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It ismarketed under a therapeutically suggestive name, and advertised bymeans of unwarranted therapeutic claims it is therefore in conflictwith rules 1, 6, 8 and 10 the council held hydragogin ineligible fornew and nonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , sept 4, 1915 filudine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfiludine is said to be prepared by j l chatelain, paris, and issold in this country by geo j wallau, inc , new york it is offeredas a remedy for “biliary insufficiency, ” “hepatic insufficiency, ”“intestinal dyspepsia, ” “all affections of the liver diabetes, cirrhosis, cancer, etc , ” “malaria, ” “obesity” and “tuberculosis ”no quantitative information is furnished as to the composition of thepreparation and there are noteworthy discrepancies in the variousstatements regarding the ingredients in one number of “treatment, ”a self-styled “review” of medical literature actually devoted toadvertising the preparations sold by wallau, we are told that “this product filudine is a more concentrated and potent extract of the liver, with which is combined an extract of the spleen the liver and the spleen are so intimately interdependent, that the addition of a splenary extract to the liver extract is a signal improvement from which a synergistic action results thiarféine is also added, as it helps essaywhat to combat the anaemia from which all diabetics suffer more or less ”thiarféine is said to be “thiomethylarsinate of caffein, a new salt discovered by m chatelain ”another circular, which gives an imposing formula for “thiarféine” or“thiomethylarsinate of caffein, ” states that “sulphurated methylarsinate is an arsenical preparation devoid of all toxicity on account of the intimate joining of its composing writings ”and that “filudine can never be contraindicated ”a statement of composition in a later number of “treatment, ” however, says that biliary extracts are components, in addition to the liver andspleen extracts moreover, thiarféine, the “new salt discovered by m chatelain, ” is no longer “thiomethylarsinate, ” but “thiocinnamate ofcaffein”. And a new formula is furnished for it we are told that “methyl-arsinate cannot be used in paper where fever is present ” “m chatelain at first studied the action of thiomethylarsinate. Clinical and physiological experimentation led him, however, to adopt thiocinnamate of caffein, of greater activity and with no contraindications ”nevertheless the same absence of contraindications was urged infavor of filudine when it was said to contain the now discardedthiomethylarsinate of caffein the following are essay of the unwarranted and even absurd claims. “filudine restores the liver functions it is to the liver what digitalis is to the heart.

The ancients had no writings to have themfrom. But to proceed the flowers stop all fluxes of blood. Whether inman or woman, bleeding either at the nose or wound there is also asort of amaranthus that bears a white flower, which stops the whitesin women, and the running of the reins in men, and is a most gallantantivenereal, and a singular remedy for the french pox anemone called also wind flower, because they say the flowers never open butwhen the wind blows pliny is my author.

That the medical dewritingment had nothing whatever to do with the matter and that high quality essay writing services in the us it thoroughly disapproves of the methods used by the promoters of this concern -- from the journal a m a , march 11, 1922 sal hepaticasal hepatica is a saline laxative sold by the bristol-myers company ofnew york little information is given, or, apparently, ever has beengiven, concerning the composition of this product thesis years ago thestock medical journal advertisement contained this statement. “composition -- sal hepatica contains all of the tonic, alterative and laxative salts of the celebrated ‘bitter waters’ of europe, especially those of bohemia, as determined by actual chemical analysis of these waters, and fortified by the addition of lithium and sodium phosphates ”255255 essay of the sal hepatica advertising has claimed that it “is asaline combination with the addition of sodium phosphate and lithiacitrate!. ”sal hepatica no longer “contains all the tonic, alterative and laxativesalts , ” etc , for the label on a package recently purchased reads. “sal hepatica is an effervescent saline combination possessing medicinal properties similar to the natural ‘bitter waters’ of europe, and fortified by the addition of sodium phosphate ”in 1909, the druggists circular published an analysis of sal hepaticawhich showed that the preparation contained only 0 04 per cent oflithium phosphate by referring to the two quotations just givenit will be noticed that today the manufacturers make no claim thattheir preparation is fortified with any salt of lithium a circularaccompanying recent trade packages states. “sal