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Good Compare And Contrast Essay Topics


As also any vein or sinews that are cut, and willdraw forth any broken bone or splinter, thorn good compare and contrast essay topics or other things got intothe flesh it is no less profitable for old sores or filthy ulcers, yea, tho’ they be fistulous and hollow but essay do advise to put alittle salt for this purpose, being applied with a little hog lard, it helps a plague sore, and other boils and pushes the fumes of thedecoction while it is warm, received by a funnel into the ears, easesthe pains of them, destroys the worms and cures the running sores inthem the juice dropped into them does the same the root of betonyis displeasing both to the taste and stomach, whereas the leaves andflowers, by their sweet and spicy taste, are comfortable both to meatand medicine these are essay of the thesis virtues anthony muse, an expert physician for it was not the practice of octavius cæsar to keep fools abouthim, appropriates to betony. It is a very precious herb, that iscertain, and most fitting to be kept in a man house, both in syrup, conserve, oil, ointment and plaister the flowers are usually conserved the beech tree in treating of this tree, you must understand, that i mean the greenmast beech, which is by way of distinction from that other small roughsort, called in sussex the smaller beech, but in essex horn-beam i suppose it is needless to describe it, being already too well knownto my countrymen place it grows in woods amongst oaks and other trees, and in parks, forests, and chases, to feed deer. And in other places to fatten swine time it blooms in the end of april, or beginning of may, for themost writing, and the fruit is ripe in september government and virtues it is a plant of saturn, and thereforeperforms his qualities and proportion in these operations the leavesof the beech tree are cooling and binding, and therefore good to beapplied to hot swellings to discuss them. The nuts do much nourish suchbeasts as feed thereon the water that is found in the hollow placesof decaying beeches will cure both man and beast of any scurf, orrunning tetters, if they be washed therewith. You may boil the leavesinto a poultice, or make an ointment of them when time of year serves bilberries, called by essay whorts, and whortle-berries descript of these i shall only speak of two sorts which are commonin england, viz the black and red berries and first of the black the small bush creeps along upon the ground, scarcely rising half ayard high, with divers small green leaves set in the green branches, not always one against the other, and a little dented about the edges:at the foot of the leaves come forth small, hollow, pale, bluishcoloured flowers, the brims ending at five points, with a reddishthread in the middle, which pass into small round berries of thebigness and colour of juniper berries, but of a purple, sweetish sharptaste. The juice of them gives a purplish colour in their hands andlips that eat and handle them, especially if they break them theroot grows aslope under ground, shooting forth in sundry places as itcreeps this loses its leaves in winter the red bilberry, or whortle-bush, rises up like the former, havingsundry hard leaves, like the box-tree leaves, green and round pointed, standing on the several branches, at the top whereof only, and not fromthe sides, as in the former, come forth divers round, reddish, sappyberries, when they are ripe, of a sharp taste the root runs in theground, as in the former, but the leaves of this abide all winter place the first grows in forests, on the heaths, and such likebarren places. The red grows in the north writings of this land, aslancashire, yorkshire, &c time they flower in march and april, and the fruit of the black isripe in july and august government and virtues they are under the dominion of jupiter itis a pity they are used no more in physic than they are the black bilberries are good in hot agues and to cool the heat of theliver and stomach. They do essaywhat bind the belly, and stay vomitingand loathings. The juice of the berries made in a syrup, or the pulpmade into a conserve with sugar, is good for the purposes aforesaid, as also for an old cough, or an ulcer in the lungs, or other diseasestherein the red worts are more binding, and stops women courses, spitting of blood, or any other flux of blood or humours, being used aswell outwardly as inwardly bifoil or twablade descript this small herb, from a root essaywhat sweet, shootingdownwards thesis long strings, rises up a round green stalk, bare ornaked next the ground for an inch, two or three to the middle thereofas it is in age or growth.

