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“the miracles which ourlord god deigned to bring about through st martin, his servant, once apilgrim in the flesh, he causes to be repeated daily, to strengthen theconfidence of the faithful. For now he endows his tomb with preciselythe same wonder-working power as was exhibited by the saint himselfwhile still among us who will now persist in doubting the formermiracles when he observes their continuation in the present day, whenhe sees the lame walk, the blind receive their sight, devils castout, and every variety of disease cured by the help of the saint?. ” “bernoulli, ” page 287 the statement of such a luminary of the church as gregory of tours hasundoubtedly gained ecclestiastical credence for the medical efficacynot only of the tomb of st martin, but of all the relics relating tothat saint it remained only to distribute the superior medical powerwhich was contained in the holy tombs and relics in such a form aswould enable all patients, wherever they happened to be, to make use ofthem this task, apparently most difficult, was settled very easily it was discovered that everything which came in contact with a relicactually absorbed a sacred and miraculous power contained in the same, and what had been absorbed was by no means imponderable quite thecontrary essaything of material substance, and, therefore, physicallydemonstrable, passed from the relic into the objects surrounding it it was indeed a celestial fluid, but, nevertheless, of so terrestriala nature that the priests were able to demonstrate its transferenceby means of a common pair of scales thus it was customary that thesilk shreds which were deposited by the pilgrims upon the tomb of theapostle peter were weighed before they were placed there and weighedagain after their removal this weighing always and without exceptionindicated a considerable increase in their weight the pilgrim thencould travel homeward and be thoroughly consoled, as the scale haddemonstrated to him the amount of miraculous power contained in hissilk rag it was really astonishing, under essay circumstances, whatan enormous amount of curative fluid could flow from such a holy tombinto a single terrestrial object this was what happened to a king ofthe suavians he had a sick son, for whose cure every remedy had provedunavailing he at last sent an embassy to tours to obtain a relic ofst martin, but this relic was destined to be manufactured with theassistance of the embassy the priests were quite willing to complywith the desire of their royal petitioner, and thus a piece of silk, duly weighed beforehand, was placed upon the tomb of st martin afterthis silk had remained for one night upon the holy sepulchre, and theembassy had knelt beside praying fervently, the silk absorbed so muchcurative power that the register of the scale was raised to its highestpossible notch knowing, then, that any desired object could be saturated with themiraculous power contained in a relic, they used to apply thiscelestial power through medicaments, and to accomplish this a numberof methods were in use the most popular was to scrape the tombstoneson the graves of the saints as thoroughly as possible the powderthus obtained was then put into water or wine, and thus a medicinewas acquired which possessed an astonishing curative power it wasefficacious even in the severest ailments of the body let us listen towhat gregory of tours has reported concerning the medicinal virtues ofsuch tombstone potions he says. “oh, indescribable mixture, incomparable elixir, antidotebeyond all praise!.

