History

Gre Essay Examples


thus it was the unavoidable consequence ofthe theistic theory of life that the priest was the physician as wellas the representative of physical knowledge and also the helper andadviser in all mundane exigencies whether bodily or psychic troublesafflicted individuals, whether an entire population groaned underheavy chastisements like pestilence, aid and deliverance were alwayssought in the sanctuary of the gods, from the infallible priest andthe priests were always equal to the occasion. They have always, in amasterly manner, known the art of satisfying the medico-physical needsof their suppliants for the religions of all civilized peoples andchristianity by no means occupies an exceptional position in thisrespect have always endeavored most strenuously to keep physical aswell as medical thought in strictest dependence upon their doctrinesand dogmas to attain this end various ceremonies, customs, and dogmaswere relied upon to keep the priests in a position to secure theassistance of the gods for humanity harassed by pain and affliction these sacred observances were strange, and varied with the variousreligious systems according to the primeval cult of zoroaster, allevils, consequently also all diseases, were derived from the principleof darkness which was embodied in the person of ahriman, and only thesacerdotal caste of the magicians who sprung from a special mediantribe was able to heal them but it was by no means easy to become amember of this caste and to acquire the magic powers pertaining toit alone it was necessary before gaining mastery over the powersof nature to become initiated into the mysteries of mitra however, after priestly consecration had once been bestowed, the individualthus honored bore the proud title “conqueror of evil, ” and was able topractise medicine as the most essential constituent of every medicaltreatment, the divine word was applied in the form of mysteriousexorcisms, sacred hymns, and certain words which were consideredspecially curative in effect, writingicularly the word “ormuzd, ” the nameof the highest god, in whose all-embracing power of healing greatconfidence was placed the sumerians, the precursors of babylonico-assyrian culture, ascribeda considerable and important rôle to dreams they were considered tobring direct medical advice from the gods, and it became the officeof the sacerdotal physician to interpret the dream in such a way as toalleviate the sufferings of the dreamer the ancient greek culture also conceded a conspicuous medicalsignificance to dreams, and even arranged a system of its own, that ofthe temple sleep, in order always to obtain prophesying dreams fromthe gods the patient, after the obligatory offering, was required toremain a night in the temple, and his dream during this night was themedical advice of the divinity in its most direct form but only thepriest was able to interpret a dream obtained in such a manner, and toextract medical efficacy from it but as it occasionally happened thata too prosaic and phlegmatic patient did not dream at all, the priestwas benevolent enough to intercede he was always promptly favored bythe gods with a suggestive dream the medical function of the priests had reached a peculiar developmentduring the first centuries of rome this was manifest especially inthe time of public calamities, such as pestilence, war, etc whensuch events reached dimensions which threatened the existence of therepublic, attempts were made to gain the favor of the gods by mostcurious ceremonies the celestials were simply invited to take writingin an opulent banquet the first divine feast of such a characterwas celebrated in rome in the sixth century, b c , on account of agreat epidemic apollo, latona, diana, hercules, mercury, and neptunewere most ceremoniously invited to take writing in a religious banquetwhich lasted for eight days the images of the gods were placed uponmagnificently cushioned couches, and the tables were loaded withdainties not only the gods, but the entire population, were invited;every one kept open house, and whoever wished to do so could feastat the richly prepared boards of the wealthy even the pronouncedenemies of the house were allowed to enter and to enjoy the daintieswithout fear of hostile remarks. Indeed, it was deemed advisable in theinterests of public hygiene to unchain the prisoners and to liberatethem but if the gods, in spite of the most opulent entertainments, did not have any consideration, and if pestilence, military disaster, failure of crops, or whatever was the immediate cause of popularanxiety, continued to persist with unabated fury, endeavors were madeby theatrical performances to provide as much as possible for theamusement of the gods such plays, at first, consisted only in gracefuldances, with flute accompaniments, and from these simple beginnings, according to livy, book 7, chapter ii , the drama is said to havedeveloped all those variations which characterized the scenic art ofantiquity there can be no doubt that even the stage of modern times isof religio-sanitary origin a peculiar fact which modern patrons of thetheater scarcely ever dream of an attempt was eventually made to increase the delight of the gods insuch amusements by a number of novel devices for instance, it wasstipulated that the performances instituted to ward off the invasion ofhannibal were to cost 333, 333⅓ copper asses but if, nevertheless, the gods were not sufficiently propitiated by banquets, dances, andplaying of the flute, and if they could not be prevailed upon by suchpastimes to remove the pestilence or other calamity, a dictator wasnamed who, if possible, on september 13th, drove a nail into the templeof jupiter to appease divine indignation it appears that this wasa primeval custom of the etruscans.