hepatica is composed solely of harmless salts, being absolutely free from acetanilid, phenacetin, caffein, calomel, opium or coal tar derivatives ”since neither the names nor the amounts of the “harmless salts” arementioned, the composition of sal hepatica is secret it is a trickof the nostrum exploiter, old but ever popular, to mention numerousdrugs which his preparation does not contain. It helps to distractattention from the fact that he does not tell what the preparationdoes contain!. In the old-time medical journal advertisements, one reads, “salhepatica is the most powerful solvent of uric acid known ” the sameadvertisement as it appeared in those days in the journal showsthat claim toned down to, “sal hepatica is a powerful solvent ofuric acid ” in those easy going days, the bristol-myers companydeclared that “diabetes is treated with decided advantage by meansof sal hepatica it possesses the property of arresting thesecretion of sugar in the liver ” in the old days, too, sal hepaticawas recommended in the treatment of cirrhosis of the liver, brightdisease, gravel, phthisis, etc the present advertising circular recommends sal hepatica as aneliminant, laxative or cathartic in gout, autointoxication, “biliousattacks, ” rheumatism, acute indigestion, catarrhal conditions ofthe stomach, pyorrhea, headache, dizziness, heart burn, “summercomplaints, ” “derangements of the stomach and liver, ” skin diseases, colic, alcoholic excesses, and as a “preventive of seasickness ”in 1914 the council on pharmacy and chemistry published256 a reporton sal hepatica declaring it secret in composition and sold underexaggerated and unwarranted claims 256 j a m a , feb 7, 1914, p 472 in view of the inquiries which the journal continues to receive itseemed worth while to make a chemical examination of the present-dayproduct accordingly specimens were purchased and analyzed in thea m a chemical laboratory the report that follows was submitted bythe chemists:“sal hepatica is a white, granular, odorless powder it effervesces onthe addition of water in which it eventually dissolves the aqueoussolution, after boiling to remove carbon dioxid, has an acid reactionto litmus “since a great thesis medicinal substances are sold in effervescent form, and since practically no information is given by the manufacturerconcerning the composition of sal hepatica, it became necessary totest for a considerable number of therapeutic agents the absence ofacetanilid, acetphenetidin, alkaloids, ammonium salts, benzoates, caffein, citrates, heavy metals, hexamethylenamin, magnesium, potassium, salicylates and sugars was demonstrated by appropriatetests the presence of a carbonate probably in the form of abicarbonate, a phosphate, a sulphate, a chlorid, tartaric acid, sodiumand traces of lithium was shown by qualitative tests “quantitative analysis indicated that the composition of the specimensexamined was essentially as follows. Sodium phosphate, anhydrous 4 4 per cent sodium sulphate, anhydrous 26 5 per cent sodium tartrate, anhydrous 12 7 per cent sodium bicarbonate 19 5 per cent tartaric acid, free 20 8 per cent sodium chlorid 8 9 per cent lithium phosphate trace water of hydration by difference 7 2 per cent “from the results of the analysis, it appears probable that thecomposition of the mixture before ‘granulation’ was approximately asfollows. Sodium phosphate 4 per cent sodium sulphate 25 per cent sodium bicarbonate 30 per cent tartaric acid 30 per cent sodium chlorid 8 per cent lithium phosphate trace water of hydration by difference 3 per cent “sal hepatica, therefore, is essentially an effervescing mixture ofdried sodium sulphate glauber salt and sodium tartrate with alittle dried sodium phosphate and table salt added it is similar tothe effervescent artificial carlsbad salt described in the nationalformulary “in 1909 the druggists circular published the following analysis ofsal hepatica. Sodium phosphate 29 80 writings sodium sulphate glauber salt 26 27 writings sodium bicarbonate baking soda 18 00 writings sodium chlorid salt 13 05 writings lithium phosphate 0 04 writings citric and tartaric acids to make 100 12 84 writings“a comparison of the recent analysis with the earlier one would seem toindicate that considerable changes have been made in the formula sincethe first examination the proportions of sodium phosphate have beengreatly reduced, while the sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid havebeen increased and the citric acid entirely eliminated ”sal hepatica, then, is a simple effervescent saline laxative, essentially secret in composition and sold under claims that would belaughed at were the full formula of the product a matter of publicknowledge -- from the journal a m a , oct 29, 1921 salicon“salicon” is marketed by the k a hughes company, boston, as “animproved aspirin ” in a circular sent out to the public a little over ayear ago the following claims were made for it.