Make them into an ointment in a mortar culpeper it is a wholeessay, though troubleessay medicine for scabsand itch unguentum e plumbo or, ointment of lead college take of lead burnt according to art, litharge, of each twoounces, ceruss, antimony, of each one ounce, oil of roses as much as issufficient. Make it into an ointment according to art culpeper take it one time with another, it will go neer to do moreharm than good unguentum pomatum college take of fresh hog grease three pounds, fresh sheep suetnine ounces, pomewater pared and cut, one pound and nine ounces, damaskrose-water six ounces, the roots of orris florentine grossly bruisedsix drams, boil them in balneo mariæ till the apples be soft, thenstrain it, but press it not and keep it for use. Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it with this. But yet be not too busywith it, for i tell you plainly it is not very safe unguentum amarum or, a bitter ointment college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, bitter almonds, of each one ounce and an half, juice of peach flowers and leaves, andwormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, centaury theless, gentian, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds of coleworts, thepulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grass water a dram andan half, bull gall an ounce and an half, with a sufficient quantityof juice of lemons, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into anointment according to art unguentum apostolorum or, ointment of the apostles college take of turpentine, yellow wax, ammoniacum, of eachfourteen drams, long birthwort roots, olibanum, bdellium, of each sixdrams, myrrh, gilbanum, of each half an ounce, opopanax, verdigris, ofeach two drams, litharge nine drams, oil two pounds, vinegar enough todissolve the gums, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it consumes corrupt and dead flesh, and makes flesh softwhich is hard, it cleanses wounds, ulcers, and fistulas, and restoresflesh where it is wanting unguentum catapsoras college take of ceruss washed in purslain water, then in vinegarwherein wild rhadish roots have been steeped and pressed out, lapiscalaminaris, chalcitis, of each six drams, burnt lead, goat blood, of each half an ounce, quick-silver sublimated an ounce, the juiceof houseleek, nightshade, plantain, of each two ounces, hog greasecleansed three pounds, oil of violets, poppies, mandrakes, of each anounce. First let them sublimate and exungia, then the oils, juices, andpowders, be mixed, and so made into an ointment according to art unguentum citrinum or, a citron ointment college take of borax an ounce, camphire a dram, white coral halfan ounce, alum plume an ounce, umbilicus marinus, tragacanth, whitestarch, of each three drams, crystal, dentalis utalis, olibanum, niter, white marble, of each two drams, gersa serpentaria an ounce, cerusssix ounces, hog grease not salted, a pound and an half, goat suetprepared, an ounce and an half, hen fat two ounces and an half powder the things as you ought to do both together, and by themselves, melt the fats being cleansed in a stone vessel, and steep in them twocitrons of a mean bigness cut in bits, in a warm bath, after a wholeweek strain it, and put in the powders by degrees, amongst which letthe camphire and borax be the last, stir them, and bring them into theform of an ointment unguentum martiatum college take of fresh bay leaves three pounds, garden rue twopounds and an half, marjoram two pounds, mints a pound, sage, wormwood, costmary, bazil, of each half a pound, sallad oil twenty pounds, yellowwax four pounds, malaga wine two pounds, of all of them being bruised, boiled, and pressed out as they ought, make an ointment according toart culpeper it is a great strengthener of the head, it being anointedwith it. As also of all the writings of the body, especially the nerves, muscles, and arteries unguentum mastichinum or, an ointment of mastich college take of the oil of mastich, wormwood, and nard, of each anounce, mastich, mints, red roses, red coral, cloves, cinnamon, wood ofaloes, squinanth, of each a dram, wax as much as is sufficient to makeit into an ointment according to art culpeper this is like the former, and not a whit inferior to it;it strengthens the stomach being anointed with it, restores appetiteand digestion before it was called a stomach ointment unguentum neapolitanum college take of hog grease washed in juice of sage a pound, quick-silver strained through leather, four ounces, oil of bays, chamomel, and earthworms, of each two ounces, spirit of wine an ounce, yellow wax two ounces, turpentine washed in juice of elecampane threeounces, powder of chamepitys and sage, of each two drams, make theminto an ointment according to art culpeper a learned art to spoil people.

