History

Help With Algebra Homework


But i will tell him a remedy, whereby he shall prevent it;take the herb of mars, wormwood, and if infortunes will do good, whatwill fortunes do?. essay think the lungs are under jupiter. And if thelungs then the breath. And though essaytimes a man gets a stinkingbreath, and yet jupiter is a fortune, forsooth. Up comes mars to him;come brother jupiter, thou knowest i sent thee a couple of trines tothy house last night, the one from aries, and the other from scorpio;give me thy leave by sympathy to cure this poor man with drinking adraught of wormwood beer every morning the moon was weak the otherday, and she gave a man two terrible mischiefs, a dull brain and a weaksight. Mars laid by his sword, and comes to her. Sister moon, saidhe, this man hath angered thee, but i beseech thee take notice he isbut a fool.

In colorado, to aphysician help with algebra homework or surgeon duly authorized to practise his professionunder the laws of the state. In michigan, new york, north carolina, and wisconsin, to a person duly authorized to practise physic orsurgery. In minnesota, oregon, and washington, to a regular physicianor surgeon. In iowa and nebraska, to a practising physician orsurgeon. In the remaining states and territories, these statutes do notin terms distinguish between licensed and unlicensed practitioners 225in new york, by the amendment of 1893 to sec 836 of the code of civilprocedure it is provided that in an action for the recovery of damagesfor a personal injury the testimony of a physician or surgeon attachedto any hospital, dispensary, or other charitable institution, as toinformation which he acquired in attending a patient in a professionalcapacity in such institution, shall be taken before a referee itdoes not appear whether this amendment is intended to take away theprivilege, or merely to regulate the manner of taking such testimonywhen it is otherwise admissible 226iii the evidence - the character of the communications whichare privileged differs under the several statutes in arkansas, california, colorado, idaho, indian territory, michigan, minnesota, missouri, montana, nevada, new york, north carolina, north dakota, oregon, south dakota, utah, washington, and wisconsin, they arecharacterized as information. In indiana, as matter committed. Iniowa and nebraska, as confidential communications. In kansas, ohio, oklahoma, and wyoming, as communications.

President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc medico-legal determination of the time of death signs of death the cessation of respiration and the absence of audible heart-beatsare signs generally regarded as sufficient in themselves to determinethe reality of death but persons have been resuscitated from a stateof asphyxia or have recovered from a state of catalepsy or lethargy inwhom, to all appearances, the respiratory and circulatory processeshave been arrested so it is advisable that we should be acquainted with essay absolutetests of death which are not connected help with algebra homework with the heart-sounds or therespiration it is well known that these important functions, although apparentlyheld in abeyance, must be speedily re-established so as to berecognized, or death will rapidly follow this condition of apparentlysuspended animation is seen among hibernating animals. The bear, forinstance, will remain for four or five months without food or drinkin a state of lethargy the heart-action and respiration hardlyappreciable yet it will be sufficiently rapid to sustain life duringthe slow metabolic processes a number of well-authenticated paper arereported in which persons could slacken their heart-action, so thatno movement of the organ could be appreciated the case of coloneltownsend, reported by cheyne, is an example he possessed the power ofapparently dying, by slowing his heart so that there was no pulse orheart-action discernible the longest period he could remain in thisinanimate state was half an hour instances have occurred in the new-born child where without questionthere have been no heart-beats or respiratory movements for a number ofminutes, the limit being set at five these are exceptional paper, and it is setting at defiance allphysiological experience to suppose that the heart-action andrespiration can be suspended entirely when once they are established, for a period as long so, then, if no motion of the heart occurs duringa period of five minutes a period five times as great as observationwarrants death may be regarded as certain the respiratory movements of the chest are essaytimes very difficultto observe they can always be better appreciated if the abdomen andchest are observed together there are two methods to determine whetherrespiration is absolutely suspended or not first, by holding a mirrorin front of the open mouth, observing whether any moisture collects onits surface second, by placing on the chest a looking-glass or basinof water, and reflecting from it an image by artificial or sun light the slightest movement would be