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Make it into a plaster according to art emplastrum de meliloto compositum or, a plaster of melilot compound college take of melilot flowers six drams, chamomel flowers, theseeds of fenugreek, bay berries husked, marsh-mallow roots, the topsof wormwood and marjoram, of each three drams, the seeds of smallage, ammi, cardamoms, the roots of orris, cypress, spikenard, cassia lignea, of essay revision service each one dram and an half, bdellium five drams. Beat them allinto fine powder, the pulp of twelve figs, and incorporate them witha pound and an half of melilot plaster simple, turpentine an ounceand an half, ammoniacum dissolved in hemlock vinegar, three ounces, styrax five drams, oil of marjoram, and nard, of each half an ounce, or a sufficient quantity, make it into a plaster with a hot mortar andpestle, without boiling culpeper it mollifies the hardness of the stomach, liver, spleen, bowels, and other writings of the body. It wonderfully assuages pain, andeases hypochondriac melancholy, and the rickets emplastrum de minio compositum or, a plaster of red lead compound college take of oil of roses omphacine twenty ounces, oil ofmastich two ounces, suet of a sheep and a calf, of each half a pound, litharge of gold and silver, red lead, of each two ounces, a tasterfull of wine. Boil them by a gentle fire continually stirring it tillit grow black, let the fire be hottest towards the latter end, then addturpentine half a pound, mastich two ounces, gum elemi one ounce, whitewax as much as is sufficient. Boil them a little, and make them into aplaster according to art culpeper it potently cures wounds, old malignant ulcers, and isvery drying emplastrum de minio simplicius or, a plaster of red lead simple college take of red lead nine ounces, oil of red roses one poundand an half, white wine vinegar six ounces, boil it into the perfectbody of a plaster it is prepared without vinegar, thus.

For looseness, take a spoonfulof it before meat, for vomiting after meat, for both, as also for therest, in the morning syrupus de erysimo or syrup of hedge-mustard college take of hedge-mustard, fresh, six handfuls, the rootsof elecampane, colt-foot, liquorice, of each two ounces, borrage, succory, maiden-hair, of each a handful and a half, the cordialflowers, rosemary and bettony, of each half a handful, annis seeds halfan ounce, raisins of the sun stoned, two ounces, let all of them, beingprepared according to art, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of barleywater and hydromel, with six ounces of juice of hedge-mustard to twopounds and a half, the which, with three pounds of sugar, boil it intoa syrup according to art culpeper it was invented against cold afflictions of the breastand lungs, as asthmas, hoarseness, &c you may take it either with aliquorice stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three orfour ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning syrupus de fumaria or syrup of fumitory college take of endive, common wormwood, hops, dodder, hart-tongue, of each a handful, essay revision service epithimum an ounce and a half, boilthem in four pounds of water till half be consumed, strain it, andadd the juice of fumitory a pound and a half, of borrage and bugloss, of each half a pound, white sugar four pounds, make them into a syrupaccording to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty concocter of melancholy, andtherefore a rational help for diseases arising thence, both internaland external, it helps diseases of the skin, as leprosies, cancers, warts, corns, itch, tetters, ringworms, scabs, &c and it is the betterto be liked, because of its gentleness it helps surfeits exceedingly, cleanses, cools, and strengthens the liver, and causes it to make goodblood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh i commend this receipt tothose whose bodies are subject to scabs and itch if you please you maytake two ounces by itself every morning syrupus de glycyrrhiza or syrup of liquorice college take of green liquorice, scraped and bruised, two ounces, white maiden-hair an ounce, dryed hyssop half an ounce, steep these infour pounds of hot water, after twenty-four hours, boil it till halfbe consumed, strain it, and clarify it, and with honey, penids, andsugar, of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding, before it beperfectly boiled, red rose water six ounces culpeper it cleanses the breast and lungs, and helps continualcoughs and pleurisies you may take it with a liquorice stick, or addan ounce of it or more to the pectoral decoction syrupus granatorum cum aceto. Vulgo, oxysaccharum simplex or syrup of pomegranates with vinegar college take of white sugar a pound and a half, juice ofpomegranates eight ounces, white wine vinegar four ounces, boil itgently into a syrup culpeper look the virtues of pomegranates among the simples syrupus de hyssopo or syrup of hyssop college take eight pounds of spring water, half an ounce of barley, boil it about half an hour, then add the roots of smallage, parsley, fennel, liquorice, of each ten drams, jujubes, sebestens, of eachfifteen, raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce and a half, figs, dates, of each ten, the seeds of mallows and quinces, gum tragacanth tiedup in a rag, of each three drams, hyssop meanly dryed, ten drams, maiden-hair six drams, boil them together, yet so, that the roots mayprecede the fruits, the fruits the seeds, and the seeds the