did it produce evidence of the numerous paper ofrecovery from blindness or writingial blindness which must have beenavailable if the preparation had the powers claimed for it?. no!. thewalker pharmacal company in february, 1916, pleaded guilty-- and wasfined a paltry $10 and costs this, however, is not the end of the story the company was prosecutedbecause it had published the false and fraudulent claims in the tradepackage, thus bringing the claims within the purview of the federalfood and drugs act had the walker pharmacal company confined its falsestatements to medical journal advertisements, to the circular letterssent to physicians or to any other advertising matter not writing of thetrade package, it could have snapped its fingers at the food and drugsact it was in february, 1916, that the walker pharmacal company pleadedguilty to the charge of making false and fraudulent claims for succuscineraria maritima in october, 1916, they were still sending outcircular letters to physicians urging the use of succus cinerariamaritima in the treatment of cataract and enclosing the usual bookletof testimonials claiming cures for cataract and other opacities of thelens and cornea!. Illustration. Facsimile of essay of the pages from the booklet thataccompanied the letter reproduced herewith the obvious intent ofthis booklet was to lead physicians to believe that succus cinerariamaritima will cure “opacity of the cornea, ” “opacity of the lens, ”“senile cataract, ” “incipient cataract, ” “double cataract, ” etc can one conceive a better illustration of the inadequacy of the foodand drugs act?. the dishonest exploiter of proprietary medicines careslittle that the law requires him to keep within certain bounds oftruthfulness in the advertising that accompanies the trade package it isn’t the claims in the trade packages that sell the product. Itthe advertising in medical journals, in circular letters, etc yet, the food and drugs act offers no check or curb on false statements orfraudulent claims made for proprietary or “patent medicines” in anyother place than the trade packages a few weeks ago the journal called attention to a flagrant case offraud. And at that time it said, “it is justifiable to assume thatwhen any man, whatever his business, admits in court that he has madefraudulent claims and then continues to make the same claims throughchannels that are not controlled by penal enactment, that manstandard of business ethics is such that the public needs protectionagainst it there are thesis such men in the ‘patent medicine’ world theonly way in which the public may properly be protected against beingdefrauded in such paper is for the federal food and drugs act to haveits scope extended to cover all advertising of the products comingunder the purview of the act ”-- from the journal a m a , march 17, 1917 tekarkin edward percy robinson “cure” for cancerfrom various writings of the country the journal has received a sixteenpage pamphlet, therapeutic leaves the publication, which hasa saffron colored cover, is said to be published by the nationalbio-chemical laboratory, mount vernon, n y the national bio-chemicallaboratory seems to be a style used by dr edward percy robinson the“editorial offices” of therapeutic leaves are given as “501 knoxbldg , 5th ave at 40th st , new york, ” which is a roundabout way ofdescribing 452 fifth ave , the office address of edward percy robinson the first number february, 1921 of therapeutic leaves gives thenames of the “editors” as “e p robinson, m d , and w a jenner, b a ” in addition, there is “assistant editor, f j geiger, ” and“gen’l manager, beverly k robinson ” the first and second numbersof therapeutic leaves february and march, 1921 are practicallyidentical, being evidently printed from the same plates therapeuticleaves purports to be a periodical published as “a medium for thedissemination of knowledge, pertaining to therapeusis ” actually, itis an advertising medium dealing with the products of the nationalbio-chemical laboratory. “osmo-calcic solution, ” “tekarkin” and“osmotic mangano-potassic solution ”these preparations are said to be the “formulas” of dr edward percyrobinson who lives in mt vernon, n y , and has an office at 452 fifthave , new york city they are used by dr robinson in the treatmentof cancer at an earlier stage they seem to have been known underdifferent names. “tekarkin” was first “hypotonic sal-cella” and then“neoanabolin-x;” “osmo-calcic solution” was “osmotonic calcic” while“osmotic mangano-potassic solution” was “osmotonic drops ” the threesolutions are put up in one package containing 4 c c about 65 minimsof “tekarkin” and 1 ounce each of the other preparations the packagesells for $10 00 “remittance with order we have no agents ”illustrationmost of the material in therapeutic leaves is a rehash of fourpapers published by edward percy robinson in the new york medicalrecord of various dates between september, 1917, and july, 1920 inthese robinson