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Found dead sitting in bed, ahandkerchief around her neck fastened to the bed-curtain the policethought she had been killed and then hung, but the physician concludedthat she had committed suicide an examination of the stomach showedthat she had essay template word previously tried to poison herself with arsenic 19 2d woman, age 51. Found hanging in half-lying position 20 3d man, age 50 first tried to kill himself with phosphorus, thensulphuric acid. Finally hung himself in a half-kneeling position 21 müller-beninga. Berlin klin woch , 1877, xiv , p 481 - man, age 40. Hung himself there was no swelling of genitals and no soilingof clothing necroscopy showed death from asphyxia, and in urethra nearmeatus quite a quantity of seminal fluid, as shown by microscopicalexamination 22 tardieu. Op cit , p 18 - the prince of condé was found hangingin his room, august 27th, 1830 he was suspended by two handkerchiefsto a window fastening, his feet, however, touching the floor the knotwas at the back of the neck as shown by the illustration, the faceturned slightly to the left, the tongue protruding. Face discolored;mucus at the mouth and nose. Arms hanging and stiff.

Which is this. Take three orfour good handfuls of the berries, either green or fresh, or dried, andhaving bruised them, put them into so thesis gallons of beer or ale whenit is new tunned up. This drink taken daily, has been found to do muchgood to thesis, both to ease the pains, and expel urine and the stone, and to cause the stone not to engender the decoction of the berries inwine and water is the most usual way. But the powder of them taken indrink is more effectual chervil it is called cerefolium, mirrhis, and mirrha, chervil, sweet chervil, and sweet cicely descript the garden chervil doth at first essaywhat resembleparsley, but after it is better grown, the leaves are much cut in andjagged, resembling hemlock, being a little hairy and of a whitish greencolour, essaytimes turning reddish in the summer, with the stalks also;it rises a little above half a foot high, bearing white flowers inspiked tufts, which turn into long and round seeds pointed at the ends, and blackish when they are ripe. Of a sweet taste, but no smell, thoughthe herb itself smells reasonably well the root is small and long, andperishes every year, and must be sown a-new in spring, for seed afterjuly for autumn fails the wild chervil grows two or three feet high with yellow stalks andjoints, set with broader and more hairy leaves, divided into sundrywritings, nicked about the edges, and of a dark green colour, whichlikewise grow reddish with the stalks. At the tops whereof stands smallwhite tufts, of flowers, afterwards smaller and longer seed the rootis white, hard, and enduring long this has little or no scent place the first is sown in gardens for a sallad herb. The secondgrows wild in thesis of the meadows of this land, and by the hedge sides, and on heaths time they flower and seed early, and thereupon are sown again inthe end of summer government and virtues the garden chervil being eaten, dothmoderately warm the stomach, and is a certain remedy saith tragusto dissolve congealed or clotted blood in the body, or that which isclotted by bruises, falls, &c the juice or distilled water thereofbeing drank, and the bruised leaves laid to the place, being takeneither in meat or drink, it is good to help to provoke urine, or expelthe stone in the kidneys, to send down women courses, and to help thepleurisy and pricking of the sides the wild chervil bruised and applied, dissolves swellings in any writing, or the marks of congealed blood by bruises or blows, in a little space sweet chervil, or sweet cicely descript this grows very like the great hemlock, having largespread leaves cut into divers writings, but of a fresher green colourthan the hemlock, tasting as sweet as the anniseed the stalks rise upa yard high, or better, being creased or hollow, having leaves at thejoints, but lesser.