herbs, about a quarter of an hour. At last, five pounds of water beingconsumed, boil the other three being first strained and clarifiedinto a syrup with two pounds and a half of sugar culpeper it mightily strengthens the breast and lungs, causes longwind, clears the voice, is a good remedy against coughs use it likethe syrup of liquorice syrupus ivæ arthriticæ, sive chamæpityos or syrup of chamepitys college take of chamepitys, two handfuls, sage, rosemary, poleymountain, origanum, calaminth, wild mints, pennyroyal, hyssop, thyme, rue, garden and wild, bettony, mother of thyme, of each a handful, theroots of acorns, birthwort long and round, briony, dittany, gentian, hog fennel, valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, asparagus, fennel, parsley, bruscus, of each an ounce, pellitory ofspain, an ounce and a half, stœchas, the seeds of annis, ammi, caraway, fennel, lovage, hartwort, of each three drams, raisins of the sun twoounces, boil them in ten pounds of water to four, to which add honeyand sugar, of each two pounds, make it into a syrup to be perfumed withsugar, nutmegs, and cubebs, of each three drams syrupus jujubinus or syrup of jujubes college take of jujubes, violets, five drams, maiden-hair, liquorice, french barley, of each an ounce, the seeds of mallows fivedrams, the seeds of white poppies, melons, lettice, seeds of quincesand gum tragacanth tied up in a rag of each three drams, boil them insix pounds of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar make it into a syrup culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup, very available in coughs, hoarseness, and pleurisies, ulcers of the lungs and bladder, as alsoin all inflammations whatsoever you may take a spoonful of it once inthree or four hours, or if you please take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de meconio, sive diacodium or syrup of meconium, or diacodium college take of white poppy heads with their seeds, gathered alittle after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three days, eightounces, black poppy heads so ordered six ounces, rain water eightpounds, steep them twenty-four hours, then boil and press them gently, boil it to three pounds, and with twenty-four ounces of sugar boil itinto a syrup according to art syrupus de meconio compositus or syrup of meconium compound college take of white and black poppy heads with their seeds, fiftydrams, maiden-hair fifteen drams, jujubes thirty, the seeds of lettice, forty drams, of mallows and quinces tied up in a rag, a dram and ahalf, liquorice five drams, water eight pounds, boil it according toart, strain it, and to three pounds of decoction add sugar and penids, of each one pound, make it into a syrup culpeper meconium is nothing else but the juice of englishpoppies boiled till it be thick. It prevails against dry coughs, phthisicks, hot and sharp gnawing rheums, and provokes sleep it is anusual fashion for nurses when they have heated their milk by exerciseor strong liquor no marvel then if their children be froward then runfor syrup of poppies, to make their young ones sleep i would fain havethat fashion left, therefore i forbear the dose. Let nurses keep theirown bodies temperate, and their children will sleep well enough, neverfear syrupus melissophylli or syrup of bawm college take of the bark of bugloss roots, an ounce, the roots ofwhite dittany, cinquefoil, scorzonera, of each half an ounce, theleaves of bawm, scabious, devil-bit, the flowers of both sorts ofbugloss, and rosemary, of each a handful, the seeds of sorrel, citrons, fennel, carduus, bazil, of each three drams, boil them in four poundsof water till half be consumed, strain it, and add three pounds ofwhite sugar, juice of bawm and rose water, of each half a pound, boilthem to a syrup, the which perfume with cinnamon and yellow sanders, ofeach half an ounce culpeper it is an excellent cordial, and strengthens the heart, breast, and stomach, it resists melancholy, revives the spirits, isgiven with good success in fevers, it strengthens the memory, andrelieves languishing nature you may take a spoonfull of it at a time syrupus de mentha or syrup of mints college take of the juices of quinces sweet and between sweet andsour, the juice of pomegranates sweet, between sweet and sour, andsour, of each a pound and a half, dried mints half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, let them lie in steep one day, then boil it half away, and with four pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup according to art:perfume it not unless the physicians command culpeper the syrup is in quality binding, yet it comforts thestomach much, helps digestion, stays vomiting, and is as excellenta remedy against sour or offensive belchings, as any is in thedispensatory take a spoonful of it after meat syrupus de mucilaginibus or syrup of mussilages college take of the seeds of marsh-mallows, mallows, quinces, ofeach an ounce, gum tragacanth three drams, let these infuse six hoursin warm decoction of mallows, white poppy seeds, and winter cherries, then press out the mussilage to an ounce and an half, with which, andthree ounces of the aforesaid decoction, and two ounces of sugar, makea syrup according to art culpeper a spoonful taken by itself, or in any convenient liquor, is excellent for any sharp corroding humours be they in what writingof the body soever, phthisicks, bloody-flux, stone in the reins orbladder, or ulcers there. It is excellent good for such as have