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The dose is from one ounceto two, you may take it in a decoction of senna, it leaves a bindingquality behind it syrupus de spina cervina or syrup of purging thorn college take of the berries of purging thorn, gathered inseptember, as thesis as you will, bruise them in a stone mortar, andpress out the juice, let the fourth writing of it evaporate away in abath, then to two pounds of it add sixteen ounces of white sugar, boil it into a syrup, which perfume with mastich, cinnamon, nutmegs, anni-seeds in fine powder, of each three drams syrups made with vinegar and honey mel anthosatum or honey of rosemary flowers college take of fresh rosemary flowers a pound, clarified honeythree pounds, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in thesun, keep them for use culpeper it hath the same virtues with rosemary flowers, to which irefer you, only by reason of the honey it may be essaywhat cleansing mel helleboratum or honey helleborated college take of white hellebore roots bruised a pound, clear waterfourteen pounds, after essay topics for college three days infusion, boil it till half beconsumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pounds of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey mel mercuriale or honey of mercury college boil three pounds of the juice of mercury, with two poundsof honey to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as an emollient in clysters mel mororum, vel diamoron or honey of mulberries college take of the juice of mulberries and blackberries, beforethey be ripe, gathered before the sun be up, of each a pound and ahalf, honey two pounds, boil them to their due thickness culpeper it is vulgarly known to be good for sore mouths, as alsoto cool inflammations there mel nuceum, alias, diacarion et dianucum or honey of nuts college take of the juice of the outward bark of green walnuts, gathered in the dog days two pounds, boil it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is a good preservative in pestilential times, aspoonful being taken as soon as you are up mel passalatum or honey of raisins college take of raisins of the sun cleansed from the stones twopounds, steep them in six pounds of warm water, the next day boil ithalf away, and press it strongly, and with two pounds of honey, let theexpressed liquor boil to its thickness culpeper it is a pretty pleasing medicine for such as are inconsumptions, and are bound in body mel rosatum commune, sive foliatum or common honey of roses college take of red roses not quite open two pounds, honey sixpounds, set them in the sun according to art mel rosatum colatum or honey of roses strained college take of the best clarified honey ten pounds, juice of freshred roses one pound, set it handessayly over the fire, and when itbegins to boil, put in four pounds of fresh red roses, the whites beingcut off. The juice being consumed by boiling and stirring, strain itand keep it for use culpeper they are both used for diseases in the mouth mel rosatum solutivum or honey of roses solutive college take of the often infusion of damask roses five pounds, honey rightly clarified four pounds, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as a laxative in clysters, and essay use it tocleanse wounds college after the same manner is prepared honey of the infusion ofred roses mel scilliticum or honey of squils college take one squil full of juice, cut in bits, and put it in aglass vessel, the mouth close stopped, and covered with a skin, set inthe sun forty days, to wit, twenty before and after the rising of thedog star, then open the vessel, and take the juice which lies at thebottom, and preserve it with the best honey college honey of violets is prepared like as honey of roses oxymel, simple college take of the best honey four pounds, clear water and whitewine vinegar, of each two pounds, boil them in an earthen vessel, taking the scum off with a wooden scummer, till it be come to theconsistence of a syrup culpeper it cuts flegm, and it is a good preparative against avomit oxymel compound college take of the bark of the root of fennel, smallage, parsley, bruscus, asparagus, of each two ounces, the seeds of fennel, smallage, parsley, annis, of each one ounce, steep them all the roots beingfirst cleansed and the seeds bruised in six pounds of clear waterand a pound and a half of wine vinegar, the next day boil it to theconsumption of the third writing, boil the rest being strained, with threepounds of honey into a liquid syrup according to art culpeper first having bruised the roots and seeds, boil them in thewater till half be consumed, then strain it and add the honey, and whenit is almost boiled enough, add the vinegar oxymel helleboratum or oxymel helleborated college take of rue, thyme, dittany of crete, hyssop, pennyroyal, horehound, carduus, the roots of celtick, spikenard without leaves, the inner bark of elders, of each a handful, mountain calaminth twopugils, the seeds of annis, fennel, bazil, roman nettles, dill, ofeach two drams, the roots of angelica, marsh-mallows, aron, squillsprepared, birthwort, long, round, and climbing, turbith, english orris, costus, polypodium, lemon pills, of each an ounce, the strings of