Providedthat the defendant may show such facts by depositions taken in the samemanner as depositions in civil paper 1, 931 the united kingdom of great britain and ireland medical acts - the act 21 and 22 victoria, c 90, and the amendmentsthereof and additions thereto, are generally spoken of as the medicalacts medical councils - there is a general council of medical education andregistration of the united kingdom, with branch councils for england, scotland, and ireland 21 and 22 vict , 1858, c 90, s 3, 6 members of the general council are chosen as provided in 49 and gre essay examples 50vict , c 48, s 7. Those representing the medical corporations must bequalified to register under this act 21 and 22 vict , c 90, s 7 the general council appoints a registrar for england, and the branchcouncils for scotland and ireland appoint respectively a registrar forscotland and ireland 10, 11 registrar - it is the duty of the registrars to keep their registerscorrect, and to erase the names of all registered persons who shallhave died, and from time to time to make the necessary alterations inthe addresses or qualifications of persons registered it is lawful forthe registrar to write a letter to any registered person, addressed tohim according to his address on the register, to inquire whether he hasceased to practise or has changed his residence, and if no answer bereturned within six months from the time of sending the letter, it islawful to erase the name of such person from the register, but it maybe restored by direction of the general council 14 qualification - persons possessed of one or more of the qualificationsdescribed in schedule a, on the payment of a fee not exceeding £5, areentitled to register on the production to the registrar of the branchcouncil for england, scotland, or ireland the document conferringor evidencing the qualification in respect whereof he seeks to beregistered, or upon transmitting by post to such registrar informationof his name and address, and evidence of his qualifications and of thetime or times at which they were obtained the several colleges andbodies mentioned in schedule a may transmit from time to time to theregistrar, under their respective seals, lists of the persons who bygrant of such colleges and bodies respectively, are for the time beingentitled to register, stating the qualifications and residences of suchpersons, and it shall be lawful for the registrar on the payment of thesaid fee to enter in the register the persons mentioned in such listswith their qualifications and places of residences as therein statedwithout other application 15 the general council is required to make orders for regulating theregisters from time to time 16 persons actually practising medicine in england before august 1st, 1815, were entitled to register under the act 17 any two or more of the colleges and bodies in the united kingdommentioned in schedule a may, with the sanction and under the directionof the general council, unite or co-operate in conducting theexaminations required for qualifications to be registered s 19, 37 and 38 vict , c 34 the privy council may suspend the right of registration in respect ofqualifications granted by any college or body 21 after such revocation, no person shall be entitled to register inrespect to any qualification granted by such college before revocation22 the privy council may issue an injunction directing any body entitledto grant qualifications to desist from imposing upon any candidatefor examination an obligation to adopt or refrain from adoptingthe practice of any writingicular theory of medicine or surgery as atest or condition of admitting him to examination or granting hima certificate. And in the event of their not complying, may orderthat such body cease to have the power of conferring a right to beregistered so long as they shall continue such practice 23 where any person entitled to be registered applies to the registrarof any branch council for that purpose, such registrar is requiredforthwith to enter in a local register the name and place of residence, and the qualifications in respect of which the person is so entitledand the date of registration. And in case of the branch council forscotland or ireland, to send to the registrar of the general council acopy of the entry, and the registrar of the general council is requiredto cause the same to be entered in the general register. And suchregistrar is required to cause all entries made in the local registerfor england to be entered in the general register 25 no qualification is entered on the register, on the first registrationor by way of addition to a regular name, unless the registrar besatisfied by proper evidence that the person claiming it is entitled toit any appeal from the decision of the registrar may be decided by thegeneral council or by the council for england, scotland, or ireland, asthe case may be any entry proved to the satisfaction of such generalcouncil or branch council to have been fraudulently or incorrectly mademay be erased from the register by an order in writing of such generalcouncil or branch council 26 medical register - the registrar