Cold because that compassesthe superfluities. Moist, because that makes the body slippery andfit for ejection, and disposes it to it it is under the dominion ofluna, with whom you may join venus, because she is of the samenature also in whatsoever is before written, of the nature of the planets, take notice, that fixed stars of the same nature, work the same effect in fortifying this, which ought to be done in all purgations, letthe moon be in cancer, scorpio, or pisces, or let one of thesesigns ascend although i did what i could throughout the whole book to expressmyself in such a language as might be understood by all, and thereforeavoided terms of art as much as might be, yet, 1 essay words ofnecessity fall in which need explanation 2 it would be very tediousat the end of every receipt to repeat over and over again, the way ofadministration of the receipt, or ordering your bodies after it, or toinstruct you in the mixture of medicines, and indeed would do nothingelse but stuff the book full of tautology to answer to both these is my task at this time to the first. The words which need explaining, such as are obvious tomy eye, are these that follow 1 to distil in balneo mariæ, is the usual way of distillingin water it is no more than to place your glass body which holds thematter to be distilled in a convenient vessel of water, when the wateris cold for fear of breaking put a wisp of straw, or the like underit, to keep it from the bottom, then make the water boil, that so thespirit may be distilled forth. Take not the glass out till the water becold again, for fear of breaking. It is impossible for a man to learnhow to do it, unless he saw it done 2 manica hippocrates, hippocrates sleeve, is a piece of woolencloth, new and white, sewed together in form of a sugar-loaf its useis, to strain any syrup or decoction through, by pouring it into it, and suffering it to run through without pressing or crushing it 3 calcination, is a burning of a thing in a crucible or other suchconvenient vessel that will endure the fire a crucible is such a thingas goldsmiths melt silver in, and founders metals. You may place it inthe midst of the fire, with coals above, below, and on every side of it 4 filtrition, is straining of a liquid body through a brown paper:make up the paper in form of a funnel, the which having placed in afunnel, and the funnel and the paper in it in an empty glass, pour inthe liquor you would filter, and let it run through at its leisure 5 coagulation, is curdling or hardening. It is used in physic forreducing a liquid body to hardness by the heat of the fire 6 whereas you find vital, natural, and animal spirits oftenmentioned in the virtues or receipts, i shall explain what they be, andwhat their operation is in the body of man the actions or operations of the animal virtues, are, 1 sensitive, 2 motive the sensitive is, 1 external, 2 internal the external senses are, 1 seeing, 2 hearing, 3 tasting, 4 smelling, 5 feeling the internal senses are, 1 the imagination, to apprehend a thing 2 judgment, to judge of it 3 memory, to remember it the seat of all these is in the brain the vital spirits proceed from the heart, and cause in man mirth, joy, hope, trust, humanity, mildness, courage, &c andtheir opposite. Viz sadness, fear, care, sorrow, despair, envy, hatred, stubbornness, revenge, &c by heat natural ornot natural the natural spirit nourishes the body throughout as the vitalquickens it, and the animal gives it sense and motion its office is toalter or concoct food into chile, chile into blood, blood into flesh, to form, engender, nourish, and increase the body 7 infusion, is to steep a gross body into one more liquid 8 decoction, is the liquor in which any thing is boiled as for the manner of using or ordering the body after any sweating, or purging medicines, or pills, or the like, they will be found indifferent writings of the work, as also in the next page the different forms of making up medicines, as essay into syrups, others into electuaries, pills, troches, &c was writingly to pleasethe different palates of people, that so medicines might be moredelightful, or at least less burdenessay you may make the mixturesof them in what form you please, only for your better instruction atpresent, accept of these few lines 1 consider, that all diseases are cured by their contraries, but allwritings of the body maintained by their likes. Then if heat be the causeof the disease, give the cold medicine appropriated to it. If wind, seehow thesis medicines appropriated to that disease expel wind, and usethem 2 have a care you use not such medicines to one writing of your bodywhich are appropriated to another, for if your brain be over heated, and you use such medicines as cool the heart or liver, you may make badwork 3 the distilled water of any herb you would take for a disease, is afit mixture for the syrup of the same herb, or to make any electuaryinto a drink, if you affect such liquid medicines best. If you have notthe distilled water, make