History

Heading For Essay


“if an eclipse of the sun occurs on the twenty-ninth day ofthe month of jypar, there will be thesis deaths on the heading for essay first day ”tablet 271. “an eclipse at the morning watch causes disease if aneclipse takes place during the morning watch, and lasts throughout thewatch, while the wind blows from the north, the sick in akkad willrecover ”tablet 79. “if a halo surrounds the moon and if regulus stands within, women will bear male children ”tablet 94. “if sun and moon on the fifteenth day ‘answer my prayer’shall he say let him nestle close to his wife, she shall conceive ason ”these few extracts show us the close relations into whichassyrico-babylonian culture brought the becoming and passing away ofall animal life with the stellar movement. In fact, as we note fromtablet 94, the astrologists of this period did not hesitate to intrudeinto the most intimate occurrences of married life it is quite obviousthat, under such circumstances, the babylonian physician was compelledto consider very carefully the utterances of the astrologists incarrying on his practise it may be possible that we shall obtain stillfurther information regarding the quality of sidereal therapy from thenumerously discovered cuneiform tablets we know positively that aphysician was forbidden to perform any surgical operations on certaindays of each month thus, for instance, the 7th, 14th, 19th, 21st, and28th of the month schall-elul were unfavorable days for such operations oefele these directions were especially stringent in regard tovenesection, to which act we shall again refer in greater detail when civilization, later on, continued to thrive upon the shores ofthe nile, astrology still found a fertile soil there, and it appearsthat here also the name ἰατρομαθηματικοί has originated, which, subsequently, was a favorite designation of adherents to the siderealart of healing the astrological prognoses made by the professionalastrologist, petosiris, for the king nechepso of sais are well known however, it appears, according to the latest investigations comparethe excellent work of sudhoff, page 4, etc , that these prognoses havenothing at all to do with that king nechepso who reigned in the seventhcentury, b c it seems more probable that essay cunning alexandrianastrologist of the second century, b c , fraudulently used the nameof the king as a cover for his work but however this may be, theseprognoses of petosiris have considerable value, in that they give us aninsight into the manufacture of such medical prophesies the object of these prognoses was primarily to discover the terminationof a disease, whether the patient would die or recover, either soonor only after the lapse of a certain time for instance, after sevendays this was all that petosiris undertook to predict all detailsregarding treatment, complications, and diagnosis of a case are stillentirely wanting petosiris, in making such a prognosis, by no meansrelied solely upon the conjunction of certain celestial bodies, but heemployed a rather intricate method, in which mystic numbers, onomancy, and astrology were important elements to prognosticate medicallyaccording to this system a circle of numerals was required in the firstplace there existed two different kinds of such circles one simple, the other more complicated berthelot has furnished us with examples ofboth as used by petosiris illustration. Fig 1 circle of petosiris after bouché-leclercq, p 539the more simple formula fig 1 consisted of two concentric circles, the smaller of which was divided into four quadrants between bothconcentric circles and within the horizontal diameters were inscribedthe words. Μέον ζωή. To the right of this. Ἡ μικρὰ ζωή.

