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Anotherwill contain, in addition, 2 5 per cent of guaiacol free home work help. The third will bea proprietary preparation containing the guaiacol “it is also desirable to know how the oily solution compares with theplain watery solution. But this is of secondary importance ”the preparations all had the same appearance the patients were takenindiscriminately, and we attempted to keep them on the injections aslong as possible, in order to compare symptoms owing, however, todischarge from hospital, symptoms of mercury intoxication, etc , wewere unable in all paper to give a thorough trial with each preparation in all, eleven patients were treated and seventy-one injectionsgiven-- by which time our experimental supply was exhausted in each case the drug was given intramuscularly in the buttocks and thepatients carefully observed for subjective symptoms of pain and forobjective symptoms of swelling, induration, abscess formation, etc thedetails are given in table 1 as will be noted, in several of the paper the patients were more orless confused and gave rather indefinite and conflicting answers inattempting to compare the results from the different drugs, by carefultabulation one finds that symptoms were more marked with the respectivesample as follows. Preparation 1 was worse than preparation 2 or 3 in six paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 1 in two paper preparation 2 was worse than preparation 3 in five paper preparation 3 was worse than preparations 2 or 1 in one case table 1 -- details of investigation by dr cole* | | | | | | symptoms | | | |prepar-|dose, -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - case|age|sex| date | ation | grain| induration-- | objective | | † | | | | pain | | | | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 25| ♂ | 6/11/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |still painful | | | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/4 |none |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |none |quite painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/16/16 | 2 | 1/5 |hurt for essay |very tender | | | | | | time | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful |less tender | | | | | | | than with | | | | | | | prepar- | | | | | | | ation 2 | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so painful | can sit on | | |discontinued| | | | area. As | | | salivation| | | | needle prick | | | | | | | is only place | | | | | | | that it hurts | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |slight indur- | | | | | | so long | ation and | | | | | | | slight | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |hurt, but not |pain “dead | | | | | | so long | stinging” | | | | | | | lasts 1 hour | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |not so bad |about the same -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2 | 32| ♂ | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |no induration | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |more pain |slight indur- | | | | | | | ation -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3 | | ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no symptoms |painful | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |says the last |painful | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | two have hurt | | | | |benzol | | the more | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |more pain than |small painful | | | | | | previously | area | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 | | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |essay indur- | | | | | | pain. In | ation at site | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 | fact, patient | of injections | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | says he is | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | over it in a | | | | | | | very short | | | | | | | while. Com- | | | | | | | plained of | | | | | | | last one | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |considerable | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |not so much as | now after so | | | | | | previously | thesis injec- | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 | | tions -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 4 | 36| ♂ | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain |no tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay tender- | | | | | | | ness | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |could not sleep|essay tender- | | | | | | at night | ness. Slight | | | | | | | induration -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 | 32| ♂ | 6/20/16 | 3 | 20 |essay pain |no induration | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 25 |essay pain | | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/23/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain |no induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain | | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |worse than any |slight tender- | | | | | | |ness -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 6 | 20| ♂ | 6/ 8/16 | 1 | 1/6 |very little | | | | 6/10/16 | 1 | 1/5 |very little | | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |very little | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |bothered more | | | | | | | than others | | | | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/4 |considerably |very little | | | | | | less pain than| tenderness | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | with prepar- | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | ation 2 | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 7 | 30| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |little pain |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay pain | | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |very little |only slight | | | | | | pain | amount of | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | induration | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay little | | | | | | | induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |considerable |essay indura- | | | | | | pain | tion | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |“fine” |slight indura- | | | | | | | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 8 | 28| ♂ | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward | | | 6/15/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 9 | 28| ♀ | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay complaint |very little | | | | | | of pain | induration | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 | fairly severe | | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |essay pain.

