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Help Me With My Statistics Homework


And having firstclarified help me with my statistics homework the honey before you put them in then strained out. Thishoney taken with a liquorice stick, is an excellent remedy for coughs, asthmas, and consumptions of the lungs fruits college winter-cherries, love apples, almonds sweet and bitter, anacardia, oranges, hazel nuts, the oily nut ben, barberries, capers, guinny pepper, figs, carpobalsamum, cloves, cassia fistula, chestnuts, cherries black and red, cicers, white, black and red, pome citrons, coculus indi, colocynthis, currants, cornels or cornelian cherries, cubebs, cucumbers garden and wild, gourds, cynosbatus, cypress, cones, quinces, dates, dwarf-elder, green figs, strawberries, common andturkey galls, acorns, acorn cups, pomegranates, gooseberries, ivy, herb true-love, walnuts, jujubes, juniper berries, bayberries, lemons, oranges, citrons, quinces, pomegranates, lemons, mandrakes, peaches, stramonium, apples, garden and wild, or crabs and apples, musk melons, medlars, mulberries, myrobalans, bellericks, chebs, emblicks, citronand indian, mirtle, berries, water nuts, hazel nuts, chestnuts, cypressnuts, walnuts, nutmegs, fistick nuts, vomiting nuts, olives pickled inbrine, heads of white and black poppies, pompions, peaches, french orkidney beans, pine, cones, white, black, and long pepper, fistick nuts, apples and crabs, prunes, french and damask, sloes, pears, englishcurrants, berries of purging thorn, black berries, raspberries, elderberries, sebastens, services, or checkers, hawthorn berries, pine nuts, water nuts, grapes, gooseberries, raisins, currants culpeper that you may reap benefit by these, be pleased toconsider, that they are essay of themtemperate in respect of heat raisins of the sun, currants, figs, pine nuts, dates, sebastens hot in the first degree sweet almonds, jujubes, cypress nuts, greenhazel nuts, green walnuts hot in the second degree the nut ben, capers, nutmegs, dry walnuts, dry hazel nuts, fistick nuts in the third degree juniper berries, cloves, carpobalsamum, cubebs, anacardium, bitter almonds in the fourth degree pepper, white, black and long, guinny pepper cold in the first degree the flesh of citrons, quinces, pears, prunes, &c in the second gourds, cucumbers, melons, pompions, oranges, lemons, citrons, pomegranates, viz the juice of them, peaches, prunes, galls, apples in the third mandrakes in the fourth stramonium moist in the first degree the flesh of citrons, lemons, oranges, viz the inner rhind which is white, the outer rhind is hot in the second gourds, melons, peaches, prunes, &c dry in the first degree juniper berries in the second the nut ben, capers, pears, fistick nuts, pine nuts, quinces, nutmegs, bay berries in the third cloves, galls, &c in the fourth all sorts of pepper as appropriated to the body of man, so they heat the head. Asanacardia, cubebs, nutmegs the breast bitter almonds, dates, cubebs, hazel nuts, pine nuts, figs, raisins of the sun, jujubes the heart walnuts, nutmegs, juniper berries the stomach sweet almonds, cloves, ben, juniper berries, nutmegs, pine nuts, olives the spleen capers the reins and bladder bitter almonds, juniper berries, cubebs, pinenuts, raisins of the sun the womb walnuts, nutmegs, bayberries, juniper berries cool the breast sebastens, prunes, oranges, lemons the heart oranges, lemons, citrons, pomegranates, quinces, pears the stomach quinces, citruls, cucumbers, gourds, musk melons, pompions, cherries, gooseberries, cornelian cherries, lemons, apples, medlars, oranges, pears, english currants, cervices or checkers the liver those that cool the stomach and barberries the reins and womb those that cool the stomach, and strawberries by their several operations, essaybind as the berries of mirtles, barberries, chestnuts, cornels, or cornelian cherries, quinces, galls, acorns, acorn-cups, medlars, checkers or cervices, pomegranates, nutmegs, olives, pears, peaches discuss capers, all the sorts of pepper extenuate sweet and bitter almonds, bayberries, juniper berries glutinate acorns, acorn cups, dates, raisins of the sun, currants expel wind bay berries, juniper berries, nutmegs, all the sorts ofpepper breed seed raisins of the sun, sweet almonds, pine nuts, figs, &c provoke urine winter cherries provoke the terms ivy berries, capers, &c stop the terms barberries, &c resist poison bay berries, juniper berries, walnuts, citrons, commonly called pome citrons, all the sorts of pepper ease pain bay berries, juniper berries, ivy berries, figs, walnuts, raisins, currants, all the sorts of pepper fruits purging choler cassia fistula, citron myrobalans, prunes, tamarinds, raisins melancholy indian myrobalans flegm colocynthis and wild cucumbers purge violently, and thereforenot rashly to be meddled withal. I desire my book should be beneficial, not hurtful to the vulgar, but myrobalans of all sorts, especiallychebs, bellericks and emblicks, purge flegm very gently, and withoutdanger of all these give me leave to commend only one to you as of specialconcernment which is juniper berries seeds college sorrel, agnus castus, marsh-mallows, bishop weed trueand common, amomus, dill, angellica, annis, rose-seed, smallage, columbines, sparagus, arach, oats, oranges, burdocks, bazil, barberries, cotton, bruscus or knee-holly, hemp, cardamoms greater andlesser, carduus benedictus, our lady thistles, bastard, saffron, caraway, spurge greater and lesser, coleworts, onions, the kernels ofcherry stones, chervil, succory, hemlock, citrons, citruls, gardenscurvy-grass, colocynthis, coriander, samphire, cucumbers gardenand wild, gourds, quinces, cummin, cynosbatus, date-stones, carrotsenglish, and cretish, dwarf-elder, endive, rocket, hedge mustard, orobus, beans, fennel, fenugreek, ash-tree keys, fumitory, brooms, grains of paradise, pomegranates, wild rue, alexanders, barley, whitehenbane, st john wort, hyssop, lettice, sharp-pointed-dock, spurge, laurel, lentils, lovage, lemons, ash-tree-keys, linseed, or flaxweed, gromwell, darnel, sweet trefoil, lupines, masterwort, marjoram, mallows, mandrakes, melons, medlars, mezereon, gromwell, sweet navew, nigella, the kernels of cherries, apricots, and peaches, bazil, orobus, rice, panick, poppies white and black, parsnips garden and wild, thorough wax, parsley, english and macedonian, burnet, pease, plantain, peony, leeks, purslain, fleawort, turnips, radishes, sumach, spurge, roses, rue, garden and wild, wormseed, saxifrage, succory, sesami, hartwort, common and cretish, mustard-seed, alexanders, nightshade, steves ager, sumach, treacle, mustard, sweet trefoil, wheat, both thefine flour and the bran, and that which starch is made of, vetches ortares, violets, nettles, common and roman, the stones of grapes, greekwheat, or spelt wheat culpeper that you may receive a little more benefit by these, thanthe bare reading of them, which doth at the most but tell you what theyare.

