History

Extended Essay Outline


Readers will recall the historyof arsanilic acid “atoxyl” or “soamin” and its acetyl derivative “arsacetin” -- editorial from the journal a m a , feb 26, 1921 262 warning against untried medicaments, j a m a 74:1654 june12 1920 263 wright, b l. Kennell, l a , and hussey, l m. Med rec 97:607 april 10 1920 264 nichols, h j. Salvarsan and sodium cacodylate, j a m a 56:492 feb 18 1911 265 voegtlin, carl, and smith, h w. J pharmacol & exper therap 16:449, 1921 266 compare schamberg, j f. Kolmer, j a , and raiziss, g w. Am j m sc 150:25 july 1920 salvarsan. Abrogate the patentthe journal has already commented on the difficulty in securingsalvarsan, on the moral and ethical question as to whether or not it isjustifiable for one person to control the output of a drug necessary topublic health this week we publish an account of the action of the st louis and chicago medical societies, which are calling on the medicalprofession to appeal to their senators and congressmen to abrogate thispatent the journal believes that this patent should be abrogated, notalone because the patentees have not supplied the demand, not alonebecause they have dictated to the medical profession who should havethe drug and how much a physician might have, not alone because ofthe war with gerthesis, not alone because of the special needs of thegovernment at this time for the control of venereal diseases, not alonebecause, as essay claim, the patent at washington does not correctlydescribe the product, but also because the people who are supplyingthis product are charging prices that are exorbitant compared to theprice at which others in this country can supply it the fact is thatthe salvarsan one can obtain today costs $4 50 per ampule of 0 6 gram, whereas the same dose of arsenobenzol-- a preparation identical with, ifnot better than, salvarsan-- costs $2 00 at retail, and as dr schambergsays.

“ it is therefore self-evident that formamint should be looked upon as a necessary writing of the treatment of all forms of tonsillitis ” “the value of formamint is equally great in diphtheric tonsillitis, or as a prophylactic ” “the extraordinary success which i had with formamint in a school epidemic of scarlet fever during may and june, 1907, was the determining factor which induced me to abandon the use of inhalations, gargles, local applications in the treatment of diseases of the throat, and to use formamint exclusively for the future ” “there are naturally thesis similar conditions in which formamint may be used as a prophylactic, notably scarlet fever, mumps, streptococcal and staphylococcal sore throats, ‘milk outbreaks’ of sore throat, drain throats, hospital throats, and the like ” “formamint tablets are indicated in angina, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, stomatitis, gingivitis, glossitis, ulceration, spongy or bleeding gums, pyorrhea alveolaris, ‘smoker sore throat, ’ abscess or boils, etc ” “as a prophylactic against diphtheria, scarlet fever, influenza, measles, epidemic poliomyelitis, and other pathogenic micro-organisms to neutralize putrefaction products in and about the teeth, correct fermentative processes, deodorize and purify the breath, etc ” “to tone up, and strengthen the tissues, prevent hoarseness and allay irritation in singers, public speakers, neutralize the effects of dust-infection or disinfect the saliva or sputum in influenza, tuberculosis, etc ”one man declares that along with specific constitutional treatment he“had the best results from the use of formamint tablets” in a case ofsyphilitic ulceration of the tongue in short, formamint is recommended for the treatment or preventionof almost everything, from a bad breath to such grave conditions asscarlet fever, diphtheria and tuberculosis, conditions in which adelay in proper treatment-- for instance, in diphtheria, a failure toadminister antitoxin-- may result in the death of the patient a series of investigations was therefore undertaken in order todiscover whether the extravagant claims regarding the germicidal powerof formamint could be verified experimental datatwo fifty-cent bottles of wulfing formamint were purchased in theopen market and were kept well stoppered to prevent deterioration qualitative tests showed the presence of formaldehyd and the amount wasdetermined quantitatively by the hydrogen peroxid method as given bysutton 23 the results were respectively, 1 99 per cent and 2 03 percent of formaldehyd 23 sutton. Volumetric analysis, edition 10, p 390 illustration. Two formamint advertisements reproduced in miniaturetypical of those appearing in a certain type of medical journals essay determinations were made of the germicidal power of formamintin vitro, that is, under controlled laboratory conditions atwenty-four-hour plain agar culture of staphylococcus aureus waswashed off in 10 c c of sterile 0 85 per cent sodium chloridsolution a 1:100, 000 dilution of this was made in each of three flaskscontaining 100 c c of sterile saliva flask 1 contained 1 per cent offormamint, flask 2, 5 per cent. Flask 3, containing no formamint, waskept as a control at intervals samples were removed and dilutions madeand plated in duplicate on standard agar the plates were incubatedtwenty-four hours at 37 c , and plates containing less than 200colonies were counted the results are given in table 1 after sevendays there was no appreciable difference in the plates another test was made by adding a 1 per cent formamint solution toplain agar plates inoculated with b coli a twenty-four-hour plainagar culture of b coli was washed off in 10 c c of sterile 0 85 percent sodium chlorid solution a 1:1, 000, 000 dilution was made of thisand 1 c c added to each plate varying amounts of 1 per cent solutionof formamint were added to each plate they were incubated seventy-twohours at 37 c after seven days’ incubation the count was the same theresults are given in table 2 another experiment was made thus. One loopful of a twenty-four-hourplain agar culture of streptococcus lacticus was mixed with a tubeof north medium one loopful from the inoculated tube was mixed with asecond tube of north medium both tubes were poured into petri dishesand allowed to cool one half of each plate was well smeared with a 10per cent solution of formamint in saliva after twenty-four hours’incubation at 37 c , only a few colonies appeared on the side to whichthe formamint had been applied, while the other half was thicklycovered with colonies table 1 -- showing time in which cultures of staphylococcus aureus werekilled by different amounts of formamint amount of formamint| period of |average count| count on flask in saliva |standing at 37 c | when plated |of saliva without per cent | hours | | formamint -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 3 | 32 | 3200 1 | 6 | 0 | 7000 5 | 1 | few | 5000 5 | 2 | 0 | 4100 5 | 3 | 0 | 3200* 5 | 6 | 0 | 7000* -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- * the last two observations were made at the same time as on the 1 percent solutions this work so far corroborates that reported in the literature