takenpurges that are too strong for their bodies, for by its slippery natureit helps corrosions, and by its cooling helps inflammations syrupus myrtinus or syrup of myrtles college take of myrtle berries two ounces and an half, sanderswhite and red, sumach, balaustines, barberry stones, red roses, ofeach an ounce and a half, medlars half a pound, bruise them in eightpounds of water to four, strain it, and add juice of quinces and sourpomegranates, of each six ounces, then with three pounds of sugar, boilit into a syrup culpeper the syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, ithelps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions ofthe internal writings, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stopsimmoderate flux of menses a spoonful at a time is the dose syrupus florum nymphæ simplex or syrup of water-lily flowers, simple college take of the whitest of white water-lily flowers, a pound, steep them in three pounds of warm water six or seven hours, let themboil a little, and strain them out, put in the same weight of flowersagain the second and third time, when you have strained it the lasttime, add its weight of sugar to it, and boil it to a syrup syrupus florum nymphæ compositus syrup of water-lily flowers compound college take of white water-lily flowers half a pound, violetstwo ounces, lettice two handfuls, the seeds of lettice, purslain, andgourds, of each half an ounce, boil them in four pounds of clear watertill one be consumed, strain it, and add half a pound of red rosewater, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper they are both fine cooling syrups, allay the heat ofcholer, and provoke sleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases ineither, you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach isempty syrupus de papavere erratico, sive rubro or syrup of erratic poppies college take of the fresh flowers of red poppies two pounds, steepthem in four pounds of warm spring water, the next day strain it, andboil it into a syrup with its equal weight in sugar culpeper the syrup cools the blood, helps surfeits, and may safelybe given in frenzies, fevers, and hot agues syrupus de pilosella or syrup of mousear college take of mousear three handfuls, the roots of lady-mantlean ounce and an half, the roots of comfrey the greater, madder, white dittany, tormentil, bistort, of each an ounce, the leavesof wintergreen, horsetail, ground ivy, plantain, adder tongue, strawberries, st john wort with the flowers, golden rod, agrimony, bettony, burnet, avens, cinquefoil the greater, red coleworts, balaustines, red roses, of each a handful, boil them gently in sixpounds of plantain water to three, then strain it strongly, and when itis settled, add gum tragacanth, the seeds of fleawort, marsh-mallowsand quinces, made into a mussilage by themselves in strawberry andbettony water, of each three ounces, white sugar two pounds, boil it tothe thickness of honey culpeper it is drying and healing, and therefore good for ruptures syrupus infusionis florum pæoniæ or syrup of the infusion of peony flowers college it is prepared in the same manner as syrup ofclove-gilliflowers syrupus de pæonia compositus or syrup of peony compound college take of the roots of both sorts of peony taken up at thefull moon, cut in slices, and steeped in white wine a whole day, ofeach an ounce and an half, contra yerva half an ounce, siler mountainsix drams, elk claws an ounce, rosemary with the flowers on, onehandful, bettony, hyssop, origanum, chamepitys, rue, of each threedrams, wood of aloes, cloves, cardamoms the less, of each two drams, ginger, spikenard, of each a dram, stœchas, nutmegs, of each two dramsand an half, boil them after one day warm digestion, in a sufficientquantity of distilled water of peony roots, to four pounds, in which being strained through hippocrates’ sleeve put four pounds and anhalf of white sugar, and boil it to a syrup culpeper it helps the falling-sickness, and convulsions syrupus de pomis aiterans or syrup of apples college take four pounds of the juice of sweet scented apples, thejuice of bugloss, garden and wild, of violet leaves, rose water, ofeach a pound, boil them together, and clarify them, and with six poundsof pure sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup for such whose stomachs areoverpressed with heat, and may safely be given in fevers, for it ratherloosens than binds. It breeds good blood, and is profitable in hecticfevers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, itquenches thirst admirably in fevers, and stays hiccoughs you may takean ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need syrupus de prasio or syrup of horehound college take of white horehound fresh, two ounces, liquorice, polipodium of the oak, fennel, and smallage roots, of each half anounce, white maiden-hair, origanum, hyssop, calaminth, thyme, savory, scabious, colt-foot, of each six drams, the seeds of annis andcotton, of each three drams, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, fatfigs ten, boil them in eight pounds of hydromel till half be consumed, boil the decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar, of each twopounds, and perfume it with an ounce of the roots of orris florentine culpeper it is appropriated to the breast and lungs, and is afine cleanser to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helpsphthisicks and coughs, and diseases subject to old men, and coldnatures take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de