Official report of council on pharmacy andchemistry-- with comments, j a m a 47:1751 nov 24 1906 the issuance of a patent for a medicinal product does not prove thatsuch a product presents a discovery or that its owner is entitled toa temporary monopoly, yet it is essay template word only fair to physicians and to othermanufacturers that notice of such patent claims be given hence, thecouncil publishes in new and nonofficial remedies the informationbearing on this point lay advertising -- rules 3 and 4 provide against the recognition ofarticles that are advertised to the public directly or indirectly, exempting from this requirement preparations which the council believesare safe to be so advertised it has been held with essay justice that certain shotgun proprietariesare purchased by the public with as much circumspection as they areordered by those physicians who are addicted to the prescribing ofthem. But even the exploiters of these mixtures have not denied thatthe use of medicines by the public on its own initiative is surroundedwith thesis objections hence the practice of self medication should notbe encouraged by prescribing or using those preparations advertised forpublic use the only objection to the rule has come from a firm which markets abrand of liquid petrolatum, the standard oil company of indiana thecouncil has considered the question of exempting simple laxatives fromthe restrictions of rules 3 and 4 as it has exempted antiseptics andnonmedicinal foods the conclusion was, however, that the excessiveuse of a simple laxative like a liquid petrolatum, when prompted bynewspaper exploitation, is likely to be detrimental to health byoveruse as well as by misuse the indirect advertisement to the public, which rule 4 providesagainst, has been the means of inducing the extensive lay use of“antikamnia, ” “bromidia” and “fellows’ syrup ” naturally rule 4 hasbeen bitterly opposed by most proprietary firms arguing that thesisphysicians dispense their own drugs, pharmaceutical firms have insistedthat every medicinal preparation should bear on its label, not onlythe dose of the preparation, but also a statement of the diseases inwhich the article is indicated whether manufacturers anticipated theprofession resentment toward the claim that physicians determinethe treatment and perhaps the diagnosis by means of the statements onlabels, or because the shirley amendment to the food and drugs actmakes the proprietor responsible for therapeutic claims on the labelof a medicine, it is a fact that fewer preparations than formerly needto be refused on account of infringement on this rule in fact, essaythoroughly objectionable proprietaries make a show of being “ethical”by omitting all therapeutic discussion from the labels of theirpreparations therapeutic claims -- rule 6 makes ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies any articles regarding which the manufacturer or hisagents make unwarranted, exaggerated or misleading statements as tothe therapeutic value recognizing the long established custom oftherapeutic exaggeration, it has been most difficult to determinethe degree of conservatism which might with fairness be requiredof a manufacturer in view of the common acceptance of individualimpressions as dependable evidence, it is often almost embarrassingto declare as incompetent the statement of essay well meaning andall-too-kind-hearted doctor however, as the pitfalls of haphazardclinical trials become better known and the physician mistrust ofglowing accounts of marvelous cures more outspoken, the manufacturers’claims will be more moderate nomenclature -- were it possible to enact and enforce a law whichwould oblige manufacturers to sell their medicinal products underproperly descriptive names and which would make it illegal for aphysician to prescribe it unless he understood the meaning of suchproperly descriptive titles, then the council might safely disband inthat case, physicians would discontinue the use of most proprietarypreparations in favor of established drugs, and successful newcomersmight each year be counted on the fingers of one hand such a rationalnomenclature is not to be thought of, at least in our generation rule 8 requires that the name of an article shall not be misleading, that it shall not be therapeutically suggestive, and that establisheddrugs shall not be disguised by fanciful titles it recognizes theright of discoverers of new drugs to name their discoveries, andinterposes no objection to arbitrary names for such products so longas such names are not misleading or do not suggest the therapeuticuses of the products as the rule provides against the recognition ofcoined names for established nonproprietary drugs, so it requires thatmixtures of drugs shall bear names descriptive of their composition it would be a long step forward if physicians would recognize morefully the objections to the thesis proprietaries which have, as theironly point of originality, a non-descriptive name for an old drug ora mixture of well known drugs it is an encouraging sign that thefederal trade commission, when issuing licenses for the manufacture ofsynthetic drugs introduced under german patents, stipulated that allmanufacturers authorized to make a given drug shall use the same namefor it irrational articles -- rule 10 provides against the recognition ofan article which, because of its composition, is useless or inimicalto the best interests of the public and medical profession thisrule excludes medicaments which 1 are unessential modifications ofestablished articles, or 2 are of no therapeutic value or 3 areirrational with regard to the recognition of mixtures or compoundscontaining two or more active ingredients, the council requires thatthe manufacturer establish the rationality of its combination the rulehas prevented the recognition of thesis unnecessary so-called ethicalspecialties though a mass of testimonials was often to be had forthem, these contained no evidence that the mixture was superior to itspotent ingredient, or that its therapeutic effect had been determined that there is a healthy tendency to use single drugs for their definiteaction and to discard combinations be they shotgun proprietaries or“mixed” vaccines is perhaps best illustrated by the fact that atthe last revision of the u s pharmacopeia a considerable number ofcomplex antiquities were omitted from that book feeling confident that this meets with the endorsement of theprofession, the council is examining more critically the evidence forthe value of pharmaceutical mixtures -- from the journal a m a , may10, 1919 “accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistry”under the caption given above, the journal of the missouri statemedical association, in its july issue, speaks editorially as follows:the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medicalassociation is a dewritingment of our national organization that hasnot received