registered by a change in position ofthe image while the writer considers the absence of heart-beats and ofrespiratory movement an absolute test of death, still essay paper mayoccur in which the establishment of this test is very difficult, andthe following additional tests may be employed:1 temperature of the body same as surrounding air 2 intermittent shocks of electricity at different tensions passed intovarious muscles, giving no indication whatever of irritability 3 careful movements of the joints of the extremities and of the lowerjaw, showing that rigor mortis is found in several writings 4 a bright needle plunged into the body of the biceps muscle cloquet needle test and left there, showing on withdrawal no signsof oxidation 5 the opening of a vein, showing that the blood has undergonecoagulation 6 the subcutaneous injection of ammonia monte verde test, causinga dirty-brown stain indicative of dissolution 7 a fillet applied to the veins of the arm richardson test, causing no filling of the veins on the distal side of the fillet 8 “diaphanous test:” after death there is an absence of thetranslucence seen in living people when the hand is held before astrong light with the fingers extended and in contact 9 “eye test:” after death there is a loss of sensibility of the eyeto light, loss of corneal transparency, and the pupil is not responsiveto mydriatics post-mortem changes the human body after death undergoes certain changes which will bediscussed under the following heads:1 cooling of the body 2 flaccidity of the body 3 rigor mortis 4 changes in color due to a cadaveric ecchymoses b putrefaction cooling of the body immediately after death there is a slight rise of temperature, supposedto be due to the fact that the metabolic changes in the tissues stillcontinue, while the blood is no longer cooled by passing through theperipheral capillaries and lungs the body gradually cools and reaches the temperature of the surroundingair in from fifteen to twenty hours. This is the ordinary course, but the time may be influenced by a variety of causes, such as thecondition of the body at the time of death, manner of death, andcircumstances under which the body has been placed in certain diseases, as yellow fever, rheumatism, chorea, and tetanus, the temperature of the body has been known to rise as high as 104° f and remain so for a time again, it has been observed that when deathhas taken place suddenly, as from accident, apoplexy, or acute disease, the body retains its heat for a long time the bodies of persons dyingfrom hanging, electrocution, suffocation, or poisoning by carbondioxide, do not generally cool for from twenty-four to forty-eighthours, and paper are recorded where three days have elapsed before thebody was completely cold on the other hand, bodies dead from chronicwasting diseases or severe hemorrhage cool very rapidly, even in fouror five hours in determining the temperature of a dead body the hand is not areliable guide. The thermometer should always be used flaccidity the first effect of death from any cause is general relaxation of theentire muscular system the lower jaw drops, the eyelids lose theirtension, the limbs are flabby and soft, and the joints become flexible in from five to six hours after death, and generally while the body isin the act of cooling, the muscles of the limbs are observed to becomehard and contracted, the joints stiff, and the body unyielding muscleswhich are contracted in the death-agony do not necessarily becomerelaxed at any time the muscular tissues in the dead body can be considered as passingthrough three stages. 1 flaccid but contractile, 2 rigid andincapable of contraction, 3 relaxed and incapable of furthercontractility rigor mortis this is essaytimes called cadaveric rigidity and occurs generally withinsix hours after death and disappears within sixteen to twenty-fourhours thesis theories have been advanced to account for it, but the mostprobable one is that the rigidity is due to the coagulation of themyosin in the muscles by the weak acids which are no longer removedfrom the system. The muscles always give an acid reaction and areopaque instead of transparent. After putrefaction has set in ammonia isdeveloped, the myosin dissolved, and so flaccidity results rigor mortis occurs first in the muscles of the eyelid, next themuscles of the lower jaw and neck are affected, then the chest andupper extremities. Afterward it gradually progresses from abovedownward, affecting the muscles of the abdomen and lower limbs therigidity disappears in the same sequence the period after deathwhen rigor mortis manifests itself, together with its duration, ischiefly dependent upon the previous degree of muscular exhaustion brown-séquard has demonstrated that the greater the degree of muscularirritability at the time of death, the later the cadaveric rigiditysets in and the longer it lasts he has also shown that the laterputrefaction sets in, the more slowly it progresses the more robust the individual and the shorter the disease, the moremarked and