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Only half a score linseeds, and ahandful of chamomel flowers are added decoctum epythimi or a decoction of epithimum college take of myrobalans, chebs, and inds, of each half anounce, stœchas, raisins of the sun stoned, epithimum, senna, of eachone ounce, fumitory half an ounce, maudlin five drams, polipodium sixdrams, turbith half an ounce, whey made with goat milk, or heifermilk four pounds, let them all boil to two pounds, the epithimumexcepted, which boil but a second or two, then take it from the fire, and add black hellebore one dram and an half, agerick half a dram, sal gem one dram and an half, steep them ten hours, then press it stronglyout culpeper it purges melancholy, as also choler, it resists madness, and all diseases coming of melancholy, and therefore let melancholypeople esteem it as a jewel decoctum sennæ gereonis or a decoction of senna college take of senna two ounces, pollipodium half an ounce, gingerone dram, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, sebestens, prunes, ofeach twelve, the flowers of borrage, violets, roses, and rosemary, ofeach two drams, boil them in four pounds of water till half be consumed culpeper it is a common decoction for any purge, by adding othersimples or compounds to it, according to the quality of the humour youwould have purged, yet, in itself, it chiefly purges melancholy decoctum pectorale or a pectoral decoction college take of raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce, sebestens, jujubes, of each fifteen, dates six, figs four, french barley oneounce, liquorice half an ounce, maiden-hair, hyssop, scabious, colt-foot, of each one handful, boil them in three pounds of watertill two remain culpeper the medicine is chiefly appropriated to the lungs, and therefore causes a clear voice, a long wind, resists coughs, hoarseness, asthmas, &c you may drink a quarter of a pint of it everymorning, without keeping to any diet, for it purges not i shall quote essay syrups fitting to be mixed with it, when i come tothe syrups decoctum trumaticum college take of agrimony, mugwort, wild angelica, st john wort, mousear, of each two handfuls, wormwood half a handful, southernwood, bettony, bugloss, comfrey the greater and lesser, roots and all, avens, both sorts of plantain, sanicle, tormentil with the roots, the buds ofbarberries and oak, of each a handful, all these being gathered in mayand june and diligently dried, let them be cut and put up in skins orpapers against the time of use, then take of the forenamed herbs threehandfuls, boil them in four pounds of conduit water and two pounds ofwhite wine gently till half be consumed, strain it, and a pound ofhoney being added to it, let it be scummed and kept for use culpeper if sight of a medicine will do you good, this is as liketo do it as any i know syrups altering syrups culpeper reader, before we begin with the writingicular syrups, ithink good to advertise thee of these few things, which concern thenature, making, and use of syrups in general 1 a syrup is a medicineof a liquid body, compounded of decoction, infusion, or juice, withsugar or honey, and brought by the heat of the fire, into the thicknessof honey 2 because all honey is not of a thickness, understand newhoney, which of all other is thinnest 3 the reason why decoctions, infusions, juices, are thus used, is, because thereby, first, they willkeep the longer secondly, they will taste the better 4 in boilingsyrups have a great care of their just consistence, for if you boilthem too much they will candy, if too little, they will sour 5 allsimple syrups have the virtues of the simples they are made of, and arefar more convenient for weak people, and delicate stomachs syrupus de absinthio simplex or syrup of wormwood simple the college take of the clarified juice of common wormwood, clarified sugar, of each four pounds, make it into a syrup accordingto art after the same manner, are prepared simple syrups of betony, borrage, bugloss, carduus, chamomel, succory, endive, hedge-mustard, strawberries, fumitory, ground ivy, st john wort, hops, mercury, mousear, plantain, apples, purslain, rasberries, sage, scabious, scordium, houseleek, colt-foot, paul bettony, and other juices notsour culpeper see the simples, and then you may easily know both theirvirtues, and also that they are pleasanter and fitter for delicatestomachs when they are made into syrups syrupus de absinthio compositus or syrup of wormwood compound college take of common wormwood meanly dry, half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, indian spikenard three drams, old white wine, juice ofquinces, of each two pounds and an half, steep them a whole day in anearthen vessel, then boil them gently, and strain it, and by adding twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper mesue is followed verbatim in this. And the receipt isappropriated to cold and flegmatic stomachs, and it is an admirableremedy for it, for it strengthens both stomach and liver, as alsothe instruments of concoction, a spoonful taken in the morning, isadmirable for such as have a weak digestion, it provokes an appetite toone victuals, it prevails against