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How To Cite Quotes In An Essay


But beingcorrected, is very profitable for the diseases of how to cite quotes in an essay the head, as fallingsickness, giddiness, and swimmings, by drawing away much phlegm andrheumatic humours that oppress the head, as also the joints and sinews;and is therefore good for palsies, convulsions, cramps, and stitchesin the sides, and the dropsy, and for provoking urine. It cleanses thereins and kidneys from gravel and stone, by opening the obstructionsof the spleen, and consume the hardness and swelling thereof thedecoction of the root in wine, drank once a week at going to bed, cleanses the mother, and helps the rising thereof, expels the deadchild. A dram of the root in powder taken in white wine, brings downtheir courses an electuary made of the roots and honey, doth mightilycleanse the chest of rotten phlegm, and wonderfully help any old strongcough, to those that are troubled with shortness of breath, and is goodfor them that are bruised inwardly, to help to expel the clotted orcongealed blood the leaves, fruit, and root do cleanse old and filthysores, are good against all fretting and running cankers, gangrenes, and tetters and therefore the berries are by essay country people calledtetter-berries the root cleanses the skin wonderfully from all blackand blue spots, freckles, morphew, leprosy, foul scars, or otherdeformity whatsoever. Also all running scabs and manginess are healedby the powder of the dried root, or the juice thereof, but especiallyby the fine white hardened juice the distilled water of the rootworks the same effects, but more weakly.

An overwhelmingly large proportion of persons who develop alcoholic psychoses in america are drinkers of whisky, or essay corresponding ardent spirit, whereas this condition is seldom seen in beer and wine drinkers italics ours -- ed thus we find the highest percentage of alcohol psychoses among the whisky drinkers who come from western europe, while the wine and beer drinking races of central and southern europe show a distinctly lower percentage, in essay instances only about one-fourth as thesis per thousand italics ours -- ed chapter iv deals with “essay aspects of liquor legislation ” likechapter ii it is an indictment of prohibition, and the united statescensus bureau reports are called on to sustain this thesis quotations, too, are made from the writings of henry smith williamsfurther to prove the point “dry” kansas and “wet” nebraska arefrequently compared, to the detriment of the former one who acceptsthe statements in this chapter will get the impression that kansas hasmore lawlessness, illiteracy, pauperism, and insanity than nebraska chapter v deals with “the problem of legislation ” it is based on thepremise that “prohibition does not prevent the consumption of liquor, ”but on the contrary, “prohibitive legislation induces the consumptionof the most harmful form of liquors ” stated in another way, it isequivalent to charging that prohibition is hard on the brewers, butbeneficial to the distillers in fact, e h williams, in another book “the question of alcohol”-- goodhue co which also champions the casefor the milder alcoholics, quotes henry smith williams as saying, relative to prohibitory legislation. “in general, it would appearthat, if our legislators of recent years had been in league with thedistiller, they could not have served his purpose better ”whether or not edward h williams’ or henry smith williams’ conceptionof the alcohol problem is good, bad or indifferent, need not at thistime concern us the medical profession, however, has a right to asktwo questions. First, is the dr edward huntington williams who wrote“alcohol, hygiene and legislation” the “dr edward h williams” who wasemployed by the brewers to write propaganda favorable to the brewinginterests?. second, was the cloth-bound book, “alcohol, hygiene andlegislation, ” which was distributed by the williams brothers, paid for, wholly or in writing, by the united states brewers’ association?. For those who wish to read dr edward huntington williams’ opinion onthe alcohol question, the following bibliography may be of service. “liquor legislation and insanity”. Medical record 84:791, 1913 “the liquor question in medicine”. Medical record 85:612, 1914 “inebriety as a medical problem”. Post-graduate 29:603, 1914 “the problem of inebriety”. N y medical journal 101:940, 1915 “aspects of inebriety in alcohol”. British journal of inebriety 13:9, 1915-1916 “the peace and war footing of alcohol”. Medical record 88:226, 1915 “alcohol and therapeutics”. Medical record 92:666, 1917 -- from the journal a m a , nov 30, 1918 biologic therapeutics and its commercial dominationthe danger of commercialized therapeutics has been enormously increasedby the introduction of biologic products these substances offer a richfield for the commercially minded, first, because of the remarkableresults which seem to have followed the use of certain products ofthis type. Second, because the field is new and the mode of actionof these substances not readily understood and, third-- and mostimportant-- because, by the very nature of the problems involved, fewphysicians are well informed concerning them the influenza epidemic oflast year was widespread and fatal in character it stimulated earnestresearch in methods of prevention and cure we were all in a frameof mind to grasp at any straw here and there essay worker would cry“eureka”-- only to be disappointed when his product was actually put tothe test however, there were more than enough manufacturers ready toplace any product on the market with specious claims that could notbe positively denied vaccines, serums, proteins-- all were advancedwith such glowing statements as to their properties that only thosephysicians who kept their feet firmly on solid ground could resistthe appeal now we have had another epidemic-- mild, it is true-- butthe memories of last year make the average physician ready to acceptanything which promises hope, and the manufacturers “make hay while thesun shines ” physicians have been and are being deluged with literatureon the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza so far as we know, fewpublications have contained any word of warning on these matters oneexception has just come to notice. The medico-military review, asemimonthly mimeographed publication sent to medical officers of thearmy by the surgeon general office this says.