the plaudits and encomiums of a wildly joyous medicalprofession nor the grateful praises of the enthusiastic manufacturerof pharmaceuticals the council seems indeed to be the unloved childof the entire family of subsidiary bodies of the association perhapsthe reason for this may be found in the character of its duties, forthe council must expose fraud, essaytimes in high places, and protectthe physician from being duped by avaricious persons and by personswho are themselves essaytimes the victims of their own credulity itthus happens that the sale of essay proprietary article previously heldin high esteem by the practitioner proves valueless, perhaps evenfraudulent the practitioner, however, may have credited much of hissuccess in treating certain conditions to that preparation and themaker has had success in accumulating dollars from its sale and bothwritingies emit a loud and vicious roar against the council, becausethey both lose money nobody wants to be “protected” against makingmoney-- make it honestly, if possible, but make it-- but this black sheepamong the councils of the american medical association insists on theirmaking their money honestly!. Despite thesis obstacles thrown into its path, the council on pharmacyand chemistry has serenely pursued its allotted tasks, correctedits mistakes, improved its methods, and today stands as the onlymedium to which the honest physician may turn for information-- notmisinformation-- regarding proprietary articles during the war thecouncil and the chemical laboratory were in close cooperation withthe surgeon-general office, testing and investigating every articleoffered to the government for the treatment of sick soldiers thevariety and the number of fakish and fraudulent stuff offered to thesurgeon-general was a pitiable exhibit of the mental gymnastics ofessay people just now the council and the laboratory have a new andimportant field before them, i e , to protect the physicians againstworthless and useless serums, vaccines and synthetics it will be thecouncil unpleasant duty to expose the fraudulent and useless amongthese articles and stamp truth on those found worthy we seem to have wandered from the topic in our caption, but not so inreality, because the burden of our thought is to lend our influence tothe spread of the motto of the advertising clubs of the world, namely, “truth in advertising ” it is our purpose to stimulate a larger degreeof enthusiasm for the work of the council on pharmacy and chemistryand the chemical laboratory, a more generous flow of inquiriesconcerning articles unfamiliar to the physician, and writingicularly tourge that the words “accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistryof the american medical association” be printed on the label and onall advertising circulars of proprietary articles that have beenadmitted to new and nonofficial remedies then, when pamphlets andcirculars are received by physicians they will read the statements ofmanufacturers with sympathetic understanding and with full confidencein the verity of the declarations the importance of creating justthat sort of receptivity in the mind of the prospective buyer is sowell known to the astute publicity expert that it is needless forus to dwell on its advantages every proprietary article advertisedin our journal, in the journal of the american medical association, and in the other state association journals, as well as in severalwell-edited privately owned journals, does in effect say to the readerthat the articles so advertised are accepted by the council becauseonly proprietary articles so accepted are accepted by us the fact isfurther acknowledged when these firms are permitted to exhibit theirgoods at our annual sessions for again the rule is enforced that onlyproprietary articles which have been approved by the council may beplaced on display why not complete the circle of ideas-- it would not be a “viciouscircle”-- by printing on labels, in advertisements and circulars, thewords. “accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistry”?. -- from thejournal a m a , aug 2, 1919 helping the councilif they were built that way, the members of the council on pharmacy andchemistry of the american medical association might become discouragedat the apparent indifference of thesis members of the medical professionto their efforts there are thesis physicians who, while figurativelypatting the council on the back, actually do nothing to aid itsefforts on the other hand, there are men in the profession who givethe council active support instead of merely passive appreciation the letter that follows was written by such a man to a pharmaceuticalconcern. I am receiving circular advertising from you concerning -- -- -- -- solution, and i am writing to suggest that until these products have been approved by the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical association, you are wasting your postage on the practice aside from the fact that these products do not appeal to me personally, i feel that i am not in a position to judge the value of such products and i depend entirely on the large clinical opportunities of the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical association in addition to their laboratory facilities, in such matters as these i may, therefore, with all due respect, suggest that it will pay you to eliminate my name from your mailing list the members of the council on pharmacy and chemistry are working weekin and week out without remuneration few appreciate how much thesescientific men are doing for rational therapeutics. Fewer still realizehow much has been accomplished through their efforts, or how much morecould be accomplished if every physician who at least believes in thework of the council would give it his full support -- editorial fromthe journal a m a , nov 6, 1920 delays in passing on products report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary the council frequently receives inquiries-- essay of them accompanied byexpressions of impatience-- concerning articles, reports on which appearto be delayed it therefore seems advisable to make a statement of essayof the factors which enter into this problem the council fully realizes the importance of giving prompt informationto the profession with regard to proprietary medicines underconsideration it therefore acts as soon as sufficient informationis available to justify a definite judgment, and publishes itsconclusions as soon as possible when adequate information is availableat the outset, there is no delay in the publication of the councilconclusions unfortunately, but very naturally, there are thesis paper in which theinformation available at the time the product is submitted is notsufficient to justify the council in coming to definite conclusions foror against the preparation in essay paper the manufacturer possessesthe required information, but to obtain it from him takes time.

