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’tis a remedy against all help with college essay diseases coming of stopping, and suchare half those that are incident to the body of man. And although agardener be of another opinion, yet a physician holds half an acre ofthem to be worth five acres of carrots twice told over dove-foot, or crane-bill descript this has divers small, round, pale-green leaves, cut inabout the edges, much like mallow, standing upon long, reddish, hairystalks lying in a round compass upon the ground. Among which rise uptwo or three, or more, reddish, jointed, slender, weak, hairy stalks, with essay like leaves thereon, but smaller, and more cut in up to thetops, where grow thesis very small bright red flowers of five leavesa-piece. After which follow small heads, with small short beaks pointedforth, as all other sorts of those herbs do place it grows in pasture grounds, and by the path-sides in thesisplaces, and will also be in gardens time it flowers in june, july, and august, essay earlier and essaylater. And the seed is ripe quickly after government and virtues it is a very gentle, though martial plant it is found by experience to be singularly good for wind cholic, asalso to expel the stone and gravel in the kidneys the decoctionthereof in wine, is an excellent good cure for those that have inwardwounds, hurts, or bruises, both to stay the bleeding, to dissolve andexpel the congealed blood, and to heal the writings, as also to cleanseand heal outward sores, ulcers, and fistulas.

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- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | the jean downs co , | | new york | | | | my dear mrs downs, | | | | the package of your “get slim” remedy for obesity has | | been given to a patient of mine with beneficial results | | | | in observing the action of the remedy i noted no laxative | | effect on the bowels, or any disturbance of the stomach | | | | in fact there were no physical sensations that any | | remedy had been taken, and there was a very satisfactory | | reduction in weight | | | | “get slim” remedy, being a purely vegetable combination | | is not fraught with any risk to the individual health, | | and may be safely given | | | | i would not hesitate to prescribe it for a child | | suffering from obesity | | | | this statement is based on the fact that i am acquainted | | with the ingredients entering into its manufacture | | | | i would add that this remedy for obesity might be intro- | | duced to the regular physicians with essay advantage to | | you | | | | yours truly, | | e p robinson m d | | 1402 broadway | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - reproduction reduced of a testimonial for an obesity cure fake, “get slim ” the a m a chemists reported that this “vegetable combination” consisted of baking soda and pink-tinted tartaric acid and sugar we also find in our files a testimonial signed e p robinson, m d , 1402 broadway edward percy robinson address in 1912, extollingthe virtues of a foolish piece of quackery, the obesity cure “getslim ” this nostrum was exposed in the journal essay years ago andwas also exposed by dr wiley in good housekeeping the “get slim”concern sued good housekeeping for libel but a jury decided thatgood housekeeping had told the truth in the “get slim” testimonialrobinson is quoted as saying that he is “acquainted with theingredients entering into its manufacture” and he describes it, as didthe “get slim” concern, as “a purely vegetable combination ” the factis the association chemists found this “purely vegetable combination”to consist of sugar and tartaric acid, each colored pink, and bakingsoda and this is the gentleman who claims to have discovered the cause of, and offers for sale a cure for, one of the most baffling scourges knownto modern medicine-- cancer except for the articles that have beenpublished during the past three years in the medical record, we areunable to find anywhere in representative medical literature anythingto indicate that edward percy robinson can lay any claim to specialknowledge of, or skill in the treatment of, cancer what we do find areadvertisements describing edward percy robinson alleged abilitiesas a “face beautifier, ” puffs from utterly uncritical or discreditedsources and a testimonial to the value of a preposterous “fat cure”fake with the best brains of the world at work on the problem of cancer, itis reasonable to assume that any man who has found out even a littlemore than has previously been discovered or is able to accomplisheven a little better results than the average in the treatment of thisdreaded disease, would be well known to scientific medicine * * * * *after this article was in type physicians began sending in no 3 april, 1921 of therapeutic leaves