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It prevails against pestilential fevers, itstrengthens the heart and nutritive virtue, purges by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep but by my author leave, i never accounted purges to be proper physicin pestilential fevers. This i believe, the syrup cleanses the liverwell, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with hypocondriacmelancholy the strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak, one, oryou may mix an ounce of it with the decoction of senna syrupus de epithymo or syrup of epithimum college take of epithimum twenty drams, mirobalans, citron, andindian of each fifteen drams, emblicks, belloricks, polypodium, liquorice, agrick, thyme, calaminth, bugloss, stœchas of each sixdrams, dodder, fumitory, of each ten drams, red roses, annis-seeds andsweet fennel seeds of each two drams and an half, sweet prunes ten, raisins of the sun stoned four ounces, tamarinds two ounces and anhalf, after twenty-four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boil it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and withfive pounds of fine sugar boil it into syrup according to art culpeper it is best to put in the dodder, stœchas and agarick, towards the latter end of the decoction it purges melancholy, andother humours, it strengthens the stomach and liver, cleanses the bodyof addust choler and addust blood, as also of salt humours, and helpsdiseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosy, &c a man may take two ounces at a time, or add one ounce tothe decoction of epithimum syrupus e floribus persicorum or syrup of peach-flowers college take of fresh peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whole dayin three pounds of warm water, then boil a little and strain it out, repeat this infusion five times in the same liquor, in three pounds ofwhich dissolve two pounds and an half of sugar and boil it into a syrup culpeper it is a gentle purger of choler, and may be given even infevers to draw away the sharp choleric humours syrupus de pomis purgans or syrup of apples purging college take of the juice of sweet smelling apples two pounds, thejuice of borrage and bugloss of each one pound and an half, senna twoounces, annis seeds half an ounce, saffron one dram, let the senna besteeped in the juices twenty-four hours, and after a boil or two strainit, and with two pounds of white sugar boil it to a syrup accordingto art, the saffron being tied up in a rag, and often crushed in theboiling culpeper the syrup is a cooling purge, and tends to rectify thedistempers of the blood, it purges choler and melancholy, and thereforemust needs be effectual both in yellow and black jaundice, madness, scurf, leprosy, and scabs, it is very gentle the dose is from oneounce to three, according as the body is in age and strength an ounceof it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out inscabs syrupus de pomis magistralis or syrup of apples magisterial college take of the juice and water of apples of each a poundand an half, the juice and water of borrage and bugloss of each nineounces, senna half a pound, annis seeds, and sweet fennel seeds, ofeach three drams, epithimum of crete, two ounces, agarick, rhubarb, ofeach half an ounce, ginger, mace, of each four scruples, cinnamon twoscruples, saffron half a dram, infuse the rhubarb and cinnamon awritingby itself, in white wine and juice of apples, of each two ounces, letall the rest, the saffron excepted, be steeped in the waters abovementioned, and the next day put in the juices, which being boiled, scummed, and strained, then with four ounces of white sugar boil itinto a syrup, crushing the saffron in it being tied up in a linen rag, the infusion of the rhubarb being added at the latter end culpeper out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge choler andmelancholy, and to resist madness syrupus de rhubarbaro or syrup of rhubarb college take of the best rhubarb and senna of each two ounces andan half, violet flowers a handful, cinnamon one dram and an half, ginger half a dram, bettony, succory and bugloss water of each onepound and an half, let them be mixed together warm all night, and inthe morning strained and boiled into a syrup, with two pounds of whitesugar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of roses culpeper it cleanses choler and melancholy very gently, and istherefore fit for children, old people, and weak bodies you may add anounce of it to the decoction of epithimum or to the decoction of senna syrupus rosaceus solutivus or syrup of roses solutive college take of spring water boiling hot four pounds, damask roseleaves fresh, as thesis as the water will contain. Let them remain twelvehours in infusion, close stopped. Then press them out and put in freshrose leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time.

One loves the field, the higher english reflective essay help other sheets. Then the throatis under venus, the quinsy lies in the throat, and is an inflammationthere. Venus rules the throat, it being under taurus her sign marseradicates all diseases in the throat by his herbs for wormwood isone and sends them to egypt on an errand never to return more, thisdone by antipathy the eyes are under the luminaries. The right eye ofa man, and the left eye of a woman the sun claims dominion over. Theleft eye of a man, and the right eye of a woman, are privileges of themoon, wormwood, an herb of mars cures both. What belongs to the sunby sympathy, because he is exalted in his house. But what belongs tothe moon by antipathy, because he hath his fall in hers suppose a manbe bitten or stung by a martial creature, imagine a wasp, a hornet, a scorpion, wormwood, an herb of mars, gives you a present cure. Thatmars, choleric as he is, hath learned that patience, to pass by yourevil speeches of him, and tells you by my pen, that he gives you noaffliction, but he gives you a cure.

