroscopy showed the blood black and thick.

B any member of the college of physicians and surgeons of theprovinces of manitoba, ontario and quebec upon producing satisfactoryevidence of the same and of identification. C any person who shall produce from any college or school ofmedicine and surgery in the dominion of canada requiring a four-years’course of study and sic a diploma of qualification. Provided hefurnish to the council satisfactory evidence of identification, andpass if deemed necessary, before the members thereof, or such examinersas may be appointed for the purpose, a satisfactory examinationtouching his fitness and capacity to practise as a physician andsurgeon, upon payment to the registrar of fifty dollars 34, as substituted by ord 14, 1890, amended by ord 9, 1891-92 powers of council - the members of the council are required to makeorders, regulations, or by-laws for the regulation of the register andthe guidance of examiners, and may prescribe subjects and modes ofexamination, and may make all regulations in respect of examinations, not contrary to the ordinance, that they may deem expedient andnecessary 36 the council may by by-law delegate to the registrar power to admit topractice and to register any person having the necessary qualificationsentitling him to be registered by the council ord 24, 1892, s 4 the council may direct the name of any person improperly registeredto be erased from the register and such name shall be erased by theregistrar ord 24, 1892, s 5 forfeiture of rights - if a medical practitioner be convicted of anyfelony or misdemeanor or after due inquiry be judged by the council tohave been guilty of infamous conduct in any professional respect, thecouncil may, if it sees fit, direct the registrar to erase the name ofsuch practitioner from the register, and the name shall be erased ord 5, 1888, s 37, as substituted by ord 24, 1892, s 1 rights of registered persons - every person registered under theordinance is entitled to practise medicine and surgery, includingmidwifery, or any one of them, as the case may be, and to demand andrecover with costs his reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of medical or surgical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patients 38 limitation - a period of one year after the term of professionalservice is established as a limitation to actions for negligence ormalpractice against members of the college 39 register, evidence - the registrar, under the direction of the council, is required to publish a register of the names and residences andthe medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by anycollege or body, of all persons appearing on the register on the dayof publication the register is called “northwest territories’ medicalregister, ” and a copy for the time being, purporting to be so printedand published, is prima facie evidence that the persons thereinspecified are registered according to the act the absence of a namefrom such copy is prima facie evidence that such person is not soregistered in case a person name does not appear on such copy, a certified copyunder the hand of the registrar of the entry of the name of such personon the register is evidence that such person is registered s 40 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights or privileges conferred and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 4 offences and penalties - to practise or profess to practise withoutregistration, for hire or reward, is punishable with a penalty of $10042 to wilfully or falsely pretend to be a physician, doctor of medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assume any title or descriptionnot actually possessed and to which the person is not legally entitledunder this ordinance, is punishable with a penalty of from $10 to $5043, as amended by ord 24, 1892, s 2 to take or use a name or description implying or calculated to leadpeople to infer registration or recognition by law as a physician, surgeon, or licentiate in medicine or surgery is punishable with apenalty of from $25 to $100 44 unregistered persons - no person is entitled to recover for any medicalor surgical advice or attendance or the performance of any operationor medicine which he may have prescribed 45. Nor to beappointed as medical officer, physician, or surgeon in any branch ofthe public service or in any hospital or other charitable institutionnot supported wholly by voluntary contributions, unless registered46 no certificate required from a physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer is registered 47 costs - in prosecutions, payment of costs may be awarded in addition tothe penalty, and in default of payment the offender may be committed tothe common jail for not more than one month 48 burden of proof - in prosecutions, the burden of proof as toregistration is upon the person charged 49 proof - the production of a printed or other copy of the register, certified under the hand of the registrar, for the time being issufficient evidence of all persons registered. A certificate onsuch copy purporting to be signed by any person in the capacity ofregistrar of the council under this ordinance is prima facie evidencethat he is registered without proof of his signature or of his being infact registrar 50 limitation of prosecutions - prosecutions must be commenced within sixmonths from the date of the offence 51 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions where deemedexpedient 52 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant 53 definition - “legally qualified medical practitioner” or “dulyqualified medical practitioner, ” or any other words implying legalrecognition as a medical practitioner or member of the medicalprofession, when used in any law or ordinance, mean a person registeredunder this ordinance 55 homœopathists - homœopathic physicians may be registered under thisordinance on complying with the terms of sec 34 58 fees - to the council from each member annually as the council maydetermine, not more than $2 and not less than $1 35 to the registrar, for registration, $50 56, as substitutedby ord 24, 1892, s 3 nova scotia medical board - there is a provincial medical board consisting ofthirteen regular qualified medical practitioners of not less than sevenyears’ standing, seven nominated and appointed by the governor incouncil, and six by the nova scotia medical society r s , 5th ser , c 24, s 1 the board appoints a secretary who is the registrar of the board3, 4 register, evidence - the registrar is required before the 1st of augusteach year to cause to be printed and published in the royal gazetteof the province, and in such other manner as the board shall appoint, a correct register of the names and residences and medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by any college or body, with thedates thereof of all persons appearing on the register as existing onjune 30th such register is called “the medical register, ” and a copythereof for the time being, purporting to be so printed and published, is prima facie evidence that the persons specified are registeredaccording to this chapter the absence of a name from such copy isprima facie evidence that such person is not so registered in thecase of a person whose name does not appear in such copy, a certifiedcopy, under the hand of the registrar, of the entry of his name onthe register is evidence that such person is registered under theprovisions of this chapter 5 students - no person can begin or enter on the study of physic, surgery, or midwifery, for the purpose of qualifying himself topractise in the province, unless he shall have obtained from theprovincial medical board a certificate that he has satisfactorilypassed a matriculation examination in the subjects specified in thechapter 6 the chapter prescribes the prerequisites to admission to preliminaryexaminations 7, 12 qualification - subject to the exceptions hereinafter, no personcan lawfully practise physic, surgery, or midwifery unless his namebe registered and unless he shall have received from the provincialmedical board a license to practise 8 no person is entitled to be registered or to receive a licenseto practise unless he satisfy the board that he has passed thematriculation or preliminary examination. That after passing suchexamination he has followed his studies during a period not less thanfour years one of which may be under the direction of one or moregeneral practitioners duly licensed. That during such four years hehas attended at essay university, college, or incorporated school ofmedicine in good standing, courses of lectures amounting together tonot less than twelve months on general anatomy, on practical anatomy, on surgery, on the practice of medicine, on midwifery, on chemistry, on materia medica and pharmacy, and on the institutes of medicine orphysiology, and one three-months’ course of medical jurisprudence;that he has attended the general practice of a hospital in whichare not less than fifty beds under the charge of not less than twophysicians or surgeons, for a period of not less than one year or twoperiods of not less than six months each. That he has also attendedtwo three-months’ courses or one six-months’ course of clinicalmedicine, and the same of clinical surgery.