quinq radicibus or syrup of the five opening roots college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, parsley, bruscus, sparagus of each two ounces, spring water, six pounds, boil away thethird writing, and make a syrup with the rest according to art, with threepounds of sugar, adding eight ounces of white wine vinegar, towards thelatter end culpeper it cleanses and opens very well, is profitable againstobstructions, provokes urine, cleanses the body of flegm, and is safelyand profitably given in the beginning of fevers an ounce at a timeupon an empty stomach is a good dose syrupus raphani or syrup of radishes college take of garden and wild radish roots, of each an ounce, the roots of white saxifrage, lovage, bruscus, eringo, rest-harrow, parsley, fennel, of each half an ounce, the leaves of bettony, burnet, pennyroyal, nettles, water-cresses, samphire, maiden-hair, of each onehandful, winter cherries, jujubes, of each ten, the seeds of bazil, bur, parsley of macedonia, hartwort, carraway, carrots, gromwell, the bark of the root of bay-tree, of each two drams, raisins of thesun stoned, liquorice, of each six drams, boil them in twelve poundsof water to eight, strain it, and with four pounds of sugar, and twopounds of honey, make it into a syrup, and perfume it with an ounce ofcinnamon, and half an ounce of nutmegs culpeper a tedious long medicine for the stone syrupus regius, alias julapium alexandrinum or julep of alexandria college boil four pounds of rose-water, and one pound of whitesugar into a julep julep of roses is made with damask rose water, inthe very same manner culpeper two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer syrupus de rosis siccis or syrup of dried roses college make four pounds of spring water hot, in which infuse apound of dried roses, by essay at a time, press them out and with twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper syrup of dried roses, strengthens the heart, comforts thespirits, binds the body, helps fluxes, and corrosions, or gnawings ofthe bowels, it strengthens the stomach, and stays vomiting you maytake an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes. After meat if forvomiting syrupus scabiosæ or syrup of scabious college take of the roots of elecampane, and polypodium of theoak, of each two ounces, raisins of the sun stoned an ounce, sebestenstwenty, colt-foot, lungwort, savory, calaminth, of each a handful andan half, liquorice, spanish tobacco, of each half an ounce, the seedsof nettles and cotton, of each three drams, boil them all the rootsbeing infused in white wine the day before in a sufficient quantityof wine and water to eight ounces, strain it, and adding four ouncesof the juice of scabious, and ten ounces of sugar, boil it to a syrup, adding to it twenty drops of oil of sulphur culpeper it is a cleansing syrup appropriated to the breastand lungs, when you perceive them oppressed by flegm, crudites, orstoppings, your remedy is to take now and then a spoonful of thissyrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy, orscabby syrupus de scolopendrio or syrup of hart-tongue college take of hart-tongue three handfuls, polypodium of theoak, the roots of both sorts of bugloss, bark of the roots of capersand tamerisk, of each two ounces, hops, dodder, maiden-hair, bawm, ofeach two handfuls, boil them in nine pounds of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pounds of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper it helps the stoppings of melancholy, opens obstructionsof the liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetic evils, andtherefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the vulgar call therickets, or liver-grown. A spoonful in a morning is a precious remedyfor children troubled with that disease men that are troubled with thespleen, which is known by pain and hardness in their left side, maytake three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one receipt worththe price of the whole book syrupus de stœchade syrup of stœchas college take of stœchas flowers four ounces, rosemary flowers halfan ounce, thyme, calaminth, origanum, of each an ounce and an half, sage, bettony, of each half an ounce, the seeds of rue, peony, andfennel, of each three drams, spring water ten pounds, boil it till halfbe consumed, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, boil it intoa syrup, which perfume with cinnamon, ginger, and calmas aromaticus, ofeach two drams tied up in a rag syrupus de symphyto or syrup of comfrey college take of roots and tops of comfrey, the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red roses, bettony, plantain, burnet, knotgrass, scabious, colt foot, of each two handfuls, press the juiceout of them all, being green and bruised, boil it, scum it, and strainit, add its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup, according to art culpeper the syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or evacuation of blood, it unitesbroken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the menses. You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease. It comforts hot stomachs exceedingly, cools the liver andheart, and resists putrefaction, pestilence, and poison college julep of violets is made of the water of violet flowersand sugar, like julep of roses culpeper it is cooling and pleasant purging syrups syrupus de cichorio cum rhubarbaro or syrup of succory with rhubarb college take of whole