I know nothingbetter, it stops fluxes, mightily strengthens the heart and stomach, neither is it so hot but it may safely be given to weak people, andbesides provokes sleep it may safely be given to young children tengrains at a time, ancient people may take a dram or more it is givenas an excellent cordial in such fevers as are accompanied with want ofsleep mithridate college take of myrrh, saffron, agarick, ginger, cinnamon, spikenard, frankincense, treacle, mustard seeds, of each ten drams, the seeds of hartwort, opobalsamum, or oil of nutmegs by expression, schenanth, stœchas, costus, galbanum, turpentine, long pepper, castorium, juice of hypocistis, styrax, calamitis, opopanax, indianleaf, or for want of it mace, of each an ounce, cassia lignea, poleymountain, white pepper, scordium, the seeds of carrots of crete, carpobalsamum or cubebs, troch, cypheos, bdelium, of each sevendrams, celtic spikenard, gum arabic, macedonian parsley seeds, opium, cardamoms the less, fennel seed, gentian, red rose leaves, dittanyof crete, of each five drams, annis seeds, asarabacca, orris acorus, the greater valerian, sagapen, of each three drams, meum acacia, thebellies of scinks, the tops of st john wort, of each two drams andan half, malaga wine, so much as is sufficient to dissolve the juicesand gums, clarified honey the treble weight of all, the wine excepted, make them into an electuary according to art culpeper it is good against poison and such as have done themselveswrong by taking filthy medicines, it provokes sweat, it helps continualwaterings of the stomach, ulcers in the body, consumptions, weaknessof the limbs, rids the body of cold humours, and diseases coming ofcold, it remedies cold infirmities of the brain, and stopping of thepassage of the senses, viz hearing, seeing, smelling, &c by cold, it expels wind, helps the cholic, provokes appetite to one victuals, it helps ulcers in the bladder, if galen say true, as also difficultyof urine, it casts out the dead child, and helps such women as cannotconceive by reason of cold, it is an admirable remedy for melancholy, and all diseases of the body coming through cold, it would fill awhole sheet of paper to reckon them all up writingicularly you may takea scruple or half a dram in the help me with my statistics homework morning, and follow your business, twodrams will make you sweat, yea one dram if your body be weak, for thentwo drams may be dangerous because of its heat phylomum persicum college take of white pepper, the seeds of white henbane, of eachtwo drams, opium, earth of lemnos, of each ten drams, lap, hematitus, saffron, of each five drams, castorium, indian spikenard, euphorbiumprepared, pellitory of spain, pearls, amber, zedoary, elecampane, troch, ramach, of each a dram, camphire a scruple, with their trebleweight in honey of roses, make it into an electuary according to art culpeper it stops blood flowing from any writing of the body, theimmoderate flowing of the menses, the hemorrhoids in men, spitting ofblood, bloody fluxes, and is profitable for such women as are subjectto miscarry. See the next receipt phylonium romanum college take of white pepper, white henbane seeds, of each fivedrams, opium two drams and an half, cassia lignea a dram and an half, the seeds of smallage a dram, parsley of macedonia, fennel, carrots ofcrete, of each two scruples and five grains, saffron a scruple and anhalf, indian spikenard, pellitory of spain, zedoary fifteen grains, cinnamon a dram and an half, euphorbium prepared, myrrh, castorium, ofeach a dram with their treble weight in clarified honey, make it intoan electuary electuarium de ovo or electuary of eggs college take a hen egg new laid, and the white being taken outby a small hole, fill up the void place with saffron, leaving the yolkin, then the hole being stopped, roast it in ashes till the shell beginto look black, take diligent heed the saffron burn not, for then isthe whole medicine spoiled, then the matter being taken out dry, ifso that it may be beaten into powder and add to it as much powder ofwhite mustard seed as it weighs then take the roots of white dittanyand tormentil, of each two drams, myrrh, hart-horn, petasitis roots, of each one dram, the roots of angelica and burnet, juniper berries, zedoary, camphire of each half an ounce, mix them all together in amortar, then add venice treacle the weight of them all, stir them aboutwith a pestle three hours together, putting in so much syrup of lemons, as is enough to make it into an electuary according to art culpeper a dram of it given at a time, is as great a help in apestilential fever as a man shall usually read of in a galenist itprovokes sweat, and then you shall be taught how to use yourself ifyears do not permit, give not so much theriaca andromachi or venice treacle college take of troches of squils forty-eight drams, troches ofvipers, long pepper, opium of thebes, magma, hedycroi dried, of eachtwenty-four drams, red roses exungulated, orris, illirick, juice ofliquorice, the seeds of sweet navew, scordium, opobalsamum, cinnamon, agerick, of each twelve drams, myrrh, costus, or zedoary, saffron, cassia lignea, indian spikenard, schenanth, pepper white and black, olibanum, dittany of crete, rhapontic, stœchas, horehound, macedonianparsley seed, calaminth, cypress, turpentine, the roots of cinquefoyland ginger, of each six drams, poley mountain, chamepitis, celticspikenard, amomus, styrax calamitis, the roots of meum, the topsof germander, the roots of rhapontic, earth of lemnos, indian leaf, chalcitis burnt, or instead thereof roman vitriol burnt, gentianroots, gum arabic, the juice of hypositis, carpobalsamum or nutmegs, or cubebs, the seeds of annis, cardamoms, fennel, hartwort, acacia, orinstead thereof the juice of sloes made thick, the seeds of treaclemustard, and ammi, the tops of st john wort, sagapen, of each fourdrams, castorium, the roots of long birth-wort, bitumen, judaicum, carrot seed, opopanax, centaury the less, galbanum, of each two drams, canary wine enough to dissolve what is to be dissolved, honey