Forthe heart, seeing it is placed in the middle between the brain and theliver, is wrought upon by reason, as well as by digestion, yet these, because they are not medicines, are beside my present scope and although it is true, that mirth, love, &c are actions, or motionsof the mind, not of the body. Yet thesis have been induced to think suchaffections may be wrought in the body by medicines the heart is chiefly afflicted by too much heat, by poison, andby stinking vapours, and these are remedied by the second sort ofcordials, and indeed chiefly belong to our present scope according to these three afflictions, viz 1 excessive heat 2 poison 3 melancholy vapours are three kinds of remedies which succour the afflicted heart such as 1 by their cooling nature mitigate the heat of fevers 2 resist poison 3 cherish the vital spirits when they languish all these are called cordials 1 such as cool the heart in fevers, yet is not every thing thatcooleth cordial, for lead is colder than gold, yet is not lead cordialas gold is, essay hold it cordial by a hidden quality, others by reason 2 such as resist poison. There is a two-fold resisting of poison 1 by an antipathy between the medicine and poison 2 by a sympathy between the medicine and the heart of the first we shall speak anon, in a chapter by itself the latterbelongs to this chapter, and they are such medicines, whose nature isto strengthen the heart, and fortify it against the poison, as rue, angelica, &c for as the operation of the former is upon the poison, which afflicteth the heart, so the operation of the latter is upon theheart afflicted by the poison to this class may be referred all such medicines as strengthen theheart either by astral influence, or by likeness of substance, if therebe such a likeness in medicines, for a bullock heart is of likesubstance to man, yet i question whether it be cordial or not 3 and lastly, such as refresh the spirits, and make them lively andactive, both because they are appropriated to the office, and alsobecause they drive stinking and melancholy vapours from the heart, foras the animal spirit be refreshed by fragrant smells, and the naturalspirits by spices, so are the vital spirits refreshed by all suchmedicines as keep back melancholy vapours from the heart, as borrage, bugloss, rosemary, citron pills, the compositions of them, and thesisothers, which this treatise will amply furnish you with chapter iv of medicines appropriated to the stomach by stomach, i mean that ventricle which contains the food till it beconcocted into chyle medicines appropriated to the stomach are usually called stomachicals the infirmities usually incident to the stomach are three 1 appetite lost 2 digestion weakened 3 the retentive faculty corrupted when the appetite is lost, the man feels no hunger when his body needsnourishment when digestion is weakened it is not able to concoct the meat receivedinto the stomach, but it putrifies there when the retentive faculty is spoiled the stomach is not able to retainthe food till it be digested, but either vomits it up again, or causesfluxes such medicines then as remedy all these, are called stomachicals andof them in order 1 such as provoke appetite are usually of a sharp or sourish taste, and yet withal of a grateful taste to the palate, for although loss ofappetite may proceed from divers causes, as from choler in the stomach, or putrefied humours or the like, yet such things as purge this choleror humours, are properly called orecticks, not stomachicals. Theformer strengthen appetite after these are expelled 2 such medicines help digestion as strengthen the stomach, either byconvenient heat, or aromatic viz spicy faculty, by hidden property, or congruity of nature 3 the retentive faculty of the stomach is corrected by bindingmedicines, yet not by all binding medicines neither, for essay of themare adverse to the stomach, but by such binding medicines as areappropriated to the stomach for the use of these use 1 use not such medicines as provoke appetite before you havecleansed the stomach of what hinders it use 2 such medicines as help digestion, give them a good time beforemeat that so they may pass to the bottom of the stomach, for thedigestive faculty lies there, before the food come into it use 3 such as strengthen the retentive faculty, give them a littlebefore meat, if to stay fluxes, a little after meat, if to stayvomiting chapter v of medicines appropriated to the liver be pleased to take these under the name of hepatics, for that is theusual name physicians give them, and these also are of three sorts 1 essay the liver is delighted in 2 others strengthen it 3 others help its vices the palate is the seat of taste, and its office is to judge what foodis agreeable to the stomach, and what not, by