blackhellebore, spurge, agerick, added at the end of the decoction, of eachtwo drams, the bark of white hellebore half an ounce, let all of thembeing dried and bruised, be digested in a glass, or glazed vesselclose stopped, in the heat of the sun, or of a furnace, posca, made ofequal writings of water and vinegar, eight pounds, sapa two ounces, threedays being expired, boil it little more than half away, strain it, pressing it gently, and add to the liquor a pound and a half of honeyroses, wherein two ounces of citron pills have been infused, boil it tothe thickness of honey, and perfume it with cloves, saffron, ginger, galanga, mace, of each a dram oxymel julianizans college take of the bark of caper roots, the roots of orris, fennel, parsley, bruscus, chicory, sparagus, cypress, of each half anounce, the leaves of harts-tongue, schænanth, tamarisk, of each half ahandful, sweet fennel seed half an ounce, infuse them in three poundsof posca, which is essaything sour, afterwards boil it till half beconsumed, strain it, and with honey and sugar clarified, of each half apound, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper this medicine is very opening, very good againsthypocondriac melancholy, and as fit a medicine as can be for thatdisease in children called the rickets college oxymel of squills simple, is made of three pounds ofclarified honey. Vinegar of squills two pounds, boil them according toart culpeper it cuts and divides humours that are tough and viscous, and therefore helps the stomach and bowels afflicted by such humours, and sour belchings if you take but a spoonful in the morning, an ablebody will think enough oxymel scilliticum compositus or oxymel of squills compound college take of origanum, dried hyssop, thyme, lovage, cardamomsthe less, stœchas, of each five drams, boil them in three pounds ofwater to one, strain it and with two pounds of honey, honey of raisinshalf a pound, juice of briony five ounces, vinegar of squills a poundand a half, boil it, and scum it according to art culpeper this is good against the falling-sickness, megrim, head-ache, vertigo, or swimming in the head, and if these be occasionedby the stomach as thesis times they are, it helps the lungs obstructed byhumour, and is good for women not well cleansed after labour, it opensthe passage of the womb syrup of purslain mesue college take of the seeds of purslain grossly bruised, half apound, of the juice of endive, boiled and clarified, two pounds, sugartwo pounds, vinegar nine ounces, infuse the seeds in the juice ofendive twenty-four hours, afterwards boil it half away with a gentlefire, then strain it, and boil it with the sugar to the consistence ofa syrup, adding the vinegar towards the latter end of the decoction culpeper it is a pretty cooling syrup, fit for any hot diseaseincident to the stomach, reins, bladder, matrix, or liver. It thickensflegm, cools the blood, and provokes sleep you may take an ounce of itat a time when you have occasion compound syrup of colt-foot renod college take six handfuls of green colt-foot, two handfuls ofmaiden-hair, one handful of hyssop, and two ounces of liquorice, boilthem in four pints, either of rain or spring water till the fourth writingbe consumed, then strain it, and clarify it, to which add three poundsof white sugar, boil it to the perfect consistence of a syrup culpeper the composition is appropriated to the lungs, andtherefore helps the infirmities, weaknesses, or failings thereof aswant of voice, difficulty of breathing, coughs, hoarseness, catharrs, &c the way of taking it is with a liquorice-stick, or if you please, you may add an ounce of it to the pectoral decoction before mentioned syrup of poppies, the lesser composition college take of the heads of white poppies and black, when both ofthem are green, of each six ounces, the seeds of lettice, the flowersof violets, of each one ounce, boil them in eight pints of water tillthe virtue is out of the heads. Then strain them, and with four poundsof sugar boil the liquor to a syrup syrup of poppies, the greater composition college take of the heads of both white and black poppies, seedsand all, of each fifty drams, maiden-hair, fifteen drams, liquorice, five drams, jujubes, thirty by number, lettice seeds, forty drams, ofthe seeds of mallows and quinces, tied up in a thin linen cloth ofeach one dram and an half, boil these in eight pints of water tillfive pints be consumed, when you have strained out the three pintsremaining, add to them, penids and white sugar, of each a pound, boilthem into a syrup according to art culpeper all these former syrups of poppies provoke sleep, butin that, i desire they may be used with a great deal of caution andwariness. Such as these are not fit to be given in the beginning offevers, nor to such whose bodies are costive, yet to such as aretroubled with hot, sharp rheums, you may safely give them. The last isappropriated to the lungs. It prevails against dry coughs, phthisicks, hot and sharp gnawing rheums, and provokes sleep it is an usualfashion for nurses when they have heated their milk by exercise orstrong liquor then run for syrup of poppies to make their young onessleep i would fain have that fashion left off, therefore i forbear thedose.