Carbolic acid produced a complete sterilization in the strength of 10 per cent almost at once, and with certainty after five minutes similar results were produced with the 5 per cent the 1 per cent carbolic acid did not show any appreciable higher english reflective essay help germicidal action on staphylococcus experiment 14 -- toxic and irritant action of chlorlyptus -- six normal guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected peritoneally with 1 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 2 with 2 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 3 with 3 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 4 with 4 c c and guinea-pig 5 with 5 c c 5 per cent respectively guinea-pig 6 was used as a control and not injected result. Guinea-pigs 1 and 2 did not show any appreciable disturbance guinea-pig 3 was sick for four days, after which it gradually recovered but it became sick again after one week and died ten days after the injection guinea-pig 4 died over night guinea-pig 5 died six hours after injection guinea-pig 5 was injected at 11:30 with 5 c c chlorlyptus ten minutes after the injection it was lying relaxed, respiration and heart normal, conjunctive reflex present one hour after the injection the animal seemed to present symptoms resembling those of narcosis. Respiration and heart were normal after four hours there was no change in the condition of the guinea-pig except that the respiration was irregular five and a half hours after it showed prostration with irregular respiration and heart action six hours after injection the animal was dead autopsy. The peritoneum showed a congestion and a fibrinous exudation, amount of liquid increased, essay writing of which was probably chlorlyptus unabsorbed spleen about normal, liver congested, kidney about normal, suprarenal glands about normal, lungs normal, pleural cavity obtained no exudation, heart soft, flabby and congested experiment 15 -- toxic and irritant action of chlorlyptus when injected into the pleural cavity -- six normal guinea-pigs used for the experiment chlorlyptus was injected in the pleural cavity as follows. Guinea-pig 1, 0 5 c c. Guinea-pig 2, 1 c c. Guinea-pig 3, 2 c c. Guinea-pig 4, 3 c c , and guinea-pig 5, 4 c c guinea-pig 6 was used as a control result. Guinea-pigs 1 and 2 recovered about four hours after injection guinea-pig 3 died three days after and guinea-pigs 4 and 5 four and two hours after, respectively conclusions. Guinea-pigs weighing on the average of 400 gm may be injected peritoneally with one or two c c or intrapleurally with 0 5 to 1 c c of chlorlyptus without having fatal results from the injection experiment 16 -- toxic and irritant action of eucalyptus oil -- three normal guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected with 1 c c of oil of eucalyptus in the peritoneum, and guinea-pig 2 with 0 5 c c in the pleural cavity guinea-pig 3 was used as a control result. Guinea-pig 1 died about three hours after injection, and guinea-pig 2 about two hours after the injection autopsy. Both guinea-pigs showed marked congestion and a moderate degree of exudate in the peritoneum experiment 17 -- toxic and virulent action of eucalyptus -- three normal guinea-pigs were selected for the experiment, as in experiment 16 the injection was made in the pleural cavity guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c and guinea-pig 2 with 1 c c of eucalyptus oil result. Guinea-pig 1 died the following day, and guinea-pig 2 one hour after the injection experiment 18 -- toxic and irritant action of dichloramin-t, 0 5 per cent in chlorcozane -- one guinea-pig was used for each experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c and guinea-pig 2 with 1 c c of dichloramin-t peritoneally result. Both animals became restless immediately after the injection, and died twelve hours after of acute hemorrhagic peritonitis experiment 19 -- effect of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus suspended in salt solution and one of that solution injected into the peritoneum of the guinea-pig -- three guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c of staphylococcus suspension as control guinea-pig 2 was given the same, and immediately after received 1 c c of chlorlyptus guinea-pig 3 was injected with the same amount, and chlorlyptus was injected twenty-four hours after injection results.

