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And, subject to sub sec 2of this section, the absence of the name of any person from such copyshall be prima facie evidence that such person is not registeredaccording to this act 34 in the case of a person whose name does not appear in such copy, acertified copy under the hand of the registrar of the entry of the nameof such person on the register shall be evidence that such person isregistered under this act 34, sub s 2 homœopathic physicians - any homœopathic physician holding a diplomaof qualification from any authorized school or college requiring athree-years’ course of study may be registered, and shall not be boundto pass the examination required by sec 29, but in lieu thereof, shallpass before the council, or such of them as may be appointed for thatpurpose, a satisfactory examination in anatomy, physiology, pathology, chemistry, obstetrics, and surgery 35, as amended, act 1890, c 30, s 2 neglect to register - those entitled to register and neglecting to doso are not entitled to any of the rights and privileges conferred byregistration and are liable to all penalties against unqualified orunregistered practitioners 37 fraudulent registration - if a person procures or causes to be procuredhis registration by means of any false or fraudulent representation ordeclaration, the registrar may, on receipt of sufficient evidence tothat effect, report the matter to the council and, on the written orderof the president, attested by the seal of the council, erase the nameof such person from the register and make known the fact and the causethereof in the british columbia gazette, and after such notice hasappeared such person shall cease to be a registered practitioner, andto enjoy any of the privileges conferred by registration, without theexpress sanction of the council 39 to wilfully procure or attempt to procure registration by falserepresentations or declarations is punishable by a penalty notexceeding $100 to knowingly aid or assist therein is punishable with apenalty of from $20 to $50 for each offence 40 unlawful practices - it is not lawful for any person not registeredto practise medicine or surgery for hire, gain, or hope of reward to so practise or profess to practise, or advertise to give advice inmedicine or surgery, is punishable with a penalty of from $25 to $10041 for a person to wilfully or falsely pretend to be a physician, doctor, or medical, surgical, or general practitioner, or assume any title, address, or description other than he actually possesses and is legallyentitled to, is punishable by a penalty of from $10 to $50 s 42 a person not registered who takes or uses any name, title, addition, ordescription implying or calculated to lead people to infer that he isregistered or recognized by law as a physician, surgeon, or licentiatein medicine or surgery is punishable with a penalty of from $25 to $10043 costs may be awarded in addition to the penalty against an offender, and on default of payment he may be committed to the common jail forone month unless the costs are sooner paid 47 unregistered persons - no one but a person registered under this act isentitled to receive any charge for any medical or surgical advice orattendance or the performance of any operation or for any medicine thathe may have prescribed 44 appointments as medical officers, physicians, or surgeons in any branchof the public service, or in a hospital or a charitable institution notsupported wholly by voluntary contribution, are conferred on registeredpersons only 45 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer is registered 46 evidence - in a prosecution, the burden of proving registration is uponthe person charged 48 registration may be proved by the production of a printed or othercopy of the register certified under the hand of the registrar of thecouncil for the time being, and any certificate on such copy purportingto be signed by any person as registrar is prima facie evidence thathe is registrar without further proof 49 limitations - prosecutions under the act must be commenced within sixmonths from the date of the offence 50 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions 51 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant under the act52 fees - to the registrar, for registration under this act, such sum asmay from time to time be fixed by the council by resolutions or by-law, but not exceeding $100 36, as amended, act 1893, c 27, s 1 to the medical council, on or before march 1st, annually, $10, or suchother sum as may from time to time be fixed by the council s 53, as amended, act 1890, c 30, s 3 for registration, by persons registered under act 1893, c 27, s 2, afee fixed by the council not to exceed $100 act 1893, c 27, s 2 manitoba college of physicians and surgeons - the medical profession isincorporated as “the college of physicians and surgeons of manitoba” rev stat of man , 1891, c 98, s 2 all persons lawfully registered under previous acts or the present actare members of the said college 3, 4 council - there is constituted by law a council of the said collegecomposed of representatives selected as provided in the act, each ofwhom must be a practitioner licensed under this act 5 to 8 no member of the college who is in arrears for his annual fees or anywriting thereof is entitled to vote at the election for members of thecouncil or be eligible for election as a member thereof 15 register - the council is required to appoint a registrar and to causea register to be kept in which shall be entered the name of everyperson registered under this act or under the consolidated statutes ofmanitoba, chap 9, and the acts amending the same, and of all personswho comply with this act, and the rules and regulations made by thecouncil respecting the qualifications of practitioners of medicine, surgery, and midwifery only those whose names are inscribed in thebook are deemed qualified and licensed to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery 17, 24, 25 qualification - all persons duly registered under existing laws whenthe revised statutes took effect are deemed registered under thepresent law 27 the registrar was