History

Hook Of An Essay


It is hot andmoist, and under the celestial balance the decoction of the roothereof in wine, is very effectual to open obstructions of the spleenand liver, and helps yellow jaundice, dropsy, pains of the loins, andwind cholic, provokes urine, and expels the stone, procures womencourses the continued use of the decoction for fifteen days, takenfasting, and next to bedward, doth help the stranguary, the difficultyand stoppage of urine, and the stone, as well as all defects of thereins and kidneys. And if the said drink be continued longer, it issaid that it cures the stone. It is found good against the frenchpox the roots bruised and applied outwardly, help the kernels ofthe throat, commonly called the king evil. Or taking inwardly, andapplied to the place stung or bitten by any serpent, heal it speedily if the roots be bruised, and boiled in old hog grease, or saltedlard, and broken bones, thorns &c remaining in the flesh, they donot only draw them forth, but heal up the place again, gathering newflesh where it was consumed the juice of the leaves dropped into theear, helps imposthumes therein the distilled water of the whole herb, when the leaves and stalks are young, is profitable drank for all thepurposes aforesaid. And helps the melancholy of the heart, and isavailable in quartan and quotidian agues. As also for them that havetheir necks drawn awry, and cannot turn them without turning theirwhole body eyebright descript common eyebright is a small low herb, rising up usuallybut with one blackish green stalk a span high, or not much more, spread from the bottom into sundry branches, whereon are small andalmost round yet pointed dark green leaves, finely snipped about theedges, two always set together, and very thick. At the joints with theleaves, from the middle upward, come forth small white flowers, markedwith purple and yellow spots, or stripes.

did he not cure hook of an essay madness?. The very word “epilepsy” shows by its derivation, ἐπίληψις to seizeupon, that possession was the presumable nature of the malady the noble work accomplished by the “pagan” pioneer alienists wasdiscredited or forgotten, and the church originated a process by whichthe possessed were to be treated this method of treatment was derivedpurely from theologic sources, tempered with sufficient dogma at firstthe treatment was gentle, in accordance with the spirit of the greatphysicians of antiquity, and if the afflicted one was not violent hewas permitted to attend public worship sacred salves and holy water, the breath or the spittle of the officiating priest, the touching ofrelics, or a visit to holy places, were the principal therapeuticagents employed these methods, even if they did no good essaytimesmerely the consolation of a kind word from the priest had a beneficialeffect, certainly did no harm, even tho such practises were factors inthe spread of superstition this mild form of treatment did not, however, long continue soonmeasures were directed toward driving out the evil spirit from thepossessed this was attempted in various ways. First, by exorcism, inthe period of justin martyr, and continued up to almost recent times see lecky, “history of european morals” “from the time of justinmartyr for about two centuries, there is, i believe, not a singlechristian writer who does not solemnly and explicitly assert thereality and frequent employment of this power ”one of the chief attributes of the devil was pride, therefore attemptswere made by exorcism to pierce this vulnerable point in the armor ofthe evil one, and the foulest, vilest epithets were used to attain thisend it is impossible to-day to print these expressions, even in a workof scientific character, and it is better, perhaps, to refer such asare especially interested in them to the manuale benedictionum, bythe bishop of passau, published in 1849, and similar works adjuvantsto this form of treatment consisted in “frightening” the devil bylong words, difficult to pronounce, commonly derived from orientallanguages, by the administration of malodorous and filthy “drugs, ” andsimilar practises it was claimed that thesis devils were thus driven out, and the annals ofthe church contain numerous records of persons cured in this manner “the jesuit fathers at vienna, in 1583, glorified in the fact thatin such a contest they had cast out twelve thousand, six hundred andfifty-two living devils” white the prevalence of these ideas tosuch a degree in the minds of the people may be noted from the factthat, in the churches themselves, such scenes are carved in stone anddepicted on canvas medieval drama teemed with similar conceptions, and this condition of affairs prevailed for over one thousand years, unfortunately not in this harmless manner, but supplemented by greatcruelty, which forms, perhaps, the most terrible chapter in the historyof medical superstition the subtleties of theologic interpretation soon evolved a morecomprehensive method of