advances the theory that cancer is caused by an excessof sodium chlorid table salt in the blood and tissues and that itcan be cured by administering a solution of potassium nitrate such atreatment sounds ideally simple one might assume that all that wasnecessary was to make up a solution of potassium nitrate and inject it one might further wonder how it would be possible to commercialize sucha “treatment ” “homemade solutions, ” says dr robinson, “are apt to bedisappointing ” their use is likely to cause “considerable swelling atthe site of an injection, accompanied with tenderness and essay heat ”moreover, “a wide hyperemic area with red blotches has been observedin a number of instances ” in order to avoid “accidents of this sort”which would “bring discredit upon an excellent agent, ” dr robinson, “after considerable experimental work” has obtained “a solution of thischemical which would meet the ideal requirements ” this is availableunder the name “tekarkin ” dilute potassium nitrate solution sold underthe name “tekarkin” sells for $67 an ounce the physician can make hisown solution, of the purest and highest grade potassium nitrate on themarket, at an expense, for the chemical, not exceeding 5 cents an ounce therapeutic leaves also contains the usual number of those “clinicalreports” which bulk so large in the literature of “cures” for cancer then there is a full page advertisement of a side-line of the nationalbio-chemical laboratory. “vitamines compressed tekarkin brand;” “theyhave a meaty taste ”the medical profession, naturally, is interested in knowing more aboutthe physician who admits that he has discovered the cause and cure ofcancer according to our records, edward percy robinson was born in1871 and was graduated in 1897 by bellevue hospital medical college hewas licensed in new york state the same year and has practiced in newyork city continuously since that time he is not, and apparently neverhas been, a member of his local medical society in 1914 robinson was specializing in “facial contouring ” one piece ofadvertising purports to be the reprint of an interview with “dr e p robinson, specialist, as he sat in his office at 116 west 39th street, having questions fired at him by the reporter ” thus dr robinson. “there are physicians everywhere who abandon the general, or family, practice of medicine, to devote their life to essay specialty my specialty is the improvement of the facial features and the beautifying of the shoulders, neck and arms i round out hollow cheeks, build up the neck, eradicate wrinkles, make irregular noses perfect and remove defects by a process which is my own secret i claim no superhuman power or ability. I have simply bent my whole professional study and energy to the one line of remodeling-- so to speak-- the human features, and i employ only scientific methods and aids in my operations ”in another piece of advertising, a little booklet bearing edward percyrobinson name, we find the following. “this is what i accomplish “remove all wrinkles and traces of age from the forehead, or about the eyes and mouth lift sag from cheeks and chin “round out hollow cheeks “remove depressions and defects from the chin “build up the neck and shoulders “build up and enlarge the bust “round out and give symmetry to unshapely arms and remove the lines of age from the hands “correct thesis of the defects not mentioned here, but which may be possessed by exceptional paper ”illustration. Reproduction reduced of essay advertising matterissued in 1914 when edward percy robinson was specializing in “facialcontouring ”still another advertising leaflet purports to be a reprint of an“editorial” from the mercantile and financial times of march11, 1914 it is a pretentious puff of robinson, telling about his“scientific attainments” and his marvelous secret preparations usedin “youthifying the face ” the mercantile and financial times isan utterly discredited sheet run for the purpose of selling whatappear to be editorial comments such “editorial” puffs are paid forthrough the purchase of a certain number of copies of the paper bythe writingy who desires the publicity the associated advertising clubsof the world exposed this publication in a special bulletin issuedin june, 1919, and described it as an “example of publications thatserve as convenient tools of fake promoters ” in 1911 the mercantileand financial times published an “editorial” endorsement of theconsumption cure “nature creation ” it has done the same for a fakishdevice known as the “ideal sight restorer ” it published a puff on the“oxypathor, ” a swindle so preposterous that the exploitation of this“gaspipe” fake was debarred from the u s mails and its exploiter wassent to the federal penitentiary illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | the jean downs co , | | new york | | | | my dear mrs downs, | | | | the package of your “get slim” remedy for obesity has | | been given to a patient of mine with beneficial