of the general council is requiredto cause to be printed, published, and sold under the direction ofsuch council, every year, a correct register of the names with therespective residences and medical titles, diplomas, and qualificationsconferred by any corporation or university or by a doctorate of thearchbishop of canterbury, with the dates thereof, of all personsappearing on the general register as existing on january 1st in everyyear such register is called the medical register, and a copy ofthe medical register for the time being is evidence that the personstherein specified are registered according to the act, and the absenceof the name of any person from such copy is evidence, until thecontrary be made to appear, that such person is not so registered;provided, that in the case of any person whose name does not appearin such copy, a certified copy under the hand of the registrar of thegeneral council or a branch council of the entry of the name of suchperson on the general or local register shall be evidence that suchperson is so registered 27 if any college or body exercise any power it possess of striking offfrom its list the name of any one of its members, it shall signifyhis name to the general council and the said council may, if they seefit, direct the registrar to erase from the register the qualificationderived from such college or body in respect of which such member wasregistered, and the registrar shall note the same therein, but the nameof no person shall be erased from the register on the ground of hishaving adopted any theory of medicine or surgery 28 if any registered medical practitioner shall be convicted in england orireland of any felony or misdemeanor, or in scotland of any crime oroffence, or shall be after due inquiry judged by the general council tohave been guilty of infamous conduct in any professional respect, thegeneral council may, if they see fit, direct the registrar to erase thename of such medical practitioner from the register 29 every person registered who may have obtained any higher degree orother qualification is entitled to have it inserted in the registerin substitution for or in addition to his qualification previouslyregistered, on the payment of such fee as the council may appoint30 compensation - no person is entitled to receive for any medical orsurgical advice, or attendance, or for the performance of any operationor for any medicine which he shall have both prescribed and supplied, unless he prove upon the trial that he is registered under this act32, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 7, s 3 definition - the words “legally qualified medical practitioner” or“duly qualified medical practitioner, ” or any words implying a personrecognized by law as a medical practitioner or member of the medicalprofession in any act of parliament, mean a person registered underthis act 34, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 7, s 3 exemptions - if they so desire, registered persons are exempt fromserving on juries, and in all corporation, parish, ward, hundred, andtown offices, and in the militia 35 disqualifications - no unregistered person is permitted to hold anyappointment as a physician, surgeon, or other medical officer in themilitary or naval service, or in emigrant or other vessels, or in anyhospital, infirmary, dispensary, or lying-in hospital, not supportedwholly by voluntary contributions, or in any lunatic asylum, jail, penitentiary, house of correction or of industry, parochial or unionworkhouse or poor-house, parish union, or other public establishedbody or institution, or to any friendly or other society for affordingmutual relief in sickness, infirmity, or old age, or as a medicalofficer of health 36, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 7, s 3 no certificate required by any act from any physician or surgeonlicentiate in medicine and surgery, or other medical practitioner, isvalid unless the signer be registered under this act 37, asamended 23 and 24 vict , c 7, s 3 penalty - wilfully procuring or attempting to procure one self to beregistered by making or producing or causing to be made or producedany false or fraudulent representation or declaration, or aiding orabetting therein, is a misdemeanor in england and ireland, and inscotland a crime or offence, punishable by fine or imprisonment theimprisonment cannot exceed twelve months 39 wilfully and falsely pretending to be or taking or using the nameor title of physician, doctor of medicine, licentiate in medicineand surgery, bachelor of medicine, surgeon, general practitioner, orapothecary, or any name, title, addition, or description implyingregistration under this act, or recognition by law as a physician orsurgeon or licentiate in medicine and surgery, or practitioner inmedicine, or apothecary, is punishable on summary conviction by apenalty not exceeding £20 40, 41 deceased physicians - every registrar of deaths in the united kingdom, on receiving notice of the death of any medical practitioner, isrequired to transmit to the registrar of the general council and theregistrar of the branch council a certificate of such death