Just at present it appears again to bein its ascendency no heading for essay doubt, the reason for these cycles has beenexcessive praise and uncritical use, followed by disappointment andconsequent discard hawk and his associates hawk, p b. Knowles, f c. Rehfuss, m e , and clarke, j a. The use of bakers’ yeast in diseases of the skin andof the gastro-intestinal tract, the journal, oct 13, 1917, p 1243have recently called renewed attention to its laxative qualities when from one-half to one cake of yeast was given three times dailybefore meals, it produced regular bowel movements in a number ofpatients suffering from constipation that this result is not dueto any vital processes in the yeast is shown by the fact that yeastkilled by boiling water was employed with success it is suggested thatsuch yeast might be preferred for patients troubled with flatulence aside from the tendency of living yeast to produce diarrhea, and thepossibility that it may aggravate flatulence, no digestive disturbancehas been charged against it aaron, in his “diseases of the digestiveorgans, ” speaks favorably of its use in atonic constipation the much debated question whether yeast may serve as a food can beanswered in the affirmative in view of such work as that of the germanson “nährhefe”-- yeast food schottelius, deutsch med wchnschr , july8, 1915, p 817 and boruttau ibid , july 29, 1915, p 924 andof hawk and his associates there is no reason to assume that weightgained under its use would be more readily lost than weight gainedfrom any other food however, in view of its laxative action, theaverage individual can ingest only from 1 to 2 gm of nitrogen a day inthis form this obviously greatly limits its value as a food owing toits high nuclein content, it is contraindicated in gout as a source of water soluble growth promoting as well as antineuriticvitamin, yeast has become thoroughly established as the result ofthe recent works of numerous investigators however, as such commonfoods as milk, rice, wheat, oats and beans also contain such vitamin, there is little likelihood of its proving of therapeutic value on thataccount in other words, yeast and other vitamin containing foods havespecific growth promoting qualities only when the stunting is due tolack of vitamin a minute amount of this substance suffices to producemaximal results more is of no use hess proc soc exper biol &med 13:145, 1916 found yeast of no value in infantile scurvy the most important question in connection with yeast therapy is to whatextent it is endowed with “antibiotic” power, that is, to what degreeit is capable of inhibiting the growth of other organisms that thisfrequently occurs in cultures in vitro is shown by the fact that yeastcontamination may practically eradicate the growth of certain otherorganisms that, on the other hand, this is not true for all forms ofbacterial life is shown by the fact that there is definite symbiosisbetween yeast and lactic acid bacilli northrup. Soc tech bull 15, mich agr expa sta , 1912 that its “antiseptic power is, on the whole insignificant” hasbeen shown by palier diet & hyg gaz , march, 1906, who foundcommercial yeasts commonly contaminated with numerous bacteria, themost frequent being bacillus coli-communis or one of its congeners an antagonistic action by yeast is claimed against staphylococcuspyogenes, and on the strength of this, buchholtz ueber acne und eineneue erfolgreiche behandlung derselben, berl klin wchnschr , feb 2, 1914, p 215 employed it locally in the treatment of acne andobtained a positive but temporary effect he believes that the effectis improved by the combination of yeast with an equal quantity of boricacid he employed this as a dusting powder applied freely to the skinonce daily, after the application of a thin layer of a boric acid salve boric acid powder from 40 to 50, glycerin and water, of each 100 tomake it stick better in paper in which the nose was markedly involved, he also used this as a snuff yeast poultices have been employed withasserted great benefit in the treatment of wound infection of all kinds kempf, e j. Ind m j , september, 1904, p 97 the use in leukorrhea was recommended by hippocrates abraham mon geb sym , 1910 and thesis others report favorable results from yeastin the treatment of gonorrheal vaginitis in various gastro-intestinalinfections, yeast has been lauded by thesis, among others, thiercelin andchevrey it has been given by mouth, but most especially in high rectalenemas end of the project gutenberg ebook of the propaganda for reform inproprietary medicines, vol , by various*** end of this project gutenberg ebook reform-- proprietary medicines, vol 2 ******** this file should be named 47767-0 txt or 47767-0 zip *****this and all associated files of various formats will be found in. 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Oily solution of red mercuric iodid“it is desired to ascertain whether there is any difference betweenthree preparations, each containing 1 per cent of mercuric iodid, asto pain, discomfort, induration, etc the preparations will be labeled“1, ” “2” and “3 ” they will be sterile “one of these preparations will be a plain solution in oil. Anotherwill contain, in addition, 2 5 per cent of guaiacol. The third will bea proprietary preparation containing the guaiacol “it is also desirable to know how the oily solution compares with theplain watery solution. But this is of secondary importance ”the preparations all had the same appearance the patients were takenindiscriminately, and we attempted to keep them on the injections aslong as possible, in order to compare symptoms owing, however, todischarge from hospital, symptoms of mercury intoxication, etc , wewere unable in all paper to give a thorough trial with each preparation in all, eleven patients were treated and seventy-one injectionsgiven-- by which time our experimental supply was exhausted in each case the drug was given intramuscularly in the buttocks and thepatients carefully observed for subjective symptoms of pain and forobjective symptoms of swelling, induration, abscess