After floating on the surface of the water for a time, thegases escape and the body sinks, rising a second time when fresh gashas formed the rapidity of decomposition in water varies, being most rapid whenthe temperature is from 64° to 68° f stagnant as well as shallow waterfavors putrefaction if a body becomes coated with mud the change isdelayed submersion in a cesspool also retards it, and the conditionsare such as to favor the formation of adipocere after a body has been removed from the water an exposure of a very fewhours to the air causes rapid decomposition, so that in twenty-fourhours more marked changes good compare and contrast essay topics may occur than would have resulted from afortnight longer submersion the face soon becomes bloated and black, so that identification is well-nigh impossible it is quite importantin medico-legal paper to estimate the time which has elapsed sincedeath in bodies found submersed in water the following are the variouschanges ordinarily seen at different periods of time, as estimated bydevergie, who has especially investigated the subject:first four or five days - little change. Rigor mortis may persist, writingicularly if the water is cold fourth or fifth day - skin of the ball of the thumb and littlefinger, also the lateral surface of the fingers, begins to whiten thiswhitening gradually extends to the palms of the hands and soles of thefeet the skin of the face will appear softened and of a more fadedwhite than the rest of the body fifteenth day - face slightly swollen and red. A greenish spotbegins to form on the neck and skin of the mid-sternum the skin of thehands and feet is quite white and wrinkled the subcutaneous cellulartissue of the thorax is reddish and the upper writing of the corticalsubstance of the brain of a greenish tint at one month - the face is reddish-brown, the eyelids and lips greenand swollen, and the neck slightly green a greenish discoloration isalso seen over the upper and middle writing of the sternum the skin iswrinkled the hair and nails still remain intact the scrotum and penisare distended by gas the lungs become very emphysematous and overlapthe heart saponification when the bodies were removed from the cimetière des innocents in paris, in 1786, fourcray observed that thesis of them had been converted intoa substance which he termed adipocere he gave it this name becauseit resembles both fat adeps and wax cera under certaincircumstances which will be considered later, it is known to be alate product of the putrefactive processes adipocere is a substanceof a cheese-like consistency, yellow or yellowish-brown in color, and composed chiefly of a mixture of the fatty acids chevreul hasshown by analysis that it is a true ammoniacal soap, but that whenformed in water impregnated with lime a calcareous may be substitutedfor an ammoniacal base this may take place either in a body exposedto river-water or buried in a grave wet by water containing calciumcarbonate or sulphate saponification can only take place when animalfat is in contact with nitrogenous matter neither fat nor fibrin whenkept separate will saponify skin deprived of all its fat will not betransformed into adipocere saponification commences in the fat of the female breast, of the cheeksand other writings of the body where large accumulations of fat are found, such as around the kidneys and in the omentum as fat is distributedextensively throughout the body, nearly all writings may undergo thistransformation taylor gives the following conditions as favorable tothe change:1 bodies of young persons, because the fat is abundant and chieflyexternal 2 bodies of corpulent adults 3 exposure of bodies to the soil of water-closets 4 the immersion of bodies in water, the change taking place morerapidly in running than in stagnant water 5 humid soil, especially when bodies are placed in it one upon theother in this case the lowest of them is first changed when a body has been completely saponified it may remain in this statefor years in one instance, after seventeen years’ burial thesis of theorgans could still be recognized the time required for saponification to take place is essaytimes ofmedico-legal importance three years are usually necessary for bodiesburied in the earth the change occurs more rapidly in water paper arerecorded where the body of a new-born child was completely saponifiedin six weeks, and again, the change had commenced in a body which hadbeen in the water about four months. But these are unusual paper data upon which opinion as to time of death is formed the changes which take place in a body before putrefaction sets in mayenable a medical jurist to form an opinion as to the probable timewhich has elapsed since death. Yet it must be remembered, to pronouncethe time which has elapsed can only be done approximately, for verythesis conditions will have to be considered, which will vary in eachindividual case the importance of considering the minutest detail iswell illustrated by the death of prince de condé, duke of bourbon, who was found dead in his bedroom in the chateau of st cyr whendiscovered at 8 o’clock in the morning, the deceased was found writinglyundressed, hanging by his cravat to one of the window shutters thebody was cold and the lower extremities rigid as in asphyxia fromhanging the warmth of the body is usually preserved longer than undercommon circumstances, viz , from twelve to fifteen hours, before whichperiod rigidity is seldom complete, the medical examiner inferred thatthe deceased must have died very soon after he retired to his bedroomon the previous night as this was proven to have been 10 p m , itfollowed that only ten hours had elapsed a short time for cooling andrigidity to have taken place it was thus rendered probable that thehanging took place soon after deceased reached his bedroom it wasalleged that the duke had been murdered, and that his body had beenafterward suspended to create a suspicion of suicide the condition ofthe body was, among other things, adverse to this opinion from 10 to12 o’clock it was proved there were numerous attendants moving aboutnear the duke awritingments they would have heard any unusual noise theduke must have made in resisting his assailant but no noise was heardin the room at that or any other time, and the presumption of thisbeing a homicide was thus strongly rebutted cadaveric rigidity, while often it will aid to, is not a reliableguide when once it is established it may remain two, three, or fourdays, according to the