dealing with the “possessor” and the possessed as an appeal to pride was ineffectual and noxious drugs unavailing, it was found necessary to whip the devil out, or the unfortunateindividuals were imprisoned, and as a refinement of this treatment theywere even tortured thus the jailer for a long time played the writingof a specialist in lunacy, with the clergy in consultation places inwhich the insane were confined were known as “fool towers” and “witchtowers ”this state of things was not altered with the dawn of the reformation the writings of luther conclusively show his ideas in regard topossession and witchcraft, and these views under calvin reachedenormous development even cotton mather, in thesis respects far inadvance of his times, and who himself had known persecution, was notemancipated from these delusions, and salem has thesis a story to tell ofpossession and witch-baiting it is true we may quite properly considerthese views as the thought of the times, but, in thesis other respects, luther, calvin, and mather were in advance of their period, and, therefore, a justification for their actions is not quite apparent marcus aurelius also was much superior to his age, yet was grateful tohis teachers that they taught him to disregard superstition in all itsvarious forms it is not unlikely that conditions of this kind frequently led toepidemics if not of actual insanity, at least to hysteria which notrarely developed in cities, nunneries, and monasteries. Thus theepidemics in erfurt in 1237, in the rhine countries in 1374, and thesisothers see hirsch it is rather remarkable that while such views and practises prevailedin the christian church, the followers of mohammed not only helddifferent views, but adopted a mode of treatment of the insane whichlaid the foundation of modern therapeutics in diseases of the mind in the twelfth century, in bagdad, a palace called the “home of mercy”was built, in which the insane were confined, examined every month, andreleased as soon as they had recovered an asylum in cairo was foundedin 1304, while the first christian asylum expressly for the mad isnoted in 1409 lecky but science fought its way through the barriers of ignorance, misdirected zeal, and superstition altho there were physicians and“magicians, ” who conformed to the views of the church, the seed sown bythe earlier schools of medicine slowly but surely began to put forthshoots, and the result was a tree of knowledge, the fruit of whichmay be observed in every modern insane asylum of the world, wherethe unfortunate sufferer is treated with kindness and skill, which, fortunately, often results in cure scientific reason frequently rebelled against the “insanesuperstition, ” at first mildly, but constantly increasing in strength, until an effectual protest was finally raised by john weir, of cleves, who was soon followed by michel de montaigne and now a battle royalwas waged between the adherents of theology and the disciples of the“resurrected” truth, and once more in the history of the world wasdemonstrated the correctness of the saying, that “truth crushed toearth shall rise again ” all over the world the warfare was carried, and at the end of the eighteenth century new champions arose jeanbaptiste pinel in france, and william tuke in england their followersare legion, and in the book of life, in letters of gold, thesis a namehas been written of those who trod in the footsteps of these pioneers theology no longer interferes in the treatment of the insane. In fact, it would be manifestly unjust not to mention that thesis christiantheologians subsequently joined in the noble work of lunacy reform, andaided progress greatly how great this progress in the treatment of the insane can best beappreciated by essay of the older physicians in practise to-day whodoes not remember the chains, the strait-jacket, the dark locked cellsof the insane asylum?. these conditions existed not very thesis years ago, and altho the novels of charles reade are no doubt greatly exaggeratedin regard to the conditions he portrayed in insane asylums, yet morethan a grain of truth is probably contained in them the books didmuch to bring about reforms in england and elsewhere modern alienists have wrought wonders. Their successful operationsare not published in the daily press, but any visitor who knows whatan insane asylum was fifty years ago, and who spends a few hours ina modern hospital for the treatment of lunatics, will observe whatappears but little short of the miraculous imagine two thousandor more insane persons dining in a large hall, upon the table atablecloth, and the insane using knife and fork in a decorous manner, and when the visitor is told that the “violent ward” is also present, and is asked to single these out from among the thesis, and fails ashe invariably does, the results attained by science, above all othermeasures, are strikingly apparent bibliography ælius swritingianus de vita hadriani caracalla in peter. 