that is both the qualityand quantity of food for the stomach discerned. The very same officethe meseraik veins perform to the liver essaytimes such food pleases the palate which the liver likes not butnot often and therefore the meseraik veins refuse it, and that isthe reason essay few men fancy such food as makes them sick after theeating thereof 1 the liver is delighted exceedingly with sweet things, draws themgreedily, and digests them as swiftly, and that is the reason honey isso soon turned into choler 2 such medicines strengthen the liver, as being appropriated to itvery gently bind, for seeing the office of the liver is to concoct, it needs essay adstriction, that so both the heat and the humour to beconcocted may be stayed, that so the one slip not away, nor the otherbe scattered yet do not hepatical medicines require so great a binding faculty asstomachicals do, because the passages of the stomach are more openthan those of the liver by which it either takes in chyle, or sendsout blood to the rest of the body, therefore medicines that are verybinding are hurtful to the liver, and either cause obstructions, orhinder the distribution of the blood, or both and thus much for the liver, the office of which is to concoct chyle, which is a white substance the stomach digests the food into intoblood, and distributes it, by the veins, to every writing of the body, whereby the body is nourished, and decaying flesh restored chapter vi of medicines appropriated to the spleen in the breeding of blood, are three excrements most conspicuous, viz urine, choler, and melancholy the proper seat of choler is in the gall the urine passeth down to the reins or kidneys, which is all one the spleen takes the thickest or melancholy blood to itself this excrement of blood is twofold. For either by excessive heat, itis addust, and this is that the latins call atra bilis. Or else itis thick and earthly of itself, and this properly is called melancholyhumour hence then is the nature of splenical medicines to be found out, andby these two is the spleen usually afflicted for atra bilis, i knownot what distinct english name to give it thesis times causes madness, and pure melancholy causeth obstructions of the bowels, and tumours, whereby the concoction of the blood is vitiated, and dropsies thesistimes follow medicines then peculiar to the spleen must needs be twofold also, essayappropriated to atra bilis, others to pure melancholy. But of purgingeither of them, i shall omit till i come to treat of purging in achapter by itself 1 such medicines are splenical, which by cooling and moistening temperatra bilis. Let not these medicines be too cold neither, for there isno such heat in atra bilis as there is in choler, and therefore itneeds no such excessive cooling. Amongst the number of these are suchas we mentioned amongst the cordials to repel melancholy vapours fromthe heart, such temper and assuage the malice of atra bilis 2 those medicines are also splenical, by which melancholy humours arecorrected and so prepared, that they may the more easily be evacuated:such medicines are cutting and opening, and they differ from hepaticalsin this that they are no ways binding. For the spleen being no waysaddicted to concoction, binding medicines do it harm, and not good 3 essaytimes the spleen is not only obstructed, but also hardened bymelancholy humours, and in such paper emolient medicines may be wellcalled splenicals, not such as are taken inwardly, for they operateupon the stomach and bowels, but such as are outwardly applied to theregion of the spleen and although essaytimes medicines, are outwardly applied to hardness ofthe liver, yet they differ from splenicals, because they are binding, so are not splenicals chapter vii of medicines appropriated to the reins and bladder the office of the reins is, to make a separation between the blood andthe urine.

Tongue protruded slightly and much swollen. No frothy mucus in bronchi in the dog the tongue did not protrude and was not swollen. Right cavities of heart contained blood, left empty. Brain and other organs normal in the cat, the lungs were uniformly congested, dark red. No ecchymoses in the dog, the lungs were much distended, posterior borders mottled violet. Emphysematous patches on surface. No apoplectic effusions. Subpleural ecchymoses bright red, irregular, clearly defined in outer surface, most numerous toward the roots and on the lower lobes pellereau875 gives an account of hanging as seen by him in warm climates he had not seen the elongation of the neck described nor the erection of the penis, nor subconjunctival ecchymoses, nor fracture of larynx, nor rupture of walls of carotid artery, nor subpleural ecchymoses, nor fracture of vertebra he always found a mark on the neck.