persistent is this muscular rigidity it has been noticedthat the bodies of soldiers killed in the beginning of an engagementbecome rigid slowly, and those killed late quickly this explains thereason why bodies are essaytimes found on the battle-field in a kneelingor sitting posture with weapons in hand if the rigidity of rigor mortis after it is once complete is overcome, as in bending an arm, it never returns. But if incomplete it mayreturn this will serve at times to distinguish real death fromcatalepsy and its allied conditions while the average duration ofrigor mortis has been given as sixteen to twenty-four hours, it mustbe remembered that in essay paper it has been known to last only a fewhours, as in death by lightning or by electrocution in other paper ithas persisted for seven and fourteen days this long continuance of rigor mortis has been noted in death fromstrychnine and other spinal poisons, in suffocation, and in poisoningby veratrum viride atmospheric conditions modify to a large extent the duration of rigormortis dry, cold air causes it to last for a long time, while warm, moist air shortens its duration also immersion in cold water brings onrigor mortis quickly and lengthens its duration cadaveric ecchymosis cadaveric lividity or hypostasis within a few hours after death the skin of the body, which is of apale, ashy-gray color, becomes covered by extensive patches of a bluishor purple color, which are most pronounced and are first seen on theback writing of the trunk, head extremities, ears, face, and neck, and aredue to the blood, before coagulating, settling in the most dependentwritings of the body, producing a mottling of the surface with irregularlivid patches there is also a stagnation of blood in the capillaryvessels, especially in those in the upper layer of the true skin or inthe space between the cuticle and cutis the discoloration continues toincrease until the body is cold, when it is entirely arrested lateron, just before putrefaction begins, the color deepens, and the changeappears to proceed from an infiltration of blood pigment into thedependent writings of the body at the same time the discolorations are appearing on the surface of thebody, internal hypostasis is also taking place, most marked in thedependent portions of the brain, lungs, intestines, kidneys, and spinalcord this condition in the brain may be mistaken for so-called congestiveapoplexy. In the lungs, for pulmonary apoplexy or the first stageof lobar pneumonia. In the intestines and spinal meninges, for thebeginning of inflammatory changes the position of these hypostases will afford the best correction forthis possible error the appearances presented by cadaveric ecchymoseshave often been mistaken for the effects of violence applied duringlife innocent persons have been accused and tried for murder ormanslaughter on charges afterward proved to be groundless therefore itis of the utmost importance that the medical jurist should be able todistinguish between ante-mortem and post-mortem ecchymoses the following are the points of difference:1 situation post-mortem ecchymoses are seen on that portion of thebody which has been most dependent, generally the posterior aspect, and they involve principally the superficial layers of the true skin;ante-mortem ecchymoses may occur anywhere, and generally the deepertissues are discolored 2 in cadaveric lividity there is no elevation of the skin and thediscoloration terminates abruptly 3 after cutting into the tissues where an ecchymosis has been producedby violence, the blood without the vessels is free in the tissue. Thisis not so in cadaveric ecchymosis 4 post-mortem ecchymoses are very extensive, ante-mortem generallylimited in area a peculiar appearance of cadaveric lividity is observed in bodieswhich have been wrapped in a sheet and allowed to cool or that havecooled in their clothing it occurs in the form of bands or stripesover the whole surface, and often gives an appearance as of a personflogged the explanation of this appearance is that the congestion ofthe vessels takes place in the interstices of the folds, while thewritings compressed remain whole the unbroken condition of the cuticle, together with the other characteristics just mentioned, are sufficientto distinguish these ecchymoses from those produced by violence whilecadaveric lividity is seen in all bodies after death, it is especiallypronounced in those persons who have died suddenly in full health orby violence, as from apoplexy, hanging, drowning, or suffocation itis very slight in the bodies of those who have died from hemorrhage oranæmia the time at which cadaveric lividity appears varies greatly casper, who has investigated the subject thoroughly, sets the time at fromtwelve to fifteen hours after death putrefaction at a period varying from a few hours to three days after death, certainchanges are seen in the human body which show that putrefaction hascommenced a change of color appears first upon the middle of theabdomen and gradually spreads over the rest of the body.