quotedby the manufacturers but the fact that a compound is a germicide whenbrought into intimate contact with bacteria in a solution or medium ina test tube or flask does not prove that it will be effective when usedin the human throat the alleged germicidal actionan attempt was made to discover whether or not the claims advanced bythe manufacturers as to the perfect germicidal action of formamint inall the nooks and crannies of the mouth and throat could be confirmed table 2 -- count of b coli cultures with different amounts of formamint no c c of 1 per cent formamint 0 0 1 0 3 0 5 0 7 1 0 1 5 2 0 3 0 count 160 33 39 26 15 12 2 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the first step in attacking this problem was to make comparative countsof the number of bacteria in the throat before and after the use offormamint the methods employed were as follows. The throat was gargledwith 50 c c of sterile 0 85 per cent sodium chlorid solution ineach case the same length of time, as far as possible, was used in theprocess the liquid was collected in a sterile flask the gargling in aseries of experiments was begun not less than two hours after a meal after essay preliminary work the following dilutions of the 50 c c ofsalt solution were found sufficient. 1:1, 000, 1:10, 000 and 1:100, 000 plates were made in duplicate from each dilution and incubatedseventy-two hours at 37 c the counts were made on plates containingless than 200 colonies except where otherwise noted standard agar wasused the mediums were always prepared in the same way all the work was carried out under conditions as nearly naturalas possible the formamint was taken according to the directionsaccompanying the trade package every opportunity was given theformamint to penetrate all the crypts and recesses about the mouthand throat the tablet was allowed to dissolve as slowly as possible, the time usually being five to six minutes, and saliva was thoroughlyforced around the mouth before being swallowed plating was alwaysdone immediately after gargling so that no growth could occur in thesalt solution the results are given in table 3 the numbers areaverage counts from several plates and calculated to show the number ofbacteria washed out by the 50 c c of salt solution table 3 -- showing that formamint does not greatly decrease the numberof bacteria in the throat | | |no found |no found | time |amount of|in throat |in throat conditions of test | since |formamint| before | after |preceding| used | use of | use of | test | |formamint |formamint -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- normal | | 0 | 15, 600, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 38, 500, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 30, 500, 000| normal | | 0 | 12, 500, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 14, 500, 000| | 1 hour | 0 | 23, 500, 000| tablet dissolved in mouth | 6 days | 1 tablet| | 15, 000, 000 and throat gargled one | | | | hour later | | | | throat again gargled two | 1 hour | 0 | | 10, 050, 000 hours after formamint | | | | was used | | | | normal | 7 days | 0 | 62, 000, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 72, 500, 000| normal | | | 61, 000, 000| tablets were taken, one | 2 days | 12 | | 39, 100, 000 per hour, and throat | | | | gargled onehour after | | | | last tablet was taken | | | | throat was again gargled 2| 1 hour | 0 | | 59, 000, 000 hours after taking last | | | | tablet | | | | normal | 5 days | 0 | 35, 000, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 62, 000, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 | 72, 000, 000| one tablet was taken each | 4 days | 24 | |175, 000, 000 half hour for 12 hours | | tablets | | consecutively throat was| | | | gargled one hour after | | | | last tablet was taken | | | | throat was again gargled | 1 hour | 0 | |168, 750, 000 two hours after last | | | | tablet was taken | | | | normal | 3 days | 0 |129, 600, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 |177, 000, 000| normal | 1 hour | 0 |147, 000, 000| normal | 3 days | 0 | 79, 000, 000| one tablet was taken | 1 hour | 1 | | 83, 200, 000 immediately after preced-| | | | ing gargle throat was | | | | again gargled at end of | | | | one hour | | | | throat was again gargled 2| 1 hour | 0 | |134, 750, 000 hours after tablet was | | | | taken | | | | normal conditions except | 19 days | 0 | 32, 600, 000| that mouth and teeth were| | | | throughly washed with | | | | soap just before gargling| | | | same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 33, 125, 000| same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 40, 375, 000| teeth were not washed | 2 days | 0 | 33, 500, 000| otherwise normal con- | | | | ditions | | | | same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 43, 330, 000| same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 54, 000, 000| same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 50, 000, 000| same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 67, 000, 000| mouth and teeth thoroughly| 2 days | 0 | 5, 270, 000| washed with soap just | | | | before throat was gargled| | | | same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 10, 916, 000| same as above | 1 hour | 0 | 8, 275, 000| normal conditions, but 1 | 3 days | 0 |228, 750, 000| c c of sterile rabbit | | | | blood was added to each | | | | plate | | | | count from the same gargle| 0 | 0 | 60, 625, 000| as above no blood used | | | | in the plates | | | | normal conditions, but | 1 hour | 0 |431, 250, 000| count was made on blood | | | | agar | | | | count from the same gargle| 0 | 0 | 59, 625, 000| asabove no blood used in| | | | the plates | | | | normal conditions, count | 2 days | 0 |683, 300, 000| was made on blood agar | | | | same gargle as above, but | 0 | 0 | 58, 500, 000| count was made on plain | | | | agar | | | | one tablet was taken just | 1 hour | 1 tablet| |558, 300, 000 after preceding gargle | | | | after one hour throat was| | | | again gargled count on | | | | blood agar | | | | same gargle as above, but | 0 | 1 tablet| | 55, 875, 000 count was made on plain | | | | agar | | | | normal conditions | 2 days | 0 | 79, 125, 000| one tablet was taken just | 1 hour | 1 tablet| | 56, 250, 000 ten minutes before gargle| 16 min | | | was made | | | | normal conditions | 2 days | 0 | 46, 750, 000| one tablet was taken just | 1 hour | 1 tablet| | 38, 500, 000 ten minutes before throat| | | | was gargled | | | | teeth and mouth were thor-| 5 days | 0 | 47, 370, 000| oughly washed with soap | | | | just before gargle was | | | | made | | | | teeth washed as above and | 1 hour | 1 tablet| | 21, 225, 000 1 tablet taken 10 minutes| | | | before gargle was made | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- finally a determination was made of the number of streptococci in thethroat before and after the use of formamint the throat was gargledin the manner previously described the streptococcus count was madeby the dilution method as given by heinemann 24 culture tubes wereused instead of fermentation tubes one per cent dextrose broth wasthe