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herausgegeben von magnus, neuburger, sudhoff heft ii breslau, 1902 suidas, lexicon ed bekker berlin, 1854 villoison anecdota græca venetiis, 1781 wierus de dæmonum præstigiis et incantationibus libri vi basileæ, 1566 und 1577 amstelodami, 1664 winckler die gesetze hammurabis, königs von babylon in. Der alte orient jahrgang 4, heft 4 leipzig, 1902 windelband geschichte der alten philosophie handbuch der klassischen alterthums-wissenschaft herausg von j von müller band v , abth 1 münchen, 1894 transcriber notewords in italics were surrounded with underscores and words in smallcapitals with all capitals the following corrections were made, on page 18 “conspiculously” changed to “conspicuously” becomes conspicuously prominent 30 “explicity” changed to “explicitly” will be more explicitly referred to 57 “julien” changed to “julian” led her toward the grave of st julian 77 “guage” changed to “gauge” gauge the ideas of priests 91 “ephesus 500” changed to “ephesus 500” the absurd theory which heraclitus of ephesus 500 b c has propounded 116 “invidual” changed to “individual” to plague an individual being 192 “person the” changed to “the person” it was not the person who acted 196 “manasteries” changed to “monasteries” nunneries, and monasteries 203 “autorisirte” changed to “autorisierte” deutsche autorisierte ausgabe otherwise the original was preserved, including inconsistenthyphenation and possible errors in languages other than english, for example the capitalisation in greek sentences end of the project gutenberg ebook of superstition in medicine, by hugo magnus*** end of this project gutenberg ebook superstition in medicine ******** this file should be named 44744-0 txt or 44744-0 zip *****this and all associated files of various formats will be found in. 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And droppedinto the ears, eases the pains in them, and heals and removes the heat the same also with the juice of houseleek is profitable against allinflammations and breakings out of the skin, and against burnings andscaldings by fire and water the juice or decoction made either ofitself, or other things of the like nature, is of much use and goodeffect for old and hollow ulcers that are hard to be cured, and forcankers and sores in the mouth or privy writings of man or woman. Andhelps also the pains of the piles in the fundament the juice mixedwith oil of roses, and the temples and forehead anointed therewith, eases the pains of the head proceeding from heat, and helps lunatic andfrantic persons very much. As also the biting of serpents, or a maddog the same also is profitably applied to all hot gouts in the feetor hands, especially in the beginning it is also good to be appliedwhere any bone is out of joint, to hinder inflammations, swellings, andpains that presently rise thereupon the powder of the dried leavestaken in drink, kills worms of the belly. And boiled in wine, killsworms that breed in old and foul ulcers one writing of plantain water, and two writings of the brine of powdered beef, boiled together andclarified, is a most sure remedy to heal all spreading scabs or itchin the head and body, all manner of tetters, ringworms, the shingles, and all other running and fretting sores briefly, the plantains aresingularly good wound herbs, to heal fresh or old wounds or sores, either inward or outward plums are so well known that they need no description government and virtues all plums are under venus, and are likewomen, essay better, and essay worse as there is great diversity ofkinds, so there is in the operation of plums, for essay that are sweetmoisten the stomach, and make the belly soluble. Those that are sourquench thirst more, and bind the belly. The moist and waterish dosooner corrupt in the stomach, but the firm do nourish more, and offendless the dried fruit sold by the grocers under the names of damaskprunes, do essaywhat loosen the belly, and being stewed, are oftenused, both in health and sickness, to relish the mouth and stomach, to procure appetite, and a little to open the body, allay choler, andcool the stomach plum-tree leaves boiled in wine, are good to washand gargle the mouth and throat, to dry the flux of rheum coming tothe palate, gums, or almonds of the ear the gum of the tree is goodto break the stone the gum or leaves boiled in vinegar, and applied, kills tetters and ringworms matthiolus saith, the oil preserved out ofthe kernels of the stones, as oil of almonds is made, is good againstthe inflamed piles, the tumours or swellings of ulcers, hoarseness ofthe voice, roughness of the tongue and throat, and likewise the painsin the ears and that five ounces of the said oil taken with one ounceof muskadel, drives forth the stone, and helps the cholic polypody of the oak descript this is a small herb consisting of nothing but roots andleaves, bearing neither stalk, flower, nor seed, as it is thought ithath three or four leaves rising from