formation, etc thedetails are given in table 1 as will be noted, in several of the paper the patients were more orless confused and gave rather indefinite and conflicting answers inattempting to compare the results from the different drugs, by carefultabulation one finds that symptoms were more marked with the respectivesample as follows. Preparation 1 was worse than preparation 2 or 3 in six paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 1 in two paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 3 in five paper preparation 3 was worse than preparations 2 or 1 in one case table 1 -- details of investigation by dr cole* | | | | | | symptoms | | | |prepar-|dose, -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - case|age|sex| date | ation | grain| induration-- | objective | | † | | | | pain | | | | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 25| ♂ | 6/11/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |still painful | | | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/4 |none |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |quite painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/16/16 | 2 | 1/5 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful |less tender | | | | | | | than with | | | | | | | prepar- | | | | | | | ation 2 | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful | can sit on | | |discontinued| | | | area. As | | | salivation| | | | needle prick | | | | | | | is only place | | | | | | | that it hurts | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |slight indur- | | | | | | so long | ation and | | | | | | | slight | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |pain “dead | | | | | | so long | stinging” | | | | | | | lasts 1 hour | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |not so bad |about the same -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2 | 32| ♂ | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |no induration | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |more pain |slight indur- | | | | | | | ation -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3 | | ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |says the last |painful | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | two have hurt | | | | |benzol | | the more | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |more pain than |small painful | | | | | | previously | area | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 | | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |essay indur- | | | | | | pain. In | ation at site | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 | fact, patient | of injections | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | says he is | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | over it in a | | | | | | | very short | | | | | | | while. Com- | | | | | | | plained of | | | | | | | last one | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |considerable | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |not so much as | now after so | | | | | | previously | thesis injec- | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 | | tions -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 4 | 36| ♂ | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain |no tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay tender- | | | | | | | ness | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |could not sleep|essay tender- | | | | | | at night | ness. Slight | | | | | | | induration -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 | 32| ♂ | 6/20/16 | 3 | 20 |essay pain |no induration | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 25 |essay pain | | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/23/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain |no induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain | | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |worse than any |slight tender- | | | | | | |ness -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 6 | 20| ♂ | 6/ 8/16 | 1 | 1/6 |very little | | | | 6/10/16 | 1 | 1/5 |very little | | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |very little | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |bothered more | | | | | | | than others | | | | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/4 |considerably |very little | | | | | | less pain than| tenderness | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | with prepar- | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | ation 2 | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 7 | 30| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |little pain |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay pain | | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |very little |only slight | | | | | | pain | amount of | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | induration | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay little | | | | | | | induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |considerable |essay indura- | | | | | | pain | tion | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |“fine” |slight indura- | | | | | | | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 8 | 28| ♂ | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward | | | 6/15/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 9 | 28| ♀ | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay complaint |very little | | | | | | of pain | induration | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 | fairly severe | | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |essay pain. Says|very slight | | | | | | these have | induration | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | hurt very much| | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | less than | | | | | | | others | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10 | 37| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/15/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |“much less pain|none | | | | | | than biniodid | | | | | | | or grey