with thetime and place, and on the receipt of such certificate the medicalregistrar is required to erase the name of the deceased from theregister 45 exceptions - the general council was by the act empowered by specialorder to dispense with such provisions of this act or such writing of anyregulations made by its authority as to them should seem fit, in favorof persons at the time of its passage practising medicine or surgeryin any writing of her majesty dominions other than great britain andireland by virtue of any of the qualifications in schedule a, and infavor of persons practising medicine or surgery within the unitedkingdom on foreign or colonial diplomas or degrees before the passageof this act, and in favor of any persons who had held appointments assurgeons or assistant surgeons in the army, navy, or militia, or in theservice of the east india company, or who were acting as surgeons inthe public service, or in the service of any charitable institution, and in favor of medical students who commenced their professionalstudies before its passage 46 the qualifications specified in schedule a are as follows:1 fellow, member inserted 22 vict , c 21, s 4, licentiate, orextra licentiate of the royal college of physicians of london this isdeclared by 23 and 24 vict , c 66, s 1, to denote the corporation of“the president and college or commonalty of the faculty of physics inlondon” the act makes provision for a new charter with change ofname to “the royal college of physicians of england, ” or retention ofold name. S 47, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 66, s 2 2 fellow, member inserted 22 vict , c 21, s 4, or licentiate ofthe royal college of physicians of edinburgh the act makes provisionfor the granting of a new charter to the royal college of physicians ofedinburgh, whereby its name is to be changed to “the royal college ofphysicians of scotland, ” or its old name may be retained. S 49, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 66, s 2 3 fellow or licentiate of the king and queen college of physiciansof ireland the act makes provision for the granting of a new charterto this college, whereby its name is to be changed to “the royalcollege of physicians of ireland, ” or its old name may be retained. S 51, as amended 23 and 24 vict , c 66, s 2 4 fellow or member or licentiate in midwifery of the royal college ofsurgeons of england 5 fellow or licentiate of the royal college of surgeons of edinburgh see 6, below 6 fellow or licentiate of the faculty of physicians and surgeons ofglasgow the act makes provision for the possible amalgamation of theroyal college of surgeons of edinburgh with the faculty of physiciansand surgeons of glasgow, in which case the united corporation is to benamed “the royal college of surgeons of scotland:” s 50 7 fellow or licentiate of the royal college of surgeons in ireland 8 licentiate of the society of apothecaries, london 9 licentiate of the apothecaries’ hall, dublin 10 doctor or bachelor or licentiate of medicine, or master in surgeryof any university of the united kingdom. Or doctor of medicine, bydoctorate granted prior to the passage of the act by the archbishop ofcanterbury 11 doctor of medicine of any foreign or colonial university orcollege, practising as a physician in the united kingdom before october1st, 1858, who shall produce certificates to the satisfaction of thecouncil, of his having taken his degree of doctor of medicine after aregular examination, or who shall satisfy the council under sec 46 amended 22 vict , c 21, s 5 of this act, that there is sufficientreason for admitting him to be registered nothing in the above act shall prevent any person, not a britishsubject, who shall have obtained from any foreign university a degreeor diploma of doctor in medicine, and who shall have passed the regularexaminations entitling him to practise medicine in his own country, from being and acting as the resident physician or medical officer ofany hospital established exclusively for the relief of foreigners insickness. Provided always such person is engaged in no medical practiceexcept as such resident physician or medical officer 22 vict , c 21, s 6 the following qualification was added by 23 and 24 vict , c 7, s 1:a diploma or license in surgery granted by any university in irelandlegally authorized to grant the same the act 39 and 40 vict , c 40, in sec 3, provides that all personswho have obtained from any university of the united kingdom legallyauthorized to confer the same, the degree of bachelor in surgery, shallbe permitted to register the same as a qualification under 21 and 22vict , c 90 the diploma of a member of the king and queen college of physiciansin ireland, and the degree of master in obstetrics of any university inthe united kingdom are added to the qualifications in schedule a of themedical act of 1858 49 and 50 vict , c 48, s 20 the change of name of any of the corporations named in 21 and 22 vict , c 90, is not to alter or affect the qualifications constituted by theact 23 and 24 vict , c 66, s 3 revocation of license - the society of apothecaries may strikeoff from the list of licentiates