the root, every one single byitself, of about a hand length, are winged, consisting of thesis smallnarrow leaves cut into the middle rib, standing on each side of thestalk, large below, and smaller up to the top, not dented nor notchedat the edges at all, as the male fern hath, of sad green colour, andsmooth on the upper side, but on the other side essaywhat rough byreason of essay yellowish flowers set thereon the root is smaller thanone little finger, lying aslope, or creeping along under the uppercrust of the earth, brownish on the outside and greenish within, of asweetish harshness in taste, set with certain rough knags on each sidethereof, having also much mossiness or yellow hairiness upon it, andessay fibres underneath it, whereby it is nourished place it grows as well upon old rotten stumps, or trunks of trees, asoak, beech, hazel, willow, or any other, as in the woods under them, and upon old mud walls, as also in mossy, stony, and gravelly placesnear unto wood that which grows upon oak is accounted the best. Butthe quantity thereof is scarce sufficient for the common use time it being always green, may be gathered for use at any time government and virtues polypodium of the oak, that which growsupon the earth is best. It is an herb of saturn, to purge melancholy;if the humour be otherwise, chuse your polypodium accordingly meuse who is called the physician evangelist for the certainty of hismedicines, and the truth of his opinion saith, that it dries upthin humours, digests thick and tough, and purges burnt choler, andespecially tough and thick phlegm, and thin phlegm also, even from thejoints, and therefore good for those that are troubled with melancholy, or quartan agues, especially if it be taken in whey or honied water, or in barley-water, or the broth of a chicken with epithymum, or withbeets and mallows it is good for the hardness of the spleen, and forpricking or stitches in the sides, as also for the cholic. Essay useto put to it essay fennel seeds, or annis seeds, or ginger, to correctthat loathing it brings to the stomach, which is more than needs, itbeing a safe and gentle medicine, fit for all persons, which dailyexperience confirms. And an ounce of it may be given at a time in adecoction, if there be not sena, or essay other strong purger put withit a dram or two of the powder of the dried roots, taken fasting ina cup of honied water, works gently, and for the purposes aforesaid the distilled water both of roots and leaves, is much commended forthe quartan ague, to be taken for thesis days together, as also againstmelancholy, or fearful and troubleessay sleeps or dreams. And with essaysugar-candy dissolved therein, is good against the cough, shortness ofbreath, and wheezings, and those distillations of thin rheum upon thelungs, which cause phthisicks, and oftentimes consumptions the freshroots beaten small, or the powder of the dried roots mixed with honey, and applied to the member that is out of joint, doth much help it. Andapplied also to the nose, cures the disease called polypus, which isa piece of flesh growing therein, which in time stops the passage ofbreath through that nostril.

At once, after five minutes, after ten minutes, after fifteen minutes, after thirty minutes, after one hour and after two hours, and tubes incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours result. Growth was shown in all tubes except those in which chlorlyptus was added in the proportion of 10 per cent and after the action of the antiseptic for two hours or longer experiment 4 -- inhibitory action of chlorlyptus in the growth of typhoid bacillus -- chlorlyptus was added to sterile bouillon in the proportion of 1:100, 1:1, 000, 1:10, 000 and 1:100, 000, and incubated for forty-eight hours at 37 c to eliminate any possible contamination of the bouillon during the manipulations all tubes were found sterile and inoculated with typhoid bacillus result. All tubes were found sterile again after being inoculated with typhoid bacillus and incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours, which shows chlorlyptus inhibited and the growth of typhoid bacillus in bouillon when this antiseptic was added in the proportions of 1:100 to 1:100, 000 remarks. In another experiment made, chlorlyptus showed a weaker inhibitory action on the growth of typhoid bacillus experiment 5 -- germicidal action of carbolic acid -- the technic was the same as that outlined in experiment 1 except that carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. Carbolic acid showed a distinct germicidal action on typhoid bacillus in the proportions of 1 per cent in ten minutes experiment 6 -- action of nitrogen gas on the growth of typhoid bacillus in bouillon and nutrient agar when chlorlyptus was added to this culture medium -- chlorlyptus was added to the bouillon in the proportions of 1:100, 1:1, 000, 1:10, 000 and 1:100, 000, as outlined in experiment 2. Also to agar kept melted at 45 c tubes were inoculated