thetreble weight of the dry species, make them into an electuary accordingto art culpeper it resists poison, and the bitings of venomous beasts, inveterate head-aches, vertigo, deafness, the falling-sickness, astonishment, apoplexies, dulness of sight, want of voice, asthmaes, old and new coughs, such as spit or vomit blood, such as can hardlyspit or breathe, coldness of the stomach, wind, the cholic, and illiacpassion, the yellow jaundice, hardness of the spleen, stone in thereins and bladder, difficulty of urine, ulcers in the bladder, fevers, dropsies, leprosies, it provokes the menses, brings forth birth andafter-birth, helps pains in the joints, it helps not only the body, but also the mind, as vain fears, melancholy, &c and is a good remedyin pestilential fevers you may take half a dram and go about yourbusiness, and it will do you good if you have occasion to go in illairs, or in pestilent times, if you shall sweat under it, as your bestway is, if your body be not in health, then take one dram, or betweenone and two, or less than one, according as age and strength is, ifyou cannot take this or any other sweating medicine by itself, mix itwith a little carduus or dragon water, or angelica water, which in myopinion is the best of the three theriacca londinensis or london treacle college take of hart-horn two ounces, the seeds of citrons, sorrel, peony, bazil, of each one ounce, scordium, coral-liana, ofeach six drams, the roots of angelica, tormentil, peony, the leavesof dittany, bay-berries, juniper-berries, of each half an ounce, the flowers of rosemary, marigolds, clove gilliflowers, the tops ofsaint john wort, nutmegs, saffron, of each three drams, the rootsof gentian, zedoary, ginger, mace, myrrh, the leaves of scabious, devil-bit, carduus, of each two drams, cloves, opium, of each a dram, malaga wine as much as is sufficient, with their treble weight inhoney, mix them according to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty cordial, resists the pestilence, and is a good antidote in pestilential times, it resists poison, strengthens cold stomachs, helps digestion, crudities of the stomach aman may safely take two drams of it in a morning, and let him fear noharm diacrocuma college take of saffron, asarabacca roots, the seeds of parsley, carrots, annis, smallage, of each half an ounce, rhubarb, the rootsof meum, indian spikenard, of each six drams, cassia lignea, costus, myrrh, schenanth, cubebs, madder roots, the juices of maudlin, andwormwood made thick, opobalsamum, or oil of nutmegs, of each two drams, cinnamon, calamus aromaticus, of each a dram and an half, scordium, cetrach, juice of liquorice, of each two drams and an half, tragacantha dram, with eight times their weight in white sugar, dissolved inendive water, and clarified, make it into an electuary according toart culpeper it is exceeding good against cold diseases of the stomach, liver, or spleen, corruption of humours and putrefaction of meat in thestomach, ill favoured colour of the body, dropsies, cold faults in thereins and bladder, provokes urine take a dram in the morning purging electuaries benedicta laxativa college take of choice turbith ten drams, diacridium, bark ofspurge roots prepared, hermodactils, red roses, of each five drams, cloves, spikenard, ginger, saffron, long pepper, amomus, or for wantof it calamus aromaticus, cardamoms the less, the seeds of smallage, parsley, fennel, asparagus, bruscus, saxifrage, gromwell, caraway, sal gem galanga, mace, of each a dram, with their treble weight ofclarified honey. Make them into an electuary according to art also youmay keep the species itself in your shops culpeper it purges flegm, chiefly from the joints, also it purgesthe reins and bladder caryocostinum college take of cloves, costus, or zedoary, ginger, cummin, ofeach two drams, hermodactils, diacridium, of each half an ounce. Withtheir double weight of honey clarified in white wine, make them into anelectuary according to art culpeper authors say it purges hot rheums, and takes awayinflammations in wounds, i assure you the electuary works violently, and may safely be given in clysters, and so you may give two or threedrams at a time, if the patient be strong for taken otherwise it wouldkill a horse cum privilegio cassia extracta pro clysteribus or cassia extracted for clysters college take of the leaves of violets, mallows, beets, mercury, pellitory of the wall, violet flowers, of each a handful, boil them ina sufficient quantity of water, the benefit of which let the cassia beextracted, and the canes washed. Then take of this cassia so drawn, andboil it to its consistence, a pound, sugar a pound and a half, boilthem to the form of an electuary according to art culpeper you may take it in white wine, it is good for gentlebodies, for if your body be hard to work upon, perhaps it will notwork at all. It purges the reins gallantly, and cools them, therebypreventing the stone, and other diseases caused by their heat electuarium amarum magistrale majus or the greater bitter electuary college take of agarick, turbith, species hiera simplex, rhubarb, of each one dram, choice aloes unwashed two drams, ginger, crystal oftartar, of each two scruples, orris, florentine, sweet fennel seeds, of each a scruple, syrup of roses solutive as much as is sufficient tomake it into an electuary according to art electuarium amarum minus or the lesser bitter electuary college take of epithimum half an ounce, the roots of angelicathree drams, of gentian, zedoary, acorus, of each two drams, cinnamonone dram and an half, cloves, mace, nutmegs, saffron, of each one dram, aloes six ounces, with syrup of fumitory, scabious and sugar so much asis sufficient to make it into a soft electuary culpeper both these purge choler, the former flegm, and thismelancholy, the former works strongest, and this strengthens most, andis good for such whose brains are annoyed you may take half an ounceof the former, if your body be any thing strong, in white wine, if verystrong an ounce, a reasonable body may take an ounce