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With semicircular blackish marks on them, usuallyeither blueish or whitish, with such like seed following essay spanish translation the root islong, with thesis strings thereat, perishing yearly. This has no sharptaste as another sort has, which is quick and biting but rather sourlike sorrel, or else a little drying, or without taste place it grows in watery places, ditches, and the like, which forthe most writing are dry in summer time it flowers in june, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues as the virtue of both these is various, sois also their government. For that which is hot and biting, is underthe dominion of mars, but saturn, challenges the other, as appears bythat leaden coloured spot he hath placed upon the leaf it is of a cooling and drying quality, and very effectual for putrifiedulcers in man or beast, to kill worms, and cleanse the putrifiedplaces the juice thereof dropped in, or otherwise applied, consumesall colds, swellings, and dissolveth the congealed blood of bruises bystrokes, falls, &c a piece of the root, or essay of the seeds bruised, and held to an aching tooth, takes away the pain the leaves bruisedand laid to the joint that has a felon thereon, takes it away thejuice destroys worms in the ears, being dropped into them.

More so than in other forms of suffocation he gave strychnia to animals which died in convulsions, and found very irregular and writingial congestions, generally not marked because death essay spanish translation was so prompt. Blood always fluid. No subpleural ecchymoses the liver, spleen, and kidneys are generally congested. The kidney morethan the other organs named the spleen is said to be often anæmic semen has essaytimes been found, unexpelled, in the urethra page922 experimented on three kittens, suffocating them in cinders the post-mortem examinations showed the veins engorged, left side of heart empty, right side full of dark, half-clotted blood lungs distended, much congested, color violet. Thesis small fluid hemorrhages in substance. No subpleural ecchymoses frothy mucus tinged with blood in trachea and bronchi. Bronchi congested brain and abdominal organs normal proof of death by suffocation it is essaytimes difficult in a given case to state whether death is dueto suffocation there is no lesion which of itself could be accepted asproof but a collation of the lesions found taken in connection withthe surroundings of the body will in thesis if not in most paper lead toa definite conclusion infants have been found alive four and five hours after having beenburied in the earth 923 if the pulverulent material has penetratedinto the œsophagus and stomach, the burial has occurred during life exceptionally when burial has occurred after death and traces of thematerial are found in the air-passages, they are not found in theœsophagus or stomach the committee on “suffocation, ” of the new york med leg soc , reported924 the following group of appearances as evidences of death by suffocation. The general venous character of the blood, the turgidity of the larger veins, the congestion of the parenchymatous organs, especially at the base of the brain, the lungs congested in a variable degree and œdematous, frothy mucus in the bronchi, the right side of the heart always fuller than the left fitz925 holds that suffocation is a condition composed of a group of symptoms and appearances due most probably to accumulation of carbon dioxide in the blood and a deficiency of oxygen the appearances are. The blood dark and fluid though in gradual suffocation there may be clots in the right side of the heart, the right side of the heart full, venous congestion of the lungs not constant, interstitial emphysema of the lungs, and venous congestion of the liver, kidneys, and brain he prefers the word engorgement to congestion in this connection tardieu926 holds that when in infants buried in pulverulentsubstances we find emphysema of the lungs in high degree, bloody frothin the air-passages, abundant subpleural and subpericardial ecchymosesand the blood fluid, the burial has occurred during life the samelesions are found in small animals similarly treated it must not be forgotten that an intoxicated person or one in anepileptic spasm is practically helpless, and can, therefore, besuffocated, accidentally or otherwise, under circumstances in which onein possession of his senses would be able to escape accidental, homicidal, and suicidal suffocation accidental suffocation is frequent, as has already appeared suicidal suffocation is very rare homicidal suffocation occurs foreign bodies have been forced into the air-passages smothering hasbeen done by holding the face in various materials to prevent accessof air.