season of the year and other circumstances, andwhen it exists there is no rule by which it can be determined whether abody has been in this state three hours or three days putrefaction, while appearing on an average, under a meantemperature, in from three to six days, is yet influenced by thesiscircumstances the heat and moisture of the surroundings, the age, sex, amount of flesh on the body, mode of death, position and coverings ofbody, all must be considered the temperature of the body aids us, yet the retention of warmth bythe abdominal viscera may be met with in a marked degree twenty hoursafter death. In one case, personally known to me, the thermometerregistered 76° f seventeen hours after death the temperature of the body, its rigidity, and the evidences ofputrefaction all furnish data from which we can estimate the probabletime which has elapsed since death it must be remembered that no oneof them furnishes any positive proof essay medical jurists have attempted to give a more definite characterto these changes in the recently dead body by dividing the intervalbetween the stopping of the heart action and the beginning ofputrefaction into three periods in the first, the warmth, pliability, and muscular irritability remain in the second, these conditions arelost and the body is cold and rigid in the third, the body is coldand pliant, the muscles are relaxed, and the joints are flexible, thecadaveric rigidity having entirely ceased there can be no doubt about the existence of these stages, but when wecome to define the precise time at which one begins and the other ends, we find it impossible for example, the first stage embraces a periodwhich cannot be more closely defined than by stating that the personmay have been dead from a few minutes to twenty hours a statement toovague to be upheld by a counsel who defends a prisoner the changes which take place in these periods and the average time theylast have been given as follows by devergie:first period, few minutes to twenty hours - characterized by warmthof the body and general or writingial relaxation of the voluntary muscles to what portion of this period the special case belongs must beestimated according to the degree of heat in the trunk and extremitiesand the degree of rigidity in the muscles, the neck and the jawscommonly showing this condition first, the legs last warmth of thebody rarely remains as long as twenty hours. In general it is sensiblycold in from ten to twelve hours during this period the muscles aresusceptible of contraction under the galvanic current, and in the earlystage under the stimulus of blows second period, ten hours to three days - the body is perfectly coldthroughout and rigidity is well marked the muscles no longer respondto stimuli the duration of this period seems long, yet in one instancethe body will be found cold and rigid nine hours after death again, cooling and rigidity may not come on for three or four days third period, three to eight days - the body is perfectly cold thelimbs and trunk pliant and free from cadaveric rigidity the musclesare not capable of contracting in summer this period is much shorter;often it will come on before three days putrefaction commences when a body is kept under the most favorableconditions, in from six to twelve days, as a slight greenishdiscoloration of the abdomen which gradually spreads throughout thebody the time at which putrefaction shows itself and the rapidity withwhich it advances is dependent upon so thesis factors, thesis of whichit is impossible often for the medical examiner to ascertain, thattoo much reliance must not be placed upon it casper estimates thefollowing to be the average changes generally found in the periods oftime given:twenty-four to seventy-two hours after death a slight green color isvisible over the centre of the abdomen the eyeballs are soft and yieldto external pressure three to five days after death the green color of the abdomen becomesintensified and general, spreading if the body be exposed to the air orburied in the ground in the following order. Genitals, breast, face, neck, upper and lastly lower extremities eight to ten days after death the discoloration becomes moreintense, the face and neck presenting a shade of reddish-green theramifications of the superficial veins on the neck, breast, and limbsbecome very apparent finally the patches congregate gases begin to bedeveloped and distend the abdomen and hollow organs and to form underthe skin in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissue the cornea fallsin and becomes concave the sphincter ani relaxes fourteen to twenty-one days after death the discoloration over thewhole body becomes intensely green, with brownish-red or brownish-blackpatches the body is bloated and appears greatly increased in sizefrom the development of gases within the abdomen, thorax, and scrotum, and also in the cellular tissue of the body generally the swollencondition of the eyelids, lips, nose, and cheeks is usually of suchextent as to obliterate the features and to destroy the identity of thebody the epidermis peels off in patches, while in certain writings, morewritingicularly the feet, it will be raised in blisters filled with red orgreenish liquid, the cuticle underneath frequently appearing blanched the color of the iris is lost the nails easily separate and the hairbecomes loosened fourth to sixth month after death the thorax and abdomen burst and thesutures of the skull give way from the development of gases within thehead the viscera appear pulpy, or perhaps disappear, leaving the bonesexposed the bones of the extremities separate at the joints at anadvanced stage the soft writings gradually disappear in giving an opinion as to how long a time has elapsed since death whena body has undergone marked putrefactive changes, we must considercarefully not only the conditions of the organs, but the mode of deathand the “surroundings ” by these i mean the quantity of clothing worn, the depth of the grave in which the body has been interred, the seasonof the year, the heat and moisture of the atmosphere the questionessaytimes presents itself to the medical examiner, of two personsfound dead, which died first?. the importance of this point was wellillustrated in the “lizzie borden case ” by a careful consideration ofall the conditions presented by each body in the ways i have indicated, the question will not ordinarily be a difficult one to decide themedico-legal considerationofwounds, includingpunctured and incised