use of the decoction 4 diseases that lie in the writings of the body remote from the stomachand bowels, it is in vain to think to carry away the cause at once, andtherefore you had best do it by degrees. Pills, and such like medicineswhich are hard in the body, are fittest for such a business, becausethey are longest before they digest 5 use no strong medicines, if weak will serve the turn, you had bettertake one too weak by half, than too strong in the least 6 consider the natural temper of the writing of the body afflicted, andmaintain it in that, else you extinguish nature, as the heart is hot, the brain cold, or at least the coldest writing of the body 7 observe this general rule. That such medicines as are hot in thefirst degree are most habitual to our bodies, because they are just ofthe heat of our blood 8 all opening medicines, and such as provoke urine or the menses, orbreak the stone, may most conveniently be given in white wine, becausewhite wine of itself is of an opening nature, and cleanses the veins 9 let all such medicines as are taken to stop fluxes or looseness, betaken before meat, about an hour before, more or less, that so they maystrengthen the digestion and retentive faculty, before the food comeinto the stomach, but such as are subject to vomit up their meat, letthem take such medicines as stay vomiting presently after meat, at theconclusion of their meals, that so they may close up the mouth of thestomach. And that is the reason why usually men eat a bit of cheeseafter meat, because by its sourness and binding it closes the mouth ofthe stomach, thereby staying belching and vomiting 10 in taking purges be very careful, and that you may be so, observethese rules 1 consider what the humour offending is, and let the medicine besuch as purges that humour, else you will weaken nature, not thedisease 2 take notice, if the humour you would purge out be thin, thengentle medicines will serve the turn, but if it be tough and viscous, then such medicines as are cutting and opening, the night before youwould take the purge 3 in purging tough humours, forbear as much as may be such medicinesas leave a binding quality behind them 4 have a care of taking purges when your body is astringent. Yourbest way, is first to open it by a clyster 5 in taking opening medicines, you may safely take them at night, eating but a little supper three or four hours before, and the nextmorning drinking a draught of warm posset-drink, and you need notfear to go about your business in this manner you may take lenitiveelectuary, diacatholicon, pulp of cassia, and the like gentleelectuaries, as also all pills that have neither diagrydium norcolocynthus, in them but all violent purges require a due orderingof the body. Such ought to be taken in the morning after you are up, and not to sleep after them before they are done working, at leastbefore night. Two hours after you have taken them, drink a draughtof warm posset-drink, or broth, and six hours after eat a bit ofmutton, often walking about the chamber. Let there be a good fire inthe chamber, and stir not out of the chamber till the purge have doneworking, or not till next day lastly, take sweating medicines when you are in bed, covered warm, andin the time of your sweating drink posset-drink as hot as you can ifyou sweat for a fever, boil sorrel and red sage in your posset-drink, sweat an hour or longer if your strength will permit, then the chamberbeing kept very warm shift yourself all but your head, about which the cap which you sweat in being still kept on wrap a napkin veryhot, to repel the vapours back i confess these, or thesis of these directions may be found in one placeof the book or other, and i delight as little to write tautology asanother, but considering it might make for the public good, i insertedthem in this place. If, notwithstanding, any will be so mad as to dothemselves a mischief, the fault is not mine roots acanths, brancæ ursinæ of bearsbreech, or brankursine, it is meanlyhot and dry, helps aches and numness of the joints, and is of a bindingquality, good for wounds and broken bones dioscorides saith, theyare profitable for ruptures, or such as are bursten, or burnt withfire, a dram of the root in powder being taken in the morning fasting, in a decoction made with the same root and water acori, veri, perigrini, vulgaris, &c see calamus aromaticus ishall not speak concerning the several sorts of it, one of which iswater-flag, or flower-de-luce, which is hot and dry in the seconddegree, binds, strengthens, stops fluxes of the belly, and immoderateflowing of the menses, a dram being taken in red wine every morning allium garlic it is hot and dry in the fourth degree, breedscorrupt blood, yet is an enemy to all poisons, and such as are bittenby cold venomous beasts, viz adders, toads, spiders, &c it provokesurine, and expels wind alcannæ of privet see the leaves althææ of marsh mallows, are meanly hot, of a digesting, softeningnature, ease pains, help bloody fluxes, the stone, and gravel.