required immediately upon his appointment to registerthe name of every person registered under previous acts 28 every person who possesses one or more of the following qualificationsshall, upon the payment of the fee, to be fixed for each writingicularclass by by-law of the council, be entitled to be registered on theproduction to the registrar of the document proving such qualification:1 persons entitled to be registered at the time of the coming intoforce of the revised statutes 2 any member of any incorporated college of physicians and surgeonsof any province of the dominion of canada, or any member of any otherincorporated body of medical men in canada, exercising powers similarto those conferred by this act on the college of physicians andsurgeons of manitoba, where, by the laws of the province under whichthe said incorporated body exists, similar rights to register and topractise medicine are granted to the persons incorporated under thisact 3 every person mentioned in chap 48 of act 49 and 50 vict of theparliament of the united kingdom 4 every graduate in medicine upon examination of the university ofmanitoba 5 every person who produces to the registrar the certificate under thecorporate seal of the university of manitoba hereinafter provided for29 the registrar is required to keep his register correct, and to makefrom time to time the necessary alterations in the addresses orqualifications of the persons registered 30 every person registered who obtains a higher degree or otherqualification is entitled to have it inserted in the register insubstitution of or in addition to the qualification previouslyregistered, on the payment of such fees as the council may appoint34 no qualification is entitled to be entered on the register unless theregistrar be satisfied by proper evidence that the person claiming itis entitled thereto appeal lies from the registrar decision to thecouncil 35 the registrar, if dissatisfied with the evidence adduced, may, subjectto appeal to the council, refuse registration until proper evidence isfurnished, duly attested by oath or affirmation before a judge of anycounty court 36 fraudulent registration - any entry proved to the satisfaction of thecouncil to have been fraudulently or incorrectly made may be erasedfrom the register by order in writing of the council 38 if a person procures or causes to be procured his registration by falseor fraudulent representations or declarations, the registrar may, on the receipt of sufficient evidence of the falsity or fraudulentcharacter, represent the matter to the council, and may on the writtenorder of the president, attested by the seal of the college, erase hisname from the register, and cause notice of the fact and cause to bepublished in the manitoba gazette, and after such notice has appearedsuch person shall cease to be a member of the college of physiciansand surgeons, and to enjoy any privilege enjoyed or conferred byregistration at any further time without the express sanction of thecouncil 39 forfeiture of rights - any registered medical practitioner convictedof felony or misdemeanor before or after the passage of the act or hisregistration forfeits his right to registration, and by direction ofthe council his name shall be erased if a person known to have beenconvicted of felony or misdemeanor presents himself for registration, the registrar may refuse registration if any person registered bejudged, after due inquiry by the council, to have been guilty ofinfamous or unprofessional conduct in any respect, the council maydirect the registrar to erase his name 40 the council may, and upon the application of any three registeredmedical practitioners shall, cause inquiry to be made into the case ofa person liable to have his name erased from the register, and on proofof such conviction or such infamous or unprofessional conduct shallcause his name to be erased. But no erasure shall be made on account ofhis adopting or refraining from adopting the practice of any writingiculartheory of medicine or surgery, nor on account of conviction for apolitical offence out of her majesty dominions, nor on account of theconviction which ought not in the opinion of the council or committeedisqualify him from the practice of medicine or surgery 41 the council may order to be paid, out of funds at their disposal, such costs as to them may seem just, to any person against whom anycomplaint has been made which, when fully determined, is found to havebeen frivolous and vexatious 42 an entry erased by order of the council shall not be again enteredexcept by order of the council or a judge or court of competentjurisdiction 43 if the council think fit, they may direct the registrar to restore anyentry erased, without a fee, or on payment of a fee not exceeding theregistration fee, as the council may fix 44 the council is authorized to ascertain the facts of any case for theexercise of its powers of erasing and restoring by committee s 45 the act provides in detail for proceedings before such committee46 to 50 no action shall be brought against the council or committee foranything done bona fide under the act appeal from the decision toerase lies to any judge of the court of queen bench for manitoba, and such judge may make such order as to restoration or confirmationof erasure or for further inquiry, and as to costs, as to him may seemright 51 evidence - in a trial under this act the burden of proof as toregistration is on the person charged 53 the production of a certificate that the person named is dulyregistered, certified under the hand of the registrar, is sufficientevidence of registration, and his signature in the capacity ofregistrar is prima facie evidence that he is registrar without proofof signature or that he is registrar 54 the registrar is required to print and publish from time to time underthe direction of the council a correct register of the names andresidences, with medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferredby any college or body, with the date thereof, of all persons appearingon the register as existing on the day of publication 55 the register is called “the manitoba medical register;” a copy thereoffor the time being