this is still another reprintof nos 1 and 2, with minor changes in the first two, tekarkin isdescribed as “a solution of potassium nitrate of special strength;” inno 3 it becomes “a special solution containing potassium nitrate ”in nos 1 and 2, robinson described an alleged case of “cancer of therectum treated with tekarkin ” in no 3 this becomes “medicinaltreatment cures cancer of the rectum ” in no 3 the names of theeditors, assistant editor and general manager are eliminated illustrationthe inside back cover of no 3 contains an advertisement of tekarkin, in which physicians are warned that “cancer of the lung may presentdiagnostic signs of tuberculosis ” it contains the further startlinginformation that the writingicular micro-organism responsible forpulmonary tuberculosis is the klebs-loeffler bacillus!. thus. “the klebs-loeffler bacillus may find a suitable habitat in a malignant area of lung tissue and thrive therein the presence of the bacillus does not necessarily exclude the presence of cancer a chronic cough with blood-streaked sputum may be the result of tuberculosis and cancer ”-- from the journal a m a , may 28, 1921 tyree antiseptic powder again the “ethical and commercial requirements” of the drug business“i am fond of the retail drug business and follow it every day ofmy life i know and observe to the fullest extent its ethical andcommercial requirements ” this from a circular letter recently receivedby physicians, and signed j s tyree, who asks that he be forgiven forwriting you personally, but there are several reasons why he thinksthe circumstances warrant it all of which is preliminary to callingattention to an enclosure, which accompanies the circular letter, andis described as a “short memorandum” submitted for “your consideration ”the “memorandum” is a four-page leaflet of which three pages aredevoted to “tyree antiseptic powder ” one of these three pagesis a reproduction of a letter on the stationery of the surgeongeneral office of the war dewritingment, and signed “w m gray, m d , microscopist, army medical museum. Pathologist to providencehospital ” the letter describes a series of “bacteriological andcomparative tests” made by dr gray with tyree antiseptic powder the entire second page of the circular is given over to the results ofthese bacteriologic tests which compare various strengths of tyreeantiseptic powder with “mercuric bichlorid, ” phenol and formaldehyde the physicians who received this advertising material in april, 1919, might easily overlook the fact that dr gray has been dead severalyears, that the letter which is reproduced is dated jan 3, 1890, andthat the bacteriologic tests were made in 1889-- thirty years ago!. The council on pharmacy and chemistry in 1906258 published theresults of an analysis of tyree antiseptic powder which showed thatalthough the stuff was advertised as a mixture of borax and alum, itwas in fact essentially a mixture of zinc sulphate and boric acid thepublication of the council report in 1906, showing the falsity of theformula, brought out the admission that the composition had recentlybeen changed certain it is, however, that for at least a decade past, the tyree product has been a zinc sulphate-boric acid preparation yet, according to the manufacturer own statement, tyree antisepticpowder in 1889, when dr gray made his bacteriologic tests, was anentirely different substance from the present mixture 258 at this time tyree antiseptic powder was an “ethicalproprietary”-- heaven save the mark!. -- and advertised only to physicians later, as the journal has shown, it entered the “patent medicine”field as “ideal for douche” and the “best preventative known ” thearticles on this nostrum are reprinted in the ninth edition of “thepropaganda for reform ”here then we have a manufacturer publishing in 1919, in behalf ofa certain product, tests that were made in 1889 with a product ofdifferent composition, although of the same name!. is this observing “tothe fullest extent” the “ethical and commercial requirements” of the“retail drug business”?. There is no scientific excuse for such a mixture as tyree antisepticpowder if, however, physicians feel that they must use an irrationalconglomeration such as this, why not prescribe pulvis antisepticus, n f ?. like the tyree product, this, too, is essentially a mixtureof zinc sulphate and boric acid, with minute amounts of phenol, eucalyptol, menthol and thymol, to say nothing of a dash of salicylicacid this official article has at least the virtue of constancy ofstrength, composition and purity assured under the federal food anddrugs act -- from the journal a m a , may 17, 1919 wheeler tissue phosphates “the commissioner of health directs me to call to your attention the enclosed advertisement issued by t b wheeler, m d , company, montreal, canada, in which the name of the association journal is being used ”accompanying this brief note to the journal from the secretary of dr haven emerson, commissioner of the dewritingment of health of the cityof new york, was a four page leaflet devoted to the exploitation of“wheeler tissue phosphates ” the trend of the circular is to leadthe average reader to infer that the journal of the american medicalassociation has endorsed wheeler tissue phosphates for example, indescribing the preparation one reads. “it embodies the best recent scientific opinion concerning the treatment of the disease tuberculosis as stated by the official journal a m a ”elsewhere in the circular the journal criticisms of thehypophosphites and the glycerophosphates proprietary preparationswhich are competitors of the wheeler product are quoted and twistedinto a tribute to the ingredients of wheeler tissue phosphates garbling quotations, distorting statements, separating phrases fromtheir contexts and omitting qualifying clauses, all for the purposeof making out a case for essay proprietary remedy is a trick as old asquackery itself that it should be used in advertising wheeler tissuephosphates is entirely fitting obviously, the t b wheeler, m d , company esteems the opinion of the journal on pharmacologic matters this being the case, it should, in the interest of truth and scientificaccuracy, publish in its advertising circulars just what the journalhas said about wheeler tissue phosphates it could not do this betterthan by quoting from a recent editorial note which commented on areport of the chemical laboratory on this preparation here is writing ofthe the journal comment. “‘wheeler tissue phosphates’ is an unscientific shotgun mixture whose most active and powerful drug is the alcohol it contains that it was not years ago relegated to the realms of obsolete and discarded preparations is a commentary alike on the lack of scientific discrimination and on the power of advertising ”here we have “wheeler tissue phosphates” stripped of the verbalcamouflage with which its exploiters have invested it -- editorialfrom the journal a m a , sept 22, 1917 briefer paragraphs alcresta lotion to the editor:-- what is the composition of alcresta lotion?. l t a hotten, m d , paris, idaho according to a circular in our files, “alcresta dental lotion-libby”contains “emetin, the active amebicidal principle of ipecac, togetherwith benzoic acid, thymol, eucalyptol and aromatics ” the theorythat emetin is an active amebicide against pyorrhea alveolaris hasbeen exploded in this connection, it is interesting to note thatthe firm does not list the product in the latest catalogue in ourfiles -- query from the journal a m a , oct 29, 1921 calcidin tablets abbott to the editor:-- what is the composition of calcidin tablets abbott and what is their value?.

Where the access of air issuddenly and completely prevented death may be immediate tardieu saysthat death follows pressure of the hand sooner than that of a ligature fleischmann739 placed cords round his own neck between hyoid bone and chin, tied them tightly, essaytimes at the side, essaytimes at the back, without respiration being interfered with, because there was no pressure on the air passages but his face grew red, eyes protruded slightly, there was a feeling of great heat in the head, of weight, commencing dizziness, and suddenly a hissing and rustling in his ears the experiment should stop at this point the same symptoms occurred from applying the cord over the larynx the first experiment lasted two minutes, the second a half-minute the difference was due to the different situation of the cord dr g m hammond740 gives an account of a personal experiment in strangulation he sat down. A towel was passed around his neck, and the ends twisted together, making forcible compression of the neck at first he had a feeling of warmth and tingling, first in the feet, then passing over the entire body. Vision writingly lost. His head felt as if it would burst. There was confused roaring in ears, like the sound heard on placing the ear to a shell. He remained conscious in one minute twenty seconds all sensibility was abolished after a few minutes’ rest a second similar trial was made, with similar results, except that sensibility was lost in fifty-five seconds a stab with a knife drawing the blood caused no sensation should the subject recover from the immediate effects of thestrangulation there may yet be serious secondary results among theseare convulsions and paralysis. Extreme swelling of face, neck, andchest. Loss of voice. Lesions of larynx and lungs. Abscesses death mayoccur suddenly and remotely from one of the sequelæ 741in the treatment of strangulation the first indication obviouslyis to remove the pressure from the neck artificial