results | | | | in observing the action of the remedy i noted no laxative | | effect on the bowels, or any disturbance of the stomach | | | | in fact there were no physical sensations that any | | remedy had been taken, and there was a very satisfactory | | reduction in weight | | | | “get slim” remedy, being a purely vegetable combination | | is not fraught with any risk to the individual health, | | and may be safely given | | | | i would not hesitate to prescribe it for a child | | suffering from obesity | | | | this statement is based on the fact that i am acquainted | | with the ingredients entering into its manufacture | | | | i would add that this remedy for obesity might be intro- | | duced to the regular physicians with essay advantage to | | you | | | | yours truly, | | e p robinson m d | | 1402 broadway | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - reproduction reduced of a testimonial for an obesity cure fake, “get slim ” the a m a chemists reported that this “vegetable combination” consisted of baking soda and pink-tinted tartaric acid and sugar we also find in our files a testimonial signed e p robinson, m d , 1402 broadway edward percy robinson address in 1912, extollingthe virtues of a foolish piece of quackery, the obesity cure “getslim ” this nostrum was exposed in the journal essay years ago andwas also exposed by dr wiley in good housekeeping the “get slim”concern sued good housekeeping for libel but a jury decided thatgood housekeeping had told the truth in the “get slim” testimonialrobinson is quoted as saying that he is “acquainted with theingredients entering into its manufacture” and he describes it, as didthe “get slim” concern, as “a purely vegetable combination ” the factis the association chemists found this “purely vegetable combination”to consist of sugar and tartaric acid, each colored pink, and bakingsoda and this is the gentleman who claims to have discovered the cause of, and offers for sale a cure for, one of the most baffling scourges knownto modern medicine-- cancer except for the articles that have beenpublished during the past three years in the medical record, we areunable to find anywhere in representative medical literature anythingto indicate that edward percy robinson can lay any claim to specialknowledge of, or skill in the treatment of, cancer what we do find areadvertisements describing edward percy robinson alleged abilitiesas a “face beautifier, ” puffs from utterly uncritical or discreditedsources and a testimonial to the value of a preposterous “fat cure”fake with the best brains of the world at work on the problem of cancer, itis reasonable to assume that any man who has found out even a littlemore than has previously been discovered or is able to accomplisheven a little better results than the average in the treatment of thisdreaded disease, would be well known to scientific medicine * * * * *after this article was in type physicians began sending in no 3 april, 1921 of therapeutic leaves this is still another reprintof nos 1 and 2, with minor changes in the first two, tekarkin isdescribed as “a solution of potassium nitrate of special strength;” inno 3 it becomes “a special solution containing potassium nitrate ”in nos 1 and 2, robinson described an alleged case of “cancer of therectum treated with tekarkin ” in no 3 this becomes “medicinaltreatment cures cancer of the rectum ” in no 3 the names of theeditors, assistant editor and general manager are eliminated illustrationthe inside back cover of no 3 contains an advertisement of tekarkin, in which physicians are warned that “cancer of the lung may presentdiagnostic signs of tuberculosis ” it contains the further startlinginformation that the writingicular micro-organism responsible forpulmonary tuberculosis is the klebs-loeffler bacillus!. thus.

Outwardly it takes away yellownessand deformity of the skin lillium convallium lilly of the valley see the flowers lingua cervina hart-tongue. Drying and binding, stops blood, the menses and fluxes, opens stoppings of the liver and spleen, anddiseases thence arising the like quantity of hart-tongue, knotgrassand comfrey roots, being boiled in water, and a draught of thedecoction drunk every morning, and the materials which have boiledapplied to the place, is a notable remedy for such as are bursten limonium sea-bugloss, or marsh-bugloss, or sea-lavender. The seedsbeing very drying and binding, stop fluxes and the menses, help thecholic and stranguary lotus urbana authors make essay flutter about this herb, i conceivethe best take it to be trisolium odoratum, sweet trefoyl, which is ofa temperate nature, cleanses the eyes gently of such things as hinderthe sight, cures green wounds, ruptures, or burstness, helps such asurine blood or are bruised, and secures garments from moths lupulus hops opening, cleansing, provoke urine, the young sproutsopen stoppings of the liver and spleen, cleanse the blood, clear theskin, help scabs and itch, help