And usually mixed with other cordials, you canhardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup syrupus de cinnamomo or syrup of cinnamon college take of cinnamon grossly bruised, four ounces, steep it inwhite wine, and small cinnamon water, of each half a pound, three days, in a glass, by a gentle heat. Strain it, and with a pound and a half ofsugar, boil it gently to a syrup culpeper it refreshes the vital spirits exceedingly, and cheersboth heart and stomach languishing through cold, it helps digestionexceedingly, and strengthens the whole body you may take a spoonful ata time in a cordial college thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups but onlywith white wine, of annis seeds, sweet fennel seeds, cloves, nutmegs, ginger, &c syrupus acetositatis citriorum or syrup of juice of citrons college take of the juice of citrons, strained without expression, and cleansed, a pound, sugar two pounds, make it into a syrup likesyrup of clove-gilliflowers culpeper it prevails against all diseases proceeding from choler, or heat of blood, fevers, both pestilential, and not pestilential. Itresists poison, cools the blood, quenches thirst, cures the vertigo, ordizziness in the head college after the same manner is made syrups of grapes, oranges, barberries, cherries, quinces, lemons, woodsorrel, mulberries, sorrel, english currants, and other sour juices culpeper if you look the simples you may see the virtues of them:they all cool and comfort the heart, and strengthen the stomach, syrupof quinces stays vomiting, so doth all syrup of grapes syrupus corticum citriorum or syrup of citron pills college take of fresh yellow citron pills five ounces, the berriesof chermes, or the juice of them brought over to us, two drams, springwater four pounds, steep them all night, boil them till half beconsumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pounds and ahalf of sugar boiled it into a syrup. Let half of it be without musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of musk tied up in a rag culpeper it strengthens the stomach, resists poison, strengthensthe heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings. It strengthens the vital spirits, restores such as are inconsumptions, and hectic fevers, and strengthens nature much you maytake a spoonful at a time syrupus e coralliis simplex or syrup of coral simple college take of red coral in very fine powder four ounces, dissolveit in clarified juice of barberries in the heat of a bath, a pound, ina glass well stopped with wax and cork, a digestion being made three orfour days, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified juice, and proceed as before, repeat this so often till all the coral bedissolved. Lastly, to one pound of this juice add a pound and a half ofsugar, and boil it to a syrup gently syrupus e coralliis compositus or syrup of coral compound college take of red coral six ounces, in very fine powder, andlevigated upon a marble, add of clarified juice of lemons, theflegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified juice ofbarberries, eight ounces, sharp white wine vinegar, and juice ofwood-sorrel, of each six ounces, mix them together, and put them ina glass stopped with cork and bladder, shaking it every day till ithave digested eight days in a bath, or horse dung, then filter it, ofwhich take a pound and a half, juice of quinces half a pound, sugar ofroses twelve ounces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup ofclove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omitting the halfdram of ambergris, and four grains of musk till the physician commandit culpeper syrup of coral both simple and compound, restore such asare in consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially thelast, and very cordial, good for hectic fevers, it stops fluxes, therunning of the reins, and the fluor albus, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the falling-sickness, it stays the menses half aspoonful in the morning is enough syrupus cydoniorum or syrup of quinces college take of the juice of quinces clarified six pounds, boil itover a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding redwine three pounds, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup, to beperfumed with a dram and a half of cinnamon, cloves and ginger, of eachtwo scruples culpeper it strengthens the heart and stomach, stays looseness andvomiting, relieves languishing nature. For looseness, take a spoonfulof it before meat, for vomiting after meat, for both, as also for therest, in the morning syrupus de erysimo or syrup of hedge-mustard college take of hedge-mustard, fresh, six handfuls, the rootsof elecampane, colt-foot, liquorice, of each two ounces, borrage, succory, maiden-hair, of each a handful and a half, the cordialflowers, rosemary and bettony, of each half a handful, annis seeds halfan ounce, raisins of the sun stoned, two ounces, let all of them, beingprepared according to art, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of barleywater and hydromel, with six ounces of juice of hedge-mustard to twopounds and a half, the which, with three pounds of sugar, boil it intoa syrup according to art culpeper it was invented against cold afflictions of the breastand lungs, as asthmas, hoarseness, &c you may take it either with aliquorice stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three orfour ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning syrupus de fumaria or