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Take it in bed, and cover yourself warm, in your sweating, drinkposset-drink as hot as you can, if it be for a fever, boil sorrel andred sage in posset-drink, sweat an hour or two if your strength willbear it, then the chamber being kept very warm, shift yourself all butyour head, about which your cap which you sweat in being kept on wrapa hot napkin, which will be a means to repel the vapours back this ihold the best method for sweating in fevers and pestilences, in whichthis electuary is very good i am very loth to leave out this medicine, which if it were stretched out, and cut in thongs, would reach roundthe world requies nicholaus college take of red rose leaves, the whites being cut off, blueviolets, of each three drams, opium of thebes, dissolved in wine, the seeds of white henbane, help me write my paper poppies white and black, the roots ofmandrakes, the seeds of endive, purslain, garden lettuce, psyllium, spodium, gum tragacanth, of each two scruples and five grains, nutmegs, cinnamon, ginger, of each a dram and an half, sanders, yellow, white, and red, of each a dram and an half, sugar three times their weight, dissolved in rose-water. Mix them together, and make of them anelectuary according to art culpeper i like not the receipt taken inwardly electuarium reginæ coloniens college take of the seeds of saxifrage and gromwell, juice ofliquorice, of each half an ounce, the seeds of caraway, annis, smallage, fennel, parsley of macedonia, broom, carrots, bruscus, asparagus, lovage, cummin, juniper, rue, siler mountain, the seeds ofacorus, pennyroyal, cinquefoyl, bayberries, of each two drams, indianspikenard, schœnanth, amber, valerian, hog fennel, lapis lincis, ofeach a dram and an half, galanga, ginger, turbith, of each two drams, sena an ounce, goat blood prepared half an ounce, mix them together:first beat them into powder, then make them into an electuary accordingto art, with three times their weight in sugar dissolved in white wine culpeper it is an excellent remedy for the stone and wind cholic, adram of it taken every morning. I assure such as are troubled with suchdiseases, i commend it to them as a jewel pills culpeper pills in greek are called, katopotia, in latin, pilulæ. Which signifies little balls, because they are made up insuch a form, that they may be the better swallowed down, by reason ofthe offensiveness of their taste pilulæ de agarico or pills of agarick college take of agarick three drams, our own blue orris roots, mastich, horehound, of each one dram, turbith five drams, specieshiera picra half an ounce, colocynthis, sarcocol, of each two drams, myrrh one dram, sapa as much as is sufficient to make it into a massaccording to art culpeper it was invented to cleanse the breast and lungs of flegm, it works pretty strongly half a dram at a time keeping yourselfwarm, cannot well do you harm, unless your body be very weak pilulæ aggregativæ college take of citron, myrobalans, rhubarb, of each half anounce, juice of agrimony and wormwood made thick, of each two drams, diagridium five drams, agarick, colocynthis, polypodium of each twodrams, turbith, aloes, of each six drams, mastich, red roses, sal gem epithymum, annis, ginger, of each a dram, with syrup of damask roses, make it into a mass according to art culpeper it purges the head of choler, flegm and melancholy, andthat stoutly. It is good against quotidian agues, and faults in thestomach and liver, yet because it is well corrected if you take buthalf a dram at a time, and keep yourself warm, i suppose you may takeit without danger pilulæ alœphanginæ college take of cinnamon, cloves, cardamoms the less, nutmegs, mace, calamus aromaticus, carpobalsamum, or juniper berries, squinanth, wood of aloes, yellow sanders, red roses dried, wormwood, of each halfan ounce, let the tincture be taken out of these, being grossly bruisedin spirit of wine, the vessel being close stopped. In three pounds ofthis tincture, being strained, dissolve aloes one pound, which beingdissolved, add mastich, myrrh, of each half an ounce, saffron twodrams, balsam of peru one dram, the superfluous liquor being consumed, either