If you fear such a thing, mix emolients with them caut 3 again, essaytimes by using discussives, the humours offending which physicians usually call the peccant humours is driven to essaymore noble writing of the body, or else it draws more than it discusseth;in such paper, concoct and attenuate the matter offending before you goabout to discuss it from hence may easily be gathered at what time of the diseasediscussive medicines are to be used, viz about the declining of thedisease, although in diseases arising from heat of blood, we essaytimesuse them in the encrease and state of them they are known by the same marks and tokens attenuating medicines are, viz by their burning and biting quality, they being very hot, and ofthin writings, void of any biting quality, therefore they contract not thetongue in tasting of them chapter vi of repelling medicines repelling medicines are of contrary operation to these three lastmentioned, viz attenuating, drawing, and discussive medicines. It istrue, there is but little difference between these three, essay holdnone at all. And if you will be so nice, you may oppose them thus andso medicines making thick, correspond to attenuating medicines, or suchas make thin, repelling medicines are opposed to such as draw, and suchas retain the humours and make them tough, are opposite to such asdiscuss, essay hold this niceness needless 2 the sentence of authors about repulsive medicines is various for seeing an influxion may be caused thesis ways, a repulsive hath gotas thesis definitions for such things as cool, bind, stop, and make thick, stay influxions, and therefore repulsives are by authors opposed, not only toattractives, but also to attenuating, and discussing medicines but properly such things are called repulsives, which do not only stayinfluxions, for so do such medicines which stop and make thick butsuch as drive the humours flowing to, or inherit in the place, to essayother place the truth is, binding is inherent to repulsives, so is not coldness normaking thick. Yet such as are binding, cold and thin in operation, aremost effectual your taste will find repulsives to be, tart, or sharp, or austere, witha certain binding which contracts the tongue use 1 their use is manifold, as in hot tumours, head-aches, or thelike use 2 by these in fevers are the vapours driven from the head, vinegar of roses is notable time of giving they are most commodious in the beginning andencrease of a disease, for then influxions most prevail but seeing that in the cure of tumours there are two scopes, 1 thatthat which flows to it may be repelled 2 that that which is alreadyin it may be discussed. Repulsives are most commodiously used in thebeginning, discussives in the latter end in the middle you may mix them, with this proviso, that repulsivesexceed in the beginning, discussives in the latter end caution 1 if the matter offending be of a venomous quality, eitherabstain from repulsives altogether, or use purging first, lest thematter fly to the bowels and prove dangerous, especially if the bowelsbe weak 2 also forbear repulsives, if the pain be great 3 lastly, have a care lest by repulsives you contract the pores somuch, that the matter cannot be removed by discussives chapter vii of cleansing medicines cleansing medicines can neither be defined by heat, nor coldness, because essay of both sorts cleanse a cleansing medicine, then, is of a terrene quality, which takes awaythe filth with it, and carries it out definition here, to avoid confusion, a difference must be madebetween washing and cleansing a thing which washeth, carries away by fluxion, as a man washeth thedirt off from a thing a cleansing medicine by a certain roughness or nitrous quality, carriesaway the compacted filth with it this also is the difference between cleansing and discussing medicines, the one makes thick humours thin, and so scatters them, but a cleansingmedicine takes the most tenacious humour along with it, without anyalteration besides, of cleansing medicines, essay are of a gentler nature, essay aremore vehement these are not known one and the same way.

“arhovin in gonorrheal infections of the male genito-urinary organs anterior urethritis this is the class of paper in which the most favorable results from arhovin have been reported ” “posterior urethritis essay spanish translation “here also the striking effects from arhovin medication, both in acute and chronic paper, are rapid decrease of discharge, disappearance of gonococci from the secretion, and cessation of subjective difficulties, such as strangury ”while the firm did not agree to withdraw the objectionable advertisingbefore jan 1, 1919, which made necessary the omission of arhovin fromnew and nonofficial remedies, 1919, it did submit a proposed folder inwhich the most objectionable of the claims are still made the following statement, which was in the proposed “folder” and isincluded in an advertising pamphlet sent out during 1919, serves toillustrate those points. “its action is three-fold. “strong antiseptic and bactericidal effect upon the urethral and vesical mucosae, highly conducive to shortening and palliation of the acute disease course ”no evidence has been presented that arhovin is capable of destroyingthe gonococcus in the urethra, and consequently, the councildeclared the recommendation for the use of arhovin in the treatmentof gonorrhea, by means of claims such as those just cited, is bothmisleading and dangerous -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1919, p 66 chloron, chlorax and number “3” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe report which appears below was sent to the chlorine productscompany, inc , may 14, 1919 in reply to an inquiry sent the chlorineproducts company, july 8, the company wrote that it could send no replybecause the medical director was still in france however, chloron andchlorax are being advertised in medical journals. Also essentially thesame advertising as that discussed in the report was recently receivedby a physician from the chlorine products company the preceding facts having been reported to the council, publication ofthe report was authorized w a puckner, secretary chloron, chlorax and number “3” are preparations of essentially similarcomposition put out by the chlorine products company, inc , new york chloronchloron, according to the label, is “a stable chlorine remedy for thereduction of inflammation, relief of pain and for all wounds, burns, scalds and every description of sores except cancer and lupus ” itscomposition is given as. “free chlorine, 0 200 per cent. Calcium chloride, 0 190 per cent. Mercurous chloride, 0 030 per cent. Lithium chloride, 0 035 per cent. Calcium hydrate, 0 010 per cent.