barley, the roots of smallage, fennel, andsparagus, of each two ounces, succory, dandelyon, endive, smoothsow-thistles, of each two handfuls, lettuce, liverwort, fumitory, topsof hops, of each one handful, maiden-hair, white and black, cetrachs, liquorice, winter cherries, dodder, of each six drams, to boil thesetake sixteen pounds of spring water, strain the liquor, and boil init six pounds of white sugar, adding towards the end six ounces ofrhubarb, six drams of spikenard, bound up in a thin slack rag the whichcrush often in boiling, and so make it into a syrup according to art culpeper it cleanses the body of venemous humours, as boils, carbuncles, and the like. It prevails against pestilential fevers, itstrengthens the heart and nutritive virtue, purges by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep but by my author leave, i never accounted purges to be proper physicin pestilential fevers. This i believe, the syrup cleanses the liverwell, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with hypocondriacmelancholy the strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak, one, oryou may mix an ounce of it with the decoction of senna syrupus de epithymo or syrup of epithimum college take of epithimum twenty drams, mirobalans, citron, andindian of each fifteen drams, emblicks, belloricks, polypodium, liquorice, agrick, thyme, calaminth, bugloss, stœchas of each sixdrams, dodder, fumitory, of each ten drams, red roses, annis-seeds andsweet fennel seeds of each two drams and an half, sweet prunes ten, raisins of the sun stoned four ounces, tamarinds two ounces and anhalf, after twenty-four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boil it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and withfive pounds of fine sugar boil it into syrup according to art culpeper it is best to put in the dodder, stœchas and agarick, towards the latter end of the decoction it purges melancholy, andother humours, it strengthens the stomach and liver, cleanses the bodyof addust choler and addust blood, as also of salt humours, and helpsdiseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosy, &c a man may take two ounces at a time, or add one ounce tothe decoction of epithimum syrupus e floribus persicorum or syrup of peach-flowers college take of fresh peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whole dayin three pounds of warm water, then boil a little and strain it out, repeat this infusion five times in the same liquor, in three pounds ofwhich dissolve two pounds and an half of sugar and boil it into a syrup culpeper it is a gentle purger of choler, and may be given even infevers to draw away the sharp choleric humours syrupus de pomis purgans or syrup of apples purging college take of the juice of sweet smelling apples two pounds, thejuice of borrage and bugloss of each one pound and an half, senna twoounces, annis seeds half an ounce, saffron one dram, let the senna besteeped in the juices twenty-four hours, and after a boil or two strainit, and with two pounds of white sugar boil it to a syrup accordingto art, the saffron being tied up in a rag, and often crushed in theboiling culpeper the syrup is a cooling purge, and tends to rectify thedistempers of the blood, it purges choler and melancholy, and thereforemust needs be effectual both in yellow and black jaundice, madness, scurf, leprosy, and scabs, it is very gentle the dose is from oneounce to three, according as the body is in age and strength an ounceof it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out inscabs syrupus de pomis magistralis or syrup of apples magisterial college take of the juice and water of apples of each a poundand an half, the juice and water of borrage and bugloss of each nineounces, senna half a pound, annis seeds, and sweet fennel seeds, ofeach three drams, epithimum of crete, two ounces, agarick, rhubarb, ofeach half an ounce, ginger, mace, of each four scruples, cinnamon twoscruples, saffron half a dram, infuse the rhubarb and cinnamon awritingby itself, in white wine and juice of apples, of each two ounces, letall the rest, the saffron excepted, be steeped in the waters abovementioned, and the next day put in the juices, which being boiled, scummed, and strained, then with four ounces of white sugar boil itinto a syrup, crushing the saffron in it being tied up in a linen rag, the infusion of the rhubarb being added at the latter end culpeper out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge choler andmelancholy, and to resist madness syrupus de rhubarbaro or syrup of rhubarb college take of the best rhubarb and senna of each two ounces andan half, violet flowers a handful, cinnamon one dram and an half, ginger half a dram, bettony, succory and bugloss water of each onepound and an half, let them be mixed together warm all night, and inthe morning strained and boiled into a syrup, with two pounds of whitesugar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of roses culpeper it cleanses choler and melancholy very gently, and istherefore fit for children, old people, and weak bodies you may add anounce of it to the decoction of epithimum or to the decoction of senna syrupus rosaceus solutivus or syrup of roses solutive college take of spring water boiling hot four pounds, damask roseleaves fresh, as thesis as the water will contain. Let them remain twelvehours in infusion, close stopped. Then press them out and put in freshrose leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time.