over hot ashes, or a bath, bring it into a mass of pills culpeper it cleanses both stomach and brain of gross and putrifiedhumours, and sets the senses free when they are thereby troubled, itcleanses the brain offended by ill humours, wind, &c helps vertigo andhead-aches, and strengthens the brain exceedingly, helps concoction, and strengthens the stomach, one dram taken at night going to bed, will work gently next day. If the writingy be weak, you may give less, ifstrong more if you take but half a dram, you may go abroad the nextday. But if you take a dram, you may keep the house. There can be noharm in that pilulæ de aloe lota or pills of washed aloes college take of aloes washed with juice of red roses, one ounce, agarick three drams, mastich two drams, diamoscu dulce half a dram, syrup of damask-roses, so much as is sufficient to make it into a massaccording to art culpeper it purges both brain, stomach, bowels, and eyes ofputrified humours, and also strengthens them use these as thesucceeding aloe rosata college take of aloes in powder four ounces, juice of damask rosesclarified one pound, mix them and digest them in the sun, or in a bath, till the superfluous liquor be drawn off, digest it, and evaporate itfour times over, and keep the mass culpeper it is a gallant gentle purger of choler, frees the stomachfrom superfluous humours, opens stoppings, and other infirmities ofthe body proceeding from choler and flegm, as yellow jaundice, &c andstrengthens the body exceedingly take a scruple, or half a dram atnight going to bed, you may walk abroad, for it will hardly work tillnext day in the afternoon pilulæ aureæ college take of aloes, diacrydium, of each five drams, red roses, smallage seeds, of each two drams and an half, the seeds of annisand fennel, of each one dram and an half, mastich, saffron, troch, alhandal, of each one dram, with a sufficient quantity of honey roses, make it into a mass according to art culpeper they are held to purge the head, to quicken the senses, especially the sight, and to expel wind from the bowels, but worksessaything harshly half a dram is the utmost dose, keep the fire, takethem in the morning, and sleep after them, they will work before noon pilulæ cochiæ, the greater college take of species, hiera picra, ten drams, troch, alhandal, three drams and an half, diacrydium two drams and an half, turbith, stœchas, of each five drams, with a sufficient quantity of syrup ofstœchas, make it into a mass, according to art culpeper it is held to purge the head, but it is but a dogged purgeat best, and must be given only to strong bodies, and but half a dramat a time, and yet with great care pilulæ cochiæ, the less college take of aloes, scammony, colocynthis, of each one ounce, with equal writings of syrup of wormwood, and of purging thorn, make itinto a mass according to art pilulæ de cynoglosso or pills of hound-tongue college take of the roots of hound-tongue dried, white henbaneseed, opium prepared, of each half an ounce, myrrh six drams, olibanumfive drams, saffron, castoreum, styrax, calamitis, of each one dram andan half, with syrup of stœchas, make it into a mass culpeper it stays hot rheums that fall down upon the lungs, therefore is good in phthisics, also it mitigates pain, a scruple isenough to take at a time going to bed, and too much if your body beweak. Have a care of opiates for fear they make you sleep your last pilulæ ex duobus or pills of two things college take of colocynthis, and scamony, of each one ounce, oil ofcloves as much as is sufficient to malax them well, then with a littlesyrup of purging thorn, make it into a mass pilulæ de eupatorio or pills of eupatorium college take of the juice of maudlin, and wormwood made thick, citron, myrobalans, of each three drams, rhubarb three drams and anhalf, mastich one dram, aloes five drams, saffron half a dram, syrup ofthe juice of endive, as much as is sufficient to make it into a mass culpeper it is a gallant gentle purge, and strengthening, fittedfor such bodies as are much weakened by disease of choler the authorappropriates it to such as have tertian agues, the yellow jaundice, obstructions or stoppings of the liver.