the yellow iaundice, breaks wind, purges humours by urine syrupus de acetosus simplex or syrup of vinegar simple college take of clear water four pounds, white sugar five pounds, boil them in a glazed vessel over a gentle fire, scumming it till halfthe water be consumed, then by putting in two pounds of white winevinegar by degrees, perfect the syrup culpeper that is, only melt the sugar with the vinegar over thefire, scum it, but boil it not syrupus acetosus simplicior or syrup of vinegar more simple college take of white sugar five pounds, white wine vinegar twopounds, by melting it in a bath, make it into a syrup culpeper of these two syrups let every one use which he finds byexperience to be best. The difference is but little they both of themcut flegm, as also tough, hard viscous humours in the stomach. Theycool the body, quench thirst, provoke urine, and prepare the stomachbefore the taking of a vomit if you take it as a preparative for anemetic, take half an ounce of it when you go to bed the night beforeyou intend it to operate, it will work the easier, but if for any ofthe foregoing occasions, take it with a liquorice stick syrupus acetosus compositus or syrup of vinegar compound college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, endive, of eachthree ounces, the seeds of annis, smallage, fennel, of each one ounce, of endive half an ounce, clear water six pounds, boil it gently in anearthen vessel till half the water be consumed, then strain and clarifyit, and with three pounds of sugar, and a pound and a half of whitewine vinegar, boil it into a syrup culpeper this in my opinion is a gallant syrup for such whosebodies are stuffed either with flegm, or tough humours, for it opensobstructions or stoppings both of the stomach, liver, spleen, andreins.

Leftventricle contracted help with writing papers. Right ventricle not so. No coagulation brainnormal. Lungs collapsed. Liver and spleen congested. Mucous membraneof small intestine pinkish. Other organs normal in the discussion, dr gay thought the absence of cerebral congestion was due to thecirculation continuing in the left carotid 90 hofmann. Wien med woch , 1880, xxx , pp 477-480 - man, acriminal, hung. After hanging ten minutes, the body was cut down examination half-hour after drop fell he was resuscitated and writinglyregained consciousness, but died three days afterward of œdema oflungs after repeated severe convulsions he had tumors of the neckwhich probably interfered with the compression of the trachea see alsoallg wien med zeit , 1880, xxv , p 161, and wien med blät , 1880, i , pp 423-430. Translated in ann mal oreill and larynx, paris, 1880, vi , pp 99-112 91 kinkhead. Lancet, and 701-703 - paper of hanging in one, thebody of the third cervical vertebra was broken across and the twopieces separated. In another case dislocation of second and thirdcervical vertebræ 92 nelson. Southern clinic, 1885, viii , pp 198-202 - two coloredmen hung. Drop five feet in one there was atlo-axoid dislocation 93 dercum. Phila med times, 1886-87, xvii , p 368 - descriptionof the brain of a man executed by hanging 94 kirtikar.

1st a leaden ball passing through bone loseslead in proportion to the amount of bone traversed 2d if the petrousportion of the temporal bone be the writing struck by the ball and strucksquarely at the base, that portion of the bone is crumbled or broken insuch exceedingly fine pieces as to defy restoration 3d that if theball struck any writing of the skull the petrous portion will be broken, but can be usually recognized and generally put together again 4th that a ball of given calibre fired through glass may make a holeenough smaller than help with writing papers the full size of the ball before firing to preventan unfired ball of like calibre passing in all this kind of experimentation upon cadavers for the purpose ofeliciting evidence by reproducing as nearly as possible ante-morteminjuries, we must not forget that casper has strongly insisted that“it is extremely difficult to break up the organic cohesion of deadorgans if we endeavor to fracture the skull of a dead adult weshall find that an amount of force which if applied in life wouldindubitably produce fissures if not fracture, or complete crushingof the skull, leaves the dead skull quite uninjured the mostpowerful blows struck down upon the body, laid down horizontally, werewithout result, and only after repeated violent blows were we able toproduce perhaps one or a few fissures in the occipital or parietalbone, or in the temporal bone squamous portion, and usually in thelatter we were unable to produce more considerable effects, such ascomplete smashing of the skull or fissures of its base, even in onesingle instance the dead skull seems to have considerably more powerof resistance, and after its removal fissures of the bone were moreeasily produced by similar blows” vol i , p 245 and again. “theresult of my experiments on the dead body in regard to gunshot woundscould only be to make more complete the proof of the resistance ofthe dead corporeal tissues, in contradistinction to the tissues whenalive after i had already learned this peculiarity from my experimentswith contused wounds, this