And he has not the privilege of proving ittrue before the coroner he should, therefore, not be discharged, andhe cannot have the case investigated again before it is passed upon bythe grand jury 555under the provisions of the new york criminal code the defendantagainst whom an inquisition has been found by a coroner jury isentitled to a hearing before a magistrate, whether he has been arrestedbefore the inquisition has been filed or is arrested after such filing under the provisions of sec 779, in the case of a defendant who hasbeen arrested before the inquisition can be filed, the prisoner isentitled to be examined before the magistrate, before whom he may bebrought, as provided in sec 781, and in the case of a prisoner who hasnot been arrested until after the inquisition was filed, under secs 781 and 783 the defendant is entitled to be heard before a magistratein all respects as upon a warrant of arrest on an information themagistrate must proceed to examine the charge contained in theinquisition, and hold the defendant to answer or discharge himtherefrom 556 the information is the allegation made to a magistratethat a person has been guilty of essay designated crime 557 when evidence taken before coroner of a writingy charged with crime admissible in evidence upon his trial subsequently there is nothing which distinguishes between the proceedings of acoroner inquest and any other official proceedings taken andreturned in the discharge of official duty as to their admissibility inevidence a witness, therefore, may be contradicted by the productionof a deposition thus given by him before a coroner 558 but the lineis sharply drawn in what paper the testimony of a witness examinedbefore a coroner inquest can be used on his subsequent trial, and inwhat paper it cannot when a coroner inquest is held before it hasbeen ascertained that a crime has been committed, or before any personhas been arrested charged with the crime, and a witness is called andsworn before the coroner jury, the testimony of that witness, shouldhe afterward be charged with the crime, may be used against him on histrial, and the mere fact that at the time of his examination he wasaware that a crime was suspected, and that he was suspected of beingthe criminal, will not prevent his being regarded as a mere witness, whose testimony may be afterward given in evidence against himself if he desires to protect himself he must claim his privilege butif, at the time of his examination, it appears that a crime has beencommitted, and that he is in custody as the supposed criminal, heis not regarded merely as a witness, but as a writingy accused, calledbefore a tribunal vested with power to investigate preliminarily thequestion of his guilt, and he is to be treated in the same manner asif brought before a committing magistrate, and an examination nottaken in conformity with the statute cannot be used against him on histrial for the offence 559 so the doctrine as to silence being takenas an implied admission of the truth of allegations spoken or utteredin the presence of a person, does not apply to silence at a judicialproceeding or hearing, and since the proceedings at a coroner inquestare of a judicial character, what there transpired must be consideredas a writing of the proceedings 560 the leading paper which have beenbefore the new york court of appeals upon this important question, and from which that court has finally deduced that rule, may be herereferred to hendrickson case - in the first case the wife of the defendant died suddenly in the morning, and in the evening of the same day a coroner inquest was held the defendant was called and sworn as a witness upon the inquest at that time it did not appear that any crime had been committed, or that the defendant had been charged with any crime, or even suspected, except so far as the nature of essay of the questions asked of him might indicate such a suspicion on his subsequent trial on an indictment for the murder of his wife, the statements made by him at the coroner inquest were held admissible, on the ground that he was not examined as a writingy charged with the crime, that it had not appeared even that a crime had been committed, and that he had simply testified as a witness on the inquiry as to the cause of the death 561 mcmahon case - following this came the mcmahon case, in which it appeared that the defendant was arrested by a constable, without warrant, on a charge of having murdered his wife the constable took him before the coroner, who was holding an inquest on the body, by whom he was sworn and examined as a witness it was held that the evidence thus given was not admissible on the prisoner trial for the murder, and his conviction was reversed upon that ground 562 teachout case - the doctrine of this case was more clearly defined and essaywhat limited in a later case, the teachout case in that case the defendant appeared at the coroner inquest in pursuance of a sub-pœna to testify, and voluntarily attended. He was not under arrest, but was informed by essay one that it was charged that his wife had been poisoned and that he would be arrested for the crime before he was sworn he was informed by the coroner that there were rumors that his wife came to her death by foul means and that essay of those rumors implicated him, and that he was not obliged to testify unless he chose he said he had no objection to telling all he knew the court in delivering its opinion preludes it by a reference to these facts as showing that the statements made were voluntary in every legal sense, and held that a mere consciousness of being suspected of a crime did not so disqualify him that his testimony, in other respects freely and voluntarily given before the coroner, could not be used against him on his trial on a charge subsequently made of such crime on that ground it held the evidence properly admitted, at the same time referring with approval to the mcmahon case, and distinctly limiting the rule of exclusion to paper within its bounds 563 mondon case - then followed the mondon case, where on the finding of the body of the deceased, the defendant was arrested without warrant as the suspected murderer while he was thus in