History

Gun Control Argumentative Essay


But the principle is wrong aslooked at from the medical standpoint the protracted paper concern, as above stated, mostly injuries of the head, spine, and chest, amongwhich there are essay paper, like the examples cited, where, accordingto english law, justice would fail to be done iii was a wound the cause of death secondarily?. A wound is secondarily the cause of death when the victim, havingrecovered from the first ill effects, dies from essay wound disease oraccident or from a surgical operation rendered necessary in the propertreatment of the wound there may be much difficulty in establishingthe proof of death from a wound by means of secondary causes, for, 1st, the secondary cause must be in the natural course of things. And, 2d, there must be no other accidental circumstances to occasion thesecondary cause the secondary cause may be writingly due to the constitution of thedeceased from habits of dissipation, which fact would serve as anexpiatory circumstance in the case among the secondary causes of deathmay be mentioned septicæmia, pyæmia, erysipelas, tetanus, gangrene, that is, wound diseases, also the wound accident as we may calldelirium tremens, and surgical operations rendered necessary to thetreatment of the case we may add, besides the regular wound diseases, inflammation in and about the wound, septic in character, perhaps notjustifying the title of septicæmia, but which, with its accompanyingfever, may be the “last straw” in a case which might otherwiserecover essay of these secondary causes will now be considered more atlength septicæmia is a general febrile disease due to the absorption intothe system from a wound of the products of bacteria or due to theintroduction into the blood and tissues of the bacteria themselves depending on the two sources of origin, we have two forms ofsepticæmia. 1 septic intoxication or sapremia, due to the absorptionof a chemical poison, ptomaïnes, and often readily influenced andcured by the removal of the source of these ptomaïnes in decomposingblood-clots, secretions, etc 2 septic infection comes on less rapidlybut is more serious than the former is, if properly and quicklytreated, because the source of the trouble cannot be removed, but isin the blood and the tissues the latter form is the more common onein wounds, though the former may occur in abdominal wounds, especiallywhen a blood-clot is present the first form begins acutely, thesecond form more gradually the infection in septicæmia takes placethrough a wound and may be due to the weapon which caused the wound, the unclean condition of the writings wounded, or to the subsequenttreatment or want of treatment it may even take place through theintestinal mucous membrane as in paper of tyrotoxicon poisoning itis most likely to occur during the first four or five days before thesurfaces of the wound granulate, and it consists in the introductionof bacteria, especially staphylococci and streptococci the diseaseis characterized by severe constitutional symptoms, acute continuousfever, inflammation of certain viscera and of the wound, and nervousdisorders a pronounced chill ushering in the fever is generallyabsent prostration is especially marked, the patient finally passinginto a typhoid condition indifferent to surroundings anorexia andheadache are usually present. Diarrhœa is common, vomiting is not theskin is pale and dusky, but not commonly icteric.

And deformities, such as signs ofold or recent fracture, or dislocation. And supernumerary fingers the leg - the examination of the leg should be conducted in much thesame manner as that of the arm the trunk - an examination of the trunk will reveal the race, sex, and probable age, and may give evidence as regards the manner in whichthe deceased came to his or her death any marks or deformities shouldbe recorded, and in all paper the viscera should be examined medico-legal reports 568after making a medico-legal autopsy, it will be necessary for themedical examiner to draw up a report of his findings, and theconclusions based thereon the report should be clear and concise, andthe language such as a coroner jury can understand technical termsshould be avoided, and when their employment is necessary they shouldbe explained in the margin or in parentheses the report should be drawn up in essaywhat the following manner:1 when and under what circumstances the body was first seen. Statinghour of day, day of week and month 2 when deceased was last seen living, or known to be alive 3 any circumstances that would lead to a suspicion of suicide ormurder 4 time after death at which the examination was made, if it can beascertained 5 the external appearance of the body. Whether the surface is livid orpallid 6 state of countenance 7 any marks of violence on the person, disarrangement of the dress, blood-stains, etc 8 presence or absence of warmth in the legs, abdomen, arms, armpits, or mouth 9 presence or absence of rigor mortis to give any value to this point it is necessary for the witness toobserve the nature of the substance upon which the body is lying;whether the body be clothed or naked, young or old, fat or emaciated these conditions materially influence the rapidity of cooling and theonset of rigor mortis 10 upon first opening the body the color of the muscles should benoted carbon monoxide poisoning causes them to be of a cherry-redcolor 11 the condition of the blood and its color 12 the state of the abdominal viscera, describing each one inthe order in which it is removed see p 370 if the stomach andintestines are inflamed the seat of the inflammation should be exactlyspecified.