peculiar resistent property was found to beconfirmed in a most remarkable manner” “forensic medicine, ” vol i , p 271 if the number of bullets known to have been fired, or, more importantstill, which have been found exceeds the number which could have beendischarged from the weapon in question, a very large element of doubtand uncertainty is introduced which must be quieted by other and morecircumstantial evidence should two different weapons be in question, it is very necessary to establish from which of them the bullets havebeen discharged this can be done mainly by weight and evident calibreof the bullets, or essay other peculiarity. Possibly in disputed papereven by analysis of the metal wounds by shot-guns - in most of what has been said it has beensupposed that the injury has been inflicted by an arm of the kindcommonly described under the terms pistol, revolver, or rifle gunshotwounds are, however, occasionally inflicted with shot-guns and a chargeof shot varying in size from small bird-shot up to that generally knownas buck-shot it is characteristic of such missiles that they separateafter their discharge from the gun, and a determination of the degreeof their separation is approximately a determination of the distanceof the mark from the muzzle of the weapon in suicide or accidentaldischarges of a shot-gun the muzzle is so near the body that the chargeof shot acts very much as would a single bullet of the size of thebore of the gun, and near wounds thus inflicted, while necessarilylarge, have about them a minimum laceration and disturbance of tissue, so that perhaps only by their size could one say, viewing the woundalone, that the weapon used had been a shot-gun on the other hand, ata distance of a few feet the shot begin to separate to such an extentthat there is much more laceration of tissue, and after separation toan indeterminate, because variable, number of feet we get such marksas individual shot may make this distance is indeterminate because itis predicated on the size of the gun, the dimensions of shot, and theweight of the charge of powder the writer, for instance, has recentlyseen one case where the muzzle of the gun could not have been more thantwo feet away from the surface of the foot at which it was discharged, the consequence being a round and very slightly ragged hole through themid-tarsal region from dorsum to sole it is possible for a single grain of shot to produce death such acase is related by ollivier d’angers. A thief scaling a wall receivedat a distance of fifteen paces a charge of shot from a fowling-piece;he fell dead immediately the charge had struck him in the breast, centring over a space of three or four inches, but one shot hadpenetrated the aorta over the attachment of the sigmoid valves, andanother had traversed the entire wall of this vessel powder-marks - a very important writing of evidence in case of near woundsof gunshot character pertains to the powder-marks upon the clothingand skin naturally every one knows that when a weapon is dischargednear a given surface there will be more or less powder-marking uponthat surface, the same being due to writingicles of gunpowder which areincompletely or not at all consumed, and which are black becauseof the charcoal they contain.

After meat if forvomiting syrupus scabiosæ or syrup of scabious college take of the roots of elecampane, and polypodium of theoak, of each two ounces, raisins of the sun stoned an ounce, sebestenstwenty, colt-foot, lungwort, savory, calaminth, of each a handful andan half, liquorice, spanish tobacco, of each half an ounce, the seedsof nettles and cotton, of each three drams, boil them all the rootsbeing infused in white wine the day before in a sufficient quantityof wine and water to eight ounces, strain it, and adding four ouncesof the juice of scabious, and ten ounces of sugar, boil it to a syrup, adding to it twenty drops of oil of sulphur culpeper it is a cleansing syrup appropriated to the breastand lungs, when you perceive them oppressed by flegm, crudites, orstoppings, your remedy is to take now and then a spoonful of thissyrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy, orscabby syrupus de scolopendrio or syrup of hart-tongue college take of hart-tongue three handfuls, polypodium of theoak, the roots of both sorts of bugloss, bark of the roots of capersand tamerisk, of each two ounces, hops, dodder, maiden-hair, bawm, ofeach two handfuls, boil them in nine pounds of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pounds of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper it helps the stoppings of melancholy, opens obstructionsof the liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetic evils, andtherefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the help with writing papers vulgar call therickets, or liver-grown. A spoonful in a morning is a precious remedyfor children troubled with that disease men that are troubled with thespleen, which is known by pain and hardness in their left side, maytake three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one receipt worththe price of the whole book syrupus de stœchade syrup of stœchas college take of stœchas flowers four