purporting to be so printed and published is primafacie evidence that the persons specified are registered s 56 in the case of any person whose name does not appear in such copy, acertified copy under the hand of the registrar of the council of theentry of the name of such person on the register is evidence thatsuch person is registered 57 the absence of the name ofany person from such copy is prima facie evidence that he is notregistered 58 practitioner rights - every person registered is entitled accordingto his qualifications to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, orany of them as the case may be, and to demand and recover full costsof suit, reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of any medicine or other medical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patient 59 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights and privileges conferred, and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 60 unregistered persons - it is not lawful for any person not registeredto practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery for hire, gain, or hope ofreward 61 no person is entitled to receive any charge for medical or surgicaladvice or attendance, or the performance of any operation, or forany medicine which he may have prescribed or supplied, unless he beregistered, but this provision does not extend to the sale of any drugor medicine by a licensed chemist or druggist 62 no person can be appointed as a medical officer, physician, orsurgeon in the public service, or in any hospital or other charitableinstitution not supported wholly by voluntary contribution, unless hebe registered 63 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer be registered 64 definition - the expression “legally qualified medical practitioner, ”or any other words importing legal recognition as a medicalpractitioner or member of the medical profession, in any law, isconstrued to mean a person registered under this act 65 immunities - a person registered under this act is exempt from jury andinquest duty if he desire it 66 limitations - no duly registered member of the college of physiciansand surgeons is liable in an action for negligence or malpractice byreason of professional services requested or rendered, unless it becommenced within one year from the termination of such service s 67 examinations - the university of manitoba is the sole examining bodyin medicine, and the council of the university may grant to any persona certificate under the seal of the university that the council ofthe university have been satisfied that the person mentioned in thecertificate is, by way of medical education and otherwise, a properperson to be registered under this act. But such certificate shall notbe granted until the person making such application shall have givenevidence of qualification by undergoing an examination or otherwise, as the statutes of the university require, and the applicant shall inall other respects first comply with the rules and regulations of theuniversity in that behalf 68 homœopathists - until a homœopathic medical college for teachingpurposes is established in manitoba, in the case of candidates wishingto be registered as homœopathists, the full time of attendance uponlectures and hospitals required by the university statutes may be spentin such homœopathic medical colleges in the united states or europe asmay be recognized by the university of manitoba 69 every candidate who at the time of his examination signifies hiswish to be registered as a homœopathic practitioner shall not berequired to pass an examination in materia medica or therapeutics, ortheory or practice of physic, or in surgery or midwifery, except theoperative practical writings thereof, before any examiners other thanthose homœopathic examiners who shall be appointed by the university ofmanitoba 70 unlawful practices - to wilfully procure or attempt to procureregistration by false or fraudulent representation or declaration, ispunishable by a penalty not exceeding $100 to knowingly aid or assisttherein, is punishable by a penalty of from $20 to $50 for each offence73 persons not registered, for hire, gain, or the hope of reward, practising or professing to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, or advertising to give advice in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, areliable to a penalty of from $25 to $100 74 a person wilfully or falsely pretending to be a physician, doctorof medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assuming a title, addition, or description other than he actually possesses and islegally entitled to, is liable to a penalty of from $10 to $50 s 75 for a person to assume a title calculated to lead people to infer thathe is registered, or is recognized by law as a physician, surgeon, or accoucheur or a licentiate in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, ispunishable with a penalty of from $25 to $100 76 on prosecution, costs may be awarded in addition to the penalty, andthe offender may be committed to the common jail for one month, unlessthe penalty and costs are sooner paid 78 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant under the act80 limitations - prosecutions are limited to commence within six monthsafter the date of the offence 81 appeal - a person convicted under this act, giving notice of appeal, must before being released give satisfactory security for the penaltyand costs of conviction and appeal 82 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions 84 fees - the council is authorized to determine by by-law an annual fee, which is required to be paid by each member of the college the fee canbe not less than $2, nor more than $5, is payable on january 1st, andmay be recovered as a debt by the college 32 the fee for registration is subject to regulation by the council33 new brunswick medical society - all persons registered under the act constitute thenew brunswick medical society act 1881, c 19, s 2 council - there is a medical council called the council of physiciansand surgeons of new brunswick, of nine legally qualified medicalpractitioners, of not less than seven years’ standing.