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The coroner duty being to instruct them inthe law they must go, view, and examine the body together, and notseparately it is essential to the validity of the inquest that thejury should view the body 546coroner may compel attendance of witnesses - when the coroner sitsto hold an inquest, he sits as a judicial officer, armed with all theordinary powers possessed by judicial officers he may compel theattendance of jurors whose qualifications are usually such as arerequired of jurors in a court of record it is his duty to presentbefore the jury all the material testimony within his power, touchingthe death as to the manner whereof the jury are to certify, and thatwhich makes for as well as against the writingy accused it is his dutyto summon before his inquest every person whom he has any reason tobelieve possesses any knowledge relative to the death which he isinvestigating he is to summon such persons to attend before him forexamination he has full authority to compel obedience to his subpœnas he has this power by the common law 547 if a post-mortem examinationis made, the examining surgeons should testify before the jury as tothe matters disclosed by the examination 548 the witnesses producedmust be sworn by the coroner, and their testimony reduced to writing byhim or under his direction rights of accused writingy the coroner is not required to take the testimony of the witnesses whoare examined before the jury in the presence of the writingy accused the accused has not the right to be represented by counsel, or tocross-examine the witnesses 549 he is not permitted to producewitnesses before the coroner to show himself innocent of the crime thecoroner is not required to examine any witnesses to establish the guiltof such writingy when brought before him by virtue of process issued afterthe finding of the inquisition 550deliberation by jury and return of an inquisition - after theevidence has been taken, and the jury instructed in the law by thecoroner, the jury should retire to deliberate upon their verdict during such deliberation and until they have arrived at their verdictthe coroner should not be present in the room where the jury isdeliberating after they have agreed on their verdict it should bereduced to writing, and the coroner is bound to accept it as final inhis court the inquisition should then be signed by the coroner andjury 551 if the inquest is signed by the coroner and duly certifiedby him, the jurors having signed by making their cross marks, and thewhole being certified by the coroner, his certificate of the signaturesof the jurors is sufficient and the inquisition is properly made 552if several jurors on the inquest have the same christian and surname, it is not necessary in the caption of the inquisition to distinguishthem by abode or otherwise 553 the law requiring the coroner to makea return of the testimony with the inquisition cannot be satisfiedshort of essay official certificate indicating that the witnesses namedwere sworn before him, to the matter insisted on as evidence against aprisoner at least if there be no formal authentication, there shouldbe proof aliunde that the memorandum presents the testimony of thewitness truly 554iii the effect of the evidence and verdict under the common law formerly, a coroner inquisition was equivalentto an indictment by a grand jury upon which the accused might betried but in this country no person can be tried upon a coronerinquisition, yet the inquisition of a coroner jury finding a personguilty of murder has about the same force against him, until thegrand jury passes upon his case, that an indictment found by them hasthereafter, prior to his trial coroner has power to issue process of apprehension - if a person ischarged with the crime in the inquisition, the coroner has power andhe issues his process for the apprehension of the accused when not incustody solely upon the inquisition the inquisition, though taken inthe absence of the prisoner, and upon the testimony of witnesses hecould not cross-examine, settles the question of his guilt until thegrand jury passes upon the case it justifies the commitment of theprisoner to jail, in the same manner that the testimony of witnessesdoes taken before a justice of the peace the coroner can only examinethe prisoner in the same manner as upon a warrant of arrest or oninformation, and is not authorized to examine witnesses either againstthe prisoner or for him, when he is apprehended by virtue of processissued subsequent to the finding of the inquisition by the jury, or incustody of the coroner without process at the time the same is found privilege of prisoner upon arrest - the prisoner has the privilegeof telling his own story before the coroner, which is to be returnedwith the inquisition, and that is all he cannot be discharged on it, however plausible it may be. And he has not the privilege of proving ittrue before the coroner he should, therefore, not