ounces, rosemary flowers halfan ounce, thyme, calaminth, origanum, of each an ounce and an half, sage, bettony, of each half an ounce, the seeds of rue, peony, andfennel, of each three drams, spring water ten pounds, boil it till halfbe consumed, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, boil it intoa syrup, which perfume with cinnamon, ginger, and calmas aromaticus, ofeach two drams tied up in a rag syrupus de symphyto or syrup of comfrey college take of roots and tops of comfrey, the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red roses, bettony, plantain, burnet, knotgrass, scabious, colt foot, of each two handfuls, press the juiceout of them all, being green and bruised, boil it, scum it, and strainit, add its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup, according to art culpeper the syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or evacuation of blood, it unitesbroken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the menses. You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease. It comforts hot stomachs exceedingly, cools the liver andheart, and resists putrefaction, pestilence, and poison college julep of violets is made of the water of violet flowersand sugar, like julep of roses culpeper it is cooling and pleasant purging syrups syrupus de cichorio cum rhubarbaro or syrup of succory with rhubarb college take of whole barley, the roots of smallage, fennel, andsparagus, of each two ounces, succory, dandelyon, endive, smoothsow-thistles, of each two handfuls, lettuce, liverwort, fumitory, topsof hops, of each one handful, maiden-hair, white and black, cetrachs, liquorice, winter cherries, dodder, of each six drams, to boil thesetake sixteen pounds of spring water, strain the liquor, and boil init six pounds of white sugar, adding towards the end six ounces ofrhubarb, six drams of spikenard, bound up in a thin slack rag the whichcrush often in boiling, and so make it into a syrup according to art culpeper it cleanses the body of venemous humours, as boils, carbuncles, and the like. It prevails against pestilential fevers, itstrengthens the heart and nutritive virtue, purges by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep but by my author leave, i never accounted purges to be proper physicin pestilential fevers. This i believe, the syrup cleanses the liverwell, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with hypocondriacmelancholy the strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak, one, oryou may mix an ounce of it with the decoction of senna syrupus de epithymo or syrup of epithimum college take of epithimum twenty drams, mirobalans, citron, andindian of each fifteen drams, emblicks, belloricks, polypodium, liquorice, agrick, thyme, calaminth, bugloss, stœchas of each sixdrams, dodder, fumitory, of each ten drams, red roses, annis-seeds andsweet fennel seeds of each two drams and an half, sweet prunes ten, raisins of the sun stoned four ounces, tamarinds two ounces and anhalf, after twenty-four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boil it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and withfive pounds of fine sugar boil it into syrup according to art culpeper it is best to put in the dodder, stœchas and agarick, towards the latter end of the decoction it purges melancholy, andother humours, it strengthens the stomach and liver, cleanses the bodyof addust choler and addust blood, as also of salt humours, and helpsdiseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosy, &c a man may take two ounces at a time, or add one ounce tothe decoction of epithimum syrupus e floribus persicorum or syrup of peach-flowers college take of fresh peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whole dayin three pounds of warm water, then boil a little and strain it out, repeat this infusion five times in the same liquor, in three pounds ofwhich dissolve two pounds and an half of sugar and boil it into a syrup culpeper it is a gentle purger of choler, and may be given even infevers to draw away the sharp choleric humours syrupus de pomis purgans or syrup of apples purging college take of the juice of sweet smelling apples two pounds, thejuice of borrage and bugloss of each one pound and an half, senna twoounces, annis seeds half an ounce, saffron one dram, let the senna besteeped in the juices twenty-four hours, and after a boil or two strainit, and with two pounds of white sugar boil it to a syrup accordingto art, the saffron being tied up in a rag, and often crushed in theboiling culpeper the syrup is a cooling purge, and tends to rectify thedistempers of the blood, it purges choler and melancholy, and thereforemust needs be effectual both in yellow and black jaundice, madness, scurf, leprosy, and scabs, it is very gentle the dose is from oneounce to three, according as the body is in age and strength an ounceof it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out inscabs syrupus de pomis magistralis or syrup of apples magisterial college take of the juice and water of apples of each a poundand an half, the juice and water of borrage and bugloss of each nineounces, senna half a pound, annis seeds, and sweet fennel