Such country people as know nothow to draw the chymical oil, may content themselves by eating ten ora dozen of the ripe berries every morning fasting they are admirablygood for a cough, shortness of breath, and consumption, pains in thebelly, ruptures, cramps, and convulsions they give safe and speedydelivery to women with child, they strengthen the brain exceedingly, help the memory, and fortify the sight by strengthening the opticnerves. Are excellently good in all sorts of agues. Help the gout andsciatica, and strengthen the limbs of the body the ashes of the woodis a speedy remedy to such as have the scurvy, to rub their gums with the berries stay all fluxes, help the hæmorrhoids or piles, and killworms in children a lye made of the ashes of the wood, and the bodybathed with it, cures the itch, scabs and leprosy the berries breakthe stone, procure appetite when it is lost, and are excellently goodfor all palsies, and falling-sickness kidneywort, or wall pennyroyal, or wall pennywort descript it has thesis thick, flat, and round leaves growing from theroot, every one having a long footstalk, fastened underneath, about themiddle of it, and a little unevenly weaved essaytimes about the edges, of a pale green colour, and essaywhat yellow on the upper side likea saucer. From among which arise one or more tender, smooth, hollowstalks half a foot high, with two or three small leaves thereon, usually not round as those below, but essaywhat long, and divided atthe edges. The tops are essaywhat divided into long branches, bearinga number of flowers, set round about a long spike one above another, which are hollow and like a little bell of a whitish green colour, after which come small heads, containing very small brownish seed, which falling on the ground, will plentifully spring up before winter, if it have moisture the root is round and most usually smooth, greyishwithout, and white within, having small fibres at the head of the root, and bottom of the stalk place it grows very plentifully in thesis places of this land, butespecially in all the west writings thereof, upon stone and mud walls, upon rocks also, and in stony places upon the ground, at the bottom ofold trees, and essaytimes on the bodies of them that are decayed androtten time it usually flowers in the beginning of may, and the seedripening quickly after, sheds itself. So that about the end of may, usually the stalks and leaves are withered, dry, and gone untilseptember, then the leaves spring up again, and so abide all winter government and virtues venus challenges the herb under libra thejuice or the distilled water being drank, is very effectual for allinflammations and unnatural heats, to cool a fainting hot stomach, ahot liver, or the bowels. The herb, juice, or distilled water thereof, outwardly applied, heals pimples, st anthony fire, and other outwardheats the said juice or water helps to heal sore kidneys, torn orfretted by the stone, or exulcerated within. It also provokes urine, is available for the dropsy, and helps to break the stone being usedas a bath, or made into an ointment, it cools the painful piles orhæmorrhoidal veins it is no less effectual to give ease to the painsof the gout, the sciatica, and helps the kernels or knots in the neckor throat, called the king evil. Healing kibes and chilblains ifthey be bathed with the juice, or anointed with ointment made thereof, and essay of the skin of the leaf upon them. It is also used in greenwounds to stay the blood, and to heal them quickly knapweed descript the common sort hereof has thesis long and essaywhat darkgreen leaves, rising from the root, dented about the edges, andessaytimes a little rent or torn on both sides in two or three places, and essaywhat hairy withal. Amongst which arises a long round stalk, four or five feet high, divided into thesis branches, at the tops whereofstand great scaly green heads, and from the middle of them thrust fortha number of dark purplish red thrumbs or threads, which after they arewithered and past, there are found divers black seeds, lying in a greatdeal of down, essaywhat like unto thistle seed, but smaller. The rootis white, hard and woody, and divers fibres annexed thereunto, whichperishes not, but abides with leaves thereon all the winter, shootingout fresh every spring place it grows in most fields and meadows, and about their bordersand hedges, and in thesis waste grounds also every where time it usually flowers in june and july, and the seed is ripeshortly after government and virtues saturn challenges the herb for his own thisknapweed helps to stay fluxes, both of blood at the mouth or nose, or other outward writings, and those veins that are inwardly broken, orinward wounds, as also the fluxes of the belly. It stays distillationof thin and sharp humours from the head upon the stomach and lungs.