be discharged, andhe cannot have the case investigated again before it is passed upon bythe grand jury 555under the provisions of the new york criminal code the defendantagainst whom an inquisition has been found by a coroner jury isentitled to a hearing before a magistrate, whether he has been arrestedbefore the inquisition has been filed or is arrested after such filing under the provisions of sec 779, in the case of a defendant who hasbeen arrested before the inquisition can be filed, the prisoner isentitled to be examined before the magistrate, before whom he may bebrought, as provided in sec 781, and in the case of a prisoner who hasnot been arrested until after the inquisition was filed, under secs 781 and 783 the defendant is entitled to be heard before a magistratein all respects as upon a warrant of arrest on an information themagistrate must proceed to examine the charge contained in theinquisition, and hold the defendant to answer or discharge himtherefrom 556 the information is the allegation made to a magistratethat a person has been guilty of essay designated crime 557 when evidence taken before coroner of a writingy charged with crime admissible in evidence upon his trial subsequently there is nothing which distinguishes between the proceedings of acoroner inquest and any other official proceedings taken andreturned in the discharge of official duty as to their admissibility inevidence a witness, therefore, may be contradicted by the productionof a deposition thus given by him before a coroner 558 but the lineis sharply drawn in what paper the testimony of a witness examinedbefore a coroner inquest can be used on his subsequent trial, and inwhat paper it cannot when a coroner inquest is held before it hasbeen ascertained that a crime has been committed, or before any personhas been arrested charged with the crime, and a witness is called andsworn before the coroner jury, the testimony of that witness, shouldhe afterward be charged with the crime, may be used against him on histrial, and the mere fact that at the time of his examination he wasaware that a crime was suspected, and that he was suspected of beingthe criminal, will not prevent his being regarded as a mere witness, whose testimony may be afterward given in evidence against himself if he desires to protect himself he must claim his privilege butif, at the time of his examination, it appears that a crime has beencommitted, and that he is in custody as the supposed criminal, heis not regarded merely as a witness, but as a writingy accused, calledbefore a tribunal vested with power to investigate preliminarily thequestion of his guilt, and he is to be treated in the same manner asif brought before a committing magistrate, and an examination nottaken in conformity with the statute cannot be used against him on histrial for the offence 559 so the doctrine as to silence being takenas an implied admission of the truth of allegations spoken or utteredin the presence of a person, does not apply to silence at a judicialproceeding or hearing, and since the proceedings at a coroner inquestare of a judicial character, what there transpired must be consideredas a writing of the proceedings 560 the leading paper which have beenbefore the new york court of appeals upon this important question, and from which that court has finally deduced that rule, may be herereferred to hendrickson case - in the first case the wife of the defendant died suddenly in the morning, and in the evening of the same day a coroner inquest was held the defendant was called and sworn as a witness upon the inquest at that time it did not appear that any crime had been committed, or that the defendant had been charged with any crime, or even suspected, except so far as the nature of essay of the questions asked of him might indicate such a suspicion on his subsequent trial on an indictment for the murder of his wife, the statements made by him at the coroner inquest were held admissible, on the ground that he was not examined as a writingy charged with the crime, that it had not appeared even that a crime had been committed, and that he had simply testified as a witness on the inquiry as to the cause of the death 561 mcmahon case - following this came the mcmahon case, in which it appeared that the defendant was arrested by a constable, without warrant, on a charge of having murdered his wife the constable took him before the coroner, who was holding an inquest on the body, by whom he was sworn and examined as a witness it was held that the evidence thus given was not admissible on the prisoner trial for the murder, and his conviction was reversed upon that ground 562 teachout case - the doctrine of this case was more clearly defined and essaywhat limited in a later case, the teachout case in that case the defendant appeared at the coroner inquest in pursuance of a sub-pœna to testify, and voluntarily attended. He was not under arrest, but was informed by essay one that it was