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- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | hyperthermine field | | | | hyperthermine can be used in practically all in- | | flammatory conditions during the past ten years, | | under the name of l’ambrine, our product has been | | widely used in the hospitals in france, as well as | | in private practice, and we have very thesis clinical | | reports on a variety of subjects its greatest use | | has been in such conditions as sciatica, lumbago, | | articular and muscular rheumatism, gout, arthritis, | | burns of all degrees, pneumonia, bronchitis, orchit-| | is, buboes, soft chancres, peritonitis, dysmenor- | | rhea, adenitis, mastitis, periostitis, synovitis, | | conjunctivitis, iritis, irido-choroiditis, abscess- | | es, bruises, furuncles, whitlow, paronychia, car- | | buncles, moist eczema and similar dermatological | | affections, and varicose and tubercular ulcers | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - photographic reproduction reduced from the “hyperthermine” “ambrine” booklet recommending it for use in rheumatism, gout, pneumonia, buboes, dysmenorrhea, eczema, tuberculous ulcers, etc it is said that de sandfort “stumbled on this treatment byaccident ”165 being a sufferer from rheumatism, he had been benefitedby hot mud baths. On returning home he sought a substitute, and finallymade a mixture of paraffin, oil of amber and amber resin this wasapplied hot, serving as a firm poultice “years later, he went onservice to a railway in china and was in yunnan at the time of theincendiary insurrection, and thesis badly burned chinese were broughtin for treatment remembering that ambroise paré treated such paperwith hot oil, he tried the effect of covering the burn with his meltedambrine, which at once glazes over, forming a coat impervious to theair, and his patients ceased to suffer ”166165 the outlook, jan 17, 1917, p 100 166 med rec , new york, jan 27, 1917, p 160 “ambrine” has been sold in america under two names. “hyperthermine, ” asexploited to physicians, and “thermozine, ” as advertised to the public physical comparison alone shows that ambrine as now sold differsfrom “hyperthermine” of a few years ago. The probable reason is that“ambrine” has changed its formula this is borne out by matas, 167who states that de sandfort “admitted that ambrine was a compound ofparaffin, oil of sesame and resins, but was not at liberty to divulgeits exact composition, as the formula and manufacture of this substancewas now the property of a private corporation, which was exploiting itas a proprietary and secret remedy ” the later formula differs from theoriginal 167 matas, rudolph. Burns treated with paraffin mixtures, new orleansmed and surg jour , april, 1917, p 681 besides the foregoing paraffin preparations, two others have recentlybeen placed on the american market, “parresine” nonsecret and“mulene” secret analysis of ambrine“ambrine” comes in rectangular cakes, about 1-1/2 inches wide, 6inches long and 1/2 inch thick it is moderately soft, but essaywhatbrittle at ordinary room temperature a black substance is present, which evidently settles out during the compounding, as in one side ofthe cake these writingicles can be clearly discerned by holding it up tothe light. In the other side there are no suspended writingicles whenmelted, the solution is not clear, and a sediment forms the meltingpoint u s p method. See later is 48 4 c the plasticity andductility168 are 27 and 30 5, respectively it is pliable and strongat body temperature the saponification number and acid number are bothvery low, but a fatty oil is present tests indicated oil of sesame ninety-eight per cent of “ambrine” is soluble in ether. This solubleportion may be treated with low-boiling ligroin petroleum ether, outof which, on standing, a black asphalt-like substance separates of theether-insoluble substance, 65 per cent is soluble in chloroform theremaining insoluble substance contains a small amount of silica andvegetable fiber the paraffin obtained from “ambrine” melted at 48 6 c as a result of various experiments, it appears that the composition of“ambrine” is essentially as follows. Paraffin m p 48 6 c 97 0 per cent fatty oil sesame?.