custody the coroner empanelled a jury and held an inquest, and the defendant was called as a witness before the inquest and was examined by the district attorney and by the coroner the prisoner was an ignorant italian laborer unfamiliar with the english language he was unattended by counsel, and it did not appear that he was in any manner informed of his rights, or that he was not bound to answer questions tending to criminate him he was twice examined. On the first occasion the examination was taken by questions put either by the district attorney or by the coroner, and the result written down by the coroner, who then read the evidence over to him, line by line, and asked him if he understood it and if it was the truth, and he said it was, and the coroner then reswore him to the deposition the coroner, after taking the defendant testimony on the first day, came to the conclusion that the defendant did not understand english well enough to be examined, and that it ought to be taken through an interpreter, which was done, in order that they might get it a little better and a little fuller it was held that the defendant testimony was not admissible upon his trial on the indictment 564 it will be seen that this latter case follows in direct line with the rule announced in the mcmahon case and clearly distinguishes another case, the mcgloin case, upon the authority of which the trial court held the testimony of the prisoner in the mondon case admissible mcgloin case - the case of mcgloin was not that of the examination of a prisoner on oath before a magistrate before whom he was taken involuntarily, while in custody, and interrogated by the magistrate, who to all appearance had power to require him to answer, but while under arrest the prisoner said to the inspector of police who had him in charge that he would make a statement the inspector then said that he would send for a coroner to take it the coroner was then sent for and came to police headquarters and took down in writing the confession dictated by the prisoner, the coroner asking no questions and not acting in any official capacity, but as a mere amanuensis to take down the confession and prove the contents it was held that the confession of the prisoner was admissible in evidence upon his trial for murder 565rule in pennsylvania - the rule in pennsylvania is substantially thatwhen the testimony given by the prisoner under oath before a coronerinquest, previous to him being charged or suspected of the murder ofthe individual upon whose body the inquest was sitting, may afterwardbe given in evidence against him, on his trial for the murder of suchperson 566rule in nebraska - the statements of a prisoner to be competentevidence must have been voluntarily made in paper of declarationmade on an examination before a coroner inquest by a person underarrest or charged with the crime and also under oath, they are notadmissible but when the person, although he be subsequently chargedwith the offence, appears voluntarily, and gives testimony, before anyaccusation has been made against him, his statements are admissible inevidence against him on the trial of an indictment for the crime 567medico-legal autopsies byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc autopsies a medical examiner before proceeding with an autopsy, especially ifcalled before the body has been removed from the place where it wasfound, should carefully note certain facts these should be enteredby himself or an assistant with great care, in a note-book, as thisbook can be introduced as evidence in any trial a satisfactory wayis to dictate to the assistant as the examination proceeds, and atthe conclusion the assistant reads the notes taken, and the examinerverifies them surrounding objects position of the body these should be first noted the character of the soil. The conditionof the ground, and whether it shows footprints. If so, their direction;the evidence of any struggle. The presence of any weapon. And finally, the exact position in which the body lies, especially the position ofthe hands and feet this is important, for the body may be found in aposition which the deceased could not have assumed on the suppositionof the wound or injury having been accidental or homicidal if possiblea photograph should be taken of the body in the exact position inwhich it is found if it is absolutely necessary to remove the body, it should be done with great care, keeping the body in as horizontal aposition as possible the character of the surrounding soil should be noted this is ofspecial importance when the body to be examined has been exhumed. Forthe question of preservation of the body and the ability to recognizepathological changes may be brought up at a trial this was animportant point raised in the buchanan case new york, 1893 if a body be found in the water, examine the character of the water andthe temperature, and if found near the shore, the character of shoreand bottom blood - the situation of blood-stains, and their number and extent, on clothing or surrounding objects should be noted this will oftenshow whether a struggle has taken place after receiving the fatalwound, and is also of medico-legal importance if made at the time thebody is found, for it may be so situated as to show that the body hasbeen interfered with after death again, spots of blood found upon articles of clothing or uponsurrounding objects should be noted as to their form and direction, forthey may serve to furnish an indication of the position of the personwith respect to them when the wound was inflicted for example, if thespot was oval, the presumption is that the person was placed obliquelywith respect to the stain while the hemorrhage was occurring the forcewith which the blood was thrown out will in essay measure be indicatedby the obliquity or length of the spot the amount of blood will alsooften indicate whether the person has died suddenly, the exact spotwhere death occurred, whether a struggle took place, and will alsopreclude the possibility of a person moving after receiving the fatalinjury when we examine a body, especially when found in a room, caremust be taken not to be misled by the accidental diffusion of blood bypersons going