Attending surgeon to the buffalo general hospital. Fellow of the german congress of surgeons. Of the american orthopædic association. Of the american genito-urinary surgeons’ association. Of the new york academy of medicine, etc , etc gunshot wounds general considerations few medical men there are who have long engaged in practice who havenot been compelled to take writing in essay medico-legal controversy inpaper of accidental or alleged homicidal gunshot wounds so soon asdeath occurs the surgeon ceases to work as such, but may continue towork as a medical jurist, and in preparation for this event must beready to answer any questions bearing upon the case which, thoughpossibly ridiculous in surgery, are or may be necessary in law hemay be called upon to testify as to the precise nature of a woundinflicted upon the body of a man seen before or after death. As to themeans by which it was inflicted. Whether the purport was suicidal orhomicidal. How much blood was lost.

Let the litharge in fine powder be boiled withthe oil to a thickness, then add the wax, which being melted, take itfrom the fire, add the gums dissolved in wine and vinegar, strain it, then add the myrrh, mastich, frankincense, birthwort, and loadstone inpowder, last of all the verdigris in powder, and make it into a plasteraccording to art culpeper it is of a cleansing nature, exceeding good againstmalignant ulcers, it consumes corruption, engenders new flesh, andbrings them to a scar emplastrum epispasticum college take of mustard seed, euphorbium, long pepper, of each onedram and an half, stavesacre, pellitory of spain of each two drams, ammoniacum, galbanum, phellium, sagapen, of each three drams, wholecantharides five drams, ship pitch, rozin, yellow wax, of each sixdrams, turpentine as much as is sufficient to make it into a plaster culpeper thesis people use to draw blisters in their necks for thetooth ache, or for rheums in their eyes. If they please to lay aplaster of this there, it will do it emplastrum a nostratibus, flos unguentorum dictum or, flower of ointments college take of rozin, per rozin, yellow wax, sheep suet, of eachhalf a pound, olibanum four ounces, turpentine two ounces and an half, myrrh, mastich, of each an ounce, camphire two drams, white wine half apound, boil them into a plaster culpeper i found this receipt in an old manuscript written in theyear 1513, the quantity of the ingredients very little altered a plaster of gum elemi college take of gum elemi three ounces, per rozin, wax, ammoniacum, of each two ounces, turpentine three ounces and an half, mallaga wineso much as is sufficient. Boil it to the consumption of the wine, thenadd the ammoniacum dissolved in vinegar culpeper the operation is the same with arceus liniment a plaister of lapis calaminaris college take of lapis calaminaris prepared an ounce, litharge twoounces, ceruss half an ounce, tutty a dram, turpentine six drams, whitewax an ounce and an half, stag suet two ounces, frankincense fivedrams, mastich three drams, myrrh two drams, camphire a dram and anhalf, make it up according to art emplastrum ad herniam college take of galls, cypress nuts, pomegranate pills, balaustines, acacia, the seeds of plantain, fleawort, water-cresses, acorn cups, beans torrified, birth-wort long and round, myrtles of eachhalf an ounce let these be powdered, and steeped in rose vinegar fourdays, then torrified and dried, then take of comfrey the greater andlesser, horsetail, woad, cetrach, the roots of osmond royal, fearn, ofeach an ounce, frankincense, myrrh, aloes, mastich, mummy, of each twoounces, bole-ammoniac washed in vinegar, lap, calaminaris prepared, litharge of gold, dragon blood, of each three ounces, ship pitch twopounds, turpentine six ounces, or as much as is sufficient to make itinto a plaster according to art culpeper the plaster is very binding and knitting, appropriated toruptures or burstens, as the title of it specifies, it strengthens thereins and womb, stays abortion, it consolidates wounds, and helps