of the latter, the weak less i would not have the unskilful too busy about purgeswithout advice of a physician diacassia with manna college take of damask prunes two ounces, violet flowers a handfuland an half, spring water a pound and an half, boil it according to arttill half be consumed, strain it, and dissolve in the decoction sixounces of cassia newly drawn, sugar of violets, syrup of violets, ofeach four ounces, pulp of tamarinds an ounce, sugar candy an ounce andan half, manna two ounces, mix them, and make them into an electuaryaccording to art culpeper it is a fine cool purge for such as are bound in the body, for it works gently, and without trouble, it purges choler, and maysafely be given in fevers coming of choler. But in such paper, if thebody be much bound, the best way is first to administer a clyster, andthen the next morning an ounce of this will cool the body, and keep itin due temper cassia extracta sine soliis senæ or cassia extracted without the leaves of sena college take twelve prunes, violet flowers a handful, frenchbarley, the seed of annis, and bastard saffron, polypodium of the oak, of each five drams, maiden-hair, thyme, epithimum, of each half ahandful, raisins of the sun stoned half an ounce, sweet fennel seedstwo drams, the seeds of purslain, and mallows, of each three drams, liquorice half an ounce, boil them in a sufficient quantity of water, strain them and dissolve in the decoction, pulp of cassia two pounds, of tamarinds an ounce, cinnamon three drams, sugar a pound, boil itinto the form of an electuary cassia extracta cum soliis senæ or cassia extracted with the leaves of sena college take of the former receipt two pounds, sena in powder twoounces, mix them according to art culpeper this is also a fine cool gentle purge, cleansing thebowels of choler and melancholy without any griping, very fit forfeverish bodies, and yet the former is gentler than this they bothcleanse and cool the reins. A reasonable body may take an ounce and anhalf of the former, and an ounce of the latter in white wine, if theykeep the house, or their bodies be oppressed with melancholy, let themtake half the quantity in four ounces of decoction of epithimum diacarthamum college take of diatragacanthum frigidum, half an ounce, pulp ofpreserved quinces an ounce, the inside of the seeds of bastard saffronhalf an ounce, ginger two drams, diacrydium beaten by itself threedrams, turbith six drams, manna two ounces, honey of roses solutive, sugar candy, of each an ounce, hermodactils half an ounce, sugar tenounces and an half, make of them a liquid electuary according to art diaphœnicon college take of the pulp of dates boiled in hydromel, penids, ofeach half a pound, sweet almonds blanched, three ounces and an half, toall of them being bruised and mixed, add clarified honey two pounds, boil them a little, and then strew in ginger, long pepper, mace, cinnamon, rue leaves, the seeds of fennel and carrots, of each twodrams, turbith four ounces, diacridium an ounce and an half, make ofthem an electuary according to art culpeper i cannot believe this is so profitable in fevers takendownwards as authors say, for it is a very violent purge diaprunum lenitive college take one hundred damask prunes, boil them in water tillthey be soft, then pulp them, and in the liquor they were boiled in, boil gently one of violet flowers, strain it, and with two pounds ofsugar boil it to a syrup, then add half a pound of the aforesaid pulp, the pulp of cassia, and tamarinds, of each one ounce, then mix with itthese powders following. Sanders white and red, spodium, rhubarb, ofeach three drams, red roses, violets, the seeds of purslain, succory, barberries, gum tragacanth, liquorice, cinnamon, of each two drams, thefour greater cold seeds, of each one dram, make it into an electuaryaccording to art culpeper it may safely, and is with good success, given in acute, burning, and all other fevers, for it cools much, and loosens the bodygently. It is good in agues, hectic fevers, and mirasmos you may takean ounce of it at a time, at night when you go to bed, three hoursafter a light supper, neither need you keep your chamber next day, unless the weather be very cold, or your body very tender diaprunum solutive college take of diaprunum lenitive whilst it is warm, four pounds, scammony prepared two ounce and five drams, mix them into an electuaryaccording to art seeing the dose of scammony is increased according to the author inthis medicine, you may use a less weight of scammony if you please catholicon college take of the pulp of cassia and tamarinds, the leaves ofsena, of each two ounces, polypodium, violets, rhubarb, of each oneounce, annis seeds, penids, sugar candy, liquorice, the seeds ofgourds, citruls, cucumbers, melons, of each two drams, the things to bebruised, being bruised, take of fresh polypodium three ounces, sweetfennel seeds six drams, boil them in four pounds of water till thethird writing be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar, boilthe decoction to the thickness of a syrup. Then with the pulps andpowder make it into an electuary according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling purge for any writing of the body, and very gentle, it may be given an ounce, or half an ounce at atime, according to the strength of the patient in acute, or peracutediseases, for it gently loosens the belly, and adds strength, it helpsinfirmities of the liver and spleen, gouts of all sorts, quotidian, tertian, and quartan agues, as also head-aches it is usually given inclysters if you like to take it inwardly, you may take an ounce atnight going to bed.

They cause dryness, and are extremely help me with my statistics homework hurtful forcholeric people, they breed but little nourishment, and that little isnaught. They are bad meat, yet good physic for phlegmatic people, theyare opening, and provoke urine and the menses, if cold be the causeobstructing. Bruised and outwardly applied, they cure the bitings ofmad dogs, roasted and applied, they help boils, and aposthumes.