wounds, and wounds made by blunt instrumentsother than gunshot wounds bygeorge woolsey, a b , m d , professor of anatomy and clinical surgery in the medical dewritingment ofthe university of the city of new york. Surgeon to bellevue hospital;member medical society of the county of new york, new york academy ofmedicine, new york surgical society, etc , etc wounds general considerations the different kinds of wounds the surgical and medico-legal ideas of wounds are quite different, thelatter including the former as well as other varieties of injuries definitions - surgically a wound means a solution of continuity andrefers to every such lesion produced by external violence or developingspontaneously the medico-legal acceptation of the term is much broaderand includes any injury or lesion caused by mechanical or chemicalmeans vibert601 quotes foderé as defining a wound medico-legally as, “every lesion of the human body by a violent cause of which the resultsare, singly or combined, concussion, contusion, puncture, incision, tear, burn, twist, fracture, luxation, etc. Whether the cause isdirected against the body or the body against the cause ” the sameauthor quotes another definition of a wound as, “every lesion howeverslight, resulting in concerning or affecting the body or health of anindividual ” taylor602 defines a wound in a medico-legal sense as “abreach of continuity in the structures of the body whether external orinternal, suddenly occasioned by mechanical violence ” thus, the termwound in its medico-legal acceptation includes not only surgical woundsbut contusions, fractures, burns, concussion, etc in france at leastthe voluntary inoculation of syphilis has been considered as comingunder the category of wounds 603medico-legally, the severity of a wound is much more important thanthe kind of wound thus we may consider wounds according to theircomparative gravity, as mortal, severe, or slight a mortal wound is one which is directly fatal to life in acomparatively short time, usually from hemorrhage, shock, or the injuryof a vital writing a wound may result fatally without being a mortalwound, as when a slight wound causes death on account of essay woundinfection severe wounds, or “wounds causing grievous bodily harm, ” as they havelong been called, do not put life in imminent danger, though they maybe inconvenient or detrimental to health pollock, c b , says that awound causing grievous bodily harm is “any wound requiring treatment ”a medical opinion or certificate may be required as to the danger of agiven wound, and on this opinion may depend the question of bail forthe prisoner by the danger of a wound in such a case is usually meantimminent danger, as any wound may be remotely dangerous to life slight wounds, as already stated, may result fatally under certainconditions under the french practice a slight wound is one which doesnot incapacitate one from work for more than twenty days looked atin another way, slight or severe wounds may be classified accordingas they are completely curable, leaving no infirmity or disturbanceof function, or not completely curable the latter are such as arenecessarily followed by permanent or temporary infirmity the question as to the severity of any given wound may essaytimes beleft to the jury to decide from the description of the wound, or amedical opinion may be required although the intent of the assailant is often of equal or greaterimportance than the severity or kind of wound, yet this can onlyoccasionally be inferred from the surgical aspects of the wound the classes of wounds to be treated in the following pages are incisedand punctured wounds and wounds with blunt instruments, essay of thecharacteristics of which we will now consider incised wounds are such as are produced by a cutting instrument, andthey are distinguished by the following characteristics. They measuremore in length than in the other dimensions they are usually straightin direction, though not infrequently curved, and they may even bezig-zag, especially where the skin lies in folds the edges of anincised wound are linear, and show no signs of contusion they areeither inverted or everted and the edges and sides of the wound areretracted the eversion of the skin is due to its elasticity, but inessay regions of the body, e g , in the scrotum, etc , the skin isinverted owing to the contraction of the muscle fibres immediatelybeneath the gaping of the wound is due to the retraction of thedivided muscles and fibrous structures it varies according as themuscles are cut directly across or more lengthwise, and in proportionto the distance of the wound from the points of attachment of themuscles the fibrous tissues, fasciæ, and aponeuroses retract less, and so givea essaywhat irregular surface to a large wound ogston604 divides incised wounds into three writings, the commencement, centre, and end, of which the end often has two or more serrationsdiffering from the commencement, which has but a single point thereare often one or more slight, superficial, tentative incisions situatedalmost always, though not invariably, near the commencement 605 thedeepest writing of the wound is more often near the commencement ifthere are angular flaps on the edges their free angles point to thecommencement of the wound coagula and clots of blood are to be found in the wound, more or lessfilling it up if it has not been interfered with on examination theends of the divided vessels are found plugged with clots which mayprotrude essaywhat from their openings if the wound is seen very shortly after its infliction, hemorrhage isin progress, and the divided arteries show their position by theirindividual, intermittent jets of blood the severity of incised woundsdepends upon the amount of hemorrhage, which is greater the deeper andlarger the wound, and the more vascular the tissues in which it occurs, especially if large and important vessels are concerned in the lattercase an incised wound may be very rapidly fatal incised wounds present the least favorable conditions for thespontaneous arrest of hemorrhage of any form of wounds the edges of anincised wound may be quite rough and even dentated or lacerated if theedge of the weapon be rough and irregular the kind and condition of a weapon which has produced a given incisedwound may often be learned by an examination of the characteristics ofthe wound weapons cutting by their weight as well as by the sharpness of theiredges, such as axes, etc , may cause a certain amount of contusionabout a wound.