medium employed one cubic centimeter was added to each of a seriesof ten tubes for each dilution and the following dilutions were used:1:10, 000, 1:100, 000 and 1:1, 000, 000 24 heinemann. Laboratory guide in bacteriology, p 86 the results given in table 4 are the average count from a number ofdilutions and are reported as the total number washed out by the50 c c of salt solution table 4 -- showing that formamint fails to reduce the number ofstreptococci in the throat | | | no found | no found | time | amount of | in throat | in throat conditions | since | formamint | before | after of test | preceding | used | use of | use of | test | | formamint | formamint -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - normal | | 0 | 1, 200, 000 | | | | | one tablet was| | | | taken and | | | | throat gargled| | | | one hour later| 4 days | 1 tablet | |14, 750, 000 | | | | normal | 3 days | 0 | 9, 950, 000 | | | | | one tablet was| | | | taken and | | | | throat gargled| | | | ten minutes | | | | later | 1 hour | 1 tablet | | 8, 000, 000 discussionthe contention that formamint contains formaldehyd was confirmed byanalysis the manufacturers also maintain that formamint is a new, definitechemical compound, consisting of five molecules of formaldehyd andone molecule of lactose, and that when dissolved in the saliva theformaldehyd is liberated in essay new and peculiar form, which theycall nascent formaldehyd this new kind of formaldehyd is, accordingto the advertising literature, especially powerful in its germicidalproperties and at the same time has absolutely no irritating or harmfuleffects not a chemical compoundthoms, 25 retained as an expert by the german government, decided, after a series of chemical investigations, that formamint was nota definite chemical compound, but that it was probably a solidsolution of formaldehyd in lactose he proved that when the processof manufacture was carried out in exactly the way called for by theformamint patents, compounds containing a greater or less per cent offormaldehyd could be made while the other properties remained similarto those of formamint the composition of the final product dependedon the proportion of the components used in the process thereforeformamint did not form a safe means of uniform dosage 25 thoms. Arb a d pharm inst d universität, berlin 11:210, 1914 as a result of thoms’ work the german courts held that formamint wasnot a new chemical compound consequently the formamint patent number189036 was annulled in berlin, nov 29, 1913 again the contention that formaldehyd in the nascent or activecondition is less poisonous and irritating than in its ordinary form iscontrary to what would be expected from the behavior of such compounds if it were liberated, as claimed, in the “nascent” condition, it wouldbe, for that very reason, not only more active but also more harmful as a matter of fact, formamint did have an irritant effect on theworker who carried out these investigations when one tablet wastaken each hour for twelve consecutive hours, marked irritation ofthe intestinal tract resulted there was almost sufficient nausea tocause vomiting and uneasiness in the alimentary canal following theexperiment when the twenty-four tablets were taken the results weresimilar but more pronounced this is decidedly in contradiction to theassertions of the manufacturers otto seifert, 26 moreover, cites the following. “by effects. Only a few patients complain of an unpleasant sharp taste, burning of the tongue seifert, sklarek among the general symptoms observed are urticaria-like exanthems glaser, roters, which are accompanied by nausea, vomiting, headache, insomnia and vertigo, burning and irritability especially in the larynx meissner. Phenomena of poisoning geissler.

Arch internat extended essay outline de physiol 8:181, 1909 lalou. Jour de physiol 14:465, 1912 analogy to epinephrin -- the analogy of secretin to epinephrindoes not generally receive enough emphasis both substances arenonspecific in distribution, but specific chemically, and especiallyphysiologically, epinephrin acting on the myoneural junctions, secretinon intestinal digestion they are both relatively simple substancesof low molecular weight, and subject to rapid oxidation whereby theirproperties disappear the action in both paper is very transient theyare the two examples of what starling calls the “acute hormones, ” inwhich it is essential that reaction take place immediately, and shalldisappear as soon as the exciting cause is removed 6363 starling. Proc roy soc med , 8, no 4, 1914, therap and pharm section, p 29 clinical use of secretindiabetes mellitus -- moore, edie and abram64 were the first tosuggest a therapeutic value for secretin, having obtained favorableresults with secretin administration in diabetes they argued that theinternal secretion of the pancreas may be stimulated by secretin, and that essay paper of diabetes may be due to lack of this necessaryexcitant owing to the importance of the question, their announcementwas followed quickly by numerous investigations by other observers previously, spriggs, at the suggestion of starling, had triedintravenous injections of secretin free from depressor substance in adiabetic patient, and had obtained negative results moore, edie andabram gave their secretin by mouth over long periods of the five papercited in their first paper, two were negative the third was that of aman, aged 25, who received daily 30 c c of secretin after a latentperiod of three weeks, the sugar suddenly fell, and after four monthsthe urine was sugar-free six months later a relapse occurred with thedevelopment of phthisis and death the other two patients were a boy, aged 7, and a girl, aged 9, whose urine in from three to five weeksbecame sugar free during the secretin treatment in spite of severediabetes one of these patients later relapsed 65 bainbridge andbeddard66 gave secretin a thorough trial in three paper with negativeresults, and are disposed to attribute the results of moore to dieting dakin and ransom67 cited one case, secretin being given for twelveweeks, with negative results. Foster, 65 nine paper, all negative;charles, 68 three paper, all negative crofton, 69 however, gavesecretin a trial in one case with favorable results moore, edie andabram, in a later paper, 70 report a large number of paper tried withthe majority of results negative, though in essay paper an improvementin the digestion, and in certain paper an increase of weight was noted 64 moore, edie and abram. Biochem jour , 1:28, 1906 65 foster. Jour biol chem , 2:297, 1906 66 bainbridge and beddard. Biochem jour , 1:429, 1906 67 dakin and ransom. Jour biol chem , 2:305, 1906 68 charles. Med press and cir , 133:578, 1906 69 crofton. Lancet, london, 176:607, 1909 70 moore, edie and abram. Biochem jour , 3:82, 1908 one method of testing the basis of moore theory would be by examiningthe prosecretin content of the intestine in diabetics bainbridge andbeddard found, in the paper referred to, 66 that from five of thesix paper of diabetics examined postmortem, little or no secretincould be prepared.