in and out, or touching the body see blood-stains, vol ii clothing - the examination of the clothing should be thorough adescription of each article should be noted, and the order in which itis removed. For often it is important to prove that the garments wereworn by or belonged to the deceased if any blood is on the clothing, note whether the blood is in large patches, or whether it is sprinkledover the garment. The amount of the blood and what garments are stainedby it note and examine whether the blood has flowed down the frontof the clothing, whether it has soaked the inner garments, or again, whether it has collected along the back. For these appearances willessaytimes demonstrate whether a wound was inflicted while the personwas sitting, standing, or lying down for example, if the throat iscut while the person is lying down, the blood will be found on eachside of the neck along the back and not down the front of the body few suicides cut their throats in a recumbent position, and thisdistribution of the blood may serve to distinguish a suicidal from ahomicidal wound the condition of the clothing may also serve to show whether therehas been any struggle, and the presence of dry spots or mud on it mayessaytimes serve to connect an accused person with an act of murder this is well illustrated in the case of reg v snipe, reported inbeck “medical jurisprudence, ” where evidence was adduced to showthat essay spots of mud on the boots and clothing of the prisoner, whenexamined microscopically, contained infusoria, shells, and essay rareaquatic vegetables the mud of the ditch close to where the body wasfound, as also the mud on the clothing of the dead body, presentedthe same microscopical appearances the medical expert who gave thisevidence swore that in his opinion the mud spots on the body and onthe prisoner boots were derived from the same ditch, for the mudof all the other ditches in the locality was found, on microscopicalexamination, to be different the well-known case which occurred innew york a few years ago, known as the “shakespeare case, ” furnishesan example of the importance of carefully examining all stains on theclothing found on bodies if there are several stabs or cuts on the body involving the dress, itshould be noted whether they are blood-stained, and if so, whether thestain is on the inside or outside of the garments, for essaytimes insimulated personal injury a stain of blood may be inadvertently appliedto the outside of the dress, as in wiping a weapon weapons - if a weapon is found, the character of the weapon and itsexact position should be noted this is frequently of importance intelling whether a person has died from an accidental or self-inflictedwound in a case where death occurs immediately or within a fewminutes, the weapon is found near the body, or often so tightly graspedin the hand that it can be with difficulty removed if the weaponis found near the body it should be noted on which side and at whatdistance, and it must be questioned whether it could have fallen onthe spot or been thrown there by the deceased it is compatible withsuicide that the weapon should be found at essay distance from the body an instance has been recorded where an individual was discovered inbed with his throat cut, and the bloody razor was found closed and inthe pocket of the deceased if a weapon cannot be discovered, or isconcealed, it is strong presumptive evidence of homicide. Especiallywhen the wound is such as to produce speedy death note whether the weapon is sharp or blunt, straight or curved if aknife, the handle and inner portion should be examined, for the blademay have been washed if the wound has involved any large vessels, it is improbable that theweapon can have been thrown any distance from the body, and when it is, there are always fair grounds to expect interference with the originalposition of the body one circumstance which always strongly points tosuicide is the finding of the weapon firmly grasped in the hand of thecadaver the hand of a dead person cannot be made to grasp or retaina weapon as does the hand which has grasped it at the last moments oflife the amount of blood on the weapon should be noted, but it must beremembered that a knife may have produced a fatal stab wound and stillno blood be found on it this is explained by the fact that in a rapidplunge the vessels were compressed, and only after the drawing of theknife and relieving of the pressure blood began to flow, or possiblythe blood may have been wiped off the knife by the elasticity of theskin when a person has died of a gunshot wound, especially at close range, it is important to look for any wadding or paper found in the wound, asin a number of instances the finding of such has led to the detectionof the criminal for example, handwriting has been found on the paper, or it has formed writing of a printed page the rest of which has beenfound in possession of the accused when a gun is discharged near thebody, a portion of the wadding is almost always found in the irregularwound produced post-mortem examination having completed the examination of the surroundings, one next proceedswith the post-mortem examination, which should be conducted accordingto a well-defined plan, following which the results obtained willalways be satisfactory if possible the body should be removed to a large, well-ventilated, andespecially well-lighted room no artificial light, if it can possiblybe avoided, should be used when performing the autopsy. Artificiallight is especially bad on account of its yellowness and its power tomodify natural color thesis diseased conditions cannot be satisfactorilydetermined by artificial light the body should be placed on a hightable, and the facility with which the autopsy is made will oftendepend on having the table high enough to render stooping unnecessary never make an autopsy, if it can possibly be avoided, on a body whilein a coffin, as the examination is always unsatisfactory the size andsurroundings of the room, and how it is lighted, should be entered inthe note-book instruments - if possible the following instruments should be at handbefore proceeding with an examination, although essay of them may bedispensed with.