syrup of fumitory college take of endive, common wormwood, hops, dodder, hart-tongue, of each a handful, epithimum an ounce and a half, boilthem in four pounds of water till half be consumed, strain it, andadd the juice of fumitory a pound and a half, of borrage and bugloss, of each half a pound, white sugar four pounds, make them into a syrupaccording to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty concocter of melancholy, andtherefore a rational help for diseases arising thence, both internaland external, it helps diseases of the skin, as leprosies, cancers, warts, corns, itch, tetters, ringworms, scabs, &c and it is the betterto be liked, because of its gentleness it helps surfeits exceedingly, cleanses, cools, and strengthens the liver, and causes it to make goodblood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh i commend this receipt tothose whose bodies are subject to scabs and itch if you please you maytake two ounces by itself every morning syrupus de glycyrrhiza or syrup of liquorice college take of green liquorice, scraped and bruised, two ounces, white maiden-hair an ounce, dryed hyssop half an ounce, steep these infour pounds of hot water, after twenty-four hours, boil it till halfbe consumed, strain it, and clarify it, and with honey, penids, andsugar, of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding, before it beperfectly boiled, red rose water six ounces culpeper it cleanses the breast and lungs, and helps continualcoughs and pleurisies you may take it with a liquorice stick, or addan ounce of it or more to the pectoral decoction syrupus granatorum cum aceto. Vulgo, oxysaccharum simplex or syrup of pomegranates with vinegar college take of white sugar a pound and a half, juice ofpomegranates eight ounces, white wine vinegar four ounces, boil itgently into a syrup culpeper look the virtues of pomegranates among the simples syrupus de hyssopo or syrup of hyssop college take eight pounds of spring water, half an ounce of barley, boil it about half an hour, then add the roots of smallage, parsley, fennel, liquorice, of each ten drams, jujubes, sebestens, of eachfifteen, raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce and a half, figs, dates, of each ten, the seeds of mallows and quinces, gum tragacanth tiedup in a rag, of each three drams, hyssop meanly dryed, ten drams, maiden-hair six drams, boil them together, yet so, that the roots mayprecede the fruits, the fruits the seeds, and the seeds the herbs, about a quarter of an hour. At last, five pounds of water beingconsumed, boil the other three being first strained and clarifiedinto a syrup with two pounds and a half of sugar culpeper it mightily strengthens the breast and lungs, causes longwind, clears the voice, is a good remedy against coughs use it likethe syrup of liquorice syrupus ivæ arthriticæ, sive chamæpityos or syrup of chamepitys college take of chamepitys, two handfuls, sage, rosemary, poleymountain, origanum, calaminth, wild mints, pennyroyal, hyssop, thyme, rue, garden and wild, bettony, mother of thyme, of each a handful, theroots of acorns, birthwort long and round, briony, dittany, gentian, hog fennel, valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, asparagus, fennel, parsley, bruscus, of each an ounce, pellitory ofspain, an ounce and a half, stœchas, the seeds of annis, ammi, caraway, fennel, lovage, hartwort, of each three drams, raisins of the sun twoounces, boil them in ten pounds of water to four, to which add honeyand sugar, of each two pounds, make it into a syrup to be perfumed withsugar, nutmegs, and cubebs, of each three drams syrupus jujubinus or syrup of jujubes college take of jujubes, violets, five drams, maiden-hair, liquorice, french barley, of each an ounce, the seeds of mallows fivedrams, the seeds of white poppies, melons, lettice, seeds of quincesand gum tragacanth tied up in a rag of each three drams, boil them insix pounds of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar make it into a syrup culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup, very available in coughs, hoarseness, and pleurisies, ulcers of the lungs and bladder, as alsoin all inflammations whatsoever you may take a spoonful of it once inthree or four hours, or if you please take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de meconio, sive diacodium or syrup of meconium, or diacodium college take of white poppy heads with their seeds, gathered alittle after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three days, eightounces, black poppy heads so ordered six ounces, rain water eightpounds, steep them twenty-four hours, then boil and press them gently, boil it to three pounds, and with twenty-four ounces of sugar boil itinto a syrup according to art syrupus de meconio compositus or syrup of meconium compound college take of white and black poppy heads with their seeds, fiftydrams, maiden-hair fifteen drams, jujubes thirty, the seeds of lettice, forty drams, of mallows and quinces tied up in a rag, a dram and ahalf, liquorice five drams, water eight pounds, boil it according toart, strain it, and to three pounds of decoction add sugar and penids, of each one pound, make it into a syrup culpeper meconium is nothing else but the juice of englishpoppies boiled till it be thick. It prevails against dry coughs, phthisicks, hot and sharp gnawing rheums, and provokes sleep it is anusual fashion for nurses when they have heated their milk by exerciseor strong liquor no marvel