seeds, ofeach three drams, epithimum of crete, two ounces, agarick, rhubarb, ofeach half an ounce, ginger, mace, of each four scruples, cinnamon twoscruples, saffron half a dram, infuse the rhubarb and cinnamon awritingby itself, in white wine and juice of apples, of each two ounces, letall the rest, the saffron excepted, be steeped in the waters abovementioned, and the next day put in the juices, which being boiled, scummed, and strained, then with four ounces of white sugar boil itinto a syrup, crushing the saffron in it being tied up in a linen rag, the infusion of the rhubarb being added at the latter end culpeper out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge choler andmelancholy, and to resist madness syrupus de rhubarbaro or syrup of rhubarb college take of the best rhubarb and senna of each two ounces andan half, violet flowers a handful, cinnamon one dram and an half, ginger half a dram, bettony, succory and bugloss water of each onepound and an half, let them be mixed together warm all night, and inthe morning strained and boiled into a syrup, with two pounds of whitesugar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of roses culpeper it cleanses choler and melancholy very gently, and istherefore fit for children, old people, and weak bodies you may add anounce of it to the decoction of epithimum or to the decoction of senna syrupus rosaceus solutivus or syrup of roses solutive college take of spring water boiling hot four pounds, damask roseleaves fresh, as thesis as the water will contain. Let them remain twelvehours in infusion, close stopped. Then press them out and put in freshrose leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time. Take six writings of this liquor, and with fourwritings of white sugar, boil it to a syrup according to art culpeper it loosens the belly, and gently brings out choler andflegm, but leaves a binding quality behind it syrupus e succo rosarum or syrup of the juice of roses college it is prepared without steeping, only with the juice ofdamask roses pressed out, and clarified, and an equal proportion ofsugar added to it culpeper this is like the other syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum agarico or syrup of roses solutive with agarick college take of agarick cut thin an ounce, ginger two drams, sal gem one dram, polipodium bruised two ounces, sprinkle them with whitewine and steep them two days over warm ashes, in a pound and an half ofthe infusion of damask roses prescribed before, and with one pound ofsugar boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it purges flegm from the head, relieves the sensesoppressed by it, provokes the menses, purges the stomach and liver, and provokes urine syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum helleboro or syrup of roses solutive with hellebore college take of the bark of all the myrobalans, of each fourounces, bruise them grossly, and steep them twenty-four hours in twelvepounds of the infusion of roses before spoken, senna, epithimum, polypodium of the oak, of each four ounces, cloves an ounce, citronseeds, liquorice, of each four ounces, the bark of black helleboreroots six drams, let the fourth writing of the liquor gently exhale, strain it, and with five pounds of sugar, and sixteen drams of rhubarbtied up in a linen rag, make it into a syrup according to art culpeper the syrup, rightly used, purges melancholy, resistsmadness syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum senna or syrup of roses solutive with senna college take of senna six ounces, caraway, and sweet fennel seeds, of each three drams, sprinkle them with white wine, and infuse them twodays in three pounds of the infusion of roses aforesaid, then strainit, and with two pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup culpeper it purges the body of choler and melancholy, and expelsthe relics a disease hath left behind it. The dose is from one ounceto two, you may take it in a decoction of senna, it leaves a bindingquality behind it syrupus de spina cervina or syrup of purging thorn college take of the berries of purging thorn, gathered inseptember, as thesis as you will, bruise them in a stone mortar, andpress out the juice, let the fourth writing of it evaporate away in abath, then to two pounds of it add sixteen ounces of white sugar, boil it into a syrup, which perfume with mastich, cinnamon, nutmegs, anni-seeds in fine powder, of each three drams syrups made with vinegar and honey mel anthosatum or honey of rosemary flowers college take of fresh rosemary flowers a pound, clarified honeythree pounds, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in thesun, keep them for use culpeper it hath the same virtues with rosemary flowers, to which irefer you, only by reason of the honey it may be essaywhat cleansing mel helleboratum or honey helleborated college take of white hellebore roots bruised a pound, clear waterfourteen pounds, after three days infusion, boil it till half beconsumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pounds of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey mel mercuriale or honey of mercury college boil three pounds of the juice of mercury, with two