They are not ‘foods ’ if they are of any use, that use has never been discovered ”in view of the foregoing, it seemed to the council advisable toexamine the claims under which a few of the proprietary hypophosphitepreparations are marketed the following are representative. fellows’ syrup of hypophosphitesno very exact information concerning the composition is furnished bythe manufacturers fellows medical mfg co , new york they say thatthe product “ contains the chemically pure hypophosphites of iron, quinin, strychnin, calcium, manganese and potassium, agreeably blended in the form of a bland, stable syrup with a slightly alkaline reaction “each fluid drachm contains the equivalent of 1-64th of a grain of pure strychnin ”the fellows’ hypophosphites advertising furnishes essaything like abarometer of the popular status of hypophosphites in one circular undated, but, from certain references contained in it, presumablyissued ten or fifteen years ago we read. “it is an indubitable fact that the hypophosphites have earned the distinction of having their therapeutic value more completely established than have any other remedial agents it is only by accepting the current view, which was originally advanced by mr fellows, that we can satisfactorily account for the incontestable fact that the hypophosphites are of supreme importance in the treatment of a very extensive variety of affections the hypophosphites increase the consumption of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide in this manner, they stimulate nutrition and promote constructive metamorphosis it is now universally conceded that the widespread utility of the hypophosphites is due to the fact that they substantially improve metabolic processes, thus increasing the disease-resisting capacity of all the tissues ”the circular, continuing, emphasizes the “incomparablephosphorus-contributing properties” of fellows’ syrup, its“extraordinary reconstructive properties” and “the magnificent resultswhich invariably attend its employment in the treatment of anemia, chronic bronchitis, chlorosis, neurasthenia, mollities ossium, delayedunion of fractures, rickets, convalescence, ” etc a circular bearing the copyright date 1914, on the other hand, admitsthat. “the theories for the favorable action of fellows syrup of hypophosphites have undergone several changes ”the same circular further maintains, however, that. “ the fact has never been challenged that in fellows syrup of hypophosphites we have one of the most efficient, most complete, most all-around tonics and roborants in the materia medica ”no attempt is made to base this assertion on the therapeutic actionof the constituents in other words, the old theory, which formed thebasis for the popularity of fellows’ syrup, has been thrown overboard, but no substitute is deemed necessary. The momentum already acquired isapparently regarded as sufficient to insure its continued sale fellows’ syrup of hypophosphites is a semisecret, unscientificpreparation-- an affront to sound therapy-- exploited by means ofextravagant and misleading statements syrupus roborans syrup hypophosphites comp with quinin, strychnin and manganeselittle information concerning this preparation seems to be furnishedat present by the manufacturers, arthur peter & co , louisville, ky according to an old circular, it contains, in each fluidounce, grains “hypophos potass 1-1/2 hypophos manganese 1 hypophos lime 1 hypophos iron 1-1/2 hypophos quinin 6/16 hypophos strichnin 1/16 “1/128 grain strychnia to teaspoonful ”further, according to the same circular.

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Hence the smallness of the hole as glass is made itvaries in elasticity. Essay writings which are to be cut into panes coolfaster than others a bullet striking the portion of the glass whichhas cooled quickly strikes an object which will yield essaywhat to theforce. In doing this a hole will be made smaller than if that morebrittle had been struck furthermore, all rifles taper more or lessfrom breech to muzzle, that is, the muzzle will measure one or morethousandths or hundredths less than the breech the bullet being forcedthrough the narrow aperture yields to the pressure and becomes smaller the gun under consideration was measured at the new york armory, andfound to be 44 at the breech or chamber and 423 at the muzzle considering these various facts, statements that a ball of known sizewill make a hole through glass smaller than the size of the ball whenfired do not admit of doubt as to their verity essay statements bearingon this same point contained in a recent letter from captain shaler, ofthe united states army, deserve mention here the following experimentwas made in washington by captain lyon in october, 1880:“noticing a statement in a newspaper to the effect that a ball firedfrom a rifle would, in passing through glass, make a round hole smallerthan the diameter of the ball used, the following experiment was made:“service ammunition used, in a calibre 45 springfield rifle topenetrate glass ═════════════════════╤═══════════════════╤════════════════════════ time fired │ size of hole made │ remarks │ in glass, inches │ ─────────────────────┼───────────────────┼──────────────────────── 1 │ 0 570 │ 2 │ 0 550 │ 3 │ 0 600 │ 4 │ 0 600 │ 5 │ 0 575 │ 6 │ 0 575 │ the frame holding the 7 │ 0 590 │ glass was placed 25 8 │ 0 620 │ yards from the muzzle 9 │ 0 600 │ of the gun │ │ average size of hole │ 0 586 │ calibre of bullet │ 0 458 │ │ ────── │ difference │ 0 125 │ ─────────────────────┴───────────────────┴────────────────────────“from the above it will be noted that there is no uniformity in thesize of the holes and that they all exceed the diameter of the bullet “these experiments were supplemented by essay made recently in whicha sash containing six panes of ordinary window-glass was placedat twenty-five yards from the firer and the glass was successivelypenetrated a separate pane being used in each case by bullets from aservice 45-calibre springfield rifle, a 30-calibre springfield rifle, a 45-calibre colt revolver and a 22-calibre revolver in every casethe hole made was much larger than the bullet making it ”with reference also to the effect of a ball being smaller than itsoriginal diameter after it leaves the piece, captain shaler states:“all very compressible bullets forced by inertia lose a