Most suicidal wounds are incisedor punctured wounds incised wounds of the throat are generallypresumptive of suicide, but a homicidal wound may be inflicted hereto conceal the source of infliction of the wound such a wound ifhomicidal would imply help me with my statistics homework malice, on account of the attempt at deceptionand concealment, and would convict the assailant of murder unlessthe deceased was asleep or drunk or was otherwise incapable ofresistance, such a homicidal wound can often be distinguished froma similar suicidal wound by the form and direction of the wound, byits irregularity, and by other wounds on the hands or person of thedeceased taylor640 mentions a case in which the peculiar form ofthe wound, like that made by butchers in killing sheep, led to thesuspicion that homicide had been committed by a butcher, who wassubsequently arrested, tried, and convicted of murder the regularityof the wound has been taken to indicate suicide rather than homicide that it does so is not questioned, but it is more or less fallaciousif resistance is impossible, in which case a murderer may easily makea regular, clean, incised wound here contused wounds are seldomsuicidal, for they are not sufficiently speedily or certainly fatal they are also more painful and disfiguring contused wounds usuallyindicate murder or accident, though there are not wanting paper ofsuicide by such weapons as a hatchet or a hammer there is moredifficulty in the case of a contused wound from a fall instead of froma weapon. For here we have to decide whether the fall was accidental, suicidal, or homicidal the nature of the wound is of little assistancein the case of insane or delirious patients, who may commit suicide inthe most unusual and curious manner taylor641 relates the case of a delirious patient in guy hospital, in 1850, who tore away the whole of the abdominal muscles from thelower writing of the anterior abdominal wall if the case had not occurredin the hospital or where there were witnesses of the deed, the natureof the wound would have indicated homicide except for the delirium the following case, quoted by the same author, illustrates a wound ofvery unusual nature and situation, which might have been taken fora homicidal wound with intent to conceal as far as the situation ofthe wound was concerned the wound was accidental and occurred in thefollowing way a girl fifteen years old jumped on to her uncle kneewhile he was holding a stick between his legs which she did not notice the stick passed up her anus, but she withdrew it and went on playing, though she complained of pain on the following night acute symptomsof peritonitis set in, and she died of it in forty-eight hours onpost-mortem examination a rent was found in the anterior writing of therectum penetrating the peritoneal cavity the situation or position of the wound - a suicidal wound must be insuch a position that the deceased could have inflicted it himself suchwounds are, therefore, generally anteriorly or laterally situated the“site of election” for suicidal wounds is the neck for incised woundsand the chest, especially in the region of the heart, for puncturedwounds the situation of suicidal wounds, of lunatics, etc , shows allkinds of fantasies the mere situation does not suffice to distinguishsuicidal wounds, as a murderer may simulate a suicidal wound forpurposes of concealment essay regard a wound in the back as proofagainst suicidal origin, but it is not so much the situation of a woundas the situation taken in connection with the direction which furnishesthe proof against suicide in such wounds as a rule, a suicidal wound, besides being in an accessible writing of thebody, is also in a writing commonly known to be rapidly mortal, as theneck and heart but suicidal wounds are not always in the situationwhich is anatomically best for being rapidly fatal concealed wounds orwounds in inaccessible writings presumptive of murder may be suicidal andso placed to impute them to another and give rise to the suspicion ofmurder the blood-vessels of the arms and legs may be selected as thesite of a suicidal wound this situation is often regarded as uncommon, though the writer has met with it in one or more paper of attemptedsuicide it is illustrated in the famous case of abdul aziz, the sultanof turkey he was found dead under suspicious circumstances with twooblique, ragged wounds at the bend of each elbow, directed from abovedownward and from within outward the joint on the left side waspenetrated, while only the skin and veins were involved on the rightside death was due to bleeding from the ulnar artery and the veins the clothing was soaked with blood and scissors stained with bloodwere found on the sofa these wounds were consistent with suicide, though not what would be expected nineteen physicians who examined thebody agreed in reporting it as suicidal, though one reason given forthis opinion, namely, “that the direction and nature of the wounds, as well as the instrument which might have effected them, lead to theconclusion of suicide, ” was hardly a valid one, for the wounds were nottypical of suicide in nature, direction, or position such wounds arerarely homicidal, though at least one such case is mentioned suicidal incised wounds, as has been said, are usually in the neck, where they may essaytimes be arrested by the larynx, especially if it beossified, though the incision often divides the larynx the situationof the wounds is often between the larynx and the hyoid bone, and thenmeeting no bony resistance, they may divide the great vessels andeven nick the vertebræ but it is rare to be so deep, at least on bothsides at once as a rule, it is deepest on the side on which it isbegun and ends more superficially as far as the situation of a woundis concerned, there is no wound which a suicide can inflict but whatmay also be inflicted by a murderer the reverse, however, is not true we cannot always certainly distinguish between suicidal and homicidalwounds from their situation the direction of the wound is one of the most important points tonotice it is considered by essay to furnish presumptive evidencefor the medical jurist, and taken in connection with the nature andsituation of the wound may often lead us to a positive opinion asto the question of the suicidal or homicidal nature of a wound theevidence from the direction of wounds is only furnished by incised andpunctured wounds, rarely by contused wounds suicidal incised wounds ofthe throat are almost always directed from above downward and from leftto right if the suicide be right-handed, and in the same direction fromright to left if the person be left-handed transverse wounds in thissituation without obliquity are also compatible with suicide, thoughperhaps more common in homicide, while obliquely transverse wounds fromabove downward and from right to left in a right-handed individual areindicative of their infliction by another homicidal incised woundsof the neck inflicted from behind or the right side, if the victimand assailant are right-handed, or from the left side if they areleft-handed, may have the same direction as similar suicidal wounds such a wound may be inflicted by a murderer to deceive as to the causeof the wound by raising the suspicion of suicide if an incised woundof the throat be inflicted by another from in front, then its directionis usually the reverse of a similar self-inflicted wound homicidal incisions, especially in the throat, may extend at one or theother end beyond the skin wound in similar suicidal wounds at bothangles of the wound the skin is the first and the last writing injured, and in such wounds the spine is seldom reached it should be bornein mind in this connection that a given suicide may be ambidextrousand this fact may be unknown to the friends of the deceased this isespecially the case in the use of the razor from practice in shaving, and the razor is the usual weapon used in such incised wounds of thethroat neglect of this point may lead to an unwarranted suspicion ofmurder