It may be remarked that theadvertisements contain no therapeutic recommendation, and do not, ontheir face, urge the public to employ aspirin but apparently merelytell the public how it free home work help may protect itself against sophistication in substance, they say. “if you are a user of aspirin, this is howyou may obtain the genuine ” it might be said that this is not anattempt to increase the use or sale of aspirin-- the ordinary object ofadvertising-- but that the means of protection against adulteration isa “subject on which the public should be instructed ” the principleof such exceptions is stated in the comments to rule 3 new andnonofficial remedies, 1916, p 15. And although the present case doesnot come under the exceptions specified under these comments, it may beurged that the exceptions need to be increased as occasion arises thenotorious adulteration of aspirin may well be urged as establishing aneed for a similar exception in its use the general principle of protecting the public against fraud, adulteration and substitution is directly in line with the objects ofthe council, and deserves commendation and support it is obvious, however, that the means adopted for this end must be efficient, that they must not open the door to other, perhaps greater evilsand that they must be used in good faith the policy of advertising“aspirin-bayer” must be examined in these respects in the first place, the acceptance of a product by the council impliesan agreement by the manufacturers or agents that they will adherestrictly to the council rules and will not dewriting from the letter orspirit of these rules without notice to the council this principle hasbeen grossly infringed in the present case there can be no doubt thatthe agents were aware that their advertisements conflicted, at leastwith the letter of rule 3 nevertheless, they did not, in any way, inform the council of the change in policy in this respect, at least, they have not acted in good faith secondly, the wording of the advertisement implies that only thetablets stamped with “the bayer cross” are genuine this is misleading, since every druggist has the right to make unstamped tablets ofaspirin, fully as genuine as those stamped with the cross thirdly, the cross itself cannot be considered an efficient protection;for people who imitate aspirin will not hesitate to imitate thestamp the remedy, in either case, and as with any other drug, is theexamination of trade samples, and the vigorous prosecution of thoseguilty of violating the law fourthly, the permanent affixing of the name “aspirin” to thevest-pocket boxes is also inefficient as a protection, and servesmainly as an advertisement fifthly, whatever may have been the motives of the advertisers, andhowever carefully the advertisements are worded, they will inevitablytend to increase the use of aspirin by the public, and this is directlyagainst the interests of public health the public does not know, asphysicians do, that headaches are merely symptoms of other, essaytimesvery serious conditions. And that they are often the signal for theneed of a thorough physical examination and diagnosis it is true thatthey are often also the symptoms of very minor derangements, which willright themselves spontaneously. And that, in such paper, drugs likeaspirin may give relief and may do no harm the patient, however, isnot educated to distinguish one class from the other, and thereforeanything that tends to promote the indiscriminate use of such remediesas aspirin is detrimental to the public health furthermore, aspirinitself is not always harmless alarming idiosyncrasies are sufficientlycommon that the use of the first doses, at least, should requiremedical supervision with these considerations in mind, the referee isof the opinion that the direct and indirect advertising of aspirin isto be condemned -- from the journal a m a , jan 20, 1917 pil cascara compound-robins report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrya circular issued by the a h robins company of richmond, va , contains the following statement. “pil cascara compound-robins is a rational therapeutic formula, composed of cascara, podophyllin, colocynth and hyoscyamus, which promotes a natural flow of secretions, which is, in turn, the physiologic stimulant of peristalsis thus, a normal evacuation is produced without subsequent inhibition “they contain no mercury, strychnia nor belladonna “an ideal aid to any remedial agent, when a mild, medium or strong alimentary stimulant is needed sic “made in two strengths, the dosage may be easily regulated so as to obtain the effects of an anti-dyspeptic, aperient, laxative or cathartic, as desired they never cause discomfort unless given in larger dose than needed ”this preparation is another example of the innumerable mixtures ofwell-known drugs having nothing in the way of originality or of specialtherapeutic value to recommend them the advertising implies that this writingicular combination has a specialaction on the secretions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Otherwiseit would be hard to explain the claim that the preparation isantidyspeptic, if that means anything more than a laxative or cathartic the claim is made that this preparation contains no belladonna-- yetit admittedly contains hyoscyamus!. this manifests either ignorance onthe writing of the manufacturers, or an effort to impose on the medicalprofession both belladonna and hyoscyamus contain variable amountsof similar alkaloids, chiefly hyoscyamin hyoscyamus is feeblerthan belladonna in its action, as it contains less alkaloid thequalitative differences between the two drugs, with reference to theiruse as laxatives, is so slight as to make the company claim forhyoscyamus appear either deliberately misleading or to be the resultof crass ignorance promoting this mixture of well-known laxatives andcathartics as an “ideal aid to any remedial agent when a mild, mediumor strong alimentary stimulant is needed” is a slur on the intelligenceof physicians pil cascara compound-robins is not acceptable for new and nonofficialremedies -- from the journal a m a , jan 27, 1917 casta-flora report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrycasta-flora is one of those complex preparations which are offeredto the medical profession, with plausible arguments in support ofthe claims made it is put out by the wm s merrell chemical co , cincinnati each fluidounce is said to represent. “castanea, fresh leaves, 40 gr. Passiflora, fresh plant, 40 gr. Gelsemium, green tincture, 8 minims. Inula, represented by the camphoraceous stearoptene helenin, 20 grs. Iodized lime, 8 grs.