The rich may bestow the cost to preserve it thapsi, &c a venomous foreign root. Therefore no more of it tormentillæ of tormentil a kind of sinqfoil. Dry in the thirddegree, but moderately hot. Good in pestilences, provokes sweat, staysvomiting, cheers the heart, expels poison trifolij of trefoil see the herb tribuli aquatici of water caltrops the roots lie too far underwater for me to reach to trachellij of throat-wort. By essay called canterbury bells. By essaycoventry bells they help diseases and ulcers in the throat trinitatis herbæ hearts-ease, or pansies i know no great virtuethey have tunicis i shall tell you the virtue when i know what it is tripolij the root purges flegm, expels poison turbith the root purges flegm, being hot in the third degreechiefly from the exterior writings of the body. It is corrected withginger, or mastich let not the vulgar be too busy with it tuburnum or toad-stools whether these be roots or no, it mattersnot much. For my writing i know but little need of them, either in foodor physic victorialis a foreign kind of garlick they say, being hung aboutthe neck of cattle that are blind suddenly, it helps them. And defendsthose that bear it, from evil spirits swallow-wort, and teazles were handled before ulmariæ, reginæ, prati, &c mead-sweet cold and dry, binding, stopsfluxes, and the immoderate flowing of the menses. You may take a dramat a time urticæ of nettles see the leaves zedoariæ of zedoary, or setwall this and zurumbet, according torhasis, and mesue, are all one.

“therefore, additional emphasis on the necessity for the proper selection of paper is essential in order that this useful preparation may not be unjustly discredited ”how these paper of sterility, abortions, etc , are to be selectedis not revealed in other words, the restriction is no more than aconvenient device by which every improvement is to be attributed to themedicine, and every failure to the physician the referee recommends that corpora lutea soluble extract, parke, davis & co , be held ineligible to n n r , because it is a secretpreparation advertised under extravagant claims editorial comment -- was it not in weir mitchell “adventures offrançois” that the itinerant promised to pull teeth without anypain, if the patient would hold absolutely still?. and, mirabiledictu, the ones who suffered were those who had not held absolutelystill!. -- from the journal a m a , april 7, 1917 wheeler tissue phosphates report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council held that the contribution from the a m a chemicallaboratory, “wheeler tissue phosphates, ” demonstrates that this is asemisecret, complex and irrational preparation, sold with misleadingclaims concerning its medicinal constituents and therapeutic properties the council directed that the report be included with the annualcouncil reports and declared wheeler tissue phosphates in conflictwith rules 1, 6, 8 and 10 w a puckner, secretary wheeler tissue phosphates l e warren, ph c , b s “wheeler tissue phosphates, ” known also as “compound elixir ofphosphates and calisaya, ” is advertised as a nerve food and anutritive tonic the label states that it contains calcium, iron, sodium trihydrogen phosphates, alkaloids of peruvian bark with 12-1/2per cent of alcohol the preparation is sold by the t b wheeler, m d co , of rouses point, new york according to the manufacturer, wheeler tissue phosphates “ is an inorganic combination of the phosphates of iron and calcium and hydrogen phosphoric acid together with hydrochloric acid, hydrocyanic acid, and quinine, cheerful coloring, and a delicious, cordial-like flavoring ” “ the iron is the green, inorganic phosphate and the calcium the simple white phosphate of your early student days ”the preparation is a red liquid, having an acid reaction, asweet-bitter taste and the odor of wild cherry qualitative testsindicated the presence of calcium, iron, a phosphate, a chlorid, asulphate, quinin or cinchona alkaloids, alcohol, sodium, cochinealcoloring and invert sugar ammonium salts, glycerol, citrates