of said society the name of anyperson who shall be convicted in england or ireland of any felony ormisdemeanor, or in scotland of any crime or offence, or who shall, after due inquiry, be judged by the general council to have beenguilty of infamous conduct in any professional respect, and the saidsociety shall forthwith signify to the general council the name of thelicentiate so stricken off 37 and 38 vict , c 34, s 4 women - the society of apothecaries is not relieved from any existingobligation, nor deprived of any right, to admit women to theexaminations required for certificates to practise as apothecaries, orto enter the lists of licentiates of said society, any women who shallhave satisfactorily passed such examinations, and fulfilled the othergeneral conditions imposed upon persons seeking to obtain from the saidsociety a qualification to be registered under 21 and 22 vict , c 905 the act 39 and 40 vict , c 41, extends the powers of every bodyentitled under 21 and 22 vict , c 90, to grant qualifications forregistration so that it may grant any qualification for registrationgranted by such body without distinction of sex but nothing in thisact is compulsory the medical act of 1886 49 and 50 vict , c 48 modified the foregoingacts as follows:examination - a person cannot lawfully be registered under the medicalacts in respect of any qualification referred to in any of those actsunless he has passed such qualifying examination in medicine, surgery, and midwifery as is in this act mentioned 49 and 50 vict , c 48, s 2 a qualifying examination shall be an examination in medicine, surgery, and midwifery held for the purpose of granting a diploma or diplomasconferring the right of registration under the medical acts, by any ofthe following bodies. A any university in the united kingdom, or any medical corporationlegally qualified at the time of the passage of this act to grant suchdiploma or diplomas in respect of medicine or surgery. Or b any combination of two or more medical corporations in the samewriting of the united kingdom, who may agree to hold a joint examinationin medicine, surgery, and midwifery, and of whom one at least iscapable of granting such diploma as aforesaid in respect of medicine, and one at least is capable of granting such diploma in respect ofsurgery. Or c any combination of any such university as aforesaid with anyother such university or universities, or of any such university oruniversities with a medical corporation or corporations. The bodiesforming such combination being in the same writing of the united kingdom3 1 the standard of proficiency at said examinations shall be such assuffices to guarantee the possession of knowledge and skill requisitefor the efficient practice of medicine, surgery, and midwifery itis the duty of the general council to secure the maintenance of suchstandard of proficiency, and it may appoint such number of inspectorsas it may determine who shall attend at all or any of the saidexaminations 3 2 the inspectors are not to interfere with the conduct of anyexamination, but to report to the general council their opinion asto the sufficiency or insufficiency of every examination which theyattend, and such other matters in relation thereto as the generalcouncil may require 3 3 if it appears to the general council that the standard of proficiencyin medicine, surgery, and midwifery, or in any of those subjects orany branch thereof required at such examinations by any such body, isinsufficient, the privy council, on a report from the general councilafter considering such report, and any objection thereto by any bodyto which it relates, may by order declare that the examination ofsuch body or bodies shall not be deemed a qualifying examination forregistration, and her majesty, with the advice of the privy council, may revoke such order if upon further report from the general council, or any body to which it relates, it seems to her expedient 41 during the continuance of such order, the examinations held by thebody or bodies to which it relates shall not be deemed qualifyingexaminations, and a diploma granted to a person passing suchexaminations shall not entitle such person to registration 42 if a medical corporation represent to the general council that itis unable to enter into a combination for holding a qualifyingexamination, and the general council is satisfied that the saidcorporation has used its best endeavor to do so on reasonable terms, the general council may on the application of such corporation appointany number of examiners to assist at the examinations for granting adiploma conferring on the holder the right of registration 51 it is the duty of the said assistant examiners to secure at the saidexaminations the maintenance of such standard of proficiency inmedicine, surgery, and midwifery as is required from candidates atqualifying examinations, and any examination held subject to thissection shall be deemed a qualifying examination 5 2 practitioner rights - a registered medical practitioner shall beentitled to practise medicine, surgery, and midwifery in the unitedkingdom, and subject to any local law, in any other