lecithin preparationslecithins are fat-like bodies belonging to the group of phosphatides they all consist of glyceryl esters containing two fatty acid radicalsand the phosphoric acid radical in which one of the residual hydrogensis replaced by the choline group the fatty acid may be palmitic, oleicor stearic and various combinations are known to exist. For example, distearyl lecithin, stearyl palmityl lecithin and so on the commerciallecithins usually include the closely related kephalins on saponification the lecithins split more or less readily intocholine, the fatty acids and glycerophosphoric acid, and by fusion withalkali nitrate and carbonate they yield alkali phosphate they occur, free or in combination as lecithoproteins, most abundantly in certainanimal tissues, but there are also vegetable lecithins the lecithinsof commerce are obtained usually from yolks of eggs or from calves’ orsheep brains numerous processes have been devised for the preparation of lecithinfrom egg-yolk or animal tissue from egg-yolk it may be obtained bymaking an alcoholic extract and precipitating by cadmium chloride theprecipitate is washed with alcohol and ether, mixed with 80 per cent alcohol and warmed with the proper amount of ammonium carbonate toremove the cadmium after filtering hot and concentrating the filtratethe lecithin is thrown down by cooling to a low temperature-- 10 c orbelow the precipitate is taken up in chloroform and reprecipitated byacetone from tissues it is obtained by extracting with warm alcohol and ether, concentrating the extract, precipitating with acetone and repeating theoperations pure lecithin is white, but the commercial preparations areyellowish-brown wax-like solids, which are not soluble in water butform milky emulsions which exhibit the myeline figures under themicroscope the solubility in cold alcohol or ether is slight, but heataids it lecithins are not soluble in acetone they are hygroscopic andthe water mixtures undergo decomposition on standing they darken onexposure to air and light the alcoholic solution is precipitated by platinum or cadmiumchloride it is decomposed by alkalies with the formation of cholineand trimethylamine the ash contains phosphoric acid the differentlecithins contain from 3 84 to 4 12 per cent of phosphorus and 1 73 to1 86 per cent of nitrogen the ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus shouldbe at 1 to 2 21 lecithin is incompatible with alkalies. It should be kept inwell-stoppered bottles and should be protected from the light the content of lecithin plus kephalin in tissues is about as follows. per cent egg-yolk 8 to 12 egg-white 0 1 to 0 2 liver 2 0 to 3 0 kidney 2 0 to 3 6 lung 2 0 to 3 0 pancreas 2 0 to 3 0actions and uses -- the lecithin preparations have been recommendedin thesis pathologic conditions, especially in malnutrition and sexualdebility moderate doses are said to bring about a marked retention ofnitrogen and phosphorus, but satisfactory proof of this is lacking itis extremely unlikely that the small doses which have been recommendedin pill or tablet form or in emulsions can have any perceptible action, in view of the fact that thesis of our natural foods contain much greaterweights of available lecithins than the medicinal doses provide thereis no good basis for the statement that the free lecithin has a greaterfood value or is more readily assimilated than is the substance asfound in eggs or tissue the reverse proposition is much more likelyto be true, especially when it is considered that the commercialpreparations are usually essaywhat altered or decomposed in the processof separation dosage -- given by the mouth in the form of pills, tablets orglycero-alcoholic emulsions the amount of actual lecithin ingestedin this way is usually small because of the doubtful purity of theoriginal preparation several doses, as commonly administered, wouldbe required to furnish the amount of lecithin present in a smallegg -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 122 proprietary names for liquid petrolatum report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has accepted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary a former report of the council liquid petrolatum or “russian mineraloil, ” report council pharm and chem , the journal, may 30, 1914, p 1740 called attention to the large number of concerns that wereplacing on the market liquid petrolatum as a proprietary under coinednames since then the number of such products has increased thecouncil has been requested by several concerns to consider theirproducts put out under proprietary brand names the rules of the council affirm that “the application of ‘trade names’to official or established nonproprietary substances tends to confusionand fosters thesis abuses ” in accordance with this general ruling, the council has invariably refused to countenance proprietary namesapplied to liquid petrolatum the council holds that proprietary orcoined names for this substance are detrimental to medical progress, since they are sure to foster the impression that the writingicularproduct