Yet they do essaywhat provoke appetite, increase thirst, ease the belly and bowels, provoke women courses, help the bitingof a mad dog, and of other venomous creatures, to be used with honeyand rue, increase sperm, especially the seed of them they also killworms in children if they drink the water fasting wherein they havebeen steeped all night being roasted under the embers, and eatenwith honey or sugar and oil, they much conduce to help an inveteratecough, and expectorate the cough phlegm the juice being snuffed upinto the nostrils, purges the head, and helps the lethargy, yet theoften eating them is said to procure pains in the head it hath beenheld by divers country people a great preservative against infection, to eat onions fasting with bread and how to cite quotes in an essay salt. As also to make a greatonion hollow, filling the place with good treacle, and after to roastit well under the embers, which, after taking away the outermost skinthereof, being beaten together, is a sovereign salve for either plagueor sore, or any other putrefied ulcer the juice of onions is good foreither scalding or burning by fire, water, or gunpowder, and used withvinegar, takes away all blemishes, spots and marks in the skin. Anddropped in the ears, eases the pains and noise of them applied alsowith figs beaten together, helps to ripen and break imposthumes, andother sores leeks are as like them in quality, as the pome-water is like an apple:they are a remedy against a surfeit of mushrooms, being baked underthe embers and taken, and being boiled and applied very warm, helpthe piles in other things they have the same property as the onions, although not so effectual orpine descript common orpine rises up with divers rough brittle stalks, thick set with fat and fleshy leaves, without any order, and littleor nothing dented about the edges, of a green colour. The flowers arewhite, or whitish, growing in tufts, after which come small chaffyhusks, with seeds like dust in them the roots are divers thick, round, white tuberous clogs. And the plant grows not so big in essay places asin others where it is found place it is frequent in almost every county of this land, and ischerished in gardens with us, where it grows greater than that which iswild, and grows in shadowy sides of fields and woods time it flowers about july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues the moon owns the herb, and he that knowsbut her exaltaration, knows what i say is true orpine is seldom usedin inward medicines with us, although tragus saith from experience ingerthesis, that the distilled water thereof is profitable for gnawingsor excoriations in the stomach or bowels, or for ulcers in the lungs, liver, or other inward writings, as also in the matrix, and helps allthose diseases, being drank for certain days together it stays thesharpness of humours in the bloody-flux, and other fluxes in the body, or in wounds the root thereof also performs the like effect it isused outwardly to cool any heat or inflammation upon any hurt or wound, and eases the pains of them. As, also, to heal scaldings or burnings, the juice thereof being beaten with essay green sallad oil, andanointed the leaf bruised, and laid to any green wound in the hand orlegs, doth heal them quickly. And being bound to the throat, much helpsthe quinsy. It helps also ruptures and burstenness if you please tomake the juice thereof into a syrup with honey or sugar, you may safelytake a spoonful or two at a time, let my author say what he will fora quinsy, and you shall find the medicine pleasant, and the cure speedy parsley this is so well known, that it needs no description government and virtues it is under the dominion of mercury. Is verycomfortable to the stomach. Helps to provoke urine and women courses, to break wind both in the stomach and bowels, and doth a little openthe body, but the root much more it opens obstructions both of liverand spleen, and is therefore accounted one of the five opening roots galen commended it against the falling sickness, and to provoke urinemightily. Especially if the roots be boiled, and eaten like parsnips the seed is effectual to provoke urine and women courses, to expelwind, to break the stone, and ease the pains and torments thereof;it is also effectual against the venom of any poisonous creature, and the danger that comes to them that have the lethargy, and is asgood against the cough the distilled water of parsley is a familiarmedicine with nurses to give their children when they are troubledwith wind in the stomach or belly which they call the frets. And isalso much available to them that are of great years the leaves ofparsley laid to the eyes that are inflamed with heat, or swollen, dothmuch help them, if it be used with bread or meal. And being friedwith butter, and applied to women breasts that are hard through thecurdling of their milk, it abates the hardness quickly. And also takesaway black and blue marks coming of bruises or falls the juice thereofdropped into the ears with a little wine, eases the pains tragus setsdown an excellent medicine to help the jaundice and falling sickness, the dropsy, and stone in the kidneys, in this manner. Take of the seedof parsley, fennel, annise and carraways, of each an ounce. Of theroots of parsley, burnet, saxifrage, and carraways, of each an ounceand an half. Let the seeds be bruised, and the roots washed and cutsmall.