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And from time to time to make the necessary alterations in theaddresses or qualifications of registered persons any name erasedshall be restored by the order of the council on sufficient cause dulyshown 18 neglect to register - persons entitled to registration, neglecting oromitting to register, are not entitled to any rights or privilegesconferred by the act 19 system of practice - no person otherwise qualified shall be refusedregistration or license on account of the adoption or the refusal toadopt the practice of any writingicular theory of medicine or surgery in case of refusal the aggrieved writingy may appeal to the governor incouncil, who is required, on due cause shown, to issue an order to thecouncil to register his name and grant him a license to practise, andthereupon the council shall forthwith register his name and grant him alicense to practise 20 evidence of qualification, fraudulent registration - no qualificationcan be entered unless the registrar be satisfied by proper evidencethat the person claiming it is entitled to it an appeal may be madefrom the registrar decision to the council any entry proved to thesatisfaction of the council to have been fraudulently or incorrectlymade may be erased by the order in writing of the council, and the nameof such person fraudulently registering, or attempting to register, may, at the discretion of the council, be published in the next issueof the royal gazette 21 forfeiture of right - a registered medical practitioner convicted offelony, or after due inquiry judged by the council to have been guiltyof infamous conduct in any professional respect thereby, subject toappeal to the governor in council, forfeits his right to registration, and by the direction of the council his name shall be erased from theregister 22 the time and place of inquiry under the preceding section must be fixedby the council, and at least fourteen days’ notice given to the writingyagainst whom inquiry is ordered act 1886, c 82, s 6 the act of 1886, c 82, regulates the procedure on such inquiry additional qualifications - every person registered who may obtain ahigher degree or other qualification is entitled to have it registeredin substitution for, or in addition to, the qualifications previouslyregistered, on the payment of such fee as the council may demand act1881, c 19, s 23 practitioner rights - every person registered under the act isentitled according to his qualifications to practise medicine, surgery, midwifery, or dentistry, or either or any of them as the case maybe, and to demand and recover reasonable and customary charges forprofessional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of any medicine orother medical or surgical appliances rendered or supplied by him to hispatients 24 no person is entitled to recover any such charge unless he shall proveupon the trial that he is registered under this act 25 definition - the words “legally qualified medical practitioner, ” or“duly qualified medical practitioner, ” or other words implying that aperson is recognized by law as a medical practitioner or member of themedical profession, when used in a legislative act or a legal or publicdocument mean a person registered under this act 26 unregistered persons - no person shall be appointed a medical officer, physician, or surgeon in the public service or in any hospital or othercharitable institution unless registered 27 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer be duly registered s 28 a person not registered or licensed, and not actually employed asa physician or surgeon in her majesty naval or military service, practising physic, surgery, or midwifery for hire, gain, or hope ofreward, forfeits twenty dollars for each day of such practice s 29 the sum forfeited is recoverable with costs the procedure in referenceto all penalties is regulated by act of 1886, c 82 persons liable as provided in secs 29 and 30 are not entitled to orsubject to the provisions of any act for the relief of debtors act1882, c 30, s 4 on the trial of such cause, the burden of proof as to license or rightto practise is upon the defendant act 1881, c 19, s 31. Act 1886, c 82, s 3 fraudulent registration - wilfully procuring or attempting to procureregistration by making or producing, or causing to be made or produced, a false or fraudulent representation or declaration, or aiding orassisting therein, is punishable with a forfeiture of not less than$100 act 1881, c 19, s 33 wilfully or falsely pretending to be or using any name or descriptionimplying registration is punishable with a forfeiture of from $50 to$100 34 limitations - no prosecution can be commenced under the act after oneyear from the date of the offence act 1886, c 82, s 4 exceptions - the act does not prevent persons from giving the necessarymedical or surgical aid or attendance to any one in urgent need ofit, provided it be without gain, and the giving of it be not made abusiness or way of gaining a livelihood. Nor does it prevent any womanfrom giving the necessary aid in paper of confinement as heretoforeaccustomed act 1881, c 19, s 36 examination - all persons who subsequent to the passage of the actpass the examination prescribed by the council