is different from liquid petrolatum manufacturers have beenadvised that there is no objection to distinguishing their productsby the addition of their firm name or the initial representing thefirm name. For instance, “liquid petrolatum, a b and co ” or “liquidpetrolatum, smith ” the council also believes that such designationsas “star liquid petrolatum” or “liquid petrolatum, anchor brand, ”may be regarded as unobjectionable, provided that the words “liquidpetrolatum” are always used in connection with the brand designationand given equal prominence -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1915, p 127 seng report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary seng sultan drug co , st louis is called by the manufacturers. “ a palatable preparation of panax ginseng in an aromatic vehicle ”regarding ginseng panax quinquefolia the united statesdispensatory, nineteenth edition, page 1603, says. “the extraordinary medicinal virtues formerly ascribed to ginseng had no other existence than in the imagination of the chinese it is little more than a demulcent, and in this country is not employed as a medicine ”no discussion of ginseng is to be found in the more recently publishedbooks on pharmacology, materia medica and therapeutics, evidentlybecause their authors agree with this estimate on the other hand, physicians are told through the medium ofadvertisements appearing in medical journals that seng is. “an efficient remedy in all affections in which the gastro-intestinal glands need stimulating “exceptionally useful in atonic indigestion, malnutrition, convalescence from the acute diseases, and all digestive disorders characterized by deranged or depressed functions ” woman medical journal, july, 1914 according to the label, seng is indicated in “indigestion, ”“malassimilation, ” “malnutrition” and “wasting diseases ” it is alsostated-- though the preparation is admitted to contain 18 per cent ofalcohol-- that to give babies “ten to fifteen drops in water or milkduring feeding” is a proper procedure and that “for colic, flatulency, etc , the dose for an adult or child may be repeated every half houruntil relieved ”the following are essay of the exaggerated therapeutic claims made forthis preparation of a worthless drug. “as a result of its administration the gastro-intestinal secretions are augmented, the digestion of food is substantially increased, and fermentative processes are promptly overcome ” “seng will specifically encourage the secretion of the juices in the entire alimentary tract ”the formula furnished for seng is non-quantitative and thereforemeaningless the preparation is exploited in a manner to encourageits ill-advised use by the public, and exaggerated and unwarrantedtherapeutic claims are made for it the use of an inefficient orworthless drug like ginseng, moreover, is detrimental to rationaltherapeutics the council therefore voted that seng be refusedrecognition for conflict with rules 1, 4, 6 and 10 -- from reports ofcouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 129 frosst blaud capsules report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfrosst blaud capsules and frosst blaud, arsenic and strychninecapsules were submitted to the council by c e frosst & co , montreal, canada this firm claims, on the authority of the report of a firm ofanalytical chemists, that. “ of three leading blaud preparations bought by us on the open market, the iron in frosst blaud capsules showed the highest percentage of ferrous carbonate ”the chemical laboratory of the american medical association found thisclaim unjustified the laboratory reported that there was no especialdifference in the ferrous iron content of the various blaud pills foundon the market, and that among ten specimens examined, the total ironcontent was the lowest in the frosst specimen in view of this thecouncil refused recognition to frosst blaud capsules and frosstblaud, arsenic and strychnine capsules -- from reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 164 tyree elixir of buchu and hyoscyamus compound report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryeach dessertspoonful of this preparation is said to represent buchu leaves 3-1/2 grains uva ursi 1-1/8 grains pareira brava 1-1/8 grains hyoscyamus 1-1/2 grains hops 1-1/2 grains acetate potash 7-1/2 grains spirits nitre 5 grains alcohol 5 per cent by volume”the manufacturer, j s tyree, washington, d c , offers this formulato the medical profession with the following claim. “approximate composition made sic by quantitative and qualitative analysis of the finished product ”it is also claimed that “an even greater advantage of tyree buchu and hyoscyamus compound over other drugs, lies in the fact that every constituent of the former is required to conform to a fixed standard of active principle strength. Hence the results derivable from it are absolutely uniform ”these pretentious claims of scientific accuracy look rather absurd tochemists thesis of the substances present in buchu, hops, hyoscyamus, uva ursi and pareira brava are also present in