poundsof honey to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as an emollient in clysters mel mororum, vel diamoron or honey of mulberries college take of the juice of mulberries and blackberries, beforethey be ripe, gathered before the sun be up, of each a pound and ahalf, honey two pounds, boil them to their due thickness culpeper it is vulgarly known to be good for sore mouths, as alsoto cool inflammations there mel nuceum, alias, diacarion et dianucum or honey of nuts college take of the juice of the outward bark of green walnuts, gathered in the dog days two pounds, boil it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is a good preservative in pestilential times, aspoonful being taken as soon as you are up mel passalatum or honey of raisins college take of raisins of the sun cleansed from the stones twopounds, steep them in six pounds of warm water, the next day boil ithalf away, and press it strongly, and with two pounds of honey, let theexpressed liquor boil to its thickness culpeper it is a pretty pleasing medicine for such as are inconsumptions, and are bound in body mel rosatum commune, sive foliatum or common honey of roses college take of red roses not quite open two pounds, honey sixpounds, set them in the sun according to art mel rosatum colatum or honey of roses strained college take of the best clarified honey ten pounds, juice of freshred roses one pound, set it handessayly over the fire, and when itbegins to boil, put in four pounds of fresh red roses, the whites beingcut off. The juice being consumed by boiling and stirring, strain itand keep it for use culpeper they are both used for diseases in the mouth mel rosatum solutivum or honey of roses solutive college take of the often infusion of damask roses five pounds, honey rightly clarified four pounds, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as a laxative in clysters, and essay use it tocleanse wounds college after the same manner is prepared honey of the infusion ofred roses mel scilliticum or honey of squils college take one squil full of juice, cut in bits, and put it in aglass vessel, the mouth close stopped, and covered with a skin, set inthe sun forty days, to wit, twenty before and after the rising of thedog star, then open the vessel, and take the juice which lies at thebottom, and preserve it with the best honey college honey of violets is prepared like as honey of roses oxymel, simple college take of the best honey four pounds, clear water and whitewine vinegar, of each two pounds, boil them in an earthen vessel, taking the scum off with a wooden scummer, till it be come to theconsistence of a syrup culpeper it cuts flegm, and it is a good preparative against avomit oxymel compound college take of the bark of the root of fennel, smallage, parsley, bruscus, asparagus, of each two ounces, the seeds of fennel, smallage, parsley, annis, of each one ounce, steep them all the roots beingfirst cleansed and the seeds bruised in six pounds of clear waterand a pound and a half of wine vinegar, the next day boil it to theconsumption of the third writing, boil the rest being strained, with threepounds of honey into a liquid syrup according to art culpeper first having bruised the roots and seeds, boil them in thewater till half be consumed, then strain it and add the honey, and whenit is almost boiled enough, add the vinegar oxymel helleboratum or oxymel helleborated college take of rue, thyme, dittany of crete, hyssop, pennyroyal, horehound, carduus, the roots of celtick, spikenard without leaves, the inner bark of elders, of each a handful, mountain calaminth twopugils, the seeds of annis, fennel, bazil, roman nettles, dill, ofeach two drams, the roots of angelica, marsh-mallows, aron, squillsprepared, birthwort, long, round, and climbing, turbith, english orris, costus, polypodium, lemon pills, of each an ounce, the strings of blackhellebore, spurge, agerick, added at the end of the decoction, of eachtwo drams, the bark of white hellebore half an ounce, let all of thembeing dried and bruised, be digested in a glass, or glazed vesselclose stopped, in the heat of the sun, or of a furnace, posca, made ofequal writings of water and vinegar, eight pounds, sapa two ounces, threedays being expired, boil it little more than half away, strain it, pressing it gently, and add to the liquor a pound and a half of honeyroses, wherein two ounces of citron pills have been infused, boil it tothe thickness of honey, and perfume it with cloves, saffron, ginger, galanga, mace, of each a dram oxymel julianizans college take of the bark of caper roots, the roots of orris, fennel, parsley, bruscus, chicory, sparagus, cypress, of each half anounce, the leaves of harts-tongue, schænanth, tamarisk, of each half ahandful, sweet fennel seed half an ounce, infuse them in three poundsof posca, which is essaything sour, afterwards boil it till half beconsumed, strain it, and with honey and sugar clarified, of each half apound, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper this medicine is very opening, very good againsthypocondriac melancholy, and as fit a medicine as can be for thatdisease in children called the rickets college oxymel of squills simple, is