And a second violation, in addition to a fine, ispunishable with imprisonment in the county jail for thirty days. Andin no case wherein the act is violated shall the violator receive acompensation for services rendered 2, 451 kentucky qualification - it is unlawful for any person to practise medicinein any of its branches who has not exhibited and registered in thecounty clerk office, in the county in which he resides, his authorityto practise, with his age, address, place of birth, and the schoolor system of medicine to which he proposes to belong the personregistering must subscribe and verify by oath before such clerk anaffidavit containing such facts, which, if wilfully false, subjects theaffiant to punishment for perjury act 1893, april 10th, s 2 authority to practise shall be a certificate from the state board ofhealth issued to any reputable physician who is practising, or whodesires to begin to practise, who possesses a diploma from a reputablemedical college legally chartered under the laws of this state, or adiploma from a reputable and legally chartered medical college of essayother state or country, indorsed as such by said board, or satisfactoryevidence from the applicant that he was reputably and honorably engagedin the practice of medicine in the state prior to february 23d, 1864 applicants may present their credentials by mail or proxy 3 nothing in the law authorizes any itinerant doctor to register orpractise medicine 4 the board may refuse a certificate to any individual guilty of grosslyunprofessional conduct of a character likely to deceive or defraud thepublic, and may, after due notice and hearing, revoke such certificatesfor like cause in paper of refusal or revocation the applicant mayappeal to the governor, whose decision affirming or overruling thedecision of the board shall be final 5 systems, exceptions - the law does not discriminate against anypeculiar school or system of medicine, nor prohibit women frompractising midwifery, nor prohibit gratuitous services in case ofemergency, nor apply to commissioned surgeons in the united statesarmy, navy, or marine hospital service, nor to a legally qualifiedphysician of another state called to see a writingicular case or family, but who does not open an office or appoint a place in the state to meetpatients or receive calls 6 penalty - any person living in this state or coming into this state whoshall practise medicine or attempt to practise medicine in any of itsbranches, or perform or attempt to perform any surgical operation foror upon any person for reward or compensation in violation of this law, shall be punished with a fine of $50, and on each subsequent convictionby a fine of $100 and imprisonment for thirty days, or either, or both;and in no case where any provision of this law has been violated shallthe violator be entitled to receive compensation for services rendered to open an office for such purpose or to announce to the public in anyother way a readiness to practise medicine in any county shall be toengage in the practice of medicine 8 fees - to the county clerk, for all services required, 50 cents s 1 louisiana constitutional provision - the general assembly must provide forthe interest of state medicine in all its dewritingments, and for theprotection of the people from unqualified practitioners of medicine const 1879, art 178 qualification - no person is allowed to practise medicine or surgery asa means of livelihood in any of its dewritingments without first makingaffidavit before a judge, justice of the peace, clerk of districtcourt, or notary public in the parish wherein he resides, of his havingreceived the degree of doctor of medicine from a regularly incorporatedmedical institution of respectable standing, in america or in europe, and designating its name and locality, and the date of his diploma;the degree is manifested by the diploma, and the respectable standingof the institution is evidenced by the indorsement or certificate ofthe state board of health, written on the face of the diploma, andsigned by its secretary. The affidavit must contain the full name ofthe person making the same, the date and place of his birth, and thenames of the places where he may have previously practised medicine orsurgery. A record of the diplomas certified must be presented by thestate board of health, and copies thereof, certified by the secretary, are received in evidence the state board of health is requiredto certify the diploma of any medical institution of credit andrespectability without regard to its system of therapeutics and whetherthe same be regular, homœopathic, or eclectic act 1882, no 31, s 1 the affidavit required by sec 1 must be recorded in the office of theclerk of the district court of the parish. The clerk must certify therecordation by indorsement on the original affidavit, which the affiantmust transmit to the state board of health. A copy of the originalaffidavit, duly certified by the clerk of the court, is admissible inevidence 2 exceptions - the provisions of the act do not apply to femalepractitioners of midwifery as such, nor to persons who had beenpractising medicine or surgery in the state without diplomas for fiveyears prior to the passage of the act, nor to persons who had beenpractising medicine or surgery from a regularly incorporated medicalinstitution of reputable standing in america or in europe, for tenyears prior to the passage of the act, provided such a practitionermake affidavit before a judge, justice of the peace, notary public, or the clerk of the court of the parish wherein he resides, settingforth the full name of the affiant, the date and place of his birth, the date of his diploma, if he have any, the name and locality of theinstitution by which it was made, the date and place where he began thepractice of medicine in louisiana, and the names of the places where hemay have previously practised medicine or surgery such affidavit mustbe transmitted or delivered to the state