alldiseases coming of cold and moisture emplastrum hystericum college take of bistort roots one pound, wood of aloes, yellowsanders, nutmegs, barberry kernels, rose seeds, of each one ounce, cinnamon, cloves, squinanth, chamomel flowers, of each half an ounce, frankincense, mastich, alipta moschata, gallia moschata, styraxcalamitis, of each one dram, mosch half a dram, yellow wax one poundand an half, turpentine half a pound, moschæleum four ounces, labdanumfour pounds, ship pitch three pounds. Let the labdanum and turpentinebe added to the pitch and wax, being melted, then the styrax, lastlythe rest in powder, and sifted, that they may be made into a plasteraccording to art culpeper the plaster being applied to the navel, is a means towithstand the fits of the mother in such women as are subject to them, by retaining the womb in its place emplastrum de mastich or, a plaster of mastich college take of mastich three ounces, bole-ammoniac washed in blackwine, an ounce and an half, red roses six drams, ivory, myrtle berries, red coral, of each half an ounce, turpentine, colophonia, tachamahacca, labdanum, of each two ounces, yellow wax half a pound, oil of myrtlesfour ounces. Make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a binding plaster, strengthens the stomach beingapplied to it, and helps such as loath their victuals, or cannot digestit, or retain it till it be digested emplastrum de meliloto simplex or, a plaster of melilot simple college take of rozin eight pounds, yellow wax four pounds, sheepsuet two pounds. These being melted, add green melilot cut small, fivepounds. Make it into a plaster according to art emplastrum de meliloto compositum or, a plaster of melilot compound college take of melilot flowers six drams, chamomel flowers, theseeds of fenugreek, bay berries husked, marsh-mallow roots, the topsof wormwood and marjoram, of each three drams, the seeds of smallage, ammi, cardamoms, the roots of orris, cypress, spikenard, cassia lignea, of each one dram and an half, bdellium five drams. Beat them allinto fine powder, the pulp of twelve figs, and incorporate them witha pound and an half of melilot plaster simple, turpentine an ounceand an half, ammoniacum dissolved in hemlock vinegar, three ounces, styrax five drams, oil of marjoram, and nard, of each half an ounce, or a sufficient quantity, make it into a plaster with a hot mortar andpestle, without boiling culpeper it mollifies the hardness of the stomach, liver, spleen, bowels, and other writings of the body. It wonderfully assuages pain, andeases hypochondriac melancholy, and the rickets emplastrum de minio compositum or, a plaster of red lead compound college take of oil of roses omphacine twenty ounces, oil ofmastich two ounces, suet of a sheep and a calf, of each half a pound, litharge of gold and silver, red lead, of each two ounces, a tasterfull of wine. Boil them by a gentle fire continually stirring it tillit grow black, let the fire be hottest towards the latter end, then addturpentine half a pound, mastich two ounces, gum elemi one ounce, whitewax as much as is sufficient. Boil them a little, and make them into aplaster according to art culpeper it potently cures wounds, old malignant ulcers, and isvery drying emplastrum de minio simplicius or, a plaster of red lead simple college take of red lead nine ounces, oil of red roses one poundand an half, white wine vinegar six ounces, boil it into the perfectbody of a plaster it is prepared without vinegar, thus. Take of redlead one pound, oil of roses one pound and an half, wax half a pound, make it into a plaster according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling healing plaster, and very drying emplastrum metroproptoticon college take of mastich one ounce and an half, galbanum dissolvedin red wine and strained, six drams, cypress turpentine two drams, cypress nuts, galls, of each one dram and an half, oil of nutmegsby expression one dram, musk two grains and an half, pitch scrapedoff from old ships two drams and an half.