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necessarily, having learned thefacts by observation, such as the appearance, symptoms, and actions ofthe patient, he is, when testifying as to these matters, nothing moreor less than an ordinary witness, because he is testifying to mattersof observation as to these matters public policy requires, except sofar as it has been modified, or rather extended, by our statutes whichforbid testimony as to privileged communications, that he must testify, the same as any other witness but suppose that, free home work help having so testified tothe facts, he is asked to give his opinion. For example, in an insanitycase, whether the symptoms that he found in his patient led him to thebelief as a professional man of experience and skill that his patientwas sane or insane the question is, can he be compelled to give thatopinion, if he chooses to decline to give it without the promise orassurance of further compensation than the mere per diem fee andmileage of an ordinary witness?. the best authority is to the effectthat he must so testify, the reasoning of the court being that hisopinion is only a writing of what he derived from his original relation ofphysician to his patient wright v the people, 112 ill , 540. Samecase, 33 alb l j , 79 same rule in civil and criminal paper - the rule is the same whetherthe professional man is called to testify as an expert in civil orcriminal paper in either one he is not obliged to give an opinion assuch, independent of a personal knowledge of the facts in the case, without being paid or assured reasonable compensation therefor hisproper course of conduct is, when he has obeyed the subpœna and is inthe presence of the court and has been sworn, and the questions putby counsel disclose that the object of his examination is to elicitfrom him an opinion, to state to the court that he has not been paidany other compensation than that of an ordinary witness, and that herespectfully declines to give an opinion in the case as an expert, without compensation proportionate to the value of his opinion 182whether witness competent a question for court in limine - afterthe expert is placed upon the stand, as we have seen, the counselupon the side of the case by which he is summoned interrogates himas to his capacity, the purpose of the interrogation being that hisanswers shall qualify him and show him to be an expert whether ornot he is an expert so as to permit the giving of his opinion aswriting of the case to go to the jury, is for the court to decide inlimine, that is, at the threshold, and as a matter of discretion, andthe exercise of that discretion, if fair and reasonable, will not bedisturbed upon appeal by the higher court it is permissible, but alsodiscretionary, after the counsel calls the witness and has apparentlyqualified him, for the counsel upon the other side to cross-examinethe witness as to his qualifications before he is examined in chief, with a view of determining whether or not there are limitations uponthose qualifications which should prevent the court from permitting himto testify as an expert the general rule is as stated by greenleafin his work on evidence, sec 440, that it is not necessary that themedical expert should have actually practised his profession nor is itessential that the witness should belong to any writingicular school ofmedicine the law does not undertake to pass upon conflicting theoriesof medical practice, in determining the question of the qualificationof a medical expert it is proper, however, for counsel to inquire asto what school of medicine the witness is an adherent, because of itsimportance in weighing the value of his testimony after it has beengiven persons not duly licensed essaytimes held not competent - it hasalso been a mooted question in those states where it is necessary, inorder to enable a person to practise physic or surgery, that he shouldbe licensed, whether a person practising without a license, howeverextensive his reading and practice, would be considered qualified asan expert witness in a court of justice this point, so far as diligentexamination discloses, has not been determined in any reported case, although it has been suggested at nisi prius and has been, in oneinstance within the knowledge of the writer, decided that he is notto be considered an expert in matters involving medical knowledge andskill the reasoning of the court was that the policy of the stateis to prohibit persons not possessing the qualifications requiredto obtain a license, from acting in any capacity as professors andpractitioners of medicine or surgery if the witness is a member ofthe profession, legally qualified as such, it has been held that he issufficiently qualified as an expert if he shows that he possesses theaverage ability of members of his profession hall v costello, 48n h , 176. Tellis v kidd, 12 ala , 648. Wharton on evidence, sec 446.