board of health, and entitlesthe affiant to be placed on the list of registered physicians orsurgeons the state board of health must preserve said affidavits, anda copy signed by the secretary is received in evidence by the courts to make a false affidavit is perjury 3 evidence - a copy of the affidavit recorded by the clerk of thedistrict court, certified by him, is prima facie evidence that theperson making the affidavit is a duly registered physician or surgeon, and a certified copy of the original affidavit filed with the stateboard of health, or a certificate emanating from the said board, thatthe name of the person mentioned in the certificate is on the list ofregistered physicians and surgeons, is conclusive evidence s 4 it is the duty of the state board of health to publish annually in theofficial journal of the state, and if there is none, in one of thedaily newspapers published in new orleans, a list of the registeredphysicians and surgeons, and their places of residence, and suchpublished list is evidence in the courts that the person is dulyregistered the board is required to strike from said list the namesof persons convicted of any infamous crimes by any court of this stateor of the united states, or of any state of the united states, whetherprior or posterior to registration. And is empowered to strike from thelist persons who die after registration 5 civil penalty - a practitioner of medicine or surgery failing to complywith this act shall not be exempt from military or jury duty, nor bepermitted to collect fees for services rendered, nor be allowed totestify as a medical or surgical expert in legal or state medicine, in any court, nor to execute any certificate as surgeon or physician, nor to hold any medical office, nor to be recognized by the state, orany parish, or municipal corporation, as a physician or surgeon, norentitled to enjoy any of the privileges, rights, or exemptions grantedto physicians and surgeons by the laws of this state. And shall forfeit$100 for each violation, to be recovered in a civil action in the nameof and for the benefit of the charity hospital at new orleans, and inaddition shall be subject to criminal prosecution 6 exceptions - the act is not applicable to practitioners of medicine orsurgery residing and practising in other states, who may be summoned inspecial instances to attend patients in the state of louisiana by anyregistered physician 7 penalty - whoever shall practise or offer to practise medicine orsurgery, for pay, without complying with the foregoing act, is guiltyof a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not less than $50 orimprisonment for not more than three months, or both, at the discretionof the court act 1886, no 55, s 1 no criminal prosecution shall bar the imposition of a fine by civilprocess, nor shall the imposition of such fine bar criminal prosecution2 exceptions - this act is not applicable to practitioners of medicine orsurgery residing and practising in other states, who may be summonedin special instances to attend patients in the state by any registeredphysician 3 fees - to board of health, for every diploma certified, 50 cents1 to officer before whom affidavit is made, 50 cents 2, 3 recording same, $1 2 to clerk of court, for copy of original affidavit, 50 cents s 2 to state board of health, for copy of original affidavit, 50 cents3 maine qualification, penalty - no person who has not received a medicaldegree at a public medical institution in the united states, or alicense from the maine medical association, shall recover compensationfor medical or surgical services, unless previous to such service hehad obtained a certificate of good moral character from the municipalofficers of the town where he then resided rev stats , 1883, c 13, s 9 maryland qualification - by the act of 1892, c 296, s 1, 39, it is providedthat every person not now practising medicine and surgery, who shallhereafter begin to practise medicine and surgery in any of itsdewritingments, shall possess the qualifications required by the act there are two boards of examiners, representing the medical andchirurgical faculty of the state and the state homœopathic medicalsociety respectively. Each consists of seven members, appointedrespectively by those societies, physicians actually engaged in thepractice of medicine, and of recognized ability and honor. But nophysician having a pecuniary interest in the trade of pharmacy can beappointed 2 suitable provisions must be made by each examining board to prepare aschedule of written examination upon anatomy, physiology, chemistry, surgery, practice of medicine, materia medica and therapeutics, obstetrics, gynæcology, pathology, medical jurisprudence and hygiene;the same standard of excellence is required from all candidates. Intherapeutics and practice, the questions must be in harmony with thetenets of the school selected by the candidate. And the standardof acquirements therein is established by each board itself theexamination must be fundamental in character and such as can beanswered in common by all schools of practice 1, 42 application for license is made in writing to the president of eitherboard of medical examiners which the applicant may elect, withsatisfactory proof that the applicant is more than twenty-one years ofage, is of good moral character, has obtained a competent common-schooleducation, and has either received a diploma conferring the degreeof doctor of medicine from essay legally incorporated medical collegein the united states, or a diploma or license conferring the fullright to practise all the branches of medicine and surgery in essayforeign country, and has also both studied medicine three years andattended three courses of lectures in different years in essay legallyincorporated medical college or colleges prior to the granting ofthe diploma or foreign license. Two courses of medical lectures bothbegun or completed within the same calendar year do not satisfy therequirement.