respiration willprobably be required, and may be aided by ammonia applied to thenostrils, tickling of the fauces, and galvanism colin742 statesthat artificial respiration is useless after cessation of heart-beat see the treatment by galvanism under “suffocation ” if the body iscold, artificial heat by means of hot bottles, etc venesection may benecessary colin strongly advises venesection to relieve the distentionof the heart stimulants and light food are often required limousin743 recommends the use of oxygen cobos744 experimented onanimals by injecting oxygen hypodermically, as a means of artificialrespiration his conclusions are that the oxygen is absorbed and carbondioxide eliminated in the same place the oxygen thus introduced causesno trouble testevin745 cures asphyxia by hypodermic injection ofether the after-treatment will depend on the after-conditions the prognosis is good if there is no serious injury to the neck andtreatment is promptly applied post-mortem appearances the post-mortem appearances in strangulation are external andinternal the external appearances are of two kinds. Those directly due toviolence and accident and those due to asphyxia external appearances directly due to violence or accident - the markson the neck in essay fatal paper there are either no marks at all orthey are but slight.

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Pulse 100 had slept well, but the movements inthe left arm had never ceased the next day these motions were limitedto the muscles of the forearm, and on the fourth day they had whollyceased these convulsions consisted in extensive motions of the wholeextremity or of muscles or muscle-groups, and not of simple tremor ifthe movements were forcibly controlled, severe pain ensued next to the motor symptoms the sensory are the most important painnot infrequently occurs after the recovery of consciousness in theaffected limb. It is apt to be sharp, severe, darting and neuralgicin character this may last at intervals for essay days, a dull acheoccurring at first between the intermissions it disappears of itselfin time without lasting effects hyperæsthesia may exist at first should this continue, or ifanæsthesia not due to secondary traumatic conditions should appearlater, we should be inclined to place these symptoms in the third class of other symptoms occurring in accidents from currents of highpotential, those which seem to be due to the direct action of theelectricity are not serious buzzing in the ears and a metallic tastein the mouth often occur at the very beginning before the consciousnessis involved nausea and vomiting frequently occur later there isoften considerable dizziness and vertigo patients essaytimes complainof sensations as of an electric shock running through the body whichoccur without cause essay hours or even days after the real shock essayof these sensations are certainly to be reckoned under the mental orpsychical symptoms susceptibility to the effects of electricity, oflightning, and of thunder-storms, though undoubtedly in thesis paperpsychical, has probably in essay paper an actual foundation this iscertainly the case in lightning stroke on the other hand, in the largemajority of paper of electric accidents no such result follows, and inthesis we are expressly told that such a result was looked for but notfound the temperature, as affected by the electricity alone and not assecondary result of injuries, is not always easy to determine it seemsto be in most paper lowered at first, being in that of moyer 97 5° andin that of robert 97° later it may rise to a certain extent, usuallyto not more than 101°, but here again the influence of traumata isdifficult to separate the pulse may be full and soft or weak and compressible it isfrequently very feeble, essaytimes almost imperceptible, and oftenrapid it is apt to remain rapid and essaywhat soft for days in severepaper the respiration is at first rapid in severe paper unless the shock beso great as to cause its cessation this rapidity remains for a varyingperiod and then disappears as a typical case of the results of shock from an electric wire, wewill mention the one reported by dr f w jackson the patient, aman twenty-two years old, came in contact with a live electric-lightwire, touching it with his hands he was thrown a distance of aboutten feet and then back again, “swinging back and forth two or threetimes ” his hands were in contact with the wire about three minutes, when the current broke and he fell to the ground unconscious was seentwo hours later by physician temperature 100°. Pulse 100, strong andbounding. Pupils dilated. Headache. Nervous and irritable. Reflexesincreased the headache was accompanied by insomnia which continued forthree days, after which it disappeared, and he resumed work apparentlynone the worse for his accident the palmar surfaces of both handsand the anterior surfaces of the forearms were blackened from the tipsof the fingers to a point midway between the wrists and the elbows, and these writings were exceedingly sensitive to the touch the leastirritation of the muscles would cause them to contract violently thiscondition ceased on the second day the current was from a fifty-lightarc circuit of about 2, 100 volts. 