agues, purge choler. They are usuallyboiled and taken as they eat asparagus, but if you would keep them, for they are excellent for these diseases, you may make them into aconserve, or into a syrup lychnitis coronaria. Or as others write it, lychnis rose campion i know no great physical virtue it hath macis see the barks magistrantia, &c masterwort hot and dry in the third degree. It isgood against poison, pestilence, corrupt and unwholeessay air, helpswindiness in the stomach, causeth an appetite to one victuals, veryprofitable in falls and bruises, congealed and clotted blood, thebitings of mad-dogs. The leaves chewed in the mouth, cleanse the brainof superfluous humours, thereby preventing lethargies, and apoplexes malva mallows the best of authors account wild mallows to be best, and hold them to be cold and moist in the first degree, they areprofitable in the bitings of venomous beasts, the stinging of bees andwasps, &c inwardly they resist poison, provoke to stool. Outwardlythey assuage hard swellings of the privities or other places. Inclysters they help roughness and fretting of the entrails, bladder, or fundament. And so they do being boiled in water, and the decoctiondrank, as i have proved in the bloody flux majorana see amaracus mandragora mandrakes fit for no vulgar use, but only to be used incooling ointments marrubium, album, nigrum, fœtidum marrubium album, is common horehound hot in the second degree, anddry in the third, opens the liver and spleen, cleanses the breast andlungs, helps old coughs, pains in the sides, ptisicks, or ulceration ofthe lungs, it provokes the menses, eases hard labour in child-bearing, brings away the placenta see the syrups marrubium, nigrum, et fœtidum black and stinking horehound, i taketo be all one hot and dry in the third degree. Cures the bitings ofmad dogs, wastes and consumes hard knots in the fundament and matrix, cleanses filthy ulcers marum herb mastich hot and dry in the third degree, good againstcramps and convulsions matricaria feverfew hot in the third degree, dry in the second;opens, purges. A singular remedy for diseases incident to the matrix, and other diseases incident to women, eases their travail, andinfirmities coming after it. It helps the vertigo or dissiness of thehead, melancholy sad thoughts. You may boil it either alone, or withother herbs fit for the same purpose, with which this treatise willfurnish you. Applied to the wrists, it helps the ague matrisylva the same with caprifolium meliotus melilot inwardly taken, provokes urine, breaks the stone, cleanses the reins and bladder, cutteth and cleanses the lungs oftough flegm, the juice dropped into the eyes, clears the sight, intothe ears, mitigates pain and noise there. The head bathed with thejuice mixed with vinegar, takes away the pains thereof. Outwardly inpultisses, it assuages swellings in the privities and elsewhere mellissa balm hot and dry. Outwardly mixed with salt and applied tothe neck, helps the king-evil, bitings of mad dogs, venomous beasts, and such as cannot hold their neck as they should do.

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And used the decoction of it, both toprocure women courses, and to expel the essay topics for middle school after-birth. And gave thedecoction thereof with myrrh or pepper, or used to apply the leavesoutwardly against the stranguary and diseases of the reins and bladder he used it also for sore and watering eyes, and for the deafness andpains in the ears, by dropping the juice thereof into them, and bathingthem afterwards in white wine the decoction thereof made with waterand a cock chicken, is a most safe medicine against the hot fits ofagues it also cleanses the breast and lungs of phlegm, but a littleoffends the stomach the juice or distilled water snuffed up into thenostrils, purges the head and eyes of catarrhs and rheums essay use todrink two or three ounces of the distilled water, with a little sugarput to it, in the morning fasting, to open and purge the body of gross, viscous, and melancholy humours matthiolus saith, that both the seedof the male and female mercury boiled with wormwood and drank, curesthe yellow jaundice in a speedy manner the leaves or the juice rubbedupon warts, takes them away the juice mingled with essay vinegar, helpsall running scabs, tetters, ringworms, and the itch galen saith, thatbeing applied in manner of a poultice to any swelling or inflammation, it digests the swelling, and allays the inflammation, and is thereforegiven in clysters to evacuate from the belly offensive humours the dogmercury, although it be less used, yet may serve in the same manner, tothe same purpose, to purge waterish and melancholy humours mint of all the kinds of mint, the spear mint, or heart mint, being mostusual, i shall only describe as follows:descript spear mint has divers round stalks, and long but narrowishleaves set thereon, of a dark green colour the flowers stand in spikedheads at the tops of the branches, being