Death from exposure post mortem. Blood crimson. Both sides of heart full. Internal organs congested case 2 criminal exposure to cold ann d’hygiene, 1868, vol ii , p 173 - girl, unmarried. Sudden delivery when at stool she stated that she had fainted, and found the child dead when she recovered the child had breathed and the cord was cut no marks of violence evidence of death being caused by wilful exposure imprisoned case 3 ill-treatment and criminal exposure ann d’ hygiene, vol vi , p 207, 1831 - man and wife tried for manslaughter of a child, æt 11 wife the stepmother starvation and ill-treatment by mother, followed by forcing the child, in a cold december day, to get into a barrel of cold water and remain there though removed by a servant, she was again placed in the cold water by the mother, death resulting the woman was sentenced to life imprisonment case 4 sunstroke, high temperature, etc dr a flint, jr , new york med jour , 1872, p 168. Dr katzenbach, new york med jour , 1873, p 93 case 5 scald, drinking from a tea-kettle accidental mr sympson, brit med jour , 1875, june 19th, p 809 - boy, æt 2½ years, drank boiling water from spout of tea-kettle inflammation of pharynx and glottis tracheotomy. Recovered case 6 fatal scald of insane person in a bath brit med jour , april, 1871, p 456 - an insane patient fatally scalded in a bath, through carelessness of an attendant the charge of manslaughter brought against the attendant case 7 fatal burn of genitals accidental caspar, “forensic med , ” vol i , p 315 - female child, 2½ years, fell on a hot flat-iron genitals burned.

And when it is given in large quantities, acute andfatal pulmonary edema ensues within twenty-four hours when respiratorydisorders are present at the time of administration, the fatal edemasupervenes very quickly thus far, no device designed to deliver fumescontrols the dosage it is interesting to consider, as do the authors, the fact that thefumes of iodin have the same effect as those of two other halogens, bromin and chlorin the results of these experiments with iodin fumeson the dog, as shown by necropsy findings, are practically identicalwith those reported by military surgeons as found in soldiers gassedwith chlorin during the war the results of these researches are additional evidence as tohow scientific research may confirm or deny conclusions based onempiric therapeutic observations the work may well serve as a modelfor similar experiments, now being made, on the therapeutic use, intravenously, of such substances as nonspecific proteins or organicpreparations of toxic drugs the patient should at least have thechance that is afford him by preliminary experiments, scientificallyperformed on animals in the research laboratory -- editorial from thejournal a m a , may 29, 1920 italian physico-chemical companythesis and various are the letters received by the journal asking forinformation about an alleged help me write my paper scientific organization in italy styledl’académie physico-chimique italienne this italian physico-chemicalacademy is operated from palermo, italy here is the scheme. Dr johndoe, an american physician receives an imposing-looking letter bearingthe palermo, sicily, postmark and addressed to “monsieur le docteurjohn doe, médecin ” on opening the letter “monsieur le docteur”finds that the “council” of l’académie physico-chimique italiennehas nominated him “honorary member of this academy” and furthermorehas bestowed on him “a first class medal for technical work andscientific merit ” all this, “in consideration of your thesis dignitiesand great learning ” dr doe is told that as soon as he will write anacceptance of this honor “in conformity with section 19 and 22 of theconstitution” he will be sent “the medal, diploma and all the otherdocuments relating to the title accorded ” the joker in the scheme liesin the necessity for dr john doe “conforming” with “section 19 and 22of the constitution ” here are the sections:illustration. Reduced photographic reproduction of the stock lettersent to american physicians by the italian physico-chemical academy the “joker” lies in the requirement around which we have drawn a line “sec 19 -- the entrance fee to cover office and postal expenses, including postage of diploma is 5 dollars, and is payable once at the admission to the academy by special bulletin filled up, stamped and signed ” “sec 22 -- those to whom medals are awarded and who wish to possess them must pay for their coinage 10 dollars as the academy does not, at present, possess the necessary funds for this purpose ”in short the whole thing means that if dr doe is willing to send $15in good american money he will receive in due time from the academy a“diploma” and a gilt not gold medal about four years ago when the “academy” seemed to be making awritingicularly heavy bid for american dollars the member of the journalstaff in charge of the propaganda dewritingment wrote to the “academy, ”on his personal stationery, asking about the cost of membership in the“academy” and asking also for a copy of the “prospectus ” and thatwas all in reply he received a letter stating that “in considerationof” his “thesis dignities and great learning” he had been nominated “anofficer of this academy” and had been awarded “la médaille de premièreclasse” for humanitarian work and scientific merit in order to obtainthese tokens of the “academy” regard it would be necessary to informthe “academy” of acceptance “in conformity with section 19 and 22 ”as the propaganda dewritingment did not consider the diploma and giltmedal worth $15 even as exhibit for its museum of fakes, the “form ofacceptance” was not filled in and returned “in accordance with section19 and 22 ”illustration. Photographic reproduction reduced of the “form ofacceptance” to “membership” in the “italian physico-chemical academy ”filling out this blank and sending it with $15 00 to the “academy”will bring the gilt medal and “diploma ”the leading spirits in the operation of this diploma and medal mill ared and g bandiera, who, so far as we can learn, are neither physiciansnor pharmacists nor have any scientific standing the “academy” hasbeen referred to at various times294 by the journal -- from thejournal a m a , feb 26, 1916 294 j a m a 48. 2196 june 29 1907. Editorial 57. 1373, berlinletter, p 1380 oct 21 1911. 58. 1455 may 11 1912. 60. 770 march8 1913. 60. 1480 may 10 1913.