then if their children be froward then runfor syrup of poppies, to make their young ones sleep i would fain havethat fashion left, therefore i forbear the dose. Let nurses keep theirown bodies temperate, and their children will sleep well enough, neverfear syrupus melissophylli or syrup of bawm college take of the bark of bugloss roots, an ounce, the roots ofwhite dittany, cinquefoil, scorzonera, of each half an ounce, theleaves of bawm, scabious, devil-bit, the flowers of both sorts ofbugloss, and rosemary, of each a handful, the seeds of sorrel, citrons, fennel, carduus, bazil, of each three drams, boil them in four poundsof water till half be consumed, strain it, and add three pounds ofwhite sugar, juice of bawm and rose water, of each half a pound, boilthem to a syrup, the which perfume with cinnamon and yellow sanders, ofeach half an ounce culpeper it is an excellent cordial, and strengthens the heart, breast, and stomach, it resists melancholy, revives the spirits, isgiven with good success in fevers, it strengthens the memory, andrelieves languishing nature you may take a spoonfull of it at a time syrupus de mentha or syrup of mints college take of the juices of quinces sweet and between sweet andsour, the juice of pomegranates sweet, between sweet and sour, andsour, of each a pound and a half, dried mints half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, let them lie in steep one day, then boil it half away, and with four pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup according to art:perfume it not unless the physicians command culpeper the syrup is in quality binding, yet it comforts thestomach much, helps digestion, stays vomiting, and is as excellenta remedy against sour or offensive belchings, as any is in thedispensatory take a spoonful of it after meat syrupus de mucilaginibus or syrup of mussilages college take of the seeds of marsh-mallows, mallows, quinces, ofeach an ounce, gum tragacanth three drams, let these infuse six hoursin warm decoction of mallows, white poppy seeds, and winter cherries, then press out the mussilage to an ounce and an half, with which, andthree ounces of the aforesaid decoction, and two ounces of sugar, makea syrup according to art culpeper a spoonful taken by itself, or in any convenient liquor, is excellent for any sharp corroding humours be they in what writingof the body soever, phthisicks, bloody-flux, stone in the reins orbladder, or ulcers there. It is excellent good for such as have takenpurges that are too strong for their bodies, for by its slippery natureit helps corrosions, and by its cooling helps inflammations syrupus myrtinus or syrup of myrtles college take of myrtle berries two ounces and an half, sanderswhite and red, sumach, balaustines, barberry stones, red roses, ofeach an ounce and a half, medlars half a pound, bruise them in eightpounds of water to four, strain it, and add juice of quinces and sourpomegranates, of each six ounces, then with three pounds of sugar, boilit into a syrup culpeper the syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, ithelps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions ofthe internal writings, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stopsimmoderate flux of menses a spoonful at a time is the dose syrupus florum nymphæ simplex or syrup of water-lily flowers, simple college take of the whitest of white water-lily flowers, a pound, steep them in three pounds of warm water six or seven hours, let themboil a little, and strain them out, put in the same weight of flowersagain the second and third time, when you have strained it the lasttime, add its weight of sugar to it, and boil it to a syrup syrupus florum nymphæ compositus syrup of water-lily flowers compound college take of white water-lily flowers half a pound, violetstwo ounces, lettice two handfuls, the seeds of lettice, purslain, andgourds, of each half an ounce, boil them in four pounds of clear watertill one be consumed, strain it, and add half a pound of red rosewater, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper they are both fine cooling syrups, allay the heat ofcholer, and provoke sleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases ineither, you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach isempty syrupus de papavere erratico, sive rubro or syrup of erratic poppies college take of the fresh flowers of red poppies two pounds, steepthem in four pounds of warm spring water, the next day strain it, andboil it into a syrup with its equal weight in sugar culpeper the syrup cools the blood, helps surfeits, and may safelybe given in frenzies, fevers, and hot agues syrupus de pilosella or syrup of mousear college take of mousear three handfuls, the roots of lady-mantlean ounce and an half, the roots of comfrey the greater, madder, white dittany, tormentil, bistort, of each an ounce, the leavesof wintergreen, horsetail, ground ivy, plantain, adder tongue, strawberries, st john wort with the flowers, golden rod, agrimony, bettony, burnet, avens, cinquefoil the greater, red coleworts, balaustines, red roses, of each a handful, boil them gently in sixpounds of plantain water to three, then strain it strongly, and when itis settled, add gum tragacanth, the seeds of fleawort, marsh-mallowsand quinces, made into a mussilage by themselves in strawberry andbettony water, of each three ounces, white sugar two pounds, boil it tothe thickness of honey culpeper it is drying and healing, and therefore