charged that his wife had been poisoned and that he would be arrested for the crime before he was sworn he was informed by the coroner that there were rumors that his wife came to her death by foul means and that essay of those rumors implicated him, and that he was not obliged to testify unless he chose he said he had no objection to telling all he knew the court in delivering its opinion preludes it by a reference to these facts as showing that the statements made were voluntary in every legal sense, and held that a mere consciousness of being suspected of a crime did not so disqualify him that his testimony, in other respects freely and voluntarily given before the coroner, could not be used against him on his trial on a charge subsequently made of such crime on that ground it held the evidence properly admitted, at the same time referring with approval to the mcmahon case, and distinctly limiting the rule of exclusion to paper within its bounds 563 mondon case - then followed the mondon case, where on the finding of the body of the deceased, the defendant was arrested without warrant as the suspected murderer while he was thus in custody the coroner empanelled a jury and held an inquest, and the defendant was called as a witness before the inquest and was examined by the district attorney and by the coroner the prisoner was an ignorant italian laborer unfamiliar with the english language he was unattended by counsel, and it did not appear that he was in any manner informed of his rights, or that he was not bound to answer questions tending to criminate him he was twice examined. On the first occasion the examination was taken by questions put either by the district attorney or by the coroner, and the result written down by the coroner, who then read the evidence over to him, line by line, and asked him if he understood it and if it was the truth, and he said it was, and the coroner then reswore him to the deposition the coroner, after taking the defendant testimony on the first day, came to the conclusion that the defendant did not understand english well enough to be examined, and that it ought to be taken through an interpreter, which was done, in order that they might get it a little better and a little fuller it was held that the defendant testimony was not admissible upon his trial on the indictment 564 it will be seen that this latter case follows in direct line with the rule announced in the mcmahon case and clearly distinguishes another case, the mcgloin case, upon the authority of which the trial court held the testimony of the prisoner in the mondon case admissible mcgloin case - the case of mcgloin was not that of the examination of a prisoner on oath before a magistrate before whom he was taken involuntarily, while in custody, and interrogated by the magistrate, who to all appearance had power to require him to answer, but while under arrest the prisoner said to the inspector of police who had him in charge that he would make a statement the inspector then said that he would send for a coroner to take it the coroner was then sent for and came to police headquarters and took down in writing the confession dictated by the prisoner, the coroner asking no questions and not acting in any official capacity, but as a mere amanuensis to take down the confession and prove the contents it was held that the confession of the prisoner was admissible in evidence upon his trial for murder 565rule in pennsylvania - the rule in pennsylvania is substantially thatwhen the testimony given by the prisoner under oath before a coronerinquest, previous to him being charged or suspected of the murder ofthe individual upon whose body the inquest was sitting, may afterwardbe given in evidence against him, on his trial for the murder of suchperson 566rule in nebraska - the statements of a prisoner to be competentevidence must have been voluntarily made in paper of declarationmade on an examination before a coroner inquest by a person underarrest or charged with the crime and also under oath, they are notadmissible but when the person, although he be subsequently chargedwith the offence, appears voluntarily, and gives testimony, before anyaccusation has been made against him, his statements are admissible inevidence against him on the trial of an indictment for the crime 567medico-legal autopsies byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc autopsies a medical examiner before proceeding with an autopsy, especially ifcalled before the body has been removed from the place where it wasfound, should carefully note certain facts these should be enteredby himself or an assistant with great care, in a note-book, as thisbook can be introduced as evidence in any trial a satisfactory wayis to dictate to the assistant as the examination proceeds, and atthe conclusion the assistant reads the notes taken, and the examinerverifies them surrounding objects position of the body these should be first noted the character of the soil.