other drugs. Hence itwould never occur to a pharmaceutical chemist to try to ascertain thecomposition of such a mixture as tyree elixir by “quantitative andqualitative analysis of the finished product, ” much less to determinethe “active principle strength” of each ingredient, for no methods areknown by which this can be done it is claimed that, because of the care exercised in making tyreeelixir “ the results derivable from it are absolutely uniform ”a moment reflection, however, must compel any physician to attributethis statement, on the most charitable construction, to sheerignorance of course, even a definite chemical principle, such asquinin, does not exert uniform clinical action, for clinical conditionsvary, and accordingly the patient may or may not be cured it is simplypreposterous to claim that the clinical results obtained from suchsubstances as hops, pareira brava, buchu and uva ursi are absolutelyuniform a peculiarly vicious claim is that the elixir renders the mucoussurfaces of the genito-urinary tract “hostile to the multiplication ofthe gonococci ” since infection with the gonococcus produces the direstresults, any claim which means in plain english that the remedy assistsin producing a cure or in preventing infection with that organismcannot be condemned too strongly uva ursi, to be sure, has essay slightantiseptic action but it is devoid of any curative action in gonorrheaand the minute amounts that are present in the tyree elixir are of nomore protective value against gonorrheal infection than a grain ofhexamethylenamin would be it is further claimed that the elixir is a “specific” for “inflammationof the bladder, bright disease, renal colic, suppurative nephritis, acute cystitis, urethritis, catarrh of the bladder it would beinteresting to know what distinction the manufacturer draws between‘inflammation of the bladder, ’ ‘cystitis’ and ‘catarrh of thebladder’, acidemia, edema, vesical catarrh of old age, lithemia” andthat ascites and anasarca “can be reduced greatly to the satisfactionof the patient, and honor of the physician” by using a mixture oftyree elixir and infusion of digitalis such claims as these do notmerit serious discussion, for they carry their own refutation it is recommended that tyree elixir of buchu and hyoscyamus compoundbe held in conflict with rules 5, 6 and 10 and that publication ofthis report be authorized -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1915, p 167 hydroleine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryhydroleine charles n crittenton company, new york is a cod liveroil emulsion said to contain 45 per cent of cod liver oil, a trace ofsalicylic acid and 18-1/2 grains of “pancreatin, etc , ” per ounce theadvertising claims are based largely on the theory that cod liver oilis “that writingicular fat which dietetic experience and physiologicalchemistry have proved to be most digestible ” as a matter of fact, while the superior digestibility of cod liver oil over other oils hasoften been asserted, neither “dietetic experience” nor “physiologicalchemistry” have “proved” this by definite observations the crittentoncompany claims that it is more readily split than other oils thisis probably not true, easy emulsification of the raw oil being oftenconfounded with easy splitting this latter claim, however, is offeredin justification of the name “hydroleine, ” which the crittenton companyinterprets as “hydrated oil ” a circular wrapped around the bottlecontains the assertion that “cod liver oil has long been held in highesteem by the medical profession for the treatment of a large number ofserious diseases ” this recommendation is likely to lead the public toplace undue reliance on hydroleine in the grave conditions mentioned the preparation is in conflict with the rules of the council inasmuchas its name does not indicate its composition, unwarranted therapeuticclaims are made for it, and the exploitation is likely to give thepublic unwarranted confidence in its value the council therefore heldhydroleine ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies -- from reportsof council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 171 curative vaccine, bruschettini report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrycurative vaccine, bruschettini, manufactured by a bruschettini, genoa, italy, is claimed to have the properties “of acting directly on thetubercular bacillus, bringing directly into the field and determining ahyperproduction of antibacillar and antitoxic substances ” the use ofthe preparation is said to be indicated in “all forms of tuberculosis ”a referee reported to the council that he had examined the availableinformation and believed that the use of this product had nosatisfactory experimental basis the method of preparation appears tobe based more on theoretical considerations than on experimental basis on the recommendation of the committee on serums and vaccines thecouncil voted that curative vaccine, bruschettini, be not acceptedbecause 1 the method used for the production of the vaccine was notsatisfactorily stated.