good for ruptures syrupus infusionis florum pæoniæ or syrup of the infusion of peony flowers college it is prepared in the same manner as syrup ofclove-gilliflowers syrupus de pæonia compositus or syrup of peony compound college take of the roots of both sorts of peony taken up at thefull moon, cut in slices, and steeped in white wine a whole day, ofeach an ounce and an half, contra yerva half an ounce, siler mountainsix drams, elk claws an ounce, rosemary with the flowers on, onehandful, bettony, hyssop, origanum, chamepitys, rue, of each threedrams, wood of aloes, cloves, cardamoms the less, of each two drams, ginger, spikenard, of each a dram, stœchas, nutmegs, of each two dramsand an half, boil them after one day warm digestion, in a sufficientquantity of distilled water of peony roots, to four pounds, in which being strained through hippocrates’ sleeve put four pounds and anhalf of white sugar, and boil it to a syrup culpeper it helps the falling-sickness, and convulsions syrupus de pomis aiterans or syrup of apples college take four pounds of the juice of sweet scented apples, thejuice of bugloss, garden and wild, of violet leaves, rose water, ofeach a pound, boil them together, and clarify them, and with six poundsof pure sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup for such whose stomachs areoverpressed with heat, and may safely be given in fevers, for it ratherloosens than binds. It breeds good blood, and is profitable in hecticfevers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, itquenches thirst admirably in fevers, and stays hiccoughs you may takean ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need syrupus de prasio or syrup of horehound college take of white horehound fresh, two ounces, liquorice, polipodium of the oak, fennel, and smallage roots, of each half anounce, white maiden-hair, origanum, hyssop, calaminth, thyme, savory, scabious, colt-foot, of each six drams, the seeds of annis andcotton, of each three drams, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, fatfigs ten, boil them in eight pounds of hydromel till half be consumed, boil the decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar, of each twopounds, and perfume it with an ounce of the roots of orris florentine culpeper it is appropriated to the breast and lungs, and is afine cleanser to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helpsphthisicks and coughs, and diseases subject to old men, and coldnatures take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de quinq radicibus or syrup of the five opening roots college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, parsley, bruscus, sparagus of each two ounces, spring water, six pounds, boil away thethird writing, and make a syrup with the rest according to art, with threepounds of sugar, adding eight ounces of white wine vinegar, towards thelatter end culpeper it cleanses and opens very well, is profitable againstobstructions, provokes urine, cleanses the body of flegm, and is safelyand profitably given in the beginning of fevers an ounce at a timeupon an empty stomach is a good dose syrupus raphani or syrup of radishes college take of garden and wild radish roots, of each an ounce, the roots of white saxifrage, lovage, bruscus, eringo, rest-harrow, parsley, fennel, of each half an ounce, the leaves of bettony, burnet, pennyroyal, nettles, water-cresses, samphire, maiden-hair, of each onehandful, winter cherries, jujubes, of each ten, the seeds of bazil, bur, parsley of macedonia, hartwort, carraway, carrots, gromwell, the bark of the root of bay-tree, of each two drams, raisins of thesun stoned, liquorice, of each six drams, boil them in twelve poundsof water to eight, strain it, and with four pounds of sugar, and twopounds of honey, make it into a syrup, and perfume it with an ounce ofcinnamon, and half an ounce of nutmegs culpeper a tedious long medicine for the stone syrupus regius, alias julapium alexandrinum or julep of alexandria college boil four pounds of rose-water, and one pound of whitesugar into a julep julep of roses is made with damask rose water, inthe very same manner culpeper two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer syrupus de rosis siccis or syrup of dried roses college make four pounds of spring water hot, in which infuse apound of dried roses, by essay at a time, press them out and with twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper syrup of dried roses, strengthens the heart, comforts thespirits, binds the body, helps fluxes, and corrosions, or gnawings ofthe bowels, it strengthens the stomach, and stays vomiting you maytake an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes. After meat if forvomiting syrupus scabiosæ or syrup of scabious college take of the roots of elecampane, and polypodium of theoak, of each two ounces, raisins of the sun stoned an ounce, sebestenstwenty, colt-foot, lungwort, savory, calaminth, of each a handful andan half, liquorice, spanish tobacco, of each half an ounce, the seedsof nettles and cotton, of each three drams, boil them all the rootsbeing infused in white wine the day before in a sufficient quantityof wine and water to eight ounces, strain it, and adding four ouncesof the juice of scabious, and ten ounces of sugar, boil it to a syrup, adding to it twenty drops of oil of sulphur culpeper it is a cleansing syrup appropriated to the breastand lungs, when you perceive them oppressed by flegm, crudites, orstoppings, your remedy is