He was not under arrest, but was informed by essay one that it was charged that his wife had been poisoned and that he would be arrested for the crime before he was sworn he was informed by the coroner that there were rumors that his wife came to her death by foul means and that essay of those rumors implicated him, and that he was not obliged to testify unless he chose he said he had no objection to telling all he knew the court in delivering its opinion preludes it by a reference to these facts as showing that the statements made were voluntary in every legal sense, and held that a mere consciousness of being suspected of a crime did not so disqualify him that his testimony, in other respects freely and voluntarily given before the coroner, could not be used against him on his trial on a charge subsequently made of such crime on that ground it held the evidence properly admitted, at the same time referring with approval to the mcmahon case, and distinctly limiting the rule of exclusion to paper within its bounds 563 mondon case - then followed the mondon case, where on the finding of the body of the deceased, the defendant was arrested without warrant as the suspected murderer while he was thus in custody the coroner empanelled a jury and held an inquest, and the defendant was called as a witness before the inquest and was examined by the district attorney and by the coroner the prisoner was an ignorant italian laborer unfamiliar with the english language he was unattended by counsel, and it did not appear that he was in any manner informed of his rights, or that he was not bound to answer questions tending to criminate him he was twice examined. On the first occasion the examination was taken by questions put either by the district attorney or by the coroner, and the result written down by the coroner, who then read the evidence over to him, line by line, and asked him if he understood it and if it was the truth, and he said it was, and the coroner then reswore him to the deposition the coroner, after taking the defendant testimony on the first day, came to the conclusion that the defendant did not understand english well enough to be examined, and that it ought to be taken through an interpreter, which was done, in order that they might get it a little better and a little fuller it was held that the defendant testimony was not admissible upon his trial on the indictment 564 it will be seen that this latter case follows in direct line with the rule announced in the mcmahon case and clearly distinguishes another case, the mcgloin case, upon the authority of which the trial court held the testimony of the prisoner in the mondon case admissible mcgloin case - the case of mcgloin was not that of the examination of a prisoner on oath before a magistrate before whom he was taken involuntarily, while in custody, and interrogated by the magistrate, who to all appearance had power to require him to answer, but while under arrest the prisoner said to the inspector of police who had him in charge that he would make a statement the inspector then said that he would send for a coroner to take it the coroner was then sent for and came to police headquarters and took down in writing the confession dictated by the prisoner, the coroner asking no questions and not acting in any official capacity, but as a mere amanuensis to take down the confession and prove the contents it was held that the confession of the prisoner was admissible in evidence upon his trial for murder 565rule in pennsylvania - the rule in pennsylvania is substantially thatwhen the testimony given by the prisoner under oath before a coronerinquest, previous to him being charged or suspected of the murder ofthe individual upon whose body the inquest was sitting, may afterwardbe given in evidence against him, on his trial for the murder of suchperson 566rule in nebraska - the statements of a prisoner to be competentevidence must have been voluntarily made in paper of declarationmade on an examination before a coroner inquest by a person underarrest or charged with the crime and also under oath, they are notadmissible but when the person, although he be subsequently chargedwith the offence, appears voluntarily, and gives testimony, before anyaccusation has been made against him, his statements are admissible inevidence against him on the trial of an indictment for the crime 567medico-legal autopsies byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc autopsies a medical examiner before proceeding with an autopsy, especially ifcalled before the body has been removed from the place where it wasfound, should carefully note certain facts these should be enteredby himself or an assistant with great care, in a note-book, as thisbook can be introduced as evidence in any trial a satisfactory wayis to dictate to the assistant as the examination proceeds, and atthe conclusion the assistant reads the notes taken, and the examinerverifies them surrounding objects position of the body these should be first noted the character of the soil. The conditionof the ground, and whether it shows footprints. If so, their direction;the evidence of any struggle. The presence of any weapon.

Beingboiled in oil help in homework they make a dainty green balsam for green wounds. Takeninwardly, they help inward wounds origanum origany. A kind of wild marjoram. Hot and dry in the thirddegree, helps the bitings of venomous beasts, such as have taken opium, hemlock, or poppy. Provokes urine, brings down the menses, helps oldcoughs. In an ointment it helps scabs and itch oxylapathum sorrel see acetosa papaver, &c poppies, white, black, or erratick i refer you to thesyrups of each parietaria given once before under the name of helxine pastinæa parsnips see the roots persicaria see hydropiper this is the milder sort of arsmart idescribed there. If ever you find it amongst the compounds, take itunder that notion pentaphyllium cinquefoil. Very drying, yet but meanly hot, if atall. Helps ulcers in the mouth, roughness of the wind-pipe whencecomes hoarsness and coughs, &c helps fluxes, creeping ulcers, andthe yellow jaundice. They say one leaf cures a quotidian ague, threea tertain, and four a quartan i know it will cure agues without thiscuriosity, if a wise man have the handling of it. Otherwise a cart loadwill not do it petroselinum parsley see smallage per columbinus see geranium persicarium folia peach leaves. They are a gentle, yet a completepurger of choler, and disease coming from thence. Fit for childrenbecause of their gentleness you may boil them in white wine. Ahandfull is enough at a time pilosella mouse-ear. Once before and this is often enough pithyusa a new name for spurge of the last edition plantago plantain cold and dry. An herb, though common, yet letnone despise it, for the decoction of it prevails mightily againsttormenting pains and excoriations of the entrails, bloody fluxes, itstops the menses, and spitting of blood, phthisicks, or consumptionsof the lungs, the running of the reins, and the fluor albus, painsin the head, and frenzies. Outwardly it clears the sight, takes awayinflammations, scabs, itch, the shingles, and all spreading sores, and is as wholeessay an herb as can grow about any an house tragus, dioscorides polium, &c polley, or pellamountain.