While flags, sabres, cannon, and other warlike signswould indicate a soldier, etc it is also noticeable that in thetattooing practised by lunatics the image relates in essay way to thenature of the peculiar form of mental disease from which they suffer, and it is chiefly among the more severe and incurable paper of mentaldegeneration that these signs are found see dr riva article, “iltatuaggio nel manicomio d’ancona, ” cronica del manicomio d’ancona, november, 1888 almost always the motive that prompts these disfigurements of theskin is the result of impulse, of thoughtlessness, or of orgy, andalmost all the tattooed come to repent of their folly the subjectof détatouage has of late taken a polemic turn in essay of thecontinental journals there are besides thesis paper on record ofsevere accidents and complications following the operation, such assevere inflammation, erysipelas, abscess, and gangrene dr beuchongives statistics of forty-seven paper, in which four were followedby mutilation and eight by death either directly or in consequenceof an amputation a certain proportion of what is known as syphilisinsontium is to be found among the reported statistics of tattooing dr bispham, of philadelphia, informs me that while at blockleyhospital he saw thirty paper of syphilis that had been communicated bythe same tattooer tattooing may essaytimes be accidental i have seen a dewritingmentalclerk with an elongated tattoo on the back of his hand caused byaccidental wounding with an inked pen a bursting shell during anaval engagement has caused a characteristic tattoo on the face of awell-known officer to be seen any day in washington two paper of thebluish-black discoloration of the skin from taking nitrate of silverhave also come under my observation both occurred in medical men, one of whom lives in florida, the other in the district of columbia silver discolorations of this kind are indelible, but i learn fromone of these gentlemen that large doses of iodide of potassium causetemporary fading of the discoloration, which returns on stopping themedicine 591the indelibility of tattoo-marks is such that their traces may beeasily recognized in the cadaver, though in a essaywhat advancedstage of putrefaction they have even been recognized on a gangrenouslimb essaytimes, however, it is extended essay outline impossible to recognize at firstsight whether there has or has not been a tattoo a strong light anda magnifying glass and a microscopic examination of the neighboringganglia to detect the presence of coloring matter may assist inremoving doubt it has been found on the bodies of tattooed cadaversthat the ganglia are filled with grains of coloring matter of thesame nature as that employed in making the tattoo attempts to removetattoo-marks generally leave a vicious scar that is equally indelible an efficacious method is to tattoo the mark with a solution oftannin, which is followed by brushing over with nitrate of silver a red cicatrix follows, and when the epidermis separates the tattoodisappears a better method, however, is by means of the electricneedle already mentioned in speaking of the electrolysis of nævi that a tattoo-mark may disappear by the effects of time and leave notrace is a matter that cooper reports after examining the mutilatedremains of a cadaver, and the statistics of caspar, tardieu, andhutin place it as high as nine in the hundred an officer of theunited states revenue marine lately called my attention to severalsuperficial tattooes on the back of his hand which had disappeared thedeeper ones, however, remained the spontaneous disappearance of atattoo seems to be possible when the operation has been done in sucha superficial way as not to have passed the rete malpighii, or whenthe tattooing has been done with essay substance not very tenacious, as vermilion, which appears to be easily eliminated but when thewritingicles of coloring matter penetrate into the fibro-elastic tissue ofthe derma, the disappearance of the tattoo is rare in seventy-eight individuals tattooed with vermilion alone, hutinfound eleven upon whom the tattoo had disappeared out of one hundredand four tattooes made with a single color, india-ink, writing ink, blue or back, not a single one had completely disappeared the resultsare identical if the tattooes are made with two colors thus in 153tattooes with vermilion and india-ink, one instance showed a fading ofthe black, in another it had completely disappeared, the red being wellmarked. Twenty times the red was writingly effaced, the black being wellmarked. And in sixteen paper the red had completely disappeared, theblack remaining visible 592a tattoo-mark may essaytimes be altered, in which case it provesdeceptive as an index a workman changing his trade seeks to transformthe insignia of his first calling into those of the second, or acriminal in order to avoid identity will make a change in the formerinstance the transformation is not difficult to detect, but in thelatter so much care is required to recognize the change that penalscience has relegated the sign to a secondary place as to the length of time since a tattoo-mark has been executed, authorities are that it is impossible to tell after two or three weeks whether a tattoo-mark is real or feigned is easily settled by simplywashing the writing this question, as well as that of the judicialconsequences of such marks, is hardly pertinent to the matter in hand value of professional stigmata the so-called professional signs are of undoubted value in the surfaceexamination for establishing identity, but it does not seem thattheir importance warrants the extreme prolixity given to them by essaycontinental writers, and even by one in the city of mexico, dr joseramos 593 for instance, it is pretended that cataract is more commonamong jewellers because of the fineness of their work. Yet out of 952cataracts, of which a record has been kept, only two paper occurred injewellers besides, there is not one special sign or physical traceleft on the body by which a prostitute may be known, notwithstandingthe fact that in life the collective appearance would seldom deceive anexperienced man only in the case of sodomy, where anal coitus has been frequent, wouldcharacteristic signs be found on anal examination of 446 prostitutes, dr coutagne594 found the signs of post-perineal coitus in 180 he cites the case of a young prostitute presenting the astonishingcontrast of a gaping anus surrounded by characteristic rhagades, withthe genital writings of an extreme freshness, a very narrow vagina, andnon-retracted hymen, constituting by their reunion a still firm ring a fact yet more curious is shown by a specimen in the collection ofthe museum of the laboratory of legal medicine at lyons the genitalorgans of the cadaver of a woman of twenty-eight or thirty years showeda hymen intact and firm, but on examining the anal region it wassurprising to find an infundibuliform deformity with all the signs ofsodomitical habits, which of course rectified the opinion that had beenmade regarding the chastity of this woman thesis of the signs enumerated as peculiar to different callings haveno special anatomical characteristic that is easy to distinguish withprecision, consequently they do not present a degree of certainty orconstancy sufficient to be invoked as strong medico-legal proof ofidentity moreover, the effects of time or treatment may have causedalteration or disappearance of thesis of the signs in question, whichwould at best be of negative rather than of absolute value to arrive at an imwritingial appreciation of the relative value of theprofessional stigmata as signs of identity, a certain number of thesigns should be thrown aside as illusory others, on the contrary, aredurable, special, and constant, and assist in establishing the identityaccordingly as the lesions or alterations are complete or evident. Butit should be borne in