with typhoid bacillus. Plates were made of the inoculated agar tubes. All plates and tubes were incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours in an atmosphere of nitrogen gas duplicate experiments were made with cultures of typhoid bacillus as above in bouillon and agar plates containing the same amount of chlorlyptus and incubated at 37 c in ordinary atmosphere as control result. Nitrogen gas did not show any appreciable increase of the germicidal action of typhoid bacillus when grown in medium containing chlorlyptus growth was about the same in cultures supplied with nitrogen gas as in those growing in ordinary atmosphere experiment 7 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on pyogenic bacteria suspended in an oily medium -- experiment with streptococcus. Cultures of streptococcus in blood agar three days old were suspended in olive oil sterile, and chlorlyptus was added in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent and inoculated in trypsinized bouillon at different intervals, namely. At once, after five minutes, after ten minutes, after fifteen minutes, after thirty minutes, and after one hour tubes were incubated at 37 c for forty-eight hours result. All tubes remained sterile the germicidal action of chlorlyptus on streptococcus suspended in oil was almost at once and with certainty after five minutes when added in the proportion of 1, 5 and 10 per cent experiment 8 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus, suspended in sterile olive oil -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 5, except that a culture of staphylococcus was used result. All tubes remained sterile the germicidal action of chlorlyptus was almost at once in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 per cent remarks. By repeating this experiment the result showed essay variations the discrepancy was probably due to an imperfect suspension of the micro-organism in the oil experiment 9 -- germicidal action of carbolic acid on streptococcus suspended in olive oil -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 5, except that carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. The germicidal action of carbolic acid of streptococcus suspended in olive oil was almost at once in the proportions of 1, 5 and 10 experiment 10 -- germicidal action of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 6 except that the carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result.

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Let the rootsbe well washed and bruised, as also the linseed, fœnugreek seed, andsquills, then steep them three days in eight pints of water, the fourthday boil them a little upon the fire, and draw out the mussilage, ofwhich take two pounds, and boil it with the oil to the consumption ofthe juice, afterwards add the wax, rozin, and colophonia, when theyare melted, add the turpentine, afterwards the galbanum and gum ofivy, dissolved in vinegar, boil them a little, and having removed themfrom the fire, stir them till they are cold, that so they may be wellincorporated culpeper it heats and moistens, helps pains of the breast coming ofcold and pleurises, old aches, and stitches, and softens hard swellings unguentum diapompholigos nihili nicholaus college take of oil of roses sixteen ounces, juice of nightshadesix ounces, let them boil to the consumption of the juice, then addwhite wax five ounces, ceruss washed two ounces, lead burnt andwashed, pompholix prepared, pure frankincense, of each an ounce, letthem be brought into the form of an ointment according to art culpeper it cools and binds, drys, and stays fluxes, either ofblood or humours in wounds, and fills hollow ulcers with flesh unguentum refrigerans galenus it is also called a cerecloath college take of white wax four ounces, oil of roses omphacine onepound, melt it in a double vessel, then pour it out into another, bydegrees putting in cold water, and often pouring it out of one vesselinto another, stirring it till it be white, last of all wash it in rosewater, adding a little rose water, and rose vinegar culpeper it is a fine cooling thing, to cure inflammations inwounds or tumours unguentum e succis aperitivis primum fœsius college take of the juice of smallage, endive, mints, wormwood, common parsley, valerian, of each three ounces, oil of wormwood andmints, of each half a pound, yellow wax three ounces, mix them togetherover the fire, and make of them an ointment culpeper it opens stoppages of the stomach and spleen, eases therickets, the breast and sides being anointed with it an ointment for the worms fœsius college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, and bitteralmonds, of each an ounce and an half, juice of the flowers or leavesof peaches, and wormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, gentian, centaury the less, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds ofcoleworts, the pulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, the meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grasswater a dram and an half, bull galls an ounce and an half, with juiceof lemons, so much as is sufficient, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper the belly being anointed with it kills the worms cerecloaths ceratum de galbano or, cerecloath of galbanum college take of galbanum prepared, an ounce and an half, assafœtidahalf an ounce, bdellium a dram, myrrh two drams, wax two ounces, carrotseeds a scruple, featherfew, mugwort, of each half a dram, dissolve thegums in vinegar, and make it a cerecloath according to art culpeper being applied to the belly of a woman after labour, itcleanses her of any relicts accidently left behind, helps the fits ofthe mother, and other accidents incident to women in that case ceratum oesypatum college take of oesypus ten ounces, oil of chamomel, and orris, of each half a pound, yellow wax two pounds, rozin a pound, mastich, ammoniacum, turpentine, of each an ounce, spikenard two drams and anhalf, saffron a dram and an half, styrax calamitis half an ounce, makethem into a cerecloath according to art culpeper it molifies and digests hard swellings of the liver, spleen, womb, nerves, joints, and other writings of the body, and is agreat easer of pain ceratum santalinum college take of red sanders, ten drams, white and yellow sanders, of each six drams, red roses twelve drams, bole-ammoniac seven drams, spodium four drams, camphire two drams, white wax washed thirty drams, oil of roses omphacine six ounces. Make it into a cerecloath accordingto art culpeper it wonderfully helps hot infirmities of the stomach, liver, and other writings, being but applied to them plaisters emplastrum ex ammoniaco or, a plaister of ammoniacum college take of ammoniacum, bran well sifted, of each an ounce, ointment of marsh-mallows, melilot plaister compound, roots of briony, and orris in powder, of each half an ounce, the fat of ducks, geese, and hens, of each three drams, bdellium, galbanum, of each one dram andan half, per-rozin, wax, of each five ounces, oil of orris, turpentine, of each half an ounce, boil the fats and oil with mussilage oflin-seed, and fenugreek seed, of each three ounces, to the consumptionof the mussilage, strain it, and add the wax, rozin, and turpentine, the ointment of marsh-mallows with the plaister of melilot. When itbegins to be cold, put in the ammoniacum, dissolved in vinegar, thenthe bdellium in powder, with the rest of the powders, and make it intoa plaister according to art culpeper it softens and assuages hard swellings, and scatters thehumours offending, applied to the side it softens the hardness of thespleen, assuages pains thence arising emplastrum e baccus lauri or, a plaister of bay-berries college take of bay-berries husked, turpentine, of each two ounces, frankincense, mastich, myrrh, of each an ounce, cypress, costus, ofeach half an ounce, honey warmed and not scummed, four ounces. Make itinto a plaister according to art culpeper it is an excellent plaister to ease any pains coming ofcold or wind, in any writing of the body, whether stomach, liver, belly, reins, or bladder it is an excellent remedy for the cholic and wind inthe bowels emplastrum barbarum magnum college take of dry pitch eight pounds, yellow wax six pounds andeight ounces, per-rozin five pounds and four ounces, bitumen, judaicum, or mummy, four pounds, oil one pound and an half, verdigris, litharge, ceruss, of each three ounces, frankincense half a pound, roach alumnot burnt, an ounce and an half, burnt, four ounces, opopanax, scalesof brass, galbanum, of each twelve drams, aloes, opium, myrrh, of eachhalf an ounce, turpentine two pounds, juice of mandrakes, or else driedbark of the root, six drams, vinegar five pounds. Let the litharge, ceruss, and oil, boil to the thickness of honey, then incorporate withthem the pitch, being melted with bitumen in powder. Then add the rest, and boil them according to art, till the vinegar be consumed, and itstick not to your hands culpeper it helps the bitings of men and beasts, easesinflammations of wounds, and helps infirmities of the joints, and goutsin the beginning emplastrum de betonica or, a plaister of betony college take of betony, burnet, agrimony, sage, pennyroyal, yarrow, comfrey the greater, clary, of each six ounces, frankincense, mastich, of each three drams, orris, round birthwort, of each six drams, whitewax, turpentine, of each eight ounces, per-rozin six ounces, gum elemi, oil of fir, of each two ounces, white wine three pounds. Bruise theherbs, boil them in the wine, then strain them, and add the rest, andmake them into a plaister according to art culpeper it is a good plaister to unite the skull when it iscracked, to draw out pieces of broken bones, and cover the bones withflesh. It draws filth from the bottom of deep ulcers, restores fleshlost, cleanses, digests, and drys emplastrum cæsarus college take of red roses one ounce and an