orlactates were not found from the quantitative values obtained thepreparation may be taken to represent. Sp gr at 25c /25c 1 1087 alcohol per cent, by volume 11 35 gm per 100 c c calcium phosphate ca₃ po₄₂*  0 397 iron phosphate fepo₄ 4h₂o* 0 068 chlorid as hydrochloric acid 0 407 sodium sulphate na₂so₄ 10h₂o  0 043 quinin sulphate u s p 0 041 sodium phosphate na₂hpo₄ 12h₂o  0 065 invert sugar 26 824 water, cochineal and flavor, to make 100 c c * it should be understood that the calcium and iron salts are held in solution by the hydrochloric acid the dose of wheeler tissue phosphates recommended by the manufactureris a tablespoonful or about 15 c c 1/2 oz the total calcium in adose of the preparation is equivalent to about one-sixth of an averagedose of the official calcium chlorid, and the total phosphate to eachdose is equivalent to about one-fourth of a dose of the officialdiluted phosphoric acid each prescribed dose of the preparationcontains about 0 01 gm 2/13 grain of iron phosphate or about onetwenty-fifth of the average dose, and to obtain a pharmacopeial dose ofiron phosphate the patient would be obliged to take three-fourths ofthe contents of an entire bottle-- or 12 ounces-- of the preparation ifit be assumed that all of the chlorid present is in the form of freehydrochloric acid, each dose of the preparation contains the equivalentof about two-thirds of one pharmacopeial dose of diluted hydrochloricacid each dose of the preparation contains about 0 0062 gm 1/10grain of quinin sulphate, or about one-sixteenth of the average tonicdose in other words, to obtain the amount of quinin sulphate given inthe u s pharmacopeia as the tonic dose, the patient would be requiredto swallow 7-1/2 fluidounces of the proprietary preparation, or thecontents of nearly half a bottle the fallacy of prescribing wheelertissue phosphates either for its quinin or its iron content is apparent wheeler tissue phosphates is, then, a mildly bitter flavored syrupwhich contains nearly 12 per cent of alcohol, small quantities each ofcalcium phosphate and hydrochloric acid and insignificant amounts ofiron and quinin salts in other words, essentially it is a sweetenedsolution of small quantities of calcium phosphate in very dilutehydrochlorid acid together with 12 per cent of alcohol bearing in mind the analysis of the preparation, how ludicrous essay ofthe claims appear. “tissue phosphates is not a hypophosphite preparation. It is not a combination of glycerophosphates or other organic salts, or so-called peptonates and manganates, all recently condemned by the best therapeutic opinion here and in europe, as much slower and less active than the simpler salts the iron is the green, inorganic phosphite and the calcium the simple white phosphate of your early student days nature takes these simple salts and builds them rapidly into lecithin, bone, and other tissue, without the delay incurred by splitting up the organic salts before she can recombine them ” “tissue phosphates is in fact a chemical food ” “the formula, suggested by professor dusart, of paris, combines in an easily assimilable and agreeable cordial. Medium medicinal doses of phosphorus, the generator of nerve force. Calcium phosphate, for cell development and nutrition. Sodium phosphate, a stimulant of liver and pancreas and corrective of acid fermentation in the alimentary canal. Iron, generating in the blood, heat and motion, phosphoric acid, tonic in sexual debility. Alkaloids of calisaya, antimalarial and antipyretic. Extract of wild cherry, tonic, yet calming irritation and diminishing nervous excitement. Ethyl alcohol 12 5%. And aromatics ”although the claim is made that the “formula” of wheeler tissuephosphates has been “suggested by professor dusart, ” such of dusartpapers as were available in this country111 failed to disclose any“formula” that was at all comparable to this product 111 dusart, l. Recherches expérimentales sur le rôle physiologiqueet thérapeutique du phosphate de chaux, paris, 1870. Quel est l’acidedu suc gastrique?. lille, 1874, unbound, 8 pages.