mind that the physical alterations and chemicalmodifications resulting from the exercise of certain trades are not inour country so important from a medico-legal point of view as they arein europe, where class distinctions are more defined value of stains and different imprints in the same manner that a very small portion or fragment of the humanbody may suffice to establish the corpus delicti, so will minuteremains or traces, as finger-marks, footprints, and other materialsurroundings, even smells or traces of perfume, be of great assistanceto justice in determining the identity of both culprit and victim, andat the same time throw light on the attendant circumstances of thedeed the traces of a bloody hand or foot, smears of tar or paint, the various spots or stains found on fabrics, instruments, etc , mayinvolve questions of great nicety the relativity of which is apparent, especially in criminal trials newspapers have familiarized the publicwith thesis paper of the kind, in which medical experts have demonstratedblood and other stains with sufficient accuracy and positiveness tosatisfy a jury the cronin case is a notable instance imprints made by finger-tips are known to be singularly persistent in four specimens of inked digit marks of sir william herschel, madein the years 1860, 1874, 1885, and 1888 respectively, though therewas a difference of twenty-eight years between the first and last, nodifference could be perceived between the impressions the forms ofthe spirals remained the same, not only in general character, but inminute and measurable details, as in the distances from the centreof the spiral and in the direction at which each new ridge took itsrise sir william herschel has made great use of digit-marks forthe purposes of legal attestation among natives of india 595 theextraordinary persistence of the papillary ridges on the inner surfaceof the hands throughout life has been a theme of discussion by theroyal society, 596 and mr galton has devised a method of indexingfinger-marks 597the impress of a naked foot covered with blood may serve to direct theinvestigations of justice in a criminal affair in france, where eightindividuals were implicated, comparative experiments upon the identityof the foot, made with a view to determine to which of the individualsought to be attributed the bloody footprints found near a wardrobe, it was shown that a degree of recognition could be established onreproducing the footprints with defibrinated blood from the eightimprints of the left foot of each individual, impregnated with blood, measures and comparisons could be made, thus helping to establish thedifference or the resemblance with those found near the wardrobe imprints thus obtained may be looked upon as a kind of documentaryevidence, but too much importance should not be attached to them asarticles tending to prove criminality the futility of such evidenceis shown in the varying sizes of different impressions of the foot ofthe same person first in rapid progression, secondly by standing, and third by slow advance the results appear less sure in the case offootprints made in mud, sand, dust, or snow nevertheless thesis factsrelating thereto may be noted with great certainty the question hasbeen mooted as to whether or not the impress left upon the soil givesalways the exact dimensions of the foot that has made them one sidehas contended that the footprints are a little smaller, while theother refutes this opinion and thinks that they are a little larger the consistency of the soil, which does not seem to have entered intothe discussion, doubtless accounts for the small differences that havegiven rise to this discrepancy of opinion the outline of the sole ofthe foot and the relative position of the toes are more or less neatlydesigned as the ground is more or less wet or soft the means employedfor taking impressions of foot or other tracks in mud, etc , showconsiderable ingenuity on the writing of those who have elaborated thesubject to discover foot-marks in mud, powdered stearic acid is spreadover the imprint and a heat of at least 212° is applied from above bythis means a solid mould may be taken of the imprint these researcheshave been extended to the exact reproduction of imprints left upon snowby pouring melted gelatine upon the imprint previously sprinkled with alittle common table salt, which rapidly lowers the temperature of thesnow about fifteen degrees and permits the mould to be taken withouttoo much hurry the study has been extended to the configuration of theplantar imprints in tabetics, but it does not appear so far to be ofmuch medico-legal value the question may arise as to the length of time since the imprintswere made this would, of course, depend upon thesis circumstances, asweather, temperature, and the like it is a fact that in greenlandfootsteps in snow have been recognized thesis months after they weremade a few summers ago, on an arctic expedition, i climbed capelisbourne, alaska, in company with another person the ground beingthawed in thesis places, our feet left very decided imprints in the mud a year afterward i visited the same spot, and on again making theascent was astonished to recognize the footsteps made the year before circumstances essaytimes direct expert attention to vestiges of otheranimals the tracks of a dog or of a horse may become the object of amedico-legal inquest the books record a case in which it was necessaryto ascertain whether a bite had been made by a large or a small dog this question was settled by producing the dogs and comparing theirteeth with the scars persons familiar with border life know theimportance of trails and the minute observation that is brought to bearon them by the experienced frontiersman in following cattle-thievesand murderers, while with the fourth united states cavalry on the riogrande frontier, i have known the peculiarity of a horse footprint inthe prairie to tell a tale of great significance observation in this respect may extend to such apparently trivialobjects as the tracks of wheels, as those of a wagon, a wheelbarrow, or a bicycle, or to the singular imprints left by crutches or awalking-stick the imprint left in the ground by a cane usually occursin the remarkable order of every two and a half or every four and ahalf steps investigation of such circumstances may result in materialfacts that may be of great assistance in establishing the relation ofone or several persons with essay writingicular act deformities and pathological peculiarities the existence of deformities or injuries is so apparent in serving toestablish identity that it seems almost superfluous to mention them, except for the purpose of deciding whether the wounds were made duringlife or after death in the matter of gunshot wounds on persons whotook writing in the late civil war, thesis of whom unfortunately belong tothe vagrant class and are often found dead, their wounds essaytimesafford excellent means of identification in thesis instances themultiple character of these wounds is almost incredible when on dutyat the army medical museum, in connection with the preparation of the“medical and surgical history of the war of the rebellion, ” i saw a manwho was literally wounded from the crown of his head to the sole of hisfoot, the scars being fifty-two in number wounds made during life might show the suggillation peculiar tobruises or traces of inflammation besides, the gaping nature of thelips of the wound, the fact of hemorrhage having taken place and thecoagulation of the blood, the infiltration of blood into the cellulartissue, etc , are surgical facts that would leave but little doubt asto the infliction of the wounds during life the cause of death is often a difficult matter to determine, asit may have been accidental, suicidal, or the result of homicide the causes relating thereto are, moreover, so thesis and varied thatspace and time