6 8 amperes the accident took placeout-of-doors on a very rainy night the amount of electricity which thepatient received was, as in all such paper, very uncertain fatal current the amount of current which will produce a fatal effect varies withthe character of the current and with the points of contact currentspassing through the head or those which affect the pneumogastric nervesare much more dangerous than others of the same character and equalstrength passing through one extremity, for example the same current will, of course, also produce different effects, according to the facility of its conduction into and through the body, and this depends again on the completeness of the contact and whetherthe body or the portion thereof concerned enters directly into thecircuit or only forms, as it were, a writingial conductor and diverts acertain portion only of the current to itself again, the condition ofthe epidermis, whether dry or wet, and the position of the person inrelation to good conductors, metallic or otherwise, has much effect if the skin and clothes be wet, the resistance to the current islessened and it passes more readily into the body in the same way, ifa person stands in close relation to a good conductor and places hishand on one wire of a high-tension electric circuit, he will receive amuch more severe shock than if not connected with such conductor thusa person standing in a pool of water water is a good conductor, andmore strongly if standing on the metallic rail of a railway track, andtouching one wire of an electric circuit with one hand, receives a muchstronger shock than if he were standing on dry land, or if his bootswere rubber or he was otherwise insulated the accidents most frequent in practice are those in which the currenthas been writingially diverted from its original course and the person hasnot entered fully into the circuit in such paper it is not usuallypossible to estimate accurately or even approximately the amount ofcurrent which the person has received no calculations can, therefore, be based on these accidents again, we find that a person may beseriously or even fatally injured by a current which another personseems to bear with impunity d’arsonval in 1887, in france, advised 500 volts as the maximum forthe continuous current and 60 volts as the maximum for the alternatingcurrent which might be employed without special permission our only accurate knowledge in regard to fatal currents comes from theexperience derived from electrocutions from these it appears that analternating current of 1, 500 volts is deadly if it passes through thebody for more than a few seconds and if the contact is perfect death - death may ensue immediately as the result of an electricshock without any evident preliminary symptoms, or it may occur later, either as the direct result of the shock or as the consequence of theexhaustion produced by the burns and other injuries, or directly fromthe injuries themselves if death does not occur immediately and ifappropriate means of aid are at hand, the sufferer usually survivesand the effect of the electric shock gradually passes away the dangerafter this arises from the burns and other injuries, and almost all thedeaths not immediate are the results of these electrocution electricity has been adopted in the state of new york as the agentfor the execution of condemned criminals this has given rise to muchdiscussion as to what form of current were the best adapted for thispurpose and as to what amount were required to produce death at onceand painlessly these questions may now be regarded as practicallysettled, at least so far as regards the purposes mentioned, and weshall only refer incidentally to the discussions and their results early in 1890 a committee consisting of dr carlos f macdonald, dr a d rockwell, and prof l h landy made a report to the superintendentof prisons at albany in regard to the efficiency of the electricalappliances and dynamos placed in the state prisons of sing sing, auburn, and clinton this report gave details of various experimentsmade on animals to determine the amount of current and the timerequired to produce a fatal result on the 6th of august, 1890, occurred the first electrocution, that ofwilliam kemmler, alias john hart, at auburn prison dr macdonald inhis official report to the governor in relation to this says.