Twoecchymoses size of beans in crico-thyroid muscles of each side. Patchof hepatization size of fist, in lung. Injury of body the examinerdeclared that she had been strangled by compression of larynx with twofingers, but he could not say how long the pressure had continued, thatis, whether she had died of the strangulation or of the pneumonia theassailant stated that he had choked her and when she seemed to be dead, had left her the woman lived alone 22 waidele. Memorabilien, 1873, xviii , pp 161-167 - husband andwife quarrelled and fought. He stated that he choked her with herneck handkerchief, and as she turned round toward him, then chokedher with his hand until she died the examiner declared that she diedof asphyxia. There was a brownish-red dry streak on each side of theneck in the laryngeal region corresponding to the handkerchief, andalso two small abrasions of skin which might have been made by thehands. He concluded, however, that she had been choked to death by thehandkerchief, because there were no ecchymoses 23 rehm. Friedreich blätter f ger med , 1883, xxxiv , pp 325-332 - woman, age 37 choked by the hand on the neck, and at thesame time assailant knee pressed against her abdomen, pressing heragainst a wall, causing hemorrhage around the pancreas death stated asdue to asphyxia 24 schüppel. Vier ger öff med , xiii , 1870, pp 140-156 - woman, just delivered of child, and boy ten years old, were burnt to death ina fire which consumed their house examination of the bodies showedupon the neck of the boy a groove, and his tongue protruded thehusband was charged with murder, was imprisoned, and committed suicide 25 weiss. Ibid , xxvii , 1877, pp 239-244 - woman strangulated bythe bands of her nightcap 26 isnard and dieu. Rev cas jud , paris, 1841, p 101 - man, age 65 marks of fingers on face and neck opinion that he had beenassaulted by two men the two murderers confessed 27 friedberg. Gericht gutacht , 1875, pp 211-224 - woman foundhanging to branch of tree, but in half-lying position, feet on ground opinion given that she had been strangled and then hung 26 tardieu. “pendaison, ” p 223 - new-born infant question whetherits death was due to asphyxia from compression of neck by the motherwith her hand to hasten delivery he doubted the possibility of themother thus assisting her child but the direction of the sevenexcoriations on its face contradicted the mother statement thetraces of finger-nails were distinct the lungs and alimentary canalshowed that the child had lived opinion given, infanticide 29 ibid , p 219 - woman, advanced in years, habits dissipated;found strangled four excoriations on left side of larynx, one onright. Blood in subcutaneous tissue marks of nails and long scratcheson wrist injuries on face and left breast she had been strangled byone hand on her neck while the other was over her mouth and nose facelivid. Eyes congested. Frothy bloody liquid flowing from mouth andnose. Tongue behind teeth. Bloody froth in larynx and trachea.

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Eyeballs protruded how to do a compare and contrast essay. Symptoms soon subsided essay hoursafterward it was found that he could not swallow solids, and liquidsonly with difficulty and coughing throat much irritated. Discharge ofmucus essaytimes tinged with blood, from mouth. Moist rattling noise inthroat in respiration. Frequent cough. Could not sleep laryngoscopeshowed penny in upper writing of œsophagus, just below laryngeal opening removed by long curved forceps 3 ibid - man suddenly fell while at dinner. Face blue. Breathingstertorous died piece of tendon found under epiglottis 4 ibid - boy, age 5 years button in larynx aphonia, dyspnœa, stridulous breathing distress gradually subsided thesis years afterwardfound mucous membrane of larynx thickened. Vocal cords red and uneven 5 ibid - man, drunk, swallowed a half-sovereign urgent dyspnœa;pain in throat.