compel a reference to other headings of this work informing an opinion as to the probable date of death the extent ofputrefaction is the chief guide if death is quite recent, we may beguided by the post-mortem rigidity or the extent to which the body hascooled the march of putrefactive decomposition would, of course, beregulated by circumstances it takes place very rapidly in persons whohave succumbed to excessive fatigue or to any disassimilative excessesor derangement resulting in ante-mortem change of the tissues, suchas those occurring in virulent or infectious diseases the body ofan infant decays more rapidly that that of an adult the course ofputrefactive phenomena is also influenced by the seasons, the extentof the exposure to air, and to other mesological causes there is amanifest difference in the special putrefactive change accordingly asa body is buried in the earth, submerged in a fluid, thrown into acesspool, or buried in a dung-heap in certain paper, especially where the body has been much mutilated, itmay be desirable to know whether there was one or several murderers while no definite rule can be laid down on this point, we are justifiedin supposing that there were two or more assassins when the body of thevictim shows both gunshot and knife wounds, or that two persons wereconcerned in the dismemberment and mutilation of a body which shows thesimultaneous presence of writings skilfully cut, while others show evidentawkwardness where there is more than one mortal wound on the same dead body, a question of medico-legal significance may arise this occurred inthe burton murder case at newport, r i , in 1885, which gave rise todiscussion of the following abstract question. “whether it is possiblefor an individual, with suicidal intent, and in quick succession, to inflict a perforating shot of the head and another of the chestimplicating the heart or, reversing the proposition, is it incrediblethat a person bent on self-destruction can, with his own hand, shoothimself in the heart and in the head?. ”after consideration of the case referred to and reversal of theprevious decision of the coroner, the supposed suicide proved to bea homicide yet if the abstract question of possibilities is aloneregarded, there is no doubt of the fact that a suicide could shoothimself in such manner, both in the head and the heart, or, changingthe order, of shots in the heart and in the head the number ofpaper recorded establishes beyond a doubt the feasibility of theself-infliction of two such wounds, and make it clear that the theoryof suicide may be maintained in such circumstances 598judicial anthropometry of late years the subject of anthropometric identification has takensuch a place before justice that it cannot be ignored by the medicallegist the facts of scientific anthropology have here been applied insuch a way as to establish with great certainty both the present andfuture identity of individuals who attempt dissimulation of their nameand antecedents the method used principally in the identificationof criminals and deserters from the army has been adopted in thepublic service599 and by most municipalities, with the exception ofnew york, where the subsequent identification of persons connectedwith municipal affairs has been and may be a source of no littleembarrassment the system is based on three recognitory elements. Photography, anthropometric measurements, and personal markings, from which adescriptive list is made that gives absolute certainty as to individualidentity owing to the illusory nature of photography and the difficultyin finding the portrait of any given individual in the large andconstantly increasing collection of a “rogues’ gallery, ” the matterhas been simplified and facilitated by grouping the photographiccollection according to the six anthropological coefficients of sex, stature, age, and color of the eyes each of these primordial groups isagain subdivided in such a way as to reduce the last group to a smallnumber, when the portrait is easily found and verified on comparing themeasurements of the head, of the extended arms, the length of the leftfoot, and that of the left middle finger the photographic proof for each individual consists of two portraitsside by side, one of which is taken full face, the other in profile ofthe right side on the back of the photographic card is recorded withrigorous precision all personal markings or peculiarities the measurements, which can be made by any person of averageintelligence in three or four minutes, are extremely simple theright ear is always measured, for the reason that this organ isalways reproduced in the traditional photograph which represents theright face other special measurements are taken on the left side theheight sitting, dimensions and character of the nose, color of eyes, etc , are also noted it is contended that by these measurements alone the identity of anindividual whose face is not even known may be established in anothercountry by telegraph the application of the system has proved of greatservice in the apprehension of deserters from the united states army when the authorities have been able to find the card, while it isclaimed to have caused the disappearance of numerous dissimulators ofidentity in the prisons of paris the police authorities of that cityreport that out of more than five hundred annual recognitions by theforegoing means, not one mistake has yet occurred 600to avoid a possible source of error mensuration of the organs and theascertainment of their form may be resorted to in the case of a cadaverthat is much decayed, or in one that has been purposely mutilated orburned by the assassin in order to prevent recognition a sufficientnumber of paper may be cited in which the measurement of a limb or abone of a deceased person known to have been lame or deformed duringlife has resulted in the establishment of identity or the reverse a mistake may be prevented in the case of supposed mutilation of adrowned body, which may have been caused by the screw of a passingsteamer other errors may result from carelessness, incorrectobservation of signs, and neglect to follow the ordinary precautionsthat should obtain in all researches on identity of the dead body certain circumstances indicative of the mental state of the culpritmay throw light on the identity a person of unsound mind wouldcertainly be suggested as the perpetrator of such a deed as that ofthe woman already mentioned, who after killing and cutting up herinfant, cooked portions of the remains with cabbage and served themat a meal of which she herself writingook equally conclusive should bethe inference in the case cited by maudsley of a person who, for noascertainable motive, kills a little girl, mutilates her remains, andcarefully records the fact in his note-book, with the remark that thebody was hot and good the handwriting left by the assassin might also furnish a strongpresumption as to the existence of a mental lesion, since the writingof the insane is often characteristic, especially in the initial stageof dementia i recall the case of a former patient, an aphasic, imprisoned for having stabbed a man in the abdomen and for havingwounded his wife in such a way that her arm had to be amputated havinglost the power to express himself phonetically, this man used a bookand pencil, but his writing showed a degree of agraphia which alonewould establish his identity beyond a doubt while it is quite possible that dishonest transactions, and even theft, may take place by telephone and the voices of the perpetrators maybe unmistakable between distant cities, it is more likely that thephonographic registration of speech or other sound by means of agramophone should become a matter of medico-legal investigation and apossible means that may lend great assistance in establishing personalidentity although no precedent may be cited, it is not going intothe