the two following paper cited by taylor642 well illustratethis fact:in the case of sellis, 643 the man was generally supposed to beright-handed, though he was found dead in bed with his throat cutand the razor on the left side of the bed in point of fact, he wasambidextrous in the use of the razor the second case, which occurredin london in 1865, was still more remarkable a publican was found dead in bed with his throat cut in a left-handedmanner he was supposed to be right-handed and there was bloody waterin a basin in the room his wife, who gave the alarm, had marks ofbruises on her, and though she said she had found her husband dead inbed after having left it for a short time, suspicion fell upon her, especially as they were in the habit of quarrelling the suspicionswere removed, however, by the explanation that he had been brought upas a wood-carver, which required him to use both hands equally, andthat he had frequently threatened to kill himself, and further that thebloody water in the basin was due to a daughter washing her hands afterhaving touched her father it is even conceivable that an ambidextrousperson, to avoid suspicion of suicide or to impute murder to another, might inflict a suicidal wound from right to left notwithstanding allthis, the above paper are very rare exceptions, and the rules statedabove as to incised wounds in the throat hold in almost every case in the case of stab-wounds of the chest, especially in the cardiacregion, the same rule as to the direction holds good, and in thesewounds we can often define the direction more accurately than in thecase of incised wounds if the suicide is right-handed the wound isregularly on the front or side of the body and directed obliquely fromabove downward and from right to left, while it is from left to rightin case of a left-handed suicide a murderer from behind, or from thatside the hand of which the victim would use, may inflict a wound in thesame situation and direction as a suicidal one here again this maybe done with the motive of concealment of the nature of the crime homicidal stab-wounds inflicted from in front, as they generally are, are usually directed from left to right, and they may be directed fromabove downward or in the opposite direction oblique wounds from abovedownward may be either suicidal or homicidal. Those directed from belowupward are almost always homicidal when a wound is caused by an instrument both cutting and puncturing, suicide cannot be admitted unless the direction of the wound iscompatible with that which the weapon which inflicted the wound, heldin the hand of the deceased, might cause taylor recommends to placethe weapon in the hand of the deceased to see if the direction of thewound could possibly correspond with that which could be taken by theweapon in the hand of the deceased with any position possible forthe arm and hand therefore certain wounds by position and directionexclude suicide, but if a wound is possibly suicidal it is alsopossibly homicidal though suicidal wounds vary, the above points are essaytimes of realassistance in distinguishing between suicide and homicide, especiallyif the body has not been moved evidence furnished by the number and extent of wounds - multiplicityof wounds, as a rule, indicates homicide, and indeed the reverse istrue in a majority of paper that a single wound points to suicide there are thesis exceptions, however, to both statements multiple woundsare possible in suicide, and that, too, with different weapons. Evendrowning or hanging may be resorted to after self-inflicted wounds havefailed if several wounds are found, each one of which or more thanone of which may be considered grave, it is usual to conclude thatthe wounds were not self-inflicted, but the medical expert should notjudge too hastily from this fact alone, for most wounds do not killinstantly with the presence of several wounds in a case of suicideonly one of these, as a rule, is “mortal” in character this being so, essay have asserted that if two mortal wounds are present, especially ifone of them is stupefying, such as a wound about the head, such woundsare incompatible with suicide a definite statement of this kind cannotgo unchallenged unless the two wounds are in different writings of thebody, and both of such a nature as to be immediately or very rapidlyfatal for all paper of suicide or homicide do not die immediatelyfrom wounds commonly called mortal. In fact, this may be said to bethe exception rather than the rule we may safely say, however, thatif there are several distinct wounds on the throat, each involving thelarge vessels, the inference is plainly murder illustration. Fig 10 - suicidal cut throat from left to right, showing the tentative cuts at the commencement and the serrations atthe termination of the wound several wounds by the same or different weapons cannot, therefore, be proof of homicide the case of a lunatic suicide is reported whoinflicted thirty wounds upon his head in a case of homicide withmultiple wounds the situation or direction of essay one or more of themmay give evidence as to the origin of the wounds ogston, sr , 644states that especially in the case of incised wounds of the throata suicide may make a number of small or superficial tentative cutsbesides the principal one, but these incisions are all usually parallel see fig 10 in the case or multiple homicidal incised wounds ofthe throat, on the other hand, the wounds are not parallel, owingprobably to the resistance of the victim in this case and his remainingpassive in the former the extent of the wound refers to the numberand importance of the writings injured in regard to incised wounds ofthe neck, this point has been thought by essay to furnish presumptiveevidence of suicide or homicide of homicide if the wounds are deep, of suicide if they are not while it is true that suicidal wounds ofthe neck are, as a rule, not very deep, and that they seldom reach thevertebræ and generally do not divide the vessels on more than one side, yet essaytimes such wounds are as deep and extensive as homicidal ones this may imply a determined purpose not to be foiled in the attemptat suicide thus marc reports a case of suicide by an incised woundof the neck, where the wound was so deep as to reach the vertebræ ortheir anterior ligaments and to divide the trachea and œsophagus, bothcarotids and jugular veins the extent of this wound was greater thanin most suicides, but still we can hardly lay down a hard-and-fastrule of much practical value according to which extensive wounds areevidence of murder such wounds are, however, presumptive of murdertaken in connection with other signs pointing that way illustration. Fig 11 - homicidal cut throat from right to left, showing a tentative cut at the commencement and the serrations at thetermination of the wound the question may arise in regard to a wound, whether the victimwounded himself by precipitating himself on the weapon this may bealleged by the defence, but it is difficult to believe if the wound isdeep, for the body would naturally repulse the weapon if the wound isdeep the weapon must at least have been strongly held, which may or maynot be consistent with the theory of self-defence if the direction ofthe wound is oblique from above downward, or if there is one externalwound and two separate tracts internally, from a second use of theweapon on the writing of the person holding it, then the above allegationis doubtful, if not impossible by comparing the relative positions of the deceased and accused, asindicated by the witnesses and accused, with the position and directionof the wound, we may often judge whether the allegation is possible orprobable besides the above points derived from the wound itself, there areseveral other factors which belong to the category of circumstantialevidence, but which come within the province of the medical expert these latter points of evidence are essaytimes almost as important asthe former, while taken in connection with them they help to make theevidence far