certain amounteven though they also gain force by slugging forcing by inertia tendsto shorten the bullet and increase the diameter, while slugging tendsto lengthen the bullet and reduce its diameter whether the bullet issmaller after it leaves the piece depends upon the bullet used and themethod of forcing employed ”to return to the billings case, it was claimed that the bullet wasalso too small it weighed 165 grains, 55 less than when it was firedfrom the rifle balch found in firing at human skulls, the subjects inall the trials but two being placed in a sitting posture, essaytimeswith a sash like the billings window in front of the subject, that theball lost lead in accordance with the resistance it met with and theamount of bone ploughed in its passage these experiments conclusivelyprove that the weight of a ball taken from a body after being fired, it having traversed a bone in its flight, is by no means evidence ofits weight before firing. In other words, a ball always loses essaylead when passing through bone with the same rifle as that producedat the trial he made a series of experiments in the dissecting-room, endeavoring to make a bullet enter the skull at the same point and innearly as possible the same direction as in the case of the murderedwoman in six such experiments there were varying losses of lead, allthe bullets used being the same general weight in two trials thedistance was but ten feet from the muzzle, yet more lead was lostthan in any of the other four the least loss recorded took place atthe longest distance, thirty-five feet this in writing accounts for theloss of lead, for at ten feet the bullet has not acquired its greatestpenetrating power, for he showed by experiment that a 220-grain bulletfired at a human skull will lose more lead than was missing from thebillings bullet, thus disposing of the question raised by the defencethat a ball could not have weighed 220 grains before being fired just how to account for the missing lead has never been clearlyestablished we have to remember that a few grains may be left inthe bore of a rifle, especially if rusty. That in passing throughglass another portion is lost, and finally it is scarcely conceivablethat any bullet should penetrate an adult skull, especially inthe neighborhood of the mastoid processes, without losing quite aperceptible percentage of its mass by friction it was also claimed by the defence that the ball taken from mrs billings’ head had been fired from a weapon of low velocity, whichwas held to account for the fact that the ball failed to pass out ofthe skull the rifle when tested at the government arsenal showeda mean velocity of 999 feet per second had it been as high as wassupposed by the defence, namely, 1, 300 or 1, 400 feet, the argumentthat a bullet driven with this force would always go through the skullwould have more weight, but with the velocity found by actual test theenergy of the ball was lessened to nearly one-half of that supposed the bullet which killed mrs billings did not pass entirely throughthe skull it ploughed into the opposite side and broke before it atriangular piece of bone which broke the skin externally this showsthe resistance of external fascia against perforation a study of thelines of fracture in this writingicular case proved very interesting, butperhaps would be essaywhat irrelevant here a measurement of the skulland of the bullet-track through it shows the former to have been ofmore than ordinary thickness and density, and the channel ploughed inthe bone by the bullet along the base of it to have been nearly twoinches in length dr balch gives the following conclusions to his veryinteresting evidence. 1st a leaden ball passing through bone loseslead in proportion to the amount of bone traversed 2d if the petrousportion of the temporal bone be the writing struck by the ball and strucksquarely at the base, that portion of the bone is crumbled or broken insuch exceedingly fine pieces as to defy restoration 3d that if theball struck any writing of the skull the petrous portion will be broken, but can be usually recognized and generally put together again 4th that a ball of given calibre fired through glass may make a holeenough smaller than the full size of the ball before firing to preventan unfired ball of like calibre passing in all this kind of experimentation upon cadavers for the purpose ofeliciting evidence by reproducing as nearly as possible ante-morteminjuries, we must not forget that casper has strongly insisted that“it is extremely difficult to break up the organic cohesion of deadorgans if we endeavor to fracture the skull of a dead adult weshall find that an amount of force which if applied in life wouldindubitably produce fissures if not fracture, or complete crushingof the skull, leaves the dead skull quite uninjured the mostpowerful blows struck down upon the body, laid down horizontally, werewithout result, and only after repeated violent blows were we able toproduce perhaps one or a few fissures in the occipital or parietalbone, or in the temporal bone squamous portion, and usually in thelatter we were unable to produce more considerable effects, such ascomplete smashing of the skull or fissures of its base, even in onesingle instance the dead skull seems to have considerably more powerof resistance, and after its removal fissures of the bone were moreeasily produced by similar blows” vol i , p 245 and again. “theresult of my experiments on the dead body in regard to gunshot woundscould only be to make more complete the proof of the resistance ofthe dead corporeal tissues, in contradistinction to the tissues whenalive after i had already learned this peculiarity from my experimentswith contused wounds, this peculiar resistent property was found to beconfirmed in a most remarkable manner” “forensic medicine, ” vol i , p 271 if the number of bullets known to have been fired, or, more importantstill, which have been found exceeds the number which could have beendischarged from the weapon in question, a very large element of doubtand uncertainty is introduced which must be quieted by other and morecircumstantial evidence should two different weapons be in question, it is very necessary to establish from which of them the bullets havebeen discharged this can be done mainly by weight and evident calibreof the bullets, or essay other peculiarity.