domain of theoretical hypothesis to mention a discovery of suchreal scientific certainty that for years after death, and thousands ofmiles away, gives an indefinite number of reproductions that cannotpossibly be mistaken by any one familiar with the voice before it hadbecome “edisonized ” essay gramophone disks lately shown me from gerthesisregistered greetings and messages to relatives in washington, who weredelighted to recognize the exact reproduction of familiar tones andaccents of the fatherland so limitless is the field of research in this direction that there isscarcely an anthropological, biological, or medical discovery thatmay not sooner or later be applied with profit in the investigationsof personal identity where the combined efforts of an attorney and anexpert are required after the most rigid and scrutinizing anatomical and materialexamination is made and the closest inquisition entered on, it mayoften be impossible to give a reasonable explanation for the causeof the physical facts observed the medical man should remember thathis is the one great exception to the rule that rigidly excludesopinions, and that scientific men called as witnesses may not givetheir opinion as to the general merits of the case, but only as to thefacts already proved this qualifying rule being altogether reversedin investigations into personal identity, and the physician opinionas to identity being indispensable, it becomes a matter of mostserious import that this opinion should be grounded upon absolute andwell-attested facts medico-legal determinationofthe time of death byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc medico-legal determination of the time of death signs of death the cessation of respiration and the absence of audible heart-beatsare signs generally regarded as sufficient in themselves to determinethe reality of death but persons have been resuscitated from a stateof asphyxia or have recovered from a state of catalepsy or lethargy inwhom, to all appearances, the respiratory and circulatory processeshave been arrested so it is advisable that we should be acquainted with essay absolutetests of death which are not connected with the heart-sounds or therespiration it is well known that these important functions, although apparentlyheld in abeyance, must be speedily re-established so as to berecognized, or death will rapidly follow this condition of apparentlysuspended animation is seen among hibernating animals. The bear, forinstance, will remain for four or five months without food or drinkin a state of lethargy the heart-action and respiration hardlyappreciable yet it will be sufficiently rapid to sustain life duringthe slow metabolic processes a number of well-authenticated paper arereported in which persons could slacken their heart-action, so thatno movement of the organ could be appreciated the case of coloneltownsend, reported by cheyne, is an example he possessed the power ofapparently dying, by slowing his heart so that there was no pulse orheart-action discernible the longest period he could remain in thisinanimate state was half an hour instances have occurred in the new-born child where without questionthere have been no heart-beats or respiratory movements for a number ofminutes, the limit being set at five these are exceptional paper, and it is setting at defiance allphysiological experience to suppose that the heart-action andrespiration can be suspended entirely when once they are established, for a period as long so, then, if no motion of the heart occurs duringa period of five minutes a period five times as great as observationwarrants death may be regarded as certain the respiratory movements of the chest are essaytimes very difficultto observe they can always be better appreciated if the abdomen andchest are observed together there are two methods to determine whetherrespiration is absolutely suspended or not first, by holding a mirrorin front of the open mouth, observing whether any moisture collects onits surface second, by placing on the chest a looking-glass or basinof water, and reflecting from it an image by artificial or sun light the slightest movement would be registered by a change in position ofthe image while the writer considers the absence of heart-beats and ofrespiratory movement an absolute test of death, still essay paper mayoccur in which the establishment of this test is very difficult, andthe following additional tests may be employed:1 temperature of the body same as surrounding air 2 intermittent shocks of electricity at different tensions passed intovarious muscles, giving no indication whatever of irritability 3 careful movements of the joints of the extremities and of the lowerjaw, showing that rigor mortis is found in several writings 4 a bright needle plunged into the body of the biceps muscle cloquet needle test and left there, showing on withdrawal no signsof oxidation 5 the opening of a vein, showing that the blood has undergonecoagulation 6 the subcutaneous injection of ammonia monte verde test, causinga dirty-brown stain indicative of dissolution 7 a fillet applied to the veins of the arm richardson test, causing no filling of the veins on the distal side of the fillet 8 “diaphanous test:” after death there is an absence of thetranslucence seen in living people when the hand is held before astrong light with the fingers extended and in contact 9 “eye test:” after death there is a loss of sensibility of the eyeto light, loss of corneal transparency, and the pupil is not responsiveto mydriatics post-mortem changes the human body after death undergoes certain changes which will bediscussed under the following heads:1 cooling of the body 2 flaccidity of the body 3 rigor mortis 4 changes in color due to a cadaveric ecchymoses b putrefaction cooling of the body immediately after death there is a slight rise of temperature, supposedto be due to the fact that the metabolic changes in the tissues stillcontinue, while the blood is no longer cooled by passing through theperipheral capillaries and lungs the body gradually cools and reaches the temperature of the surroundingair in from fifteen to twenty hours. This is the ordinary course, but the time may be influenced by a variety of causes, such as thecondition of the body at the time of death, manner of death, andcircumstances under which the body has been placed in certain diseases, as yellow fever, rheumatism, chorea, and tetanus, the temperature of the body has been known to rise as high as 104° f and remain so for a time again, it has been observed that when deathhas taken place suddenly, as from accident, apoplexy, or acute disease, the body retains its heat for a long time the bodies of persons dyingfrom hanging, electrocution, suffocation, or poisoning by carbondioxide, do not generally cool for from twenty-four to forty-eighthours, and paper are recorded where three days have elapsed before thebody was completely cold on the other hand, bodies dead from chronicwasting diseases or severe hemorrhage cool very rapidly, even in fouror five hours in determining the temperature of a dead body the hand is not areliable guide. The thermometer should always be used flaccidity the first effect of death from any cause is general relaxation of theentire muscular system the lower jaw drops, the eyelids lose theirtension, the limbs are flabby and soft, and the joints become flexible in from five to six hours after death, and generally while the body isin the act of cooling, the muscles of the limbs are observed to becomehard and contracted, the joints stiff, and the body unyielding muscleswhich are contracted in the death-agony do not necessarily becomerelaxed at any time the muscular tissues in the dead body can be considered as passingthrough three stages. 