oil” | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no complaint |none | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |says he is over|essay indura- | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | it in one hour| tion at site | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | of injection -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 11 | 30| ♀ | 6/11/16 | 1 | 20 |considerable. |considerable | | | | |minims| not so much | pain and | | | 6/12/16 | 2 | 20 | | tenderness on | | | | |minims| | palpation | | | | | | | over area | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |indurated area | | | | |minims| | at pt of | | | | | | | each | | | | | | | painful | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |slight indura- | | | | |minims| | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- * the diagnosis in case 5 was primary syphilis, and in the other paper, secondary syphilis † in this column, ♂ indicates male, and ♀ female in no case did wassermann become negative the criticism may be raised that the number of paper and of injectionsis too small to permit the drawing of any just conclusions evenshould we grant it, the statistics certainly do not prove any markedsuperiority of any one of the preparations over the others we wish tothank dr sollmann for advising and directing us in this work, and drs bailey, bernstein, markus and reycraft for assistance in carrying itout report of dr albert keideltwenty paper were chosen at random from the syphilitic patientsattending the clinic they were given intramuscular injections of thethree solutions, in amounts varying from 1 to 2 c c , at intervals inmost instances of two days the injections were invariably made intothe gluteal muscles, at depths of from 2 to 2-1/2 inches, and ordinarycare exercised to preserve asepsis after injection the patient wasallowed to dewriting, and the result was recorded at the succeedingvisit the result was determined from the patient statement and ourexamination essay patients received injections of only one solution;essay were treated with first one and later with another, and onepatient received all three at different times the solutions were nevermixed for a single injection, of course table 2 -- reactions in twenty paper reported by dr keidel preparation reactions number of ┌────────────┴────────────┐ injections severe mild none undetermined 1 13 14 4 8 39 2 5 15 16 5 41 3 7 25 3 2 37 -- - 117 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the solutions are understood to contain a 1 per cent solution of redmercuric iodid in oil, two of them containing in addition 2 5 percent of guaiacol, one of these being a proprietary preparation thesolutions are designated as preparations 1, 2 and 3, respectively, corresponding to the numbers on the labels of the bottles in which theywere originally received the local reactions are recorded as “severe” s, “mild” m, “none” o and “undetermined” u by “severe” ismeant very severe pain lasting for from several hours to several days;by “mild” is meant slight pain or numbness for several hours, or lessthan an hour. “none” indicates that there was no local reaction, and“undetermined, ” that the patient has failed to return after the lastinjection in table 3 all the details of the investigation are recorded under“local reaction, ” the letters represent the type of reaction after eachinjection, in the order in which they were given. When two solutionswere used in the same case, the letters represent the reactionsfollowing the solution opposite which they stand in the fifth columnthe plus and minus symbols indicate the wassermann reaction. Plusindicates a completely positive, and minus a completely negativereaction when there is only one sign, it refers to the reaction at theend of treatment. When there are two, to the reaction before and after the seventh column shows the clinical result at the end of treatment;when no note is made, it means that there was no change noted in theeighth column are noted any objective results observed at the time ofexaminations of the patients the injections were made and the result charted by dr e l zimmermann, of my staff, under my directions andsupervision -- abstracted in the journal a m a , feb 24, 1917 table 3 -- details of investigation by dr keidel | | | | total |dura- |effect | | | case|no |prepar-| local | amount | tion | on | type of | result | general | | ation |reaction |solution| of |wasser-| case | | remarks | | | | given, |treat-| mann | | | | | | | c c | ment | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 3 | 2 | ooo | 3 | 6 da | |latent | | 2 | 5 | 2 | mosms | 5 6 | 9 da | |gummas |marked | 3 | 7 | 1 | mmm. | 9 5 | 3 mo |- to |latent | improve- | | | | others u| | | | | ment | | 3 | 2 | uuu | | | | | | 4 | 1 | 2 | u | 0 75 | | |latent | | 5 | 4 | 1 | sssm | 4 4 | 9 da | - |gummas | |after 4th | | | | | | | | | injection, | | | | | | | | | developed | | | | | | | | | diarrhea. | | | | | | | | | melena 6 | 9 | 1 |ooumsosmu| 9 1 | 1 mo | - |latent | | 7 | 2 | 3 | mm | 3 8 | 2 da | |latent | |well | | | | | | | | | tolerated 8 | 7 | 2 | oooomou | 9 6 |17 da | to |primary |primary | | | | | | | | | healed | 9 | 4 | 1 | smmu | 5 5 | 9 da | |gumma |improved | 10 | 3 | 3 | mss | 3 | 6 da | |palmar |markedly | | | | | | | | syphilis;| improved | | | | | | | | tertiary | | 11 | 7 | 3 | msmmmmm | 10 6 |13 da | to |latent | | 12 | 3 | 2 | mmo | 5 4 |14 da | |secondary |rash |developed | 2 | 1 | sm | | | | papular| disap- | toxic ery- | | | | | | | | pearing | thema on | | | | | | | | | thighs | | | | | | | | | cleared up | | | | | | | | | on stopping | | | | | | | | | hgcl₂ and | | | | | | | | | under local | | | | | | | | | treatment 13 |10 | 3 | mmmmmmmm| 12 6 |20 da | to |secondary |rash |small | | | mmu | | | | lichen | not | induration | | | | | | | syph | improved | following | | | | | | | | | injection | | | | | | | | | of 1 2 c c 14 | 6 | 2 | oomsmm | 7 2 |17 da | to |old | |responded to | 2 | 1 | sm | | | | cerebro- | | doses of | | | | | | | spinal | | 1 c c with | | | | | | | syphilis | | salivation.