For hadi mentioned but only one, i had revealed more to them help me write my paper than ever thecollege intended they should know, or give me thanks for doing the qualities and appropriation of the simple distilled waters simple distilled waters either cool or heat. Such as cool, either coolthe blood or choler waters cooling the blood lettice, purslain, water lilies, violets, sorrel endive, succory, fumitory waters cooling and repressing choleric humours, or vapours in the head nightshade, lettice, water lilies, plantain, poppies, viz theflowers both of white black and red poppies, black cheries the breast and lungs violets, poppies all three sorts, colt-foot in the heart sorrel, quinces, water lilies, roses, violets, green orunripe walnuts in the stomach quinces, roses, violets, nightshade, houseleeks, orsengreen, lettice, purslain in the liver endive, succory, nightshade, purslain, water lilies in the reins and bladder endive, succory, winter cherries, plantain, water lilies, strawberries, houseleek or sengreen, black cherries in the womb endive, succory, lettice, water lilies, purslain, roses simple waters which are hot, concoct either flegm or melancholy waters concocting flegm in the head, arebettony, sage, marjoram, chamomel, fennel, calaminth, rosemary-flowers, primroses, eye-bright in the breast and lungs maiden-hair, bettony, hysop, horehound, carduus benedictus, scabious, orris, or flower-de-luces, bawm, self-heal, &c in the heart bawm, rosemary in the stomach wormwood, mints, fennel, chervil, time, mother oftime, marigolds in the liver wormwood, centaury, origanum, marjoram, maudlin, costmary, agrimony, fennel in the spleen water-cresses, wormwood, calaminth in the reins and bladder rocket, nettles, saxifrage, pellitory ofthe wall, alicampane, burnet in the womb mugwort, calaminth, penny-royal, savin, mother of time, lovage waters concocting melancholy in the head, arehops, fumitory the breast bawm, carduus benedictus the heart borrage, bugloss, bawm, rosemary the liver endive, chicory, hops the spleen dodder, hart-tongue, tamarisk, time having thus ended the appropriation, i shall speak briefly of thevirtues of distilled waters lettice water cools the blood when it is over-heated, for whenit is not, it needs no cooling. It cools the head and liver, stayshot vapours ascending to the head, and hinders sleep. It quenchesimmoderate thirst, and breeds milk in nurses, distil it in may purslain water cools the blood and liver, quenches thirst, helps suchas spit blood, have hot coughs, or pestilences the distilled water of water lily-flowers cools the blood and thebowels, and all internal writings of the body. Helps such as have theyellow jaundice, hot coughs and pleurisies, the head-ache, coming ofheat, fevers pestilential and not pestilential, as also hectic fevers the water of violet flowers, cools the blood, the heart, liver andlungs, over-heated, and quenches an insatiable desire of drinking, theyare in their prime about the latter end of march, or beginning ofapril, according as the year falls out the water of sorrel cools the blood, heart, liver, and spleen. Ifvenice treacle be given with it, it is profitable in pestilentialfevers, distil it in may endive and succory water are excellent against heat in the stomach;if you take an ounce of either for their operation is the samemorning and evening, four days one after another, they cool the liver, and cleanse the blood. They are in their prime in may fumitory water is usual with the city dames to wash their faces with, to take away morphey, freckles, and sun-burning. Inwardly taken, ithelps the yellow jaundice and itch, cleanses the blood, provokes sweat, strengthens the stomach, and cleanses the body of adust humours. It isin its prime in may and june the water of nightshade helps pains in the head coming of heat takeheed you distil not the deadly nightshade instead of the common, if youdo, you may make mad work let such as have not wit enough to know