writing of hermajesty dominions, and to recover in due course of law in respectof such practice, any expenses or charges in respect of medicamentsor other appliances, or any fees to which he may be entitled, unlesshe is a fellow of a college of physicians, the fellows of which areprohibited by by-law from recovering at law their expenses, charges orfees, in which case such prohibitory by-law, so long as it is in force, may be pleaded in bar of any legal proceeding instituted by such fellowfor recovery of expenses, charges, or fees 6 members of general council - the constituent members of the generalcouncil are designated by this act in sec 7 members of the general council representing the registered medicalprofession must themselves be registered medical practitioners, andmembers of the branch council for the writing of the united kingdom inwhich they are elected 8 colonial and foreign practitioners - when a person shows to thesatisfaction of the registrar of the general council that he holdsessay recognized colonial medical diploma or diplomas granted to himin a british possession to which this act applies, and that he is ofgood character, and is by law entitled to practise medicine, surgery, and midwifery in such british possession, he shall on application tothe said registrar, and on the payment of such fee not exceeding £5, as the general council may determine, be entitled without examinationin the united kingdom to be registered as a colonial practitioner inthe medical register. Provided he proves to the satisfaction of theregistrar.

For it should be remembered that the portion of poisonremaining in the alimentary tract is but the residue of the dosewhich had been sufficient to destroy life, and if the processes ofelimination have been rapid no trace of the poison will be found in thealimentary canal but can readily be detected in other organs again, the poison may not have been introduced by the mouth, in which casenone may be found in the digestive tract the chemist should receive, besides the stomach and entire intestinalcanal, the liver, one or both kidneys, the spleen, a piece of musclefrom the leg, the brain, and any urine found in the bladder when it is impossible for any reason to obtain the whole of any organ, the writing removed should be carefully weighed and its proportion to therest of the organ noted it is also of extreme importance to preserve in sealed and labelledjars those writings of a body which may show the evidence of disease, oron the appearance of which one evidence is founded order of autopsy in gre essay examples making the autopsy, the operator should stand on the right side ofthe body and make the incision by grasping the knife firmly in thehand, and cutting with the whole of the blade and not with the point the knife should be swept along from the shoulder rather than from thewrist, thus making a long, smooth, deep cut. Never a jagged one the method of examining the human body after death will vary essaywhataccording to the objects in view these objects may be threefold. 1to ascertain whether a person has died from violence or poison. 2 toestablish the cause of death, especially if it has been sudden. And 3to ascertain the lesion of a disease, or to confirm a diagnosis the only difference between a medico-legal and pathological autopsyis that in the former case everything which might subserve the endsof justice should be carefully noted, and the changes found mostaccurately described. Especially any abnormalities found on theexternal examination of the body a photograph should be taken of thebody the head should be opened and the brain examined first, and not last, as is often done in the ordinary autopsy careful notes should be taken during each step of the examination, tobe reread, verified, and signed at the completion of the autopsy it must be remembered that most of the lesions of disease which arefound, indicate the disease rather than the cause of death. That oftenthe lesion found will seem hardly extensive enough to cause death, andthat from accidents and injuries apparently trivial, death may result it must often be acknowledged that no sufficient cause of death can befound, but the more accurate and careful the examinations especiallywhen a microscopical examination of the organs is made the fewer willbe the number of such paper if no apparent lesion is found, it mustnot be forgotten that thesis poisons destroy life and leave no trace thatthe pathologist can discover care should always be exercised not to mistake the ordinary post-mortemappearance which we find at autopsies for the lesions of disease the examination of the human body, whether it be made from amedico-legal or pathological standpoint, is divided into two maindivisions. 1 the external examination, and 2 the internal examination external examination its minuteness will depend on the character of the case, as when theperson is unknown, or when suspected to have died from unnaturalcauses in such paper the external examination is very important the following are the steps to be followed. 1 give a general description of the body. Apparent age, height, andweight of the individual.