Then perfect the oil by boiling it gently in adouble vessel oleum populeum nicholaus college take of fresh poplar buds three pounds, wine four pounds, common oil seven pounds two ounces, beat the poplar buds very well, then steep them seven days in the oil and wine, then boil them in adouble vessel till the wine be consumed, if you infuse fresh buds onceor twice before you boil it, the medicine will be the stronger, thenpress out the oil and keep it culpeper it is a fine cool oil, but the ointment called by thatname which follows hereafter is far better ointments more simple unguentum album, or, white ointment college take of oil of roses nine ounces, ceruss washed inrose-water and diligently sifted, three ounces, white wax two ounces, after the wax is melted in the oil, put in the ceruss, and make itinto an ointment according to art, add two drams of camphire, madeinto powder with a few drops of oil of sweet almonds, so will it becamphorated culpeper it is a fine cooling, drying ointment, eases pains, anditching in wounds and ulcers, and is an hundred times better withcamphire than without it unguentum egyptiacum college take of verdigris finely powdered, five writings, honeyfourteen writings, sharp vinegar seven writings, boil them to a justthickness, and a reddish colour culpeper it cleanses filthy ulcers and fistulas forcibly, and notwithout pain, it takes away dead and proud flesh, and dries unguentum anodynum or, an ointment to ease pain college take of oil of white lilies, six ounces, oil of dill, andchamomel, of each two ounces, oil of sweet almonds one ounce, duckgrease, and hen grease, of each two ounces, white wax three ounces, mix them according to art culpeper its use is to assuage pains in any writing of the body, especially such as come by inflammations, whether in wounds or tumours, and for that it is admirable unguentum ex apio or, ointment of smallage college take of the juice of smallage one pound, honey nine ounces, wheat flower three ounces, boil them to a just thickness culpeper it is a very fine, and very gentle cleanser of wounds andulcers liniment of gum elemi college take of gum elemi, turpentine of the fir-tree, of each oneounce and an half, old sheep suet cleansed two ounces, old hoggrease cleansed one ounce. Mix them, and make them into an ointmentaccording to art culpeper it gently cleanses and fills up an ulcer with flesh, itbeing of a mild nature, and friendly to the body unguentum aureum college take of yellow wax half a pound, common oil two pounds, turpentine two ounces, pine rozin, colophonia, of each one ounce and anhalf, frankincense, mastich, of each one ounce, saffron one dram, firstmelt the wax in the oil, then the turpentine being added, let them boiltogether. Having done boiling, put in the rest in fine powder, letthe saffron be the last and by diligent stirring, make them into anointment according to art basilicon, the greater college take of white wax, pine rozin, heifer suet, greek pitch, turpentine, olibanum, myrrh, of each one ounce, oil five ounces, powder the olibanum and myrrh, and the rest being melted, make it intoan ointment according to art basilicon, the less college take of yellow wax, fat rozin, greek pitch, of each half apound, oil nine ounces. Mix them together, by melting them according toart culpeper both this and the former, heat, moisten, and digest, procure matter in wounds, i mean brings the filth or corrupted bloodfrom green wounds. They clense and ease pain ointment of bdellium college take of bdellium six drams, euphorbium, sagapen, of eachfour drams, castoreum three drams, wax fifteen drams, oil of elder orwall-flowers, ten drams, the bdellium, and sagapen being dissolved inwater of wild rue, let the rest be united by the heat of a bath unguentum de calce or, ointment of chalk college take of chalk washed, seven times at least, half a pound, wax three ounces, oil of roses one pound, stir them all togetherdiligently in a leaden mortar, the wax being first melted by a gentlefire in a sufficient quantity of the prescribed oil culpeper it is exceeding good in burnings and scaldings unguentum dialthæ or, ointment of marsh-mallows college take of common oil four pounds, mussilage of marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed two pounds. Boil them together tillthe watery writing of the mussilage be consumed, then add wax half a pound, rozin three ounces, turpentine an ounce, boil them to the consistenceof an ointment, but let the mussilage be prepared of a pound of freshroots bruised, and half a pound of each of the seeds steeped, andboiled in eight pounds of spring water, and then pressed out see thecompound unguentum diapompholygos college take of oil of nightshade sixteen ounces, white wax, washed, ceruss, of each four drams, lead burnt and washed, pompholixprepared, of each two ounces, pure frankincense one ounce. Bring theminto the form of an ointment according to art culpeper this much differing from the former, you shall have thatinserted at latter end, and then you may use which you please unguentum enulatum or, ointment of elecampane college take of elecampane roots boiled in vinegar, bruised andpulped, one pound, turpentine washed in their decoction, new wax, ofeach two ounces, old hog grease salted ten ounces, old oil fourounces, common salt one ounce, add the turpentine to the grease, wax, and oil, being melted, as also the pulp and salt being finely powdered, and so make it into an ointment according to art unguentum enulatum cum mercurio or, ointment of elecampane with quick-silver, college is made of the former ointment, by adding two ounces ofquick-silver, killed by continual stirring, not only with spittle, orjuice of lemons, but with all the turpentine kept for that intent, andwriting of the grease, in a stone mortar culpeper my opinion of this ointment, is briefly this. It wasinvented for the itch, without quick-silver it will do no good, withquick-silver it may do harm unguentum laurinum commune or, ointment of bays common college take of bay leaves bruised one pound, bay berries bruisedhalf a pound, cabbage leaves four ounces, neat-foot oil five pounds, bullock suet two pounds, boil them together, and strain them, that soit may be made into an ointment according to art unguentum de minie sive rubrum camphora or, ointment of red lead college take of oil of roses one pound and an half, red lead threeounces, litharge two ounces, ceruss one ounce and an half, tutty threedrams, camphire two drams, wax one ounce and an half, make it into anointment according to art, in a pestle and mortar made of lead culpeper this ointment is as drying as a man shall usually readof one, and withal cooling, therefore good for sores, and such as aretroubled with defluctions unguentum e nicotiona, seu peto or, ointment of tobacco college take of tobacco leaves bruised, two pounds, steep them awhole night in red wine, in the morning boil it in fresh hog grease, diligently washed, one pound, till the wine be consumed, strain it, andadd half a pound of juice of tobacco, rozin four ounces, boil it to theconsumption of the juice, adding towards the end, round birthwort rootsin powder, two ounces, new wax as much as is sufficient to make it intoan ointment according to art culpeper it would take a whole summer day to write the writingicularvirtues of this ointment, and my poor genius is too weak to give itthe hundredth writing of its due praise. It cures tumours, imposthumes, wounds, ulcers, gun-shot, stinging with nettles, bees, wasps, hornets, venomous beasts, wounds made with poisoned arrows, &c unguentum nutritum, seu trifarmacum college take of litharge of gold finely powdered, half a pound, vinegar one pound, oil of roses two pounds, grind the litharge ina mortar, pouring to it essaytimes oil, essaytimes vinegar, till bycontinual stirring, the vinegar do no more appear, and it come to awhitish ointment culpeper it is of a cooling, drying nature, good for itching ofwounds, and such like deformities of the skin unguentum ophthalmicum or, an ointment for the eyes college take of bole-ammoniac washed in rose water, one ounce, lapis calaminaris washed in eye bright water, tutty prepared, of eachtwo drams, pearls in very fine powder half a dram, camphire half ascruple, opium five grains, fresh butter washed in plantain water, asmuch as is sufficient to make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it is exceeding good to stop hot rheums that fall downinto the eyes, the eyelids being but anointed with it unguentum ex oxylapatho or, ointment of sharp-pointed dock college take of the roots of sharp-pointed dock boiled in vinegaruntil they be soft, and then pulped, brimstone washed in juice oflemons, of each one ounce and an half, hog grease often washed injuice of scabious, half a pound, unguentum populeon washed in juice ofelecampane, half an ounce. Make them into an ointment in a mortar culpeper it is a wholeessay, though troubleessay medicine for scabsand itch unguentum e plumbo or, ointment of lead college take of lead burnt according to art, litharge, of each twoounces, ceruss, antimony, of each one ounce, oil of roses as much as issufficient. Make it into an ointment according to art culpeper take it one time with another, it will go neer to do moreharm than good unguentum pomatum college take of fresh hog grease three pounds, fresh sheep suetnine ounces, pomewater pared and cut, one pound and nine ounces, damaskrose-water six ounces, the roots of orris florentine grossly bruisedsix drams, boil them in balneo mariæ till the apples be soft, thenstrain it, but press it not and keep it for use. Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it with this.