themasunder, have wit enough to let them both alone till they do the water of white poppies extinguishes all heat against nature, helps head-aches coming of heat, and too long standing in the sun distil them in june or july colt-foot water is excellent for burns to wash the place with it;inwardly taken it helps phthisicks and other diseases incident to thelungs, distil them in may or june the water of distilled quinces strengthens the heart and stomachexceedingly, stays vomiting and fluxes, and strengthens the retentivefaculty in man damask rose water cools, comforts, and strengthens the heart, so dothred rose-water only with this difference, the one is binding, the otherloosening. If your body be costive, use damask rose water, because itis loosening. If loose, use red, because it is binding white rose water is generally known to be excellent against hotrheums, and inflammations in the eyes, and for this it is better thanthe former the water of red poppy flowers, called by thesis corn-roses, becausethey grow so frequently amongst corn, cools the blood and spiritsover-heated by drinking or labour, and is therefore excellent insurfets green walnuts gathered about the latter end of june or july, and bruised, and so stilled, strengthen the heart, and resist thepestilence plantain water helps the headache. Being dropped into the ear ithelps the tooth-ache, helps the phthisicks, dropsy and fluxes, and isan admirable remedy for ulcers in the reins and bladder, to be used ascommon drink. The herb is in its prime in may strawberry water cools, quenches thirst, clarifies the blood, breaksthe stone, helps all inward inflammations, especially those in thereins, bladder and passages of the urine. It strengthens the liver andhelps the yellow jaundice the distilled water of dog grass, or couch grass, as essay call it, cleanses the reins gallantly, and provokes urine, opens obstructions ofthe liver and spleen, and kills worms black cherry water provokes urine, helps the dropsy it is usuallygiven in diseases of the brain, as convulsions, falling-sickness, palsyand apoplexy betony is in its prime in may, the distilled water thereof is verygood for such as are pained in their heads, it prevails against thedropsy and all sorts of fevers. It succours the liver and spleen, and helps want of digestion and evil disposition of the body thencearising. It hastens travail in women with child, and is excellentagainst the bitings of venomous beasts distil sage whilst the flowers be on it, the water strengthens thebrain, provokes the menses, helps nature much in all its actions marjoram is in its prime in june, distilled water is excellent forsuch whose brains are too cold, it provokes urine, heats the womb, provokes the menses, strengthens the memory and helps the judgment, causes an able brain distil camomel water about the beginning of june it eases thecholick and pains in the belly. It breaks the stone in the reins andbladder, provokes the menses, expels the dead child, and takes awaypains in the head fennel water strengthens the heart and brain. Dilates the breast, thecough, provokes the menses, encreases milk in nurses, and if you washyour eyes with it, it clears the sight the hooves of the fore feet of a cow dried and taken any away, encrease milk in nurses, the smoke of them drives away mice mizaldus calaminth water heats and cleanses the womb, provokes the menses, andeases the pains of the head, distil it in may the distilled water of rosemary flowers, helps such as are troubledwith the yellow jaundice, asthmas, it cleanses the blood, helpsconcoction, strengthens the brain and body exceedingly water of the flowers of lilies of the valley, strengthens the brainand all the senses the water of cowslip flowers helps the palsey.

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Eyelids swollen and livid. Livid spots on face and left ear;lower lip torn. A number of marks on neck. One red stripe not sharplylimited. Skin not parchmenty and no ecchymosis.