  • cheap assignment help
  • free essay writing help online
  • free algebra help online
  • college statistics homework help
  • sat without essay
  • great gatsby essay
  • edit essay
  • buy assignments
  • writers freelance
  • writing essays and papers for pay
  • mla style essay
  • write my college paper
  • analytical essay thesis
  • using quotes in an essay
  • example of persuasive essay
  • top resume writing services
  • what is the best paper writing service
  • research paper thesis help
  • help with accounting homework for free
  • how to write an example essay
  • how to end a college essay

And that, in such paper, drugs likeaspirin help with algebra homework may give relief and may do no harm the patient, however, isnot educated to distinguish one class from the other, and thereforeanything that tends to promote the indiscriminate use of such remediesas aspirin is detrimental to the public health furthermore, aspirinitself is not always harmless alarming idiosyncrasies are sufficientlycommon that the use of the first doses, at least, should requiremedical supervision with these considerations in mind, the referee isof the opinion that the direct and indirect advertising of aspirin isto be condemned -- from the journal a m a , jan 20, 1917 pil cascara compound-robins report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrya circular issued by the a h robins company of richmond, va , contains the following statement. “pil cascara compound-robins is a rational therapeutic formula, composed of cascara, podophyllin, colocynth and hyoscyamus, which promotes a natural flow of secretions, which is, in turn, the physiologic stimulant of peristalsis thus, a normal evacuation is produced without subsequent inhibition “they contain no mercury, strychnia nor belladonna “an ideal aid to any remedial agent, when a mild, medium or strong alimentary stimulant is needed sic “made in two strengths, the dosage may be easily regulated so as to obtain the effects of an anti-dyspeptic, aperient, laxative or cathartic, as desired they never cause discomfort unless given in larger dose than needed ”this preparation is another example of the innumerable mixtures ofwell-known drugs having nothing in the way of originality or of specialtherapeutic value to recommend them the advertising implies that this writingicular combination has a specialaction on the secretions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Otherwiseit would be hard to explain the claim that the preparation isantidyspeptic, if that means anything more than a laxative or cathartic the claim is made that this preparation contains no belladonna-- yetit admittedly contains hyoscyamus!. this manifests either ignorance onthe writing of the manufacturers, or an effort to impose on the medicalprofession both belladonna and hyoscyamus contain variable amountsof similar alkaloids, chiefly hyoscyamin hyoscyamus is feeblerthan belladonna in its action, as it contains less alkaloid thequalitative differences between the two drugs, with reference to theiruse as laxatives, is so slight as to make the company claim forhyoscyamus appear either deliberately misleading or to be the resultof crass ignorance promoting this mixture of well-known laxatives andcathartics as an “ideal aid to any remedial agent when a mild, mediumor strong alimentary stimulant is needed” is a slur on the intelligenceof physicians pil cascara compound-robins is not acceptable for new and nonofficialremedies -- from the journal a m a , jan 27, 1917 casta-flora report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrycasta-flora is one of those complex preparations which are offeredto the medical profession, with plausible arguments in support ofthe claims made it is put out by the wm s merrell chemical co , cincinnati each fluidounce is said to represent.