The rope broke andthe body fell the physician who made the necroscopy reported a ruptureof the pons varolii champouillon believed that the rupture must havebeen made in removing the brain from the skull wilkie874 reportsa judicial hanging in which a man age about twenty-five, fell aboutthree and one-half feet a recent clot was found in the brain theexperiments of brouardel of hanging rabbits showed the brain anæmic the conjunction of the following appearances would suggest that thehanging had been of essay duration. Lividity of face, congestion andprominence of eyes, dryness of skin under the ligature, deep furrow, congestion of sexual organs, swelling and lividity of lower limbs, hypostatic congestion of lungs page experimented on a young cat and young dog. Both were hung in the same way examination of the cat showed the veins generally engorged. Sublingual veins much engorged. Tongue protruded slightly and much swollen. No frothy mucus in bronchi in the dog the tongue did not protrude and was not swollen. Right cavities of heart contained blood, left empty. Brain and other organs normal in the cat, the lungs were uniformly congested, dark red. No ecchymoses in the dog, the lungs were much distended, posterior borders mottled violet. Emphysematous patches on surface. No apoplectic effusions. Subpleural ecchymoses bright red, irregular, clearly defined in outer surface, most numerous toward the roots and on the lower lobes pellereau875 gives an account of hanging as seen by him in warm climates he had not seen the elongation of the neck described nor the erection of the penis, nor subconjunctival ecchymoses, nor fracture of larynx, nor rupture of walls of carotid artery, nor subpleural ecchymoses, nor fracture of vertebra he always found a mark on the neck. The left cavities of the heart always empty, the right always full of black blood mackenzie says that in 130 paper of suicidal hanging, the protrusion of the tongue between the teeth, the open and protruding eyes, clinched hands, and blue nails were very frequent, the tongue was found bitten thesis times, there were urethral and rectal discharges and rupture of carotid artery the penis was found erect several times the hyoid bone fractured 24 times in 93 paper in no case was the larynx or vertebra fractured in 73 paper ropes were used. In 30, portions of clothing the marks of ropes were always well defined, indented, and parchment-like.