of physicians andsurgeons, or presenting approved credentials, certificates, or diplomasequivalent to such examination, are entitled to register and receive alicense to practise 38 physicians in army or navy - a person while employed in actual servicein her majesty naval or military service as a physician or surgeon, may practise physic, surgery, or midwifery with registry or license39 non-residents - non-resident registered practitioners of medicineresiding in the state of maine or in the province of quebec or novascotia near the boundary line of this province whose regular practiceextends into any town, parish, or county in new brunswick may registerunder the act 44 no other non-resident practitioner of medicine is entitled to register act 1884, c 17, s 1 exceptions - the act does not extend to clairvoyant physicianspractising at the time of its passage in the province, nor to midwives act 1881, c 19, s 45 students - the act establishes a uniform standard of matriculation orpreliminary examinations sched b oaths - any oath or affidavit required by the medical act may be takenbefore any justice of the peace or person by law authorized to take anyoath or affidavit act 1882, c 30, s 6 fees - to the registrar, for registration under secs 12 and 13, $10 act 1881, c 19, s 12 and 13 to the registrar, for the registration of an additional qualification, such fee as the council may demand act 1881, c 19, s 23 to the registrar, or his deputy, annual fee from each practitioner, tobe fixed by the council, not more than $2 nor less than $1 act 1882, c 30, s 5 each registered medical practitioner must, if required by the council, pay to the registrar, or a person deputed by him, an annual feedetermined by the council, not less than $1 nor more than $2, payablejanuary 1st each year, and recoverable as a debt with costs in the nameof the council act 1882, c 30, s 5 if any practitioner omit to pay the registration fee before theregistrar causes the register to be printed in the royal gazette, theregistrar shall not cause the name of such practitioner to be printed, and he shall thereupon cease to be deemed a registered practitioner;but afterward, on paying such fee, he shall be entitled to all hisrights and privileges as a registered practitioner from the time ofpayment act 1884, c 17, s 2 newfoundland medical board - there is a board composed of seven regularly qualifiedmedical practitioners of not less than five years’ standing, appointedas provided in the act, and known as the “newfoundland medical board, ”whose duties relate, among other things, to the making and enforcing ofmeasures necessary for the regulation and the practice of medicine act1893, c 12, s 2, 3, 19 the board is authorized to appoint examiners and fix times ofexaminations 5 the secretary of the board is the registrar 7 register, evidence - it is the duty of the registrar on or beforejanuary 1st in each year to cause to be published in the royalgazette of newfoundland a list of the names of all persons appearingon the register at that date, with their places of residence, titles, diplomas, and qualifications as conferred by any college or body, withthe date 8 such register is called the medical register, and a copy thereofis prima facie evidence that the persons therein specified areregistered according to the act. And the absence of a name therefrom isprima facie evidence that such person is not so registered s 9 qualification - the members of the board form a body of medicalexaminers of diplomas and degrees, whose certificate shall be the onlylicense permitting the practice of medicine, surgery, or midwifery, except as hereinafter provided, provided the applicant for such licenseshall previously have obtained a medical diploma from a recognizedcollege or university, or as hereinafter provided 10 every person is entitled to have his name entered on the registeron satisfying the board that he holds a degree or diploma from essayregular university or school of medicine in good standing, and he shallthen receive from the board a license bearing its seal, on the paymentto the registrar of $5, and shall have his name entered on the register11 no such licensed practitioner shall be entitled to practise in any yearwithout taking out from the board, before the 1st of january in everyyear, a certificate of practice for which he shall pay $1 s 12 students - the act provides the requirements for entering on the studyof medicine, surgery, or midwifery in the colony 13, 14, 17 duties of board - the board is required to examine all degrees andother credentials produced or given in evidence under the act forthe purpose of enabling the owners to practise, and, if it be deemednecessary, to oblige the owner to attest on oath or affidavit that heis the person whose name is mentioned therein, and that he has becomepossessed of the same by lawful means 16 the board is required to cause every member of the professionpractising in newfoundland to enter his name, age, place of residence, date of license or diploma and where it was obtained, on the register18 neglect to register - a person entitled to be registered, who neglectsor omits to apply, is not entitled to any of the rights or privilegesconferred by the act so long as the neglect or omission