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And that they contain hexamethylenamin, are neutraland therefore give up no formaldehyde in the presence of water alone the laboratory further reported that they contain phenolphthalein andacetanilid these tablets were directed to be taken internally andtherefore their effect was not intended to be local the amount of hexamethylenamin was not determined, but in any casecould not exceed 5 grains per tablet it is evident that 4 grainsof acetanilid and 10 grains of hexamethylenamin and 1 grain ofphenolphthalein in two tablets “if given in the acute stage” ofinfluenza would not “avert a serious attack, ” as claimed in theadvertisements the council declared tablets formothalates inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1919, p 92 triple arsenates with nuclein report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has declared triple arsenates with nuclein no 1 andtriple arsenates with nuclein no 2, tablets marketed by the abbottlaboratories, inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies becauseunwarranted therapeutic claims rule 6 are made for them and becausethey present an illogical combination of drugs rule 10 thepublication of the following report has been authorized by the council w a puckner, secretary the following claims are made for triple arsenates with nuclein. “puts ‘pep’ and strength back into that patient recovering from spanish influenza, pneumonia, typhoid, or surgical operation an extremely powerful reconstructive tonic try it for that ‘run down’ feeling ”triple arsenates with nuclein is said to contain “strychnin arsenategr 1/128, quinin arsenate gr 1/64, iron arsenate gr 1/64, nucleinsolution mins 4 ” a second preparation, of double strength-- triplearsenates with nuclein no 2-- is also advertised the council voted notto accept these preparations for new and nonofficial remedies on thefollowing grounds:the quantities of quinin, iron and nuclein in the doses represented inthese mixtures are negligible. Thus, one tablet of triple arsenateswith nuclein containing 1/64 grain of quinin arsenate contains onlyabout 1/90 grain of anhydrous quinin. The tablet containing 1/64grain of iron arsenate contains 1/210 grain of iron. 4 minims of thenuclein solution assuming it to be the “nuclein solution-abbott”would contain but 2/5 of a grain of nuclein-- a substance which even inlarge doses is of questionable therapeutic value the amounts of ironand nuclein contained in doses of this preparation are insignificantin comparison with the amounts present in ordinary foods the onlysubstances present in even small therapeutic doses are strychnin andarsenic the effects of arsenic and strychnin are very differentand there are comparatively few conditions in which they should beprescribed at the same time hence a preparation containing thesetwo in fixed proportions is illogical -- from reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1919, p 92 “anti-pneumococcic oil” and the use of camphor in pneumonia report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted and authorized publication of the report whichappears below this report declares “anti-pneumococcic oil” a solutionof camphor in oil sold by eimer and amend, new york ineligible fornew and nonofficial remedies because 1 the recommendations for itsuse in pneumonia are not warranted by the evidence, 2 the name isnot descriptive of its composition but is therapeutically suggestive, and 3 the sale of a solution of camphor in oil under a namenondescriptive of its composition is unscientific and a hindrance totherapeutic progress w a puckner, secretary the council having decided to consider anti-pneumococcic oil eimerand amend, new york, the preparation was assigned to the committee ontherapeutics for report the report that follows was made by a memberof this committee:according to the advertising, anti-pneumococcic oil is a “twenty-fiveper cent solution of camphor in a thin oil” which was “originated” byaugust seibert, m d the following directions are given for its use. “10 c c 150 minims to every 100 pounds of body weight, to be injected hypodermically every eight to twelve hours in pneumococcic pneumonia, as soon after the initial chill as possible ”it is claimed that the prescribed dose one hour before generalanesthesia begins, “safeguards against postoperative pneumonia, ” and, that “animals can so be immunized against later and otherwise fatalintravenous pneumococcic infection boehnke, institute for experimentaltherapy, frankfort ” the advice is given. “in pneumococcic meningitis, endocarditis and pleuritis, 3% of salicylic acid should be added to this oil ”in an article by seibert, “camphor and pneumococci” medicalrecord, april 20, 1912, a reprint of which is used to advertiseanti-pneumococcic oil, previous work münchen, med wchnschr , no 36, 1909 is mentioned as the starting point for the use of camphor inpneumonia in this article, the author reports his first case, that ofa young woman who entered st francis’ hospital on the third day afterthe initial chill “with the symptoms of severe toxemia unconscious, temperature 105 5 f , pulse 130, and respiration 40 and involvement ofboth lower lobes ” “large doses of camphor, ” 12 c c of a 20 per cent solution, were injected hypodermically “every twelve hours, resultingin gradual improvement and recovery by the fourth day, without acrisis ” seibert reports success in its use in twenty-one paper, butgives no case histories or protocols he admits, however, that infour out of sixteen paper, following the first twenty-one so reportedcertain “limitations of this treatment were observed, ” and a “suddenrise of temperature in two patients on the second and third days oftreatment, respectively, proved to be due to pneumococcic nephritis, promptly subdued by appropriate doses of urotropin, while the camphorinjections were continued and resulting in speedy recovery ” he furtheradmits that empyema occurs, and states. “this proves that the camphorbrought into the blood cannot prevent the as yet living organisms, constantly entering the blood current from the affected alveoli, fromcolonizing in the renal and pleural tissue ”he reports, among thirty-seven patients treated in this manner, one death, that of a man 68 years old, weighing 200 pounds, with afatty heart heart failure was the real cause of death seibert alsoreports essay very incomplete experimental work. Dr hensel, assistantand pathologist of the german hospital, found that “1/10, 000 writingof camphor added to the usual culture media inhibited the growthof pneumococci, while the controls all thrived”. Dr j c welch, pathologist of the lying-in hospital, found that rabbits infectedwith lethal doses of pneumococcus cultures intravenously were savedby large doses of camphorated oil.