Then the styrax andfeces being mixed with the turpentine, last of all the colophonia, mastich, frankincense, bdellium, alum, myrrh, and fenugreek in powder:let them be made into a plaster culpeper it strengthens the stomach, and helps digestion emplastrum nigrum august called in high dutch stichstaster college take of colophonia, rozin, ship pitch, white wax, romanvitriol, ceruss, olibanum, myrrh, of each eight ounces, oil of rosesseven ounces, oil of juniper berries three ounces, oil of eggs twoounces, oil of spick one ounce, white vitriol, red coral, mummy, ofeach two ounces, earth of lemnos, mastich, dragon blood, of each oneounce, the fat of an heron one ounce, the fat of pimullus three ounces, load stone prepared, two ounces, earthworms prepared, camphire, of eachone ounce. Make them into a plaster according to art culpeper it is very good in green wounds and shootings a key to galen method of physic the general use of physic i shall desire thee, whoever thou art, that intendest the noble thoughtoo much abused study of physic, to mind heedfully these followingrules. Which being well understood, shew thee the key of galen andhippocrates their method of physic. He that useth their method, andis not heedful of these rules, may soon cure one disease, and causeanother more desperate that thou mayest understand what i intend, it is to discover in ageneral way of the manifest virtues of medicines i say of the manifest virtues, and qualities, viz such as areobvious to the senses, especially to the taste and smell. For it hathbeen the practice of most physicians, in these latter ages as well asours, to say, when they cannot give, nor are minded to study a reason, why an herb, plant, &c hath such an operation, or produces such aneffect in the body of man. It doth it by an hidden quality, for theynot minding the whole creation, as one united body, not knowing whatbelongs to astral influence, not regarding that excellent harmonythe only wise god hath made in a composition of contraries in theknowledge of which consists the whole ground and foundation of physicare totally led astray by tradition it is the manifest qualities of medicines that here i am to speak to, and you may be pleased to behold it in this order section 1 of the temperature of medicines section 2 of the appropriation of medicines section 3 of the properties of medicines section i of the temperature of medicines herbs, plants, and other medicines manifestly operate, either by heat, coldness, dryness, or moisture, for the world being composed of sothesis qualities, they and only they can be found in the world, and themixtures of them one with another but that they may appear as clear as the sun when he is upon themeridian, i shall treat of them severally, and in this order 1 of medicines temperate 2 of medicines hot 3 of medicines cold 4 of medicines moist 5 of medicines dry of medicines temperate if the world be composed of extremes, then it acts by extremes, foras the man is, so is his work. Therefore it is impossible that anymedicine can be temperate, but may be reduced to heat, cold, dryness, or moisture, and must operate, i mean such as operate by manifestquality by one of these, because there is no other to operate by, andthat there should be such a temperate mixture, so exquisitely of thesequalities in any medicine, that one of them should not manifestly excelthe other, i doubt it is a system too rare to find thus then i conclude the matter to be, those medicines are calledtemperate not because they have excess of temperature at all in themwhich can neither be said, to heat nor cool so much as will amount tothe first degree of excess, for daily experience witnesses that theybeing added to medicines, change not their qualities, they make themneither hotter nor colder their use they are used in such diseases where there is no manifestdistemper of the first qualities, viz heat and cold, for example;in obstruction of the bowels, where cold medicines might make theobstruction greater, and hot medicines cause a fever in fevers of flegm, where the cause is cold and moist, and the effecthot and dry. In such, use temperate medicines which may neitherencrease the fever by their heat, nor condensate the flegm by theircoldness besides, because contraries are taken away by their contraries, and every like maintained by its like, they are of great use, topreserve the constitution of the body temperate, and the body itselfin strength and vigour, and may be used without danger, or fear ofdanger, by considering which writing of the body is weak, and using suchtemperate medicines as are appropriated to that writing of medicines hot the care of the ancient physicians was such that they did not labourto hide from, but imwriting to posterity, not only the temperature ofmedicines in general, but also their degrees in temperature, that sothe distempered writing may be brought to its temperature, and no further;for all things which are of a contrary temperature, conduce not tocure, but the strength of the contrariety must be observed, that so themedicine may be neither weaker nor stronger, than just to take awaythe distemper. For if the distemper be but meanly hot, and you applya medicine cold in the fourth degree, it is true, you may soon removethat distemper of heat, and bring another of cold twice as bad galen, de simp med facul lib 3 cap 12 then, secondly, not only the distemper itself, but also the writing ofthe body distempered must be heeded. For if