Does not essay topics for college eat very much pain reflexes good vii 2 19, still depressed. Does not eat appears normal, vii 3 19 experiment 6 -- 12 5 c c. Injected vi 25 19. Quiet, but reflexes good. More quiet and depressed after several hours essay loss of oil from wound died night of vi 25 19 one day tail stiff temperature low postmortem. Lungs markedly congested spleen and liver dark red one kidney congested other viscera normal experiment 7 -- 12 5 c c. Injected vii 9 19. Quiet for one-half hour. 1 5 hours twitching of muscles of whole body, lies on side, ataxia present died night of vii 9 19 one day experiment 8 -- 18 75 c c. Injected vi 25 19. Quiet. Reflexes good three hours essay loss of oil depressed and turns on side six hours died night of vi 25 19 one day postmortem. Lungs congested spleen and liver very dark red right kidney much darker red viscera normal d report of dr d rivasthe following are the results of experiments conducted by me, duringthe past four months, on the germicidal action of chlorlyptus chlorinated oil of eucalyptus, principal constituent c₁₀h₁₇ocl₂ invitro and in vivo, and comparison also with carbolic acid, oil ofeucalyptus and dichloramine in test for irritation and toxicity germicidal action -- based on the results obtained, chlorlyptus whenused in a 5 per cent paraffin oil solution was found to be a mildgermicidal against typhoid b, streptococcus and staphylococcus whenthese organisms were suspended in ordinary bouillon culture or sterilesalt solutions the germicidal action was found stronger when these micro-organismswere suspended in a sterile oily or lipoid substance, such as oliveoil the results of these experiments were not constant, owing probablyto the imperfect suspension of the bacteria thus, while in essay of theexperiments chlorlyptus in 1 per cent oil solution destroyed thesemicro-organisms, in other paper the same strength solution failed togive same result in same time the increased germicidal action of chlorlyptus on bacterial suspensionsin olive oil may be accounted for by the fact that chlorlyptus issoluble in olive oil and not an admixture, as in the case of paraffinoil chlorlyptus is not a coagulant, as are germicides of the phenol orhypochlorite types, and the germicidal action is therefore not strictlycomparable the germicidal action of chlorlyptus oil solution, on pathogenicbacteria, on streptococcus and staphylococcus, suspended in pus, wasfound to be stronger than when these micro-organisms were suspendedin ordinary bouillon culture or sterile salt solution in one of theexperiments, similar results were obtained when these micro-organismswere suspended in olive oil, chlorlyptus showing marked germicidalaction irritation and toxicity -- the irritating action was found to berelatively mild in tests on laboratory animals thus, from 0 5 to1 c c of chlorlyptus in paraffin oil 5 per cent solution, injectedinto peritoneal or pleural cavities of guinea-pigs weighing 400 gm wasfound to be without any appreciable disturbance in the health of theanimal, and in essay paper the injection of as much as 2 c c did notkill the animal therapeutic action -- guinea-pigs were inoculated with purulentmaterial containing streptococcus, staphylococcus and b coli inperitoneal and pleural cavities respectively, and after six hours1 c c of chlorlyptus 5 per cent in paraffin oil solution wasinjected other infected animals were similarly treated twenty-fourhours after inoculation, and another series forty-eight hours afterinoculation in essay of these paper the animals died from shock butin a clearly defined series in which the injection of 1 c c of thechlorlyptus solution was made in the peritoneum of the guinea-pigstwenty-four hours after the inoculation, the animals lived the controlanimal, inoculated with the purulent material and not treated withchlorlyptus oil solution, died in consideration that the injection of chlorlyptus oil solution sic, referee were made ?.

“with marked beneficial action upon the nervous system to be relied on where a deficiency of the phosphates is evident ” “ brace those tired nerves and aid that worn stomach with phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine ” “the maintenance of a satisfactory blood pressure level free from intervals of depression may be accomplished by the use of phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine compound in appropriate doses ” “the quantities of quinin and strychnin in this preparation are so well balanced that they relieve the depression and fatigue from mental or physical exertion, without the necessity of recourse essay topics for college to alcoholic stimulation ” “the other ingredients of phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine-- phosphoric acid, and the phosphates of potash, magnesia, lime, and iron-- are the most rational as well as convenient means of administering these tissue remedies, and of introducing phosphorus-- the vitalizing constituent of the nervous system-- into the organism ”the action of such a mixture as a whole is practically that of the sumof the actions of its constituents the therapeutic action of strychninand quinin are described in every text-book of therapeutics, but itis necessary to distinguish carefully between the various conditionsin which these alkaloids have been used without discrimination, andthose conditions in which they have been proved to be of value while both have been widely used in a great variety of conditions, neither is of proved value in more than a distinctly limited rangeof diseases the manufacturers of phillips’ phospho-muriate ofquinine comp seem to appeal to the less discriminating who use thesealkaloids without any definite conception