Rec de mém de méd , etc , paris, 1869, xxii , pp 443, 444 - soldier, age 32, while drunk, strangled gre essay examples himself with hishandkerchief, wrapping thesis folds around his neck, making a deep furrowwithout ecchymosis. Face pale, eyes closed, lips writingly closed 38 borchard. Jour de méd de bordeaux, 1860, v , p 349 etseq - collation of paper of suicide by strangulation. First, anofficer who placed his sabre scabbard under his cravat second, awoman strangled herself with a silk cravat, tightly tied third, a mantied the sleeve of his jacket around his neck and fastened the end toa window, so that the strangulation was writingly due to suspension fourth, a woman strangled by a cord 39 hofmann. Wien med presse, 1879, xx , p 16, et seq alsolehrbuch, p 559 - woman, age 20, found dead in bath-room, with athick thread passed three times around the neck, and tied tightly infront at the second and third turns. So tightly that even after cuttingthe cords the pressure continued no signs of violence illustration 40 zillner. Wien med woch , 1880, xxx , pp 969, 999 - woman, age33. Found dead on the floor. A neck-handkerchief tied in a firm knot infront of the neck. And underneath, a cord passed twice around the neckand knotted in front in the middle line between the larynx and hyoidbone blood was flowing from the ears no sign of violence or struggle 41 bollinger. Friedreich blätter f ger med , 1889, xl , p 3 - man, age 48. Melancholic. Found dead had torn up writing of a sheet, fastened it around his neck and the ends around a bed-post, then placedhis feet against the farther post and pressed, tightening the ligature illustration 42 roth. Ibid , p 9 - man, age 68.

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1 biniodol severe, 33 3 gre essay examples. Mild, 35 9. None, 10 3. unrecorded, 20 5 2 without guaiacol severe, 12 2. Mild, 36 8. None, 39 0. unrecorded, 12 2 3 with guaiacol severe, 18 9. Mild, 67 5. None, 8 1. unrecorded, 5 5 the manufacturer of biniodol supplied the names of several physicianswho have used that preparation in their practice correspondence withthese elicited the following statements:one had used biniodol in forty-eight paper and states that “only a fewpatients complain of pain at all and then only of a general soreness inthe muscle ” this physician reports a limited experience with the useof another manufacturer “mercury biniodide oil solution” apparentlysix paper, but severe pain following the injections made it necessaryto abandon that preparation another of these physicians named by the manufacturer, withoutreference to any series of paper, reports that “biniodol is superior toany oily solution of mercury biniodid that i have tried ”a third physician has “used it biniodol a few times” and is“convinced that it has no special action or virtue” over “any redmercuric iodide in oil ”this evidence, in its most favorable estimate, shows biniodol to bea good 1 per cent solution of mercuric iodid in oil, but fails tojustify attributing to the preparation any unique characteristics thepreparations made in the laboratory were as satisfactory, or betterthan the biniodol, and the presence or absence of the guaiacol was ofno consequence biniodol conflicts with rule 6, since claims of superior therapeuticefficiency made for it are not established.