And for centuries following, the medical how to cite quotes in an essay worldwas divided between the galenists and the chemists, until a completeascendency over both was obtained by the sect of the vitalists thisstate of things has been occasioned by the circumstance that medicalpractitioners have often been more given to the formation of theoriesupon the nature of disease and the mode of its treatment, than tothat careful observation and patient accumulation of facts, by which, in other sciences, the phenomena of nature have been unravelled iam far from undervaluing the great benefits conferred upon mankindby the study of medicine, and have no wish to minister to any vulgarprejudice against a useful and learned profession, but it is not to beoverlooked that, as an art, it has been characterized, in a greaterdegree, by fluctuations of opinion as to its principles and the modeof its practice, than, perhaps, any other pursuit that it has beendistinguished by the constant promulgation and explosion of theories, that it has alternated between the advancement of new doctrines andthe revival of old ones, and that its professors in every age havebeen noted for the tenacity with which they have clung to opinions, and the unanimity with which they have resisted the introduction ofvaluable discoveries they still continue to disagree in respect to thetreatment of diseases as old as the human race. And at the present day, when great advances have been made in all dewritingments of knowledge, aradical and fundamental difference divides the allopathist from thefollowers of hahnemann, to say nothing of those who believe in thesovereign instrumentality of water “in fact, nothing comparatively is known of the philosophy of disease its eradication or cure, where the result of human agency is, inthe great majority of instances, attributable rather to the carefulobservation, judgment and experience of the writingicular practitioner, than to the application of general or established methods available toall the popular axiom, that ‘doctors differ, ’ is as true now as itever was, and as long as it continues to be so, it is impossible forthe law to recognize any class of practitioners, or the followers ofany writingicular system or method of treatment, as exclusively entitledto be regarded as doctors in adverting to the conflicting viewsand differences of opinion, that exist and have ever existed in thepractice of the healing art, it is not to call in question the valueof learned, skilful and experienced physicians, but merely to showthe error of attempting, in the present state of medical science, to recognize, as matter of law, any one system of practice, or ofdeclaring that the practitioner who follows a writingicular system is adoctor, and that one who pursues a different method is not ” and seealso white v carroll, 42 n y , 161. Ordronaux’ “jurisprudence ofmedicine, ” 27 this decision was prior to the statute of 1874 and the provisions ofthe penal code before noted since those statutes, it is a misdemeanorto practise except as permitted by the provisions of those statutes in new york and elsewhere practitioner without license cannot sue andrecover for his fees since the passage of the new york act of 1844 laws of 1844, p 406, there has been no precise statutory provision in that state prohibitingin terms persons who practise physic or surgery without a license, from suing to obtain a recovery for services performed but this is oflittle consequence, for, as we have already stated, so practising hasbeen declared to be a misdemeanor by the penal code of new york it is a well-settled principle that when any act is declared by statuteto be criminal, a contract calling for the performance of such an actis illegal and void the early english authorities on this point arefully collated in wheeler v russell 17 metc , mass , 258, and thelater english and american paper may be found in “american and englishcyclopædia of law, ” title “contracts, ” vol iii , p 872 et seq. Seealso id , vol xviii , p 440 further consideration of the validityof contracts for medical and surgical services will be had hereafter a full synopsis of the statutes of the different states regulating thelicensing of physicians and surgeons in force at the time this volumegoes to press will be placed in another chapter in a suit between a person who has performed medical and surgicalservices, and one who employed him, it is said that the personperforming the services is presumed to have been licensed to doso 157 if the state sues for a penalty, a different rule is claimedto prevail 158how may a diploma or license be proved in a court of law?. It is evident from the foregoing considerations that in any proceedingsto punish for practising without license or legal authority, and inactions to recover payment for professional services in the states andcountries, where