1 flaccid but contractile, 2 rigid andincapable of contraction, 3 relaxed and incapable of furthercontractility rigor mortis this is essaytimes called cadaveric rigidity and occurs generally withinsix hours after death and disappears within sixteen to twenty-fourhours thesis theories have been advanced to account for it, but the mostprobable one is that the rigidity is due to the coagulation of themyosin in the muscles by the weak acids which are no longer removedfrom the system. The muscles always give an acid reaction and areopaque instead of transparent. After putrefaction has set in ammonia isdeveloped, the myosin dissolved, and so flaccidity results rigor mortis occurs first in the muscles of the eyelid, next themuscles of the lower jaw and neck are affected, then the chest andupper extremities. Afterward it gradually progresses from abovedownward, affecting the muscles of the abdomen and lower limbs therigidity disappears in the same sequence the period after deathwhen rigor mortis manifests itself, together with its duration, ischiefly dependent upon the previous degree of muscular exhaustion brown-séquard has demonstrated that the greater the degree of muscularirritability at the time of death, the later the cadaveric rigiditysets in and the longer it lasts he has also shown that the laterputrefaction sets in, the more slowly it progresses the more robust the individual and the shorter the disease, the moremarked and persistent is this muscular rigidity it has been noticedthat the bodies of soldiers killed in the beginning of an engagementbecome rigid slowly, and those killed late quickly this explains thereason why bodies are essaytimes found on the battle-field in a kneelingor sitting posture with weapons in hand if the rigidity of rigor mortis after it is once complete is overcome, as in bending an arm, it never returns. But if incomplete it mayreturn this will serve at times to distinguish real death fromcatalepsy and its allied conditions while the average duration ofrigor mortis has been given as sixteen to twenty-four hours, it mustbe remembered that in essay paper it has been known to last only a fewhours, as in death by lightning or by electrocution in other paper ithas persisted for seven and fourteen days this long continuance of rigor mortis has been noted in death fromstrychnine and other spinal poisons, in suffocation, and in poisoningby veratrum viride atmospheric conditions modify to a large extent the duration of rigormortis dry, cold air causes it to last for a long time, while warm, moist air shortens its duration also immersion in cold water brings onrigor mortis quickly and lengthens its duration cadaveric ecchymosis cadaveric lividity or hypostasis within a few hours after death the skin of the body, which is of apale, ashy-gray color, becomes covered by extensive patches of a bluishor purple color, which are most pronounced and are first seen on theback writing of the trunk, head extremities, ears, face, and neck, and aredue to the blood, before coagulating, settling in the most dependentwritings of the body, producing a mottling of the surface with irregularlivid patches there is also a stagnation of blood in the capillaryvessels, especially in those in the upper layer of the true skin or inthe space between the cuticle and cutis the discoloration continues toincrease until the body is cold, when it is entirely arrested lateron, just before putrefaction begins, the color deepens, and the changeappears to proceed from an infiltration of blood pigment into thedependent writings of the body at the same time the discolorations are appearing on the surface of thebody, internal hypostasis is also taking place, most marked in thedependent portions of the brain, lungs, intestines, kidneys, and spinalcord this condition in the brain may be mistaken for so-called congestiveapoplexy.

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“syphilodol is dispensed in the form of tablets and also hermetically closed glass syringes or ampules so that it may be used either by the mouth, intravenously or intramuscularly at the discretion of the physician an advantage of the tablets is that they can and should be given during the interim between the injections ” laboratory report on syphilodolseveral samples of “syphilodol” were sent to the american medicalassociation chemical laboratory by readers of the journal an originalbottle of tablets was ordered direct from the french medicinal company the bottle contained 25 yellow tablets, having an average weight of0 276 gm 4-1/4 grains after being powdered, “syphilodol” was foundto be only writingially soluble in water the excipient is soluble andto be neutral in reaction these findings contradict the claims onthe circular accompanying the bottle to the extended essay outline effect that “syphilodolis a yellow powder, soluble in water, and has an acid reaction ”qualitative tests indicated the presence of mercury, sucrose canesugar, iodid, calcium, sulphate, fatty material, a trace of silver, a trace of arsenic and a very minute trace of antimony. A red dye wasalso present both qualitative and quantitative data showed that themercury was present in the form of mercurous iodid yellow iodid ofmercury-- hydrargyri iodidum flavum quantitative estimations yieldedthe following. Silver ag 0 001 per cent mercury hg 11 1 per cent iodid i- 7 8 per cent sucrose cane sugar 72 0 per cent ash calcium sulphate 2 5 per cent ether-soluble material fatty material-- petrolatum 3 5 per cent thus each tablet of “syphilodol” contains approximately, 3/4 grainof mercurous iodid an ampule of “syphilodol, ” labeled 0 4 gram, contained approximately 1 5 c c of a liquid which after evaporationon a water-bath left a residue weighing 0 8 mg , or 1/80 grain asecond ampule held about 2 c c of liquid, which contained a trace ofarsenic less than 0 00001 gm , or 1/6000 grain. A very small amountof mercury was indicated but not definitely established the liquid hadthe physical characteristics of water accompanying “syphilodol” advertising sent to physicians is a circularletter inviting the doctor to become a member in the “united statesbacteriological and research institute ” the “institute” seems to be ameans of suggesting that the physician have bacteriologic, pathologicand serologic examinations made on behalf of his patients in view ofthe fact that it is to the commercial interest of the french medicinalcompany to have as thesis users of “syphilodol” as possible, it wouldbe interesting to know what proportion of the wassermann tests arereported negative shorn of its mystery, syphilodol the “synthetic chemical product ofsilver, arsenic and antimony” is essentially mercurous iodid-- yellowiodid of mercury details of analysis syphilodol tabletsin france there has been on the market for essay time a syntheticcompound of silver, arsenic and antimony having the general structureof arsphenamin structurally, the formula as given by bonard, danyssand tournier is c₁₂h₁₂n₂as₂ 2agbrsbo h₂so₄₂-- dioxy diaminoarsenobensolstibicosilver sulphate as the advertising matter for“syphilodol” referred to the synthetic compound of silver, antimonyand arsenic, and also to its use in syphilis by fournier, the abovecompound was first suspected however, the general characteristicsof syphilodol tablets, such as writingial solubility in water, but notsoluble in sodium hydroxid, sodium bicarbonate or acids, threw doubt onthe hypothesis when a small amount of the powdered tablets was treatedwith water, a yellow residue could be filtered off. The filtrate waspink, opalescent, which on standing gave a clear pink solution, anda small yellow precipitate the residue, when allowed to remain insulphuric acid solution 20 per cent over night became red. Onboiling, the red precipitate with sulphuric acid, the precipitatevolatilized and could be condensed in a watch glass adding a pinch ofmanganese dioxid to the hot sulphuric acid mixture caused an evolutionof iodin fumes a small amount of powdered syphilodol tablets wasplaced in the sunlight.