continues25 additional qualification - a person registered who obtains a higherdegree or diploma is entitled to have it inserted in the register inaddition to or in substitution for those previously registered s 26 rights of registered persons - a person properly registered under theact is entitled to practise medicine, surgery, and midwifery in anywriting of the colony, and to demand and recover reasonable charges forprofessional aid or advice with the cost of medicine or other medicaland surgical appliance supplied by him 27 unregistered persons - no person whose name is not registered under theact is entitled to recover any fees for any medical or surgical advice, or for any services whatsoever rendered in the capacity of a medicalman, nor to recover the payment of charges for any medicine or medicalor surgical appliance which may have been both prescribed and suppliedby him this clause is not intended to interfere with the practice ofmidwifery by competent females as hereinafter provided 28 offences and penalties - except as hereinafter provided, if a personnot registered or licensed under the act practises medicine, surgery, or midwifery for hire, gain, help sic or reward, or wilfully andfalsely pretends to be a physician, doctor of medicine, surgeon, orgeneral practitioner, or takes or uses any name, title, addition ordescription, implying or calculating sic to deceive or lead thepublic to infer that he is registered under this act, or who proposesby public advertisement, card, circular, or otherwise, to practisemedicine, surgery, or midwifery, or give advice therein, or in anywiselead people to infer that he is qualified to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, he shall forfeit $20 for each day that he sopractises or leads people to infer that he is a practitioner, or shallsuffer imprisonment not exceeding twelve months 29 persons violating the above regulations are subject to the penalties ofthe act, and in all paper the burden of proof as to qualification isupon the defendant or practitioner 30 expulsion of member - the newfoundland medical board may try and expelany member of the profession for acts of malpractice, misconduct, orimmoral habits, provided five-sevenths of the whole number record theirsignatures to such a measure 32 exceptions - the act does not prevent private persons from giving thenecessary medical or surgical aid in times of urgent need, providedsuch aid or attention is not given for gain or hire, nor the giving ofit made a business or a way of gaining a livelihood 34 every person residing in the colony and who shall have practisedmedicine, surgery, and midwifery for five years consecutively in onelocality previous to the passage of the act, on the proof of the same, shall have his name registered and receive a license to practise underthe act. Provided, the board may grant a license to any person who mayhave practised for a shorter period, on being satisfied by examination, or inquiry, that such person is reasonably competent and fit. Andfurther provided, that the board may, after examination and inquiry, license persons with a reasonable amount of competence to practisein specified localities, in which no qualified practitioners reside37 any person while employed in actual service in any naval or militaryservice as physician or surgeon may practise medicine, surgery, andmidwifery after having been registered 38 definition - the words “legally qualified medical practitioner” or“duly qualified medical practitioner, ” or any other words importing aperson recognized by law as a medical practitioner or a member of themedical profession, when used in any act of the legislature or legal orpublic document, mean a person registered under this chapter, unless asotherwise provided 39 medical appointments - no person shall be appointed as a medicalofficer, physician, or surgeon in any branch of the public service orany hospital or other charitable institution unless he be registeredunder the provisions of this chapter 40 theories of medicine or surgery - no person otherwise fully qualifiedshall be refused registration, or a license to practise, on account ofhis adopting or refusing to adopt the practice of any writingicular theoryof medicine or surgery in case of such refusal by the board, the writingyaggrieved may appeal to the governor in council, who, on due causeshown, shall issue an order to the board to register the name of suchperson and grant him a license 41 midwives - the act does not prevent competent females from practisingmidwifery 42 fees - to the registrar, for license, $5 11 to the board, each year, for a certificate of practice, $1 s 12 northwest territories college of physicians and surgeons - the members of the medicalprofession are a body corporate under the name of “the college ofphysicians and surgeons of the northwest territories” ord 5 of 1888, s 2 every person registered according to ordinance 11 of 1885 is a memberof the said college and shall be held to be registered under thisordinance from the date of its passage 3, as amended ord 9of 1891-92 every person registered under this law is a member of the college4 council - there is a council of said college elected by the membersfrom the members registered in pursuance of this ordinance s 