made of three pounds ofclarified honey. Vinegar of squills two pounds, boil them according toart culpeper it cuts and divides humours that are tough and viscous, and therefore helps the stomach and bowels afflicted by such humours, and sour belchings if you take but a spoonful in the morning, an ablebody will think enough oxymel scilliticum compositus or oxymel of squills compound college take of origanum, dried hyssop, thyme, lovage, cardamomsthe less, stœchas, of each five drams, boil them in three pounds ofwater to one, strain it and with two pounds of honey, honey of raisinshalf a pound, juice of briony five ounces, vinegar of squills a poundand a half, boil it, and scum it according to art culpeper this is good against the falling-sickness, megrim, head-ache, vertigo, or swimming in the head, and if these be occasionedby the stomach as thesis times they are, it helps the lungs obstructed byhumour, and is good for women not well cleansed after labour, it opensthe passage of the womb syrup of purslain mesue college take of the seeds of purslain grossly bruised, half apound, of the juice of endive, boiled and clarified, two pounds, sugartwo pounds, vinegar nine ounces, infuse the seeds in the juice ofendive twenty-four hours, afterwards boil it half away with a gentlefire, then strain it, and boil it with the sugar to the consistence ofa syrup, adding the vinegar towards the latter end of the decoction culpeper it is a pretty cooling syrup, fit for any hot diseaseincident to the stomach, reins, bladder, matrix, or liver. It thickensflegm, cools the blood, and provokes sleep you may take an ounce of itat a time when you have occasion compound syrup of colt-foot renod college take six handfuls of green colt-foot, two handfuls ofmaiden-hair, one handful of hyssop, and two ounces of liquorice, boilthem in four pints, either of rain or spring water till the fourth writingbe consumed, then strain it, and clarify it, to which add three poundsof white sugar, boil it to the perfect consistence of a syrup culpeper the composition is appropriated to the lungs, andtherefore helps the infirmities, weaknesses, or failings thereof aswant of voice, difficulty of breathing, coughs, hoarseness, catharrs, &c the way of taking it is with a liquorice-stick, or if you please, you may add an ounce of it to the pectoral decoction before mentioned syrup of poppies, the lesser composition college take of the heads of white poppies and black, when both ofthem are green, of each six ounces, the seeds of lettice, the flowersof violets, of each one ounce, boil them in eight pints of water tillthe virtue is out of the heads. Then strain them, and with four poundsof sugar boil the liquor to a syrup syrup of poppies, the greater composition college take of the heads of both white and black poppies, seedsand all, of each fifty drams, maiden-hair, fifteen drams, liquorice, five drams, jujubes, thirty by number, lettice seeds, forty drams, ofthe seeds of mallows and quinces, tied up in a thin linen cloth ofeach one dram and an half, boil these in eight pints of water tillfive pints be consumed, when you have strained out the three pintsremaining, add to them, penids and white sugar, of each a pound, boilthem into a syrup according to art culpeper all these former syrups of poppies provoke sleep, butin that, i desire they may be used with a great deal of caution andwariness. Such as these are not fit to be given in the beginning offevers, nor to such whose bodies are costive, yet to such as aretroubled with hot, sharp rheums, you may safely give them. The last isappropriated to the lungs.

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Mezereon being thearabick name tithymallus, esula, &c spurge hot and dry help with writing papers in the fourth degree:a dogged purge, better let alone than taken inwardly. Hair anointedwith the juice of it will fall off. It kills fish, being mixed withany thing that they will eat. Outwardly it cleanses ulcers, takes awayfreckles, sunburning and morphew from the face tormentilla see the root trinitatis herba pansies, or heart-ease. They are cold and moist, both herbs and flowers, excellent against inflammations of the breastor lungs, convulsions or falling-sickness, also they are held to begood for venereal complaints trifolium trefoil. Dry in the third degree, and cold. The ordinarymeadow trefoil, cleanses the bowels of slimy humours that stick tothem, being used either in drinks or clysters. Outwardly they take awayinflammations tussilago colt-foot. Essaything cold and dry, and therefore goodfor inflammations, they are admirably good for coughs, and consumptionsof the lungs, shortness of breath, &c it is often used and with goodsuccess taken in a tobacco-pipe, being cut and mixed with a little oilof annis seeds see the syrup of colt-foot valeriana valerian, or setwall see the roots verbascum, thapsus barbatus mullin, or higtaper it is essaythingdry, and of a digesting, cleansing quality, stops fluxes and thehemorrhoids, it cures hoarseness, the cough, and such as are brokenwinded verbena vervain. Hot and dry, a great opener, cleanser, healer, ithelps the yellow jaundice, defects in the reins and bladder, pains inthe head.