a license or diploma of a regularly chartered schoolor college is required by statute to entitle the person to practise, itmay become important to establish first, the legal authority to grantthe license or diploma. And second, the genuineness of the license ordiploma produced it frequently happens that the diploma or license hasbeen obtained in another state or country under the new york statutes, especially the laws of 1880 and 1890, it was made necessary to file adiploma when it had been issued by a chartered school of another stateit must be certified to by essay lawfully incorporated medical collegein this state, before being received for filing, or regarded by the lawas conferring upon its possessor the right to practise in that state as to the chief element of authenticity, namely, the legalincorporation or authority of the body or institution granting thediploma, it is clear that the act of incorporation itself would bethe best evidence of the incorporation of the college or school, anda special act granting the power to license to a board of censors orother official body or board would have to be produced to show theright vested in that board or body to grant a license in georgia ithas been held hunter v blount, 27 ga , 76, that to prove a diplomagiven to a physician in another state, the existence of the college, and the fact of its being a chartered institution, must be shown byproducing its act of incorporation in thornton case 8 term rep , 303. Same case, 3 esp , 4, it washeld that the mere production in court of a diploma under the sealof one of the universities, is not of itself evidence to show thatthe person named in the diploma received the degree which the diplomaspecified in another and later case, however, simpson v dunmore 9 m & w , 45. Same case, 5 jurist, 1012, it was held that it wasunnecessary for the person producing a license from the apothecaries’company an incorporated body to practise as an apothecary, the sealon which license was proved to be genuine, to give any additionalevidence of his identity with the person named in the license thereason for this doctrine is probably to be found in the well-known ruleof evidence, that identity of both christian name and family name, issufficient to raise a presumption of fact that the person bearing thename is the identical person so named in any written instrument in walmsley v abbott 1 k & p , 309. Same case, 5 d & r , 62, proof of the signature of one of the examiners who signed a certificateof examination was held sufficient to warrant the acceptance of thecertificate in evidence in the first instance in another case theproof was that a person previously a stranger to the place went to atown which was the seat of a university, and was told that a certainbuilding was the college, and that a certain person whom he saw therewas the librarian, and that this librarian showed him what purportedto be the seal of the university, and also a book which the librarianstated was the book of acts or records of the university, and the sealso shown him was compared with the seal of a certain diploma, thegenuineness of which was in question, and a copy was made from the saidbook of acts, of an entry stating that the degree of m d had beenconferred by the university upon a person bearing the same name as thatin the diploma, and this proof was held a sufficient authentication ofthe diploma, and of the act or authority of the university conferringthe degree collins case, 1 addison & ellis, 695. Same case, 3 n & m , 703 159the rule in criminal prosecutions - we have seen above, that in acriminal prosecution the burden is on the defendant to produce andprove his license, but to warrant a conviction for practising withouta license it must be shown that the accused actually practised itis not enough to show that he is called by persons whom he attendspersonally, that is, for whom he prescribes, or to whom he givesmedicine or whom he treats there must be proof shown that he has donethis on his own account or for his own profit but proof of a singleact connected with other circumstances, such as tend to show that heheld himself out as a physician, is enough burham v state, 116ind , 112.

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Green wounds ’twill cure in a trice. Ulcers and gangreensvery speedily, not only in men, but also in beasts, therefore theindians dedicated it to their god taken in a pipe, it hath almost asthesis virtues. It easeth weariness, takes away the sense of hunger andthirst, provokes to stool. He saith, the indians will travel four dayswithout either meat or drink, by only chewing a little of this in theirmouths. It eases the body of superfluous humours, opens stoppings seethe ointment of tobacco nummularia money-wort, or herb two-pence. Cold, dry, binding, helpsfluxes, stops the menses, helps ulcers in the lungs.