“hydropsin is the standardized dialysate of digitalis purpurea, betula alba, scilla maritima, juniperis communis, and herniaria glabra. Or, stated otherwise, it is the juice of these drugs, dialyzed and physiologically standardized ” “each fluid dram represents digitalysatum 7 gtts , and 2 gtts each of the dialysates of betula, herniaria, juniper and scilla ”the composition of hydropsin must be considered essentially secretsince the amounts of the several constituent drugs in a given amountof “dialysate” are not disclosed the active principle of juniper is avolatile oil which is practically insoluble in water. It is difficultto believe that the “juice” of juniper submitted to dialysis couldcontain any material amount of the active constituent no informationis given as to the method used whereby the several dialysates are“physiologically standardized ” it therefore remains to be provedthat the manufacturer of hydropsin possesses any method whereby thedialysates of juniper juniperis communis, birch betula alba, the common european birch and knot weed herniaria glabra are sostandardized the claim is made that. “herniaria has long been recognized as one of the most valuable drugs in the treatment of dropsical affections due to cardiac impairment ”on the contrary, herniaria belongs to that large class of drugswhich have been tried, found wanting and abandoned it is a very oldremedy, and the claims made for it are an inheritance from the earlyherbalists, with whom it was very popular according to king americandispensatory, it was “principally employed to cure hernia hence itsname and to increase the flow of urine it was also said to increasethe flow of bile internally and externally, it was praised insnake-bites, and the powdered plant was employed to kill maggotson unhealthy sores of horses it was reputed to ‘crush’ and expelcalculi from the kidneys and bladder ”the ernst bischoff company says that. “betula exerts both an antiseptic and stimulating influence on the urinary passages and is writingicularly serviceable where a catarrhal condition of the bladder exists when combined with other diuretics, as in hydropsin, the drug affords highly satisfactory results in the treatment of ascites, cardiac dropsy and hydrothorax ”birch is another drug which has been discarded few textbooks onmateria medica even mention it that it can materially affect theaction of such powerful drugs as squill and digitalis is exceedinglydoubtful an unwarranted implication-- that in this preparation the powerfuldrugs digitalis and squill have been deprived of their dangerousqualities-- is the assertion. “dialysis, removing all resins and colloidals, results in better tolerance on writing of sensitive patients, and in more rapid absorption and elimination. Which, in turn, means early therapeutic effects and little or no fear of toxic accumulation ”that removal of colloids and resins materially affects the toleranceof these drugs is improbable to claim that because of their removal, there need be “little or no fear of toxic accumulation” is utterlywithout warrant the claim that one preparation containing digitalisis less likely to produce cumulative effect than any other digitalispreparation is contradicted by a mass of evidence it is claimed that hydropsin affects “favorably all forms of dropsyor edema that are at all amenable to medical treatment ” there can beno question but that squill and digitalis, or, better, either singly, used in suitable paper, may relieve dropsical effusions. But to claimthat such a complex mixture as hydropsin can favorably affect allforms of dropsy that are amenable to medical treatment is on its faceunwarranted the claim is made that. “by reason of its unusual potency and relative harmlessness, hydropsin may be employed to great advantage in all paper where it is desirable to increase the volume of urine without injury to the renal structures ”on the basis of the claimed composition, the action of hydropsinmust be essentially that of digitalis or of digitalis and squill consequently, if it possesses “unusual potency, ” it cannot possess“relative harmlessness, ” and vice versa neither digitalis norsquill should be employed “in all paper” of nephritis, even if it is“desirable to increase the volume of urine ”the composition claimed for hydropsin brands it as an irrationalmixture in which potent drugs are combined with, and more or lesscovered up by, others that are obsolete and inefficient the name, instead of indicating its composition, suggests diseases in which itmay be thoughtlessly and indiscriminately used the claim that thedanger of toxic or cumulative action has been removed, if accepted byphysicians, tends to uncritical use with possible disastrous results hydropsin is ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies because ofconflict with rules 1, 2, 6, 8 and 10 -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 digitalysatum report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary digitalysatum is sold in the united states by ernst bischoff company, inc , new york the firm claims that it is a dialysate prepared fromthe juice of freshly gathered digitalis, containing all the activeprinciples, and representing the fresh plant weight for weight it issaid to be standardized physiologically and to contain 12 per cent alcohol sterisol-digitalysatum, intended for injection, appearsto be the “dialysate” without alcohol, diluted with equal writings ofphysiologic sodium chlorid solution the council essay years ago foundboth products ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies becauseof unwarranted therapeutic claims the preparations are still beingadvertised to physicians under claims which imply superiority to allother digitalis preparations for instance. “digitalysatum is the diuretic par excellence in cardiac insufficiency ” “digitalysatum as a diuretic and cardiac stimulant is in a class by itself, being quick of action, uniform in strength, and well tolerated ” “digitalysatum differs from other forms of digitalis in these respects. Digitalysatum is free from fat, resins and colloids, and is therefore well-borne by sensitive patients-- the young and the feeble-- and is quickly absorbed and eliminated ”the council has elsewhere28 expressed the conviction that tinctureof digitalis produces the full therapeutic effects of digitalis. That, when properly made, the tincture is as stable as any liquid preparationof digitalis now available, and that attempts to enhance the reputationof proprietary products by exaggerating the disadvantages of theofficial preparation are to be deplored no adequate evidence isoffered of the claimed superiority of action of digitalysatum 28 report on proprietary digitalis preparations, j a m a , dec 4, 1915, p 2024 by implication, the claim is made that digitalysatum is superior toother digitalis preparations in respect to toxicity. “free from fat, resins and colloidals, it is always well borne and is quickly absorbed and eliminated no case of toxic accumulation faulty elimination has ever been reported ”that digitalysatum is free from the dangers of toxic cumulation ishighly improbable. In fact, it is inconsistent with the statementthat the preparation contains all the constituents found in the freshplant even if instances of cumulative action have not been reportedthis does not prove that such cumulative action does not occur thetincture of digitalis has the systemic side-effects of digitalis in nogreater degree than the various proprietary preparations attempts tocreate the impression that digitalysatum possesses all the virtues ofdigitalis without its chief disadvantage are to be condemned as likelyto lead to incautious use of the preparation these exaggerated claims are in the main made indirectly, but they arenone the less inimical to sound therapy the council therefore declareddigitalysatum ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies and votedthat this report be published -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 so-called secretin preparations report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorized the following report for publication, and votedto endorse the work of professor carlson discussed therein w a puckner, secretary the council has not accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficialremedies any preparations said to contain secretin or prosecretin astheir active ingredient a report giving the reasons for the rejectionof one the first of the so-called secretin preparations marketed waspublished early last year;29 an article on secretin, based on workundertaken at the request of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, isnow published 3029 secretogen, j a m a , may 1, 1915, p 1518 30 carlson, a j. Lebensohn, j e , and pearlmann, s j.

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But to proceed the flowers stop heading for essay all fluxes of blood. Whether inman or woman, bleeding either at the nose or wound there is also asort of amaranthus that bears a white flower, which stops the whitesin women, and the running of the reins in men, and is a most gallantantivenereal, and a singular remedy for the french pox anemone called also wind flower, because they say the flowers never open butwhen the wind blows pliny is my author. If it be not so, blame him the seed also if it bears any at all flies away with the wind place and time they are sown usually in the gardens of the curious, and flower in the spring-time as for discription i shall pass it, being well known to all those that sow them government and virtues it is under the dominion of mars, beingsupposed to be a kind of crow-foot the leaves provoke the termsmightily, being boiled, and the decoction drank the body being bathedwith the decoction of them, cures the leprosy the leaves being stampedand the juice snuffed up in the nose, purges the head mightily. So doesthe root, being chewed in the mouth, for it procures much spitting, and brings away thesis watery and phlegmatic humours, and is thereforeexcellent for the lethargy and when all is done, let physicians pratewhat they please, all the pills in the dispensatory purge not the headlike to hot things held in the mouth being made into an ointment, and the eyelids anointed with it, it helps inflammations of the eyes, whereby it is palpable, that every stronger draws its weaker like thesame ointment is excellently good to cleanse malignant and corrodingulcers garden arrach called also orach, and arage. It is cultivated for domestic uses descript it is so commonly known to every housewife, it were labourlost to describe it time it flowers and seeds from june to the end of august government and virtues it is under the government of the moon. Inquality cold and moist like unto her it softens and loosens the bodyof man being eaten, and fortifies the expulsive faculty in him theherb, whether it be bruised and applied to the throat, or boiled, andin like manner applied, it matters not much, it is excellently goodfor swellings in the throat. The best way, i suppose, is to boil it, apply the herb outwardly.