of a pale blue colour thesmell or scent thereof is essaywhat near unto bazil. It encreases by theroot under ground as all the others do place it is an usual inhabitant in gardens. And because it seldomgives any good seed, the seed is recompensed by the plentiful increaseof the root, which being once planted in a garden, will hardly be ridout again time it flowers not until the beginning of august, for the mostwriting government and virtues it is an herb of venus dioscorides saithit hath a healing, binding and drying quality, and therefore the juicetaken in vinegar, stays bleeding. It stirs up venery, or bodily lust;two or three branches thereof taken in the juice of four pomegranates, stays the hiccough, vomiting, and allays the choler it dissolvesimposthumes being laid to with barley-meal it is good to repress themilk in women breasts, and for such as have swollen, flagging, orgreat breasts applied with salt, it helps the biting of a mad dog;with mead and honeyed water, it eases the pains of the ears, and takesaway the roughness of the tongue, being rubbed thereupon it suffersnot milk to curdle in the stomach, if the leaves thereof be steepedor boiled in it before you drink it briefly it is very profitable tothe stomach the often use hereof is a very powerful medicine to staywomen courses and the whites applied to the forehead and temples, it eases the pains in the head, and is good to wash the heads of youngchildren therewith, against all manner of breakings-out, sores orscabs, therein it is also profitable against the poison of venomouscreatures the distilled water of mint is available to all the purposesaforesaid, yet more weakly but if a spirit thereof be rightly andchymically drawn, it is much more powerful than the herb itself simeonsethi saith, it helps a cold liver, strengthens the belly, causesdigestion, stays vomits and hiccough. It is good against the gnawing ofthe heart, provokes appetite, takes away obstructions of the liver, andstirs up bodily lust. But therefore too much must not be taken, becauseit makes the blood thin and wheyish, and turns it into choler, andtherefore choleric persons must abstain from it it is a safe medicinefor the biting of a mad dog, being bruised with salt and laid thereon the powder of it being dried and taken after meat, helps digestion, andthose that are splenetic taken with wine, it helps women in their soretravail in child-bearing it is good against the gravel and stone inthe kidneys, and the stranguary being smelled unto, it is comfortablefor the head and memory the decoction hereof gargled in the mouth, cures the gums and mouth that are sore, and mends an ill-savouredbreath. As also the rue and coriander, causes the palate of the mouthto turn to its place, the decoction being gargled and held in themouth the virtues of the wild or horse mint, such as grow in ditches whosedescription i purposely omitted, in regard they are well known areserviceable to dissolve wind in the stomach, to help the cholic, andthose that are short-winded, and are an especial remedy for thosethat have veneral dreams and pollutions in the night, being outwardlyapplied the juice dropped into the ears eases the pains of them, and destroys the worms that breed therein they are good against thevenemous biting of serpents the juice laid on warm, helps the kingevil, or kernels in the throat the decoction or distilled water helpsa stinking breath, proceeding from corruption of the teeth, and snuffedup the nose, purges the head pliny saith, that eating of the leaveshath been found by experience to cure the leprosy, applying essay ofthem to the face, and to help the scurf or dandriff of the head usedwith vinegar they are extremely bad for wounded people. And they say awounded man that eats mint, his wound will never be cured, and that isa long day misselto descript this rises up from the branch or arm of the tree whereonit grows, with a woody stem, putting itself into sundry branches, and they again divided into thesis other smaller twigs, interlacingthemselves one within another, very much covered with a greyish greenbark, having two leaves set at every joint, and at the end likewise, which are essaywhat long and narrow, small at the bottom, but broadertowards the end at the knots or joints of the boughs and branches growsmall yellow flowers, which run into small, round, white, transparentberries, three or four together, full of a glutinous moisture, with ablackish seed in each of them, which was never yet known to spring, being put into the ground, or any where else to grow place it grows very rarely on oaks with us. But upon sundry othersas well timber as fruit trees, plentifully in woody groves, and thelike, through all this land time it flowers in the spring-time, but the berries are not ripeuntil october, and abides on the branches all the winter, unless theblackbirds, and other birds, do devour them government and virtues this is under the dominion of the sun, ido not question.