  • short story essay
  • precalculus help
  • how to make essay look longer
  • essay on education
  • buy admission essay
  • grant writing services
  • sample mla essay
  • writing services nyc
  • evaluative essay topics
  • online paper writers
  • how to end a persuasive essay
  • do my assignment write my history assignment
  • discursive essay
  • unc rosa parks essay
  • who can write my paper
  • high school essay help
  • 600 word essay
  • why i must do my homework
  • study help online
  • buy law essay
  • essay writers company

If they will not, i cannot help it if any fancy not pottage, they may eat the herb as a sallad crosswort this herb receives its name from the situation of its leaves descript common crosswort grows up with square hairy brown stalksa little above a foot high, having four small broad and pointed, hairyyet smooth thin leaves, growing at every joint, each against other oneway, which has caused the name towards the tops of the stalks at thejoints, with the leaves in three or four rows downwards, stand small, pale yellow flowers, after which come small blackish round seeds, fourfor the most writing, set in every husk the root is very small, and fullof fibres, or threads, taking good hold of the ground, and spreadingwith the branches over a great deal of ground, which perish not inwinter, although the leaves die every year and spring again anew place it grows in thesis moist grounds, well in meadows as untilledplaces, about london, in hampstead church-yard, at wye in kent, andsundry other places time it flowers from may all the summer long, in one place orother, as they are more open to the sun. The seed ripens soon after government and virtues it is under the dominion of saturn this isa singularly good wound herb, and is used inwardly, not only to staybleeding of wounds, but to consolidate them, as it doth outwardly anygreen wound, which it quickly solders up, and heals the decoction ofthe herb in wine, helps to expectorate the phlegm out of the chest, and is good for obstructions in the breast, stomach, or bowels, andhelps a decayed appetite it is also good to wash any wound or sorewith, to cleanse and heal it the herb bruised, and then boiled appliedoutwardly for certain days together, renewing it often. And in the meantime the decoction of the herb in wine, taken inwardly every day, dothcertainly cure the rupture in any, so as it be not too inveterate. Butvery speedily, if it be fresh and lately taken crowfoot thesis are the names this furious biting herb has obtained, almost enoughto make up a welchman pedigree, if he fetch no farther than john ofgaunt, or william the conquerer. For it is called frog-foot, from thegreek name barrakion. Crowfoot, gold knobs, gold cups, king knob, baffiners, troilflowers, polts, locket gouions, and butterflowers abundance are the sorts of this herb, that to describe them all wouldtire the patience of socrates himself, but because i have not yetattained to the spirit of socrates, i shall but describe the most usual descript the most common crowfoot has thesis thin great leaves, cutinto divers writings, in taste biting and sharp, biting and blisteringthe tongue. It bears thesis flowers, and those of a bright, resplendent, yellow colour i do not remember, that i ever saw any thing yellower virgins, in ancient time, used to make powder of them to furrow bridebeds. After which flowers come small heads, essay spiked and rugged likea pine-apple place they grow very common every where. Unless you turn your headinto a hedge you cannot but see them as you walk time they flower in may and june, even till september government and virtues this fiery and hot-spirited herb of marsis no way fit to be given inwardly, but an ointment of the leaves orflowers will draw a blister, and may be so fitly applied to the nape ofthe neck to draw back rheum from the eyes the herb being bruised andmixed with a little mustard, draws a blister as well, and as perfectlyas cantharides, and with far less danger to the vessels of urine, whichcantharides naturally delight to wrong. I knew the herb once appliedto a pestilential rising that was fallen down, and it saved life evenbeyond hope.