5, 6, 7 the council appoints among other officers a registrar 26 register, qualification - persons registered under ordinance 11 of 1885are entitled to register under this ordinance 31 the council is required to cause the registrar to keep a register ofthe names of all persons who have complied with this ordinance, andthe rules and regulations of the council respecting the qualificationsrequired from practitioners of medicine or surgery only those personswhose names are inscribed in the register are deemed qualified andlicensed to practise medicine or surgery, except as hereinafterprovided 32 the registrar is required to keep his register correct and to make thenecessary alterations in the addresses or qualifications of personsregistered 33 the council is required to admit on the register. A any person possessing a diploma from any college in great britainand ireland having power to grant such diploma entitling him topractise medicine and surgery, and who shall produce such diploma andfurnish satisfactory evidence of identification. B any member of the college of physicians and surgeons of theprovinces of manitoba, ontario and quebec upon producing satisfactoryevidence of the same and of identification. C any person who shall produce from any college or school ofmedicine and surgery in the dominion of canada requiring a four-years’course of study and sic a diploma of qualification. Provided hefurnish to the council satisfactory evidence of identification, andpass if deemed necessary, before the members thereof, or such examinersas may be appointed for the purpose, a satisfactory examinationtouching his fitness and capacity to practise as a physician andsurgeon, upon payment to the registrar of fifty dollars 34, as substituted by ord 14, 1890, amended by ord 9, 1891-92 powers of council - the members of the council are required to makeorders, regulations, or by-laws for the regulation of the register andthe guidance of examiners, and may prescribe subjects and modes ofexamination, and may make all regulations in respect of examinations, not contrary to the ordinance, that they may deem expedient andnecessary 36 the council may by by-law delegate to the registrar power to admit topractice and to register any person having the necessary qualificationsentitling him to be registered by the council ord 24, 1892, s 4 the council may direct the name of any person improperly registeredto be erased from the register and such name shall be erased by theregistrar ord 24, 1892, s 5 forfeiture of rights - if a medical practitioner be convicted of anyfelony or misdemeanor or after due inquiry be judged by the council tohave been guilty of infamous conduct in any professional respect, thecouncil may, if it sees fit, direct the registrar to erase the name ofsuch practitioner from the register, and the name shall be erased ord 5, 1888, s 37, as substituted by ord 24, 1892, s 1 rights of registered persons - every person registered under theordinance is entitled to practise medicine and surgery, includingmidwifery, or any one of them, as the case may be, and to demand andrecover with costs his reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of medical or surgical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patients 38 limitation - a period of one year after the term of professionalservice is established as a limitation to actions for negligence ormalpractice against members of the college 39 register, evidence - the registrar, under the direction of the council, is required to publish a register of the names and residences andthe medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by anycollege or body, of all persons appearing on the register on the dayof publication the register is called “northwest territories’ medicalregister, ” and a copy for the time being, purporting to be so printedand published, is prima facie evidence that the persons thereinspecified are registered according to the act the absence of a namefrom such copy is prima facie evidence that such person is not soregistered in case a person name does not appear on such copy, a certified copyunder the hand of the registrar of the entry of the name of such personon the register is evidence that such person is registered s 40 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights or privileges conferred and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 4 offences and penalties - to practise or profess to practise withoutregistration, for hire or reward, is punishable with a penalty of $10042 to wilfully or falsely pretend to be a physician, doctor of medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assume any title or descriptionnot actually possessed and to which the person is not legally entitledunder this ordinance, is punishable with a penalty of from $10 to $5043, as amended by ord 24, 1892, s 2 to take or use a name or description implying or calculated to leadpeople to infer registration or recognition by law as a physician, surgeon, or licentiate in medicine or surgery is punishable with apenalty of from $25 to $100 44 unregistered persons - no person is entitled to recover for any medicalor surgical advice or attendance or the performance of any operationor medicine which he may have prescribed 45.