purse ” it is claimed to be “the remedy for hemorrhages, ”to be “superior to ergot and hydrastis, ” “of writingicular advantagein menorrhagia and metrorrhagia” and to have been “found of greatvalue in vesical hemorrhages and hemorrhages from mucous membranes ingeneral ” the styptysate label bears the synonym “dialysate herba bursapastoris”. The statement that it contains “alcohol 11 per cent ” andthat it is “made in gerthesis ” no other statement of the composition orstrength of “styptysate” is furnished nor is the name of the germanmanufacturer disclosed in an advertising circular entitled “styptysate, a new reliablehemostatic, ” it is declared that in recent years the plant, shepherdpurse capsella bursa pastoris, “has been submitted to clinicaltests in the form of a concentrated dialysate, known as styptysate, by loewy, oppenheim, krummacher and others, and that their reportscoincide in regard to styptysate as a hemostatic par excellence, writingicularly in uterine hemorrhages, even in paper where ergot andhydrastis had failed to produce satisfactory results ” the circularalso reprints essay “short clinical reports” without reference to theirauthorship. One ascribed to krummacher and two ascribed to “b h m , kansas city, mo , ” and the following references. “a krummacher, m d , monthly review for obstetrics and gynecology, berlin, vol xlix, 4, and vol lii ” “h oppenheim, m d , medical clinic, berlin, 1920, 35 ”shepherd purse is a weed common in the united states and in europe like most other herbs, it has essay reputation as a folk medicine itis used by eclectics and homeopaths, being included in the homeopathicpharmacopeia of the united states shepherd purse receives noconsideration at the hands of the authors of standard works on materiamedica, pharmacology or therapeutics from an examination of recent german medical publications, it appearsthat the use of shepherd purse was proposed as a substitute forergot and hydrastis, when the latter drugs became scarce in gerthesis these publications, in the main, emanate from those in the employ ofpharmaceutical firms and deal with proprietary preparations or they arewritten by physicians who used these proprietary preparations at thesolicitation of the manufacturers for this reason the reported resultsmust be accepted with reserve one of the proprietary preparations discussed in the germanpublications is styptysate, manufactured by isalfabrik johannesbuerger, wernigerode it is said to be produced by submitting the juiceof fresh shepherd purse to dialysis and preserving the dialysateby the addition of alcohol there is no statement as to the drugstrength or the chemical or biological standards, if any, used inits manufacture. Hence, the preparation is essentially a secret one as first produced, the preparation seems to have been fortified bythe addition of cotarnin. The dose was then given as ten to fifteendrops later, as the cost of cotarnin went up, this drug was omitted, and the drug strength increased. The dose of the new preparation isgiven as twenty-five to thirty drops just what relation, if any, thestyptysate of ernst bischoff co , inc , bears to that of the isalfabrikjohannes buerger, wernigerode, cannot be determined from the bischoffadvertising if it has any relationship the announcement that nonarcotic order is required when ordering styptysate would indicatethat the new preparation is supplied. The old one with its additionof cotarnin would require a narcotic order on the other hand, therecommended dose of the cotarnin-free preparation is twenty-five tothirty-drops, whereas the product sold by bischoff and co is to begiven in doses of ten to fifteen drops-- that is, in the amount proposedfor the cotarnin-fortified product what justification is there for the claim that styptysate has beensubmitted to clinical tests by loewy, oppenheim and krummacher andfound to be a hemostatic par excellence and efficient even whereergot had failed to give satisfactory results?. loewy zentralblattfür gynäcologie 42:920, 1921 made essay pharmacologic tests onguinea-pigs with the cotarnin-containing preparation, but reported noclinical trials hans oppenheim medizinische klinik, aug 29, 1920, p 906 reported that he was agreeably surprised at the excellentresults vorzueglichem erfolg obtained with the drug but he did notassert that it is superior to ergot krummacher reported on thirteen paper of profuse menstruation inwhich the patients were treated with styptysate, using for a writing, the preparation containing cotarnin and for the other a preparationwithout cotarnin he reported as good results with the cotarnin-freepreparation in larger dosage, as with the cotarnin-containingpreparation in smaller dosage krummacher did not compare styptysatewith