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Forlaryngitis, for bronchitis, and for asthma no acceptable evidence was submitted as to the value of the product inthe treatment of any of the foregoing conditions in view of what isknown about non-specific reactions, it seems likely that any influencewhich this vaccine may have on the diverse conditions enumerated bythe manufacturer, is due to this, rather than to the combination oforganisms used in its preparation on the recommendation of the committee on serums and vaccines, thecouncil declared “sherman mixed vaccine no 40” ineligible to newand nonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims made for itare unwarranted rule 6 and because the combination, in view ofits complexity, is irrational and detrimental to sound therapy rule10 -- from the journal a m a , june 23, 1918 ophthalmol-lindemann report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryophthalmol-lindemann was taken up for consideration by the councilbecause of inquiries received the following report, declaringophthalmol inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, was adopted bythe council and its publication authorized w a puckner, secretary ophthalmol-lindemann innis, speiden and co , new york is advertisedas a treatment for eye diseases by “hyperemia ” the circularadvertising the product is written essaywhat in the style of “patentmedicine” advertisements it contains testimonials of dubious value the principle underlying the use of ophthalmol is that employedto a considerable extent by ophthalmologists, through the use ofethylmorphine “dionin”, etc , viz , the production of conjunctivalirritation in inflammatory eye diseases ophthalmol is, therefore, merely a special agent for the production of such ophthalmic irritation the advertising circular contains no evidence that ophthalmol is in anyrespect superior to the established agents for producing conjunctivalhyperemia on the other hand, there are obvious objections to theuse in the eye of a substance of unknown and apparently indefinitecomposition and uncertain activity ophthalmol is said to be an oilysolution of “glandular extract of the fish cobitis fossilis ” cobitisfossilis is a small fish said to be common in gerthesis according tokochs, who analyzed ophthalmol arb a d pharm inst d univ berl , 4:140, 1907, this fish is popularly believed to predictweather, but medical virtues are not ascribed to it this “fishy”extract is indefinite, to say the least the activity of the preparation is described by the manufacturer thus:“it seems probable that the typical action of ophthalmol is due tocertain organic acids which may have formed during manufacture throughthe decomposition of protein bodies contained in the crude material ”the profession is not told whether this important decomposition is, or, in fact, can be controlled so as to produce a material of uniformactivity kochs concluded from his analysis that ophthalmol had the propertiesof rancid olive oil containing about 6 to 7 per cent mineral oil theoil contained no nitrogen, left no ash on ignition and though traces ofiodin were claimed to be present, essay scorer no iodin could be found it is recommended that ophthalmol be rejected first, because the usein the eye of an irritant of secret composition and uncertain activityis unscientific and against the interest of public health. Second, because ophthalmol is of secret composition the composition claimedbeing practically meaningless, and, third, because no evidence hasbeen submitted to substantiate its claimed superiority over establishedmethods of treatment the council declared ophthalmol inadmissible tonew and nonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , july 6, 1918 silvol ineligible for n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe following report on silvol parke, davis & company was adopted bythe council and its publication authorized w a puckner, secretary the council took up the consideration of silvol parke, davis &company because of inquiries received the following report wassubmitted by the referee in charge of silver preparations:silvol parke, davis & company is a silver-protein preparation of theargyrol type like argyrol, it is said to contain about 20 per cent of silver the referee finds that, like argyrol, it is nonirritant tothe nasal mucosa in a 10 per cent solution. Does not precipitate withchlorid. Dissolves in water readily. A 25 per cent solution has a highspecific gravity silvol, 1 137 at 20 c. Argyrol, 1 147 at 20 c , andis not very viscid viscosity, 1 25 a 1:1, 000 solution of silvol isclear and about 50 per cent deeper in color than a solution of argyrolof the same strength silvol differs from argyrol mainly in that its solutions yield a fineprecipitate with egg albumin under suitable conditions, while argyrolis nonprecipitant. And in that silvol solutions are not so effectivelydecolorized by lloyd reagent the manufacturers did not reply to an inquiry with regard to thebasis for the claims made for silvol see appendix the referee wastherefore obliged to deduce these claims from the firm advertisingmatter about the same claims are made for the local use of silvol asare generally made for argyrol these may be accepted without detailedevidence in view of the similarity of the two preparations its usefulness, as suggested in the advertising, when given by mouth“in the treatment of acute or chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, orgastro-enteritis, ” or the efficacy of very dilute solutions 0 2 percent against dysentery, etc , is doubtful and requires substantiationby evidence the claims that silvol is astringent, though nonirritantand noncoagulant, that it is a “powerful germicide” or even that itis a “powerful antiseptic, ” and that it may be used with advantagewherever “a silver salt is indicated, ” need substantiation there is noproof of the assertions that silvol is “the most efficacious of silversalts”. “the most efficient antiseptic, ” and “the most remarkableorganic silver compound ”as the manufacturers have not presented any evidence for their highlyimprobable claims, and as they have not signified any intention ofmaking their claims agree with substantiated facts, it is recommendedthat silvol be declared inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the council adopted the report of its referee and authorized itspublication appendixthe following letter from the secretary of the council was sent toparke, davis & company, march 20, 1917 no reply to it has beenreceived. The referee of the council who is conducting an investigation of silver preparations asked me to inquire if you are willing to submit your evidence for the following claims which are made in your circulars for silvol. 1 how it is possible for the solution to be astringent, and at the same time nonirritant and noncoagulant?.