to take now and then a spoonful of thissyrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy, orscabby syrupus de scolopendrio or syrup of hart-tongue college take of hart-tongue three handfuls, polypodium of theoak, the roots of both sorts of bugloss, bark of the roots of capersand tamerisk, of each two ounces, hops, dodder, maiden-hair, bawm, ofeach two handfuls, boil them in nine pounds of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pounds of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper it helps the stoppings of melancholy, opens obstructionsof the liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetic evils, andtherefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the vulgar call therickets, or liver-grown. A spoonful in a morning is a precious remedyfor children troubled with that disease men that are troubled with thespleen, which is known by pain and hardness in their left side, maytake three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one receipt worththe price of the whole book syrupus de stœchade syrup of stœchas college take of stœchas flowers four ounces, rosemary flowers halfan ounce, thyme, calaminth, origanum, of each an ounce and an half, sage, bettony, of each half an ounce, the seeds of rue, peony, andfennel, of each three drams, spring water ten pounds, boil it till halfbe consumed, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, boil it intoa syrup, which perfume with cinnamon, ginger, and calmas aromaticus, ofeach two drams tied up in a rag syrupus de symphyto or syrup of comfrey college take of roots and tops of comfrey, the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red roses, bettony, plantain, burnet, knotgrass, scabious, colt foot, of each two handfuls, press the juiceout of them all, being green and bruised, boil it, scum it, and strainit, add its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup, according to art culpeper the syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or evacuation of blood, it unitesbroken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the menses. You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease.

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I knew the herb once appliedto a pestilential rising that was fallen down, and it saved life essay template word evenbeyond hope. It were good to keep an ointment and plaister of it, if itwere but for that cuckow-point it is called aron, janus, barba-aron, calve-foot, ramp, starchwort, cuckow-point, and wake robin descript this shoots forth three, four or five leaves at the most, from one root, every one whereof is essaywhat large and long, broad atthe bottom next the stalk, and forked, but ending in a point, withouta cut on the edge, of a full green colour, each standing upon a thickround stalk, of a hand-breadth long, or more, among which, after twoor three months that they begin to wither, rises up a bare, round, whitish green stalk, spotted and streaked with purple, essaywhat higherthan the leaves. At the top whereof stands a long hollow husk close atthe bottom, but open from the middle upwards, ending in a point. Inthe middle whereof stands the small long pestle or clapper, smaller atthe bottom than at the top, of a dark purple colour, as the husk is onthe inside, though green without. Which, after it hath so abided foressay time, the husk with the clapper decays, and the foot or bottomthereof grows to be a small long bunch of berries, green at the first, and of a yellowish red colour when they are ripe, of the bigness of ahazel-nut kernel, which abides thereon almost until winter. The rootis round, and essaywhat long, for the most writing lying along, the leavesshooting forth at the largest end, which, when it bears its berries, are essaywhat wrinkled and loose, another growing under it, which issolid and firm, with thesis small threads hanging thereat the wholeplant is of a very sharp biting taste, pricking the tongue as nettlesdo the hands, and so abides for a great while without alteration theroot thereof was anciently used instead of starch to starch linen with there is another sort of cuckow-point, with less leaves than theformer, and essay times harder, having blackish spots upon them, whichfor the most writing abide longer green in summer than the former, andboth leaves and roots are more sharp and fierce than it. In all thingselse it is like the former place these two sorts grow frequently almost under every hedge-sidein thesis places of this land time they shoot forth leaves in the spring, and continue but untilthe middle of summer, or essaywhat later. Their husks appearing beforethe fall away, and their fruit shewing in april government and virtues it is under the dominion of mars tragusreports, that a dram weight, or more, if need be, of the spotted wakerobin, either fresh and green, or dried, having been eaten and taken, is a present and sure remedy for poison and the plague the juice ofthe herb taken to the quantity of a spoonful has the same effect butif there be a little vinegar added thereto, as well as to the rootaforesaid, it essaywhat allays the sharp biting taste thereof upon thetongue the green leaves bruised, and laid upon any boil or plaguesore, doth wonderfully help to draw forth the poison. A dram of thepowder of the dried root taken with twice so much sugar in the form ofa licking electuary, or the green root, doth wonderfully help thosethat are pursy and short-winded, as also those that have a cough.