more conclusive evidence furnished by the weapon as to the origin of wounds we have already seen in a former section that we can often tell, byvarious signs of the wound, with what kind of a weapon it was made wemay thus be able to say that a wound was made by a weapon similar toone exhibited also by examination of the weapon itself and from thecircumstantial evidence of where and how it was found, we may essaytime essay that the wound was inflicted almost certainly with a writingicularweapon all this evidence may essaytimes be made use of in judgingbetween the suicidal and homicidal origin of a wound the position of the weapon or the place where it is found is amatter of considerable importance if it has not been touched, itsposition should be carefully examined, or inquired about if it has beenmoved the presence of a weapon which might have caused the woundsin the hand of the victim is in general proof of suicide the weaponmust not merely lie in the hand, it must be gripped by the hand onemight suppose that the weapon placed and held in the hand until rigormortis sets in would still be firmly held casper says that this isnot so, but that the weapon falls from the grasp as soon as the handis unbound also hofmann645 experiments proved the same point bythe use of ligatures and several artificial means he tried to confinea weapon in the hand of a recently dead body so that it would be asfirmly held as by a contraction of the muscles during life theseexperiments were entirely unsuccessful, for though the fingers remainedclosed, the object was simply held and not grasped, and fell from thehand on the release of pressure in suicide the weapon is essaytimes held so firmly that force isrequired to dislodge it it seems as if the muscular spasm or grippersists after death, as cadaveric spasm, until rigor mortis occursand sets it, as it were the murderer, therefore, cannot imitate thisgrip, and an unsuccessful attempt to do so would indicate murder itshould be borne in mind that the weapon in the hand of the deceasedmay have been for the purposes of defence. Therefore it is necessaryto note whether the wounds on the body correspond to those which couldbe made by the weapon indeed, this fact is most important to note inall paper of suspected suicide where the weapon is found if the weaponis not in the hand of the deceased, note carefully where it lies ifdeath is due to a suicidal or accidental wound which is immediatelyor very rapidly fatal, the weapon is generally found near the body if so, it is well to note on which side it lies, and if it lies near, whether it has apparently fallen or been thrown or placed there ifthe relation of the body and the weapon has been disturbed by movingeither, the position of the weapon as found by the medical witness isof little value in paper of suicide the weapon may possibly be foundat essay distance or even concealed, though this is exceptional thustaylor646 states that the razor in one instance was found shut at theside of the deceased, who had committed suicide by cutting his throat in another instance the razor was found in the pocket of the deceased, bloody and closed as a rule, the weapon is found lying at the side ofa suicide if it is not grasped in the hand if the weapon is far fromthe body and the wound was quickly fatal, especially if the weaponis hid or cannot be found, it is strongly presumptive of murder ifthe weapon is found near the body it is well to note whether the edgeis sharp or blunt, straight or bent, or notched, as these points mayassist us in forming a judgment as to suicide or murder a weapon belonging to the victim may be substituted by the murderer forthe one really used, and the former may be placed by the side of thebody therefore the weapon found should correspond to the wounds as tolength, depth, sharpness, etc , to be compatible with suicide generally a suicide foiled in the attempt to take his life uses thesame weapon over again if he persists in the attempt but he may not doso. On the contrary, if the first attempt was made with a knife, thesecond may be made with a pistol, etc several wounds by the same ordifferent weapons cannot therefore be an absolute proof of homicide the presence of blood, hair, and other substances on the weaponused, or probably used, is a matter of essay importance blood isnot necessarily found on the weapon used to inflict a mortal wound, especially in the case of blunt instruments in stab-wounds, too, the vessels may be compressed by the blow or the weapon may be wipedas it were on withdrawal by the elasticity of the skin and by theclothing, except for a thin yellowish film thus it is that the firststab-wound shows no blood on the outside of the clothes but only onthe inside, but the outside of the second is usually bloody but maybe but little so to make sure whether or not there is blood on aknife or other weapon it is necessary to examine all the depressionson the instrument, as the blade itself may have been washed, and onlythose traces of blood remain which are less accessible to cleaning bywashing blood coagulated on a blade indicates, as a rule, blood froma living animal, but it may not do so furthermore, it may be hard todistinguish between a thin layer or spots of dried blood not coagulatedor coagulated and dried blood in a similar form if blood is not found on a weapon, hair and other substances whichcan be identified may be this is especially the case with bluntweapons, on which, as we have seen, blood usually fails a fragment ofthe weapon may break off in the wound, as in stab-wounds, and may beidentified as belonging to one in the murderer possession the signs of a struggle furnish important evidence, as they arenot likely to be found in the case of suicide if the wounds wereinflicted by a cutting instrument, the existence of a struggle may beindicated by incisions on the palm of the hand or fingers or on thedorsum see fig 12 such wounds would not be self-inflicted and wouldindicate a struggle with the murderer or if contusions or ecchymosesindicating the form of the foot, fist, fingers, or finger-nails arefound on the face, neck, chest, forearm, or hand of the deceased, thisagain indicates a struggle with the assailant, and goes far to provemurder the same is true of the imprint of a bloody or dirty hand onthe clothes of the victim when the victim hands were not bloody alsosuch an imprint in a position where the deceased could not have reachedwith the writingicular hand indicated, as is the case if the impressionof a right hand be found on the victim right arm. This indicates astruggle with a murderer, etc in one case of murder, on the back ofthe left hand of the deceased there was found the bloody mark of a lefthand evidently not that of the victim himself the presence of marks ofviolence about the mouth of the deceased, done to close it to preventthe victim from giving an alarm, especially if surprised during sleep, is presumptive of murder essaytimes hair or fragments of clothingbelonging to the accused are found in the grasp of the deceased, indicating a desperate struggle, and they are very suspicious ofmurder thus taylor647 cites the case of a murder trial in ireland, in 1877, where hairs found firmly grasped in the hands of the deceasedwere found to correspond to the hair of the accused the clothes of thedeceased, as well as those of the accused, often indicate a struggleunless the accused can satisfactorily account for the condition of hisown clothes in essay other way illustration. Fig 12 - incised wounds of right hand in the struggleof defence homicide the examination of the clothes and body of the deceased and theaccused may furnish important evidence if suicide is accomplished by a weapon like a knife, it is rare for thehand not to be bloody if it is not bloody we may well suspect a caseof supposed suicide the presence of blood on the hand does not provesuicide, though its absence may disprove it, as the hand is generallybloody in case of murder by being carried to the wound the examination of the clothing of the