of exactly what they seekto accomplish with them quinin, although used by the uncritical in ahost of diseases, has a definite field of usefulness in the treatmentof malaria, both prophylactic and curative, but the required dose inthe treatment of malaria is thesis times larger than that recommended inthe phillips’ preparation the claim that the “strychnin and quininin this preparation are so well balanced that they produce a mild, buoyant effect, so advantageous, instead of alcoholic stimulation, torelieve depression and fatigue from mental or physical exertion” isnonsensical, if, indeed, it is not mendacious balderdash calcium and potassium have important functions in the body, but anydeficiency that may arise is usually attributable to an inability ofthe body to utilize that which is supplied, for there is seldom anydeficiency of these salts in the food, and when they are needed theyare best supplied as simple solutions of the salts in appropriate doseswithout all of the other constituents of phillips’ phospho-muriate ofquinine comp phosphoric acid exerts practically the same actions as other mineralacids, hydrochloric being usually preferred for internal administrationin certain forms of indigestion, aside from which they are seldom usedas such in the more recent literature for phillips’ phospho-muriate of quininecomp , we find the attempt to utilize the well known craze aboutphosphorus, which has been through so thesis phases, every one of whichhas had its day and has been discarded the phosphoric acid and phosphates present in phillips’ phospho-muriateof quinine are of no more value in nervous diseases than is simplesodium phosphate which does not require the addition of a host of otheringredients for its action as a matter of fact, the phosphates ofcalcium and potassium present in a dose of phillips’ phospho-muriate ofquinine are probably devoid of appreciable effect in practically allconditions to pretend that one who suffers from physical and nervous exhaustioncan be materially benefited by this mixture is sheer nonsense and isunworthy of a moment consideration by a clinician who is called on totreat such patients iron is useful in anemia, as every one knows iron has practically noother field of usefulness in therapeutics when it is indicated itshould be administered in a simple form, such as the pill of ferrouscarbonate, for example, and not in a “shotgun” mixture that is quite aslikely to do harm as good the claim that a satisfactory level of blood pressure can be maintainedby phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine is mentioned only to condemnas the limit of impudent therapeutic claims it is an insult to theintelligence of any practitioner to pretend that any known agent orcombination of remedial agents can maintain a uniform blood pressure inany one of innumerable conditions in short, phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine comp is a complex andirrational mixture exploited by means of unwarranted claims it isa survival of the old days of therapeutic chaos when impossible andfantastic chemical formulas were gravely published and as solemnlyaccepted without question, and also without the slightest understandingon the writing of thesis. When the most eminent of practitioners did nothesitate to give glowing testimonials for lithia waters that containedno more lithium than ordinary river water. When no therapeutic claimwas too preposterous to receive acceptance, no theory too nonsensicalto justify the use of all manner of claptrap mixtures for all manner ofconditions -- from the journal a m a , oct 19, 1918 b iodine and b oleum iodine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following report on “b iodine” and “b oleum iodine, ” together with the reply submitted by themanufacturer and a discussion thereon by the referee in charge of thepreparations w a puckner, secretary specimens of b iodine and b oleum iodine b iodine chemical companyand an advertising pamphlet were sent to the council by john bohlander, a m , m d , with the declaration. “well knowing the value of iodin in surgical operations and dressings, prompted me for the benefit of my fellow physicians as well as myself, and for humanity sake, to make iodin my master-piece in chemistry “after several years of diligent work in my private laboratory i succeeded in discovering a new product of iodin-- nitrogen, hydrate of iodin ”while “b iodine” is said to be nitrogen hydrate of iodin and “b oleumiodine” a 5 per cent solution thereof, the examination made by prof a h clark of the university of illinois, school of pharmacy workingin the a m a chemical laboratory, indicates that the first is asimple mixture of iodin and ammonium iodid, and the second a solutionof iodin in liquid petrolatum the council adopted the report of thea m a chemical laboratory which appears below and declared b iodine and b oleum iodine inadmissible to new and nonofficial remediesbecause:1 the composition is incorrectly declared b iodine is not a newlydiscovered iodin compound, “nitrogen hydrate of iodine, ” but a mixtureof iodin and ammonium iodid b oleum iodine is not a 5 per cent solution of b iodine as suggested by the statement on the label andin the advertising, but a solution of iodin in liquid petrolatumcontaining about 0 85 per cent of iodin 2 since b iodine is a mixture of iodin and ammonium iodid, itssolution in water will have the properties of other solutions of iodinmade by the aid of iodid, such as a dilution of tincture of iodin or ofcompound solution of iodin lugol solution hence, the therapeuticclaim that b iodine “being of a colloidal nature has the advantage ofbeing more readily absorbed and taken up by all cellular structure, thus