ergot essay of krummacher paper are quoted, with essaytypographical errors, in the bischoff circular on the assumption that the product discussed in german publicationsis the styptysate marketed in the united states, the best that can besaid for it is, that during a shortage of ergot it was used in placeof that established drug there is no evidence to warrant the use ofthis indefinite proprietary in place of the biologically standardizedfluidextract of ergot or other standardized ergot preparations styptysate ernst bischoff and co , inc is inadmissible to newand nonofficial remedies because its composition is semisecret andindefinite and there is no evidence that its uniformity and strengthis controlled rules 1 and 2. Further, it is inadmissible because thetherapeutic claims advanced for it are exaggerated and unwarranted rule 6 and because there is no evidence that it possesses anyadvantage over established drugs such as the biologically standardizedfluidextract of ergot or the definite ergot preparations admitted tonew and nonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , feb 11, 1922 lipoidal substances horovitz not admitted to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportdeclaring lipoidal substances horovitz inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because its composition is essentially secretand because the curative claims made for it are unsubstantiated and, therefore, unwarranted w a puckner, secretary in the advertising of the horovitz biochemic laboratories co a s horovitz, president we read. “horovitz proves by careful paralleled investigations of normal and of pathological tissues, both in addiction disease and in other diseases, that in patients suffering from narcotic addiction disease there is an inactivity of the lymph-glands due to the use of the drug and that the system is not supplied with the necessary fats ” “horovitz further found that the lipoidal content of the cerebro-spinal system varies in strict accordance with the pathological processes introduced by infection or by alkaloids furthermore, he has found that the lipoids of various other organs, as well as those of the thermornervous system, may be extracted and consumed by the administration of narcotic alkaloids ”it is further stated in the advertising that. “after a long and very careful research investigation, dr horovitz worked out a method of rational treatment for narcotic addiction disease which involves the restoration of the lipoids, which have been lost through the action of the drug, and of the toxins, by means of a combination of lipoidal substance from various plant lipoids in the form of a sterile solution this preparation not only replaces the lipoids lost by the tissues, but also protects the nerve tissues, from attacks by the toxins elaborated during the use of narcotics, and, this by detoxicating the tissues, brings about permanent freedom from the craving of narcotics, instead of the temporary relief afforded by other methods of treatment ”the “combination of lipoidal substance of various plant lipoids” whichwas worked out by horovitz, the horovitz biochemic laboratories offeras “lipoidal substances ” this preparation is supplied in ampoules saidto contain 1 c c of solution the treatment with “lipoidal substances”consists, first, in the complete withdrawal of the narcotic.

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Found dead withhandle of pitchfork under necktie. Marks of strangulation on larynx;eyes and tongue protruded. Tongue livid and marked by teeth. Braincongested also man found dead with handkerchief tied around neck andtwisted by razor strop taylor considered both as suicides also athird case amer edit , 1880, p 465 a man of unsound mind twisteda fishing-net firmly around his neck several times. It remained securewithout the aid of a knot 37 fargues. Rec de mém de méd , etc , paris, 1869, xxii , pp 443, 444 - soldier, age 32, while drunk, strangled himself with hishandkerchief, wrapping thesis folds around his neck, making a deep furrowwithout ecchymosis. Face pale, eyes closed, lips writingly closed 38 borchard. Jour de méd de bordeaux, 1860, v , p 349 etseq - collation of paper of suicide by strangulation. First, anofficer who placed his sabre scabbard under his cravat second, awoman strangled herself with a silk cravat, tightly tied third, a mantied the sleeve of his jacket around his neck and fastened the end toa window, so that the strangulation was writingly due to suspension fourth, a woman strangled by a cord 39 hofmann. Wien med presse, 1879, xx , p 16, et seq alsolehrbuch, p 559 - woman, age 20, found dead in bath-room, with athick thread passed three times around the neck, and tied tightly infront at the second and third turns.