deceased is of greatimportance as we have noticed before, a suicide generally opens them, a murderer rarely a suicide is often writingly or even wholly undressedwhen he inflicts the wound, while murder is usually committed on thoseentirely dressed the wound of the clothes should correspond to that ofthe body in case of murder in suicide the wounds of the body and ofthe clothes may not correspond, especially if there exists a motive tofalsely impute the crime the clothes of the deceased as well as thoseof the accused may indicate a struggle, as we have already noticed ofcourse, in regard to the clothes examined, it is necessary to clearlyprove that they were worn at the time by the deceased or accused, otherwise serious mistakes may be and essaytimes are made in examiningthe blood-spots on the clothing, note whether the blood occurs in largepatches or sprinkled as by a spurting vessel or by continued violence the body of the accused may present scratches, marks of nails, contusions, bites, or other wounds indicative of a struggle it wouldbe well to ask the accused how he received the wounds or scars, to seeif his explanations tally with the injuries it is hard to tell whenwounds which have cicatrized were inflicted. We can only distinguishbetween old and recent ones, and thus control the statements of theaccused an examination of the finger-nails of the prisoner soonafter the crime may reveal blood underneath when the rest of thehands and person are free from it note also the site and shape ofthe blood-spots, if they exist, and whether or not they came from anarterial jet these spots may be on the body or clothes of the accused the account of the accused as to these spots may or may not correspondto the facts as indicated by them the above leads us to the more orless important question:could the assailant have escaped without stains?. It is possible for the murderer to escape without being spotted withblood, but the probability of this occurrence depends on the natureof the wound and the relative positions of the deceased and theassailant at the time the wounds were inflicted this latter fact isvery largely, if not altogether, a matter of speculation as far asthe medical evidence goes it is a popular, though false, idea thata murderer clothes must be bloody, and the police may be misled inexpecting to find them so in every instance taylor1 cites severalpaper in which either no blood was found on the murderer clothes, or only small spots wholly out of proportion to the amount of bloodwhich must have spurted or flowed from the wound absence of blood onthe prisoner clothes is often made use of by the defence to provethe prisoner innocence, whereas, besides the possibilities of havinghad no spots in the first place, the clothes may have been changedor washed before the examination was made this has occurred in morethan one murder trial taylor648 mentions the following paper inillustration:it was alleged that the absence of blood-stains on the prisonerclothing was a strong proof of his innocence in the trial ofsub-inspector montgomery for the murder of mr glasse omagh ass , july, 1873 in this case the weapon was a bill-hook which had producedcontused wounds on the head there was blood on the floor about thebody, but the wounds were not likely to have been accompanied by muchspurting yet it was assumed that the assailant in this case musthave been covered with blood much stress was laid upon the absenceof blood-stains on the first two trials the jury could not agree, owing chiefly to the absence of blood-stains, but on the third trialhe was convicted and afterward admitted that he had removed theblood-stains from the clothes with cold water also in the case ofreg v courvoisier c c c , 1840 the accused, who was tried forthe murder of lord william russel, had no blood-stains on his clothes all the vessels of the throat of the deceased had been cut to thevertebræ while he was asleep it was contended most strongly that theaccused could not possibly have committed the crime, as he had noblood-stains but after conviction he confessed that he wore no clotheswhen he committed the murder, and he only had to wash his hands and thecarving-knife he used again, in the case of reg v thompson durhamwint ass , 1863 the defence mainly relied on the absence of blood onthe prisoner clothing the wound in the throat of the wife of theaccused was five inches long, directed from left to right, dividingall the vessels and nerves of the neck the medical witness statedjustly that no such wound could be self-inflicted it was rapidlyfatal no weapon was found near the body the prisoner was convicted the same author cites the case of a prisoner on whose trousers wornsoon after the murder no blood-marks were found, but the trousersactually worn by him were found with blood upon them juries have evenacquitted the prisoner apparently only because no marks of blood werefound, though the other circumstances were explicable only on thetheory of murder it should be remembered in this connection that blood-stains may befound on the clothing of thesis, especially on the coarse clothingof working-people this may be accounted for by the occupation, flea-bites, accidental circumstances, or it may occur withoutdefinite explanation such persons may be accused of murder and yetthe blood-stains be consistent with innocence too much importanceshould not, therefore, be attached to them, even if the accused cannotsatisfactorily explain them and if he does not attempt to do so ina suspicious way that blood on the clothing even under suspiciouscircumstances may be consistent with innocence is illustrated by thecase of a suicide by cutting the throat, in 1872, cited by taylor 649in this case the son first found his father dead, and thought that hehad broken a blood-vessel he raised the body, staining his hands andclothes, then went for help at the inquest he was closely questionedas to the presence of the blood-stains, but there could be no doubtthat the case was one of suicide in general, we may say that a murderer is much more likely to escapewithout blood-stains in contused wounds, and more likely in the caseof punctured wounds than in incised wounds, for in punctured woundsthe bleeding is much less free and is less likely to spurt from thewound in the case of incised wounds he is most apt to escape withoutstains if he is behind or to the side of the victim when he inflictsthe wound in other words, when a writing of the body of the deceasedwas between the assailant and the wound inflicted furthermore, theassailant is more likely to escape without blood-stains if there is asingle wound than if there are several, and each additional wound makesit more likely that he will be spotted with blood the examination of the ground or floor and the furniture, etc , mayfurnish essay evidence as to the nature of the crime, and also helpthe witness to answer the questions which may essaytimes be asked, i e , at what spot was the victim wounded?.

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But it help me with my statistics homework causes head-ache. It provokes sleep likewise, but must be given with caution the root boiled in water, to theconsumption of one third, helps the cough thus you see that conveniences have their inconveniences, and virtue isseldom unaccompanied with essay vices what i have written concerningrushes, is to satisfy my countrymen questions. Are our rushes goodfor nothing?. yes, and as good let them alone as taken there areremedies enough without them for any disease, and therefore as theproverb is, i care not a rush for them. Or rather they will do you asmuch good as if one had given you a rush rye this is so well known in all the counties of this land, and especiallyto the country-people, who feed much thereon, that if i did describeit, they would presently say, i might as well have spared that labour its virtue follows government and virtues rye is more digesting than wheat. The breadand the leaven thereof ripens and breaks imposthumes, boils, and otherswellings.