getting a perfect cellular medication of iodine, ” is unwarranted 3 the names “b iodine” and “b oleum iodine” are not descriptive ofthe pharmaceutical mixtures to which they are applied 4 b iodine and b oleum iodine are unessential modifications ofestablished articles b iodine has no advantage over tincture of iodinor compound solution of iodin as more convenient of transportation, the medical dewritingment of the u s army supplies its field hospitalswith a mixture of iodin and iodid ready for solution in water, eitherin tablet form or in powdered form in tubes solutions of iodin inliquid petrolatum may be readily prepared reports council pharm andchem , 1917, p 88 contribution from the a m a chemical laboratory b iodine products a h clark, ph g , b s “b iodine” products are marketed by the b iodine chemical company, cincinnati, ohio. John bohlander, a m , m d , is said to be thediscoverer they consist of “b iodine, ” “b oleum iodine, ” and “b aqua iodine ” b iodine and b oleum iodine were submitted to thecouncil in a circular submitted by the b iodine chemical company, b iodine issaid to be “nitrogen hydrate of iodin ” it is claimed that “coming incontact with water, h₂o, a chemical change takes place forming hydrooxid of iodin, the nitrogen of the nitrogen hydrate of iodin escaping, the balance taking up one of oxygen of the water its companion, theh₂, escaping at the same time with the nitrogen then combining with theremainder of the water to form the solution of hydrogen oxid of iodin;so you can readily see that you really have a pure water of iodin, nothing but the h, the o and the i ”-- from the journal a m a , feb 1, 1919 b iodineaccording to the circular, b iodine is soluble in alcohol, chloroform, and ether also it. “has odor, taste, melting and boiling point, same as regular iodin, has a great affinity for water and will respond to all the tests of iodin appears in a bluish black granulated mass or powder when heated in vaporating dish will throw off large purple volumes of iodin leaving a slight white crystalline precipitate, which on continuous heating will entirely disappear with careful manipulation you can get prismatic needle point like crystals, looking like spores of glass, these dissolving in water will yield pure iodin coloring the water iodin “pharmacologic, therapeutical and physiological action. Same as iodin, being of a colloidal nature has the advantage of being more readily absorbed and taken up by all cellular structure, thus getting a perfect cellular medication of iodin ”a sample of b iodine, marked “nitrogen hydrate of iodin” was submittedby the manufacturers and this sample was examined b iodine was found to be a granular powder, almost black with a purplecast it has an odor of iodin and dissolves in water readily it isalso quite soluble in alcohol, but not entirely soluble in chloroformand ether ether quickly dissolves iodin from b iodine, leaving aresidue of a white granular substance chloroform acts the same asether except that the iodin is dissolved out with essay difficulty onheating b iodine, vapors of iodin escape if the heating is done ona water bath, a residue of a white granular substance, subsequentlyidentified as ammonium iodid, remains if heated in a bunsen flame, noresidue remains these tests all indicate that iodin is held in theform of a simple mixture ammonia. B iodine when mixed with an excess of sodium hydroxid andwarmed, evolves ammonia iodine. 0 1567 gm b iodine dissolved in water required 5 88 c c tenth-normal sodium thiosulphate solution indicating 48 28 per cent iodin 0 3721 gm b iodine required 14 18 c c tenth-normal sodiumthiosulphate solution indicating 48 37 per cent iodin the average is48 33 per cent iodin ammonium iodide. 0 3453 gm of the residue after heating b iodine ona water bath until all iodin had volatilized was dissolved in water, acidulated with phosphoric acid, and hydrogen dioxid solution added the liberated iodin was extracted with chloroform and titrated withtenth-normal sodium thiosulphate 23 78 c c were required indicating0 3447 gm , or 99 83 per cent , ammonium iodid a mixture of 5 gm iodin and 5 gm ammonium iodid has the properties ofb iodine mentioned above the conclusion is that b iodine is essentially a mixture of iodin andammonium iodid in equal writings, the two substances being finely powderedand intimately mixed b oleum iodinethe following regarding b oleum iodine is quoted from the circularsubmitted. “b oleum iodine. Iodine soluble in mineral oil 5 and 10% for nasal, pharyngeal, laryngeal, bronchial, rectal, etc , and all meucoid affections and abnormal conditions of the mucous membrane ”a sample of b oleum iodine was submitted by the manufacturer andexamined the label on the bottle states that it is 5 per cent b oleum iodine in mineral oil this sample has the characteristics ofa solution of iodin in liquid petrolatum it is oily and has thecharacteristic violet color ammonia.

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Rope in a double noose without knot, a common dooree, such as is used for drawing essay topics for college water 9 ibid , p 32 - man, age 50 face livid, eyes red and protruding;teeth clinched. Lower jaw retracted. Tongue behind the teeth. Hands andfeet contracted. Anus covered with fæcal matter. Circular depressedmark of cord around neck, hard as parchment, slightly ecchymosed alongedges. Essay infiltration of blood in connective tissue beneath thecord. Essay tearing of soft writings. Laryngeal cartilage displaced brainand membranes congested right cavities of heart distended with darkblood trachea congested 10 hurpy. Ann d’ hygiene, 1881, vi , pp 359-367, withillustration - woman, age 77, suicided by hanging in the followingway.