the head be distempered byheat, and you give such medicines as cool the heart or liver, you willbring another disease, and not cure the former the degrees then of temperature are to be diligently heeded, whichantient physicians have concluded to be four in the qualities, viz heat and cold, of each we shall speak a word or two severally of medicines hot in the first degree those are said to be hot in the first degree, which induce a moderateand natural heat to the body, and to the writings thereof. Either cold bynature, or cooled by accident, by which natural heat is cherished whenweak, or restored when wanting effect 1 the first effect then of medicines hot in the first degree, is, by their sweat and temperate heat to reduce the body to itsnatural heat, as the fire doth the external writings in cold weather, unless the affliction of cold be so great that such mild medicines willnot serve the turn effect 2 the second effect is, the mitigation of pain arising fromsuch a distemper, and indeed this effect hath other medicines, essaythat are cold, and essay that are hotter than the first degree, theybeing rationally applied to the distemper these medicines the greekscall anodyna, and shall be spoken of in their proper places in thisplace let it suffice that medicines hot in the first degree, makethe offending humours thin, and expel them by sweat, or insensibletranspiration, and these of all others are most congruous or agreeableto the body of man, for there is no such equal temperature of heatand cold in a sound man, but heat exceeds, for we live by heat andmoisture, and not by cold medicines then which are hot in the first degree, are such as justcorrespond to the natural heat of our bodies. Such as are hotter orcolder, are more subject to do mischief, being administered by anunskilful hand, than these are, because of their contrariety to nature;whereas these are grateful to the body by their moderate heat effect 3 thirdly, these take away weariness, and help fevers, beingoutwardly applied, because they open the pores of the skin, and bytheir gentle heat prepare the humours, and take away those fuliginousvapours that are caused by fevers discommodities yet may discommodities arise by heedless givingeven of these, which i would have young students in physic to be verycareful in, lest they do more mischief than they are aware of, viz it is possible by too much use of them, to consume not only what isinimical in the body, but also the substance itself, and the strengthof the spirits, whence comes faintings, and essaytimes death. Besides, by applying them to the writings of the body they are not appropriatedto, or by not heeding well the complexion of the patient, or thenatural temper of the writing of the body afflicted, for the heart is hot, but the brain temperate effect 4 lastly, medicines hot in the first degree, cherish heat inthe internal writings, help concoction, breed good blood, and keep it goodin temper, being bred of medicines hot in the second degree these are essaything hotter than the natural temper of a man use their use for such whose stomachs are filled with moisture, because their faculty is too hot and dry. They take away obstructionsor stoppings, open the pores of the skin, but not in the same mannerthat such do as are hot in the first degree, for they do it withoutforce, by a gentle heat, concocting, and expelling the humours, bystrengthening and helping nature in the work.

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That for tuberculosis, no 3 is described as “polyvalent, non-specific protein which rapidlyattacks the acid-fast, encapsulated tubercle bacilli”. Proteogen no 10 for syphilis is said to be a combination of “non-specific plantproteins and different chemicals which has the power to paralyze anddestroy living spirochete ” it is stated that proteogens are scientificpreparations based on standard ingredients and that the standardizationis more accurate than in serums, vaccines or toxins, etc the reportgives no proof of such statements the testimonials that are submitted are typical of “reports” thatmanufacturers are able to obtain from essay physicians, to prove theefficacy of almost any preparation in any disease each consists, practically, of the opinion of the individual who has employed theproteogens or the opinion of the patient who has been treated few dataare given in these reports from which an imwritingial conclusion might bedrawn a few of the testimonials presented by the william s merrellcompany follow the valuelessness of such material as scientificevidence is obvious. Rheumatism:-- proteogen no 2 -- the doctor has one case being treated with no 2 she has improved so rapidly she cannot express her pleasure, and will continue for essay time on the treatments she is a patient who was confined during the time she suffered from a rheumatic illness, and it seemed to affect her mental condition this condition is clearing up also, very much to the pleasure of both patient and doctor -- november 27, 1918 influenza:-- proteogen no 12 -- first day, temperature 102, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12. Second day, temperature 100, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12. Third day, temperature 98 8, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12, and then discharged the case as recovered -- october 31, 1918 asthma:-- proteogen no 4 -- splendid results obtained from a sample of proteogen no 4 three ampoules affected effected?.