half, bistort roots, cypress nuts, all the sanders, mints, coriander seeds, of each threedrams, mastich half an ounce, hypocistis, acacia, dragon blood, earthof lemnos, bole-ammoniac, red coral, of each two drams, turpentinewashed in plantain water four ounces, oil of roses three ounces, whitewax twelve ounces, per-rozin ten ounces, pitch six ounces, the juiceof plantain, houseleek, and orpine, of each an ounce, the wax, rozin, and pitch being melted together, add the turpentine and oil, then thehypocistis and acacia dissolved in the juices, at last the powders, andmake it into a plaister according to art culpeper it is of a fine, cool, binding, strengthening nature, excellently good to repel hot rheums or vapours that ascend up to thehead, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown emplastrum catagmaticum the first college take of juice of marsh-mallow roots six ounces, bark ofashtree roots, and their leaves, the roots of comfrey the greater andsmaller with their leaves, of each two ounces, myrtle berries an ounceand an half, the leaves of willow, the tops of st john wort, of eachan handful and an half, having bruised them, boil them together in redwine, and smith water, of each two pound, till half be consumed, strain it, and add oil of myrtles, and roses omphacine, of each onepound and an half, goat suet eight ounces, boil it again to theconsumption of the decoction, strain it again, and add litharge ofgold and silver, red lead, of each four ounces, yellow wax one pound, colophonia half a pound, boil it to the consistance of a plaister, thenadd turpentine two ounces, myrrh, frankincense, mastich, of each halfan ounce, bole-ammoniac, earth of lemnos, of each one ounce, stir themabout well till they be boiled, and made into an emplaister accordingto art catagmaticum the second college take of the roots of comfrey the greater, marsh-mallows, misselto of the oak, of each two ounces, plantain, chamepitys, st john wort, of each a handful, boil them in equal writings of blackwine, and smith water till half be consumed, strain it, and addmussilage of quince seeds made in tripe water, oil of mastich androses, of each four ounces, boil it to the consumption of the humidity, and having strained it, add litharge of gold four ounces, boil it tothe consistence of an emplaister, then add yellow wax four ounces, turpentine three ounces, colophonia six drams, ship pitch ten ounces, powders of balaustines, roses, myrtles, acacia, of each half an ounce, mummy, androsamum, mastich, amber, of each six drams, bole-ammoniacfine flowers, frankincense, of each twelve drams, dragon blood twoounces. Make it into a plaister according to art culpeper both this and the former are binding and drying, theformer rules will instruct you in the use emplastrum cephalicum or, a cephalic plaister college take of rozin two ounces, black pitch one ounce, labdanum, turpentine, flower of beans, and orobus, dove dung, of each half anounce, myrrh, mastich, of each one dram and an half, gum of juniper, nutmegs, of each two drams, dissolve the myrrh and labdanum in a hotmortar, and adding the rest, make it into a plaister according to art if you will have it stronger, add the powders, euphorbium, pellitory ofspain, and black pepper, of each two scruples culpeper it is proper to strengthen the brain, and repel suchvapours as annoy it, and those powders being added, it dries up thesuperfluous moisture thereof, and eases the eyes of hot scaldingvapours that annoy them emplastrum de cerussa or, a plaister of ceruss college take of ceruss in fine powder, white wax, sallad oil, ofeach three ounces, add the oil by degrees to the ceruss, and boil it bycontinual stirring over a gentle fire, till it begin to swell, then addthe wax cut small by degrees, and boil it to its just consistence culpeper it helps burns, dry scabs, and hot ulcers, and in generalwhatever sores abound with moisture emplastrum ex cicuta cum ammoniaco or, a plaister of hemlock with ammoniacum college take of the juice of hemlock four ounces, vinegar, ofsquills, and ammoniacum, of each eight ounces, dissolve the gum in thejuice and vinegar, after a due infusion, then strain it into its justconsistence according to art culpeper i suppose it was invented to mitigate the extreme pains, and allay the inflammations of wounds, for which it is very good. Letit not be applied to any principal writing emplastrum e crusta panis or, a plaister of a crust of bread college take of mastich, mints, spodium, red coral, all thesanders, of each one dram, oil of mastich and quinces, of each onedrain and an half, a crust of bread toasted, and three times steepedin red rose vinegar, and as often dried, labdanum, of each two ounces, rozin four ounces, styrax calamitis half an ounce, barley meal fivedrams. Make them into a plaister according to art culpeper i shall commend this for a good plaister to strengthenthe brain as any is in the dispensatory, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown.