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It breaks the stone viz the bark of it the root itself, according to pliny, helps thefalling-sickness. According to matthiolus, helps ruptures. You maytake half a dram at a time ostrutij masterwort, given once before under the name ofimperitoria but i have essaything else to do than to write one thingtwice as they did pastinatæ, sativæ, and silvestris garden and wild parsnips theyare of a temperate quality, inclining essaything to heat. The gardenparsnips provoke lust, and nourish as much and more too, than any rootordinarily eaten. The wild are more physical, being cutting, cleansing, and opening. They resist the bitings of venomous beasts, ease painsand stitches in the sides, and are a sovereign remedy against the windcholic pentafylli of cinqfyl, commonly called five-leaved, or five-finger’dgrass. The root is very drying, but moderately hot. It is admirableagainst all fluxes, and stops blood flowing from any writing of the body:it helps infirmities of the liver and lungs, helps putrified ulcers ofthe mouth, the root boiled in vinegar is good against the shingles, andappeases the rage of any fretting sores you may safely take half adram at a time in any convenient liquor petacitæ of butter-bur the roots are hot and dry in the seconddegree, they are exceeding good in violent and pestilential fevers, they provoke the menses, expel poison, and kill worms peucedani, fœniculi porcini of sulphur-wort, hogs-fennel, orhore-strange it is very good applied to the navels of children thatstick out, and ruptures.

The other beingsmall pieces, essaytimes two and essaytimes four, standing on each sideof the middle rib underneath them among which do rise up divers roughor hairy stalks about two feet high, branching forth with leaves atevery joint not so long as those below, but almost as much cut in onthe edges, essay into three writings, essay into more on the tops of thebranches stand small, pale, yellow flowers consisting of five leaves, like the flowers of cinquefoil, but large, in the middle whereof standa small green herb, which when the flower is fallen, grows to be round, being made of thesis long greenish purple seeds, like grains which willstick upon your clothes the root consists of thesis brownish strings orfibres, smelling essaywhat like unto cloves, especially those which growin the higher, hotter, and drier grounds, and in free and clear air place they grow wild in thesis places under hedge sides, and by thepath-ways in fields. Yet they rather delight to grow in shadowy thansunny places time they flower in may or june for the most writing, and their seedis ripe in july at the farthest government and virtues it is governed by jupiter, and that giveshopes of a wholeessay healthful herb it is good for the diseases ofthe chest or breast, for pains, and stiches in the side, and to expelcrude and raw humours from the belly and stomach, by the sweet savourand warming quality it dissolves the inward congealed blood happeningby falls or bruises, and the spitting of blood, if the roots, eithergreen or dry, be boiled in wine and drank. As also all manner of inwardwounds or outward, if washed or bathed therewith the decoction alsobeing drank, comforts the heart, and strengthens the stomach and a coldbrain, and therefore is good in the spring times to open obstructionsof the liver, and helps the wind cholic. It also helps those that havefluxes, or are bursten, or have a rupture. It takes away spots or marksin the face, being washed therewith the juice of the fresh root, orpowder of the dried root, has the same effect with the decoction theroot in the spring-time steeped in wine, gives it a delicate savourand taste, and being drank fasting every morning, comforts the heart, and is a good preservative against the plague, or any other poison ithelps indigestion, and warms a cold stomach, and opens obstructions ofthe liver and spleen it is very safe. You need have no dose prescribed. And is very fit tobe kept in every body house balm this herb is so well known to be an inhabitant almost in every garden, that i shall not need to write any discription thereof, although itsvirtues, which are thesis, may not be omitted government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter, and under cancer, and strengthens nature much in all its actions let a syrup made withthe juice of it and sugar as you shall be taught at the latter end ofthis book be kept in every gentlewoman house to relieve the weakstomachs and sick bodies of their poor sickly neighbours. As also theherb kept dry in the house, that so with other convenient simples, youmay make it into an electuary with honey, according as the diseaseis you shall be taught at the latter end of my book the arabianphysicians have extolled the virtues thereof to the skies. Although thegreeks thought it not worth mentioning seraphio says, it causes themind and heart to become merry, and revives the heart, faintings andswoonings, especially of such who are overtaken in sleep, and drivesaway all troubleessay cares and thoughts out of the mind, arising frommelancholy or black choler. Which avicen also confirms it is very goodto help digestion, and open obstructions of the brain, and hath somuch purging quality in it saith avicen as to expel those melancholyvapours from the spirits and blood which are in the heart and arteries, although it cannot do so in other writings of the body dioscorides says, that the leaves steeped in wine, and the wine drank, and the leavesexternally applied, is a remedy against the stings of a scorpion, andthe bitings of mad dogs. And commends the decoction thereof for womento bathe or sit in to procure their courses. It is good to wash achingteeth therewith, and profitable for those that have the bloody flux the leaves also, with a little nitre taken in drink, are good againstthe surfeit of mushrooms, helps the griping pains of the belly. Andbeing made into an electuary, it is good for them that cannot fetchtheir breath.

The juice of the root put intothe nostrils, purges essay plagiarism checker the head, helps the noise in the ears, and thetooth-ache. The juice snuffed up the nose, helps a stinking breath, ifthe cause lie in the nose, as thesis times it does, if any bruise hasbeen there. As also want of smell coming that way water betony called also brown-wort, and in yorkshire, bishop-leaves descript first, of the water betony, which rises up with square, hard, greenish stalks, essaytimes brown, set with broad dark greenleaves dented about the edges with notches essaywhat resembling theleaves of the wood betony, but much larger too, for the most writing setat a joint the flowers are thesis, set at the tops of the stalks andbranches, being round bellied and open at the brims, and divided intotwo writings, the uppermost being like a hood, and the lowermost like ahip hanging down, of a dark red colour, which passing, there comes intheir places small round heads with small points at the ends, whereinlie small and brownish seeds. The root is a thick bush of strings andshreds, growing from the head place it grows by the ditch side, brooks and other water-courses, generally through this land, and is seldom found far from thewater-side time it flowers about july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues water betony is an herb of jupiter incancer, and is appropriated more to wounds and hurts in the breastthan wood betony, which follows. It is an excellent remedy for sickhogs it is of a cleansing quality the leaves bruised and applied areeffectual for all old and filthy ulcers. And especially if the juice ofthe leaves be boiled with a little honey, and dipped therein, and thesores dressed therewith. As also for bruises and hurts, whether inwardor outward the distilled water of the leaves is used for the samepurpose. As also to bathe the face and hands spotted or blemished, ordiscoloured by sun burning i confess i do not much fancy distilled waters, i mean such waters asare distilled cold. Essay virtues of the herb they may haply have itwere a strange thing else. But this i am confident of, that beingdistilled in a pewter still, as the vulgar and apish fashion is, bothchemical oil and salt is left behind unless you burn them, and then allis spoiled, water and all, which was good for as little as can be, bysuch a distillation wood betony descript common or wood betony has thesis leaves rising from theroot, which are essaywhat broad and round at the end, roundly dentedabout the edges, standing upon long foot stalks, from among which riseup small, square, slender, but upright hairy stalks, with essay leavesthereon to a piece at the joints, smaller than the lower, whereonare set several spiked heads of flowers like lavender, but thickerand shorter for the most writing, and of a reddish or purple colour, spotted with white spots both in the upper and lower writing the seedsbeing contained within the husks that hold the flowers, are blackish, essaywhat long and uneven the roots are thesis white thready strings.

It is excellent good for such as have takenpurges that are too strong for their bodies, for by its slippery natureit helps corrosions, and by its cooling helps inflammations syrupus myrtinus or syrup of myrtles college take of myrtle berries two ounces and an half, sanderswhite and red, sumach, balaustines, barberry stones, red roses, ofeach an ounce and a half, medlars half a pound, bruise them in eightpounds of water to four, strain it, and add juice of quinces and sourpomegranates, of each six ounces, then with three pounds of sugar, boilit into a syrup culpeper the syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, ithelps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions ofthe internal writings, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stopsimmoderate flux of menses a spoonful at a time is the dose syrupus florum nymphæ simplex or syrup of water-lily flowers, simple college take of the whitest of white water-lily flowers, a pound, steep them in three pounds of warm water six or seven hours, let themboil a little, and strain them out, put in the same weight of flowersagain the second and third time, when you have strained it the lasttime, add its weight of sugar to it, and boil it to a syrup syrupus florum nymphæ compositus syrup of water-lily flowers compound college take of white water-lily flowers half a pound, violetstwo ounces, lettice two handfuls, the seeds of lettice, purslain, andgourds, of each half an ounce, boil them in four pounds of clear watertill one be consumed, strain it, and add half a pound of red rosewater, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper they are both fine cooling syrups, allay the heat ofcholer, and provoke sleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases ineither, you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach isempty syrupus de papavere erratico, sive rubro or syrup of erratic poppies college take of the fresh flowers of red poppies two pounds, steepthem in four pounds of warm spring water, the next day strain it, andboil it into a syrup with its equal weight in sugar culpeper the syrup cools the blood, helps surfeits, and may safelybe given in frenzies, fevers, and hot agues syrupus de pilosella or syrup of mousear college take of mousear three handfuls, the roots of lady-mantlean ounce and an half, the roots of comfrey the greater, madder, white dittany, tormentil, bistort, of each an ounce, the leavesof wintergreen, horsetail, ground ivy, plantain, adder tongue, strawberries, st john wort with the flowers, golden rod, agrimony, bettony, burnet, avens, cinquefoil the greater, red coleworts, balaustines, red roses, of each a handful, boil them gently in sixpounds of plantain water to three, then strain it strongly, and when itis settled, add gum tragacanth, the seeds of fleawort, marsh-mallowsand quinces, made into a mussilage by themselves in strawberry andbettony water, of each three ounces, white sugar two pounds, boil it tothe thickness of honey culpeper it is drying and healing, and therefore good for ruptures syrupus infusionis florum pæoniæ or syrup of the infusion of peony flowers college it is prepared in the same manner as syrup ofclove-gilliflowers syrupus de pæonia compositus or syrup of peony compound college take of the roots of both sorts of peony taken up at thefull moon, cut in slices, and steeped in white wine a whole day, ofeach an ounce and an half, contra yerva half an ounce, siler mountainsix drams, elk claws an ounce, rosemary with the flowers on, onehandful, bettony, hyssop, origanum, chamepitys, rue, of each threedrams, wood of aloes, cloves, cardamoms the less, of each two drams, ginger, spikenard, of each a dram, stœchas, nutmegs, of each two dramsand an half, boil them after one day warm digestion, in a sufficientquantity of distilled water of peony roots, to four pounds, in which being strained through hippocrates’ sleeve put four pounds and anhalf of white sugar, and boil it to a syrup culpeper it helps the falling-sickness, and convulsions syrupus de pomis aiterans or syrup of apples college take four pounds of the juice of sweet scented apples, thejuice of bugloss, garden and wild, of violet leaves, rose water, ofeach a pound, boil them together, and clarify them, and with six poundsof pure sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup for such whose stomachs areoverpressed with heat, and may safely be given in fevers, for it ratherloosens than binds. It breeds good blood, and is profitable in hecticfevers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, itquenches thirst admirably in fevers, and stays hiccoughs you may takean ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need syrupus de prasio or syrup of horehound college take of white horehound fresh, two ounces, liquorice, polipodium of the oak, fennel, and smallage roots, of each half anounce, white maiden-hair, origanum, hyssop, calaminth, thyme, savory, scabious, colt-foot, of each six drams, the seeds of annis andcotton, of each three drams, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, fatfigs ten, boil them in eight pounds of hydromel till half be consumed, boil the decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar, of each twopounds, and perfume it with an ounce of the roots of orris florentine culpeper it is appropriated to the breast and lungs, and is afine cleanser to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helpsphthisicks and coughs, and diseases subject to old men, and coldnatures take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de quinq radicibus or syrup of the five opening roots college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, parsley, bruscus, sparagus of each two ounces, spring water, six pounds, boil away thethird writing, and make a syrup with the rest according to art, with threepounds of sugar, adding eight ounces of white wine vinegar, towards thelatter end culpeper it cleanses and opens very well, is profitable againstobstructions, provokes urine, cleanses the body of flegm, and is safelyand profitably given in the beginning of fevers an ounce at a timeupon an empty stomach is a good dose syrupus raphani or syrup of radishes college take of garden and wild radish roots, of each an ounce, the roots of white saxifrage, lovage, bruscus, eringo, rest-harrow, parsley, fennel, of each half an ounce, the leaves of bettony, burnet, pennyroyal, nettles, water-cresses, samphire, maiden-hair, of each onehandful, winter cherries, jujubes, of each ten, the seeds of bazil, bur, parsley of macedonia, hartwort, carraway, carrots, gromwell, the bark of the root of bay-tree, of each two drams, raisins of thesun stoned, liquorice, of each six drams, boil them in twelve poundsof water to eight, strain it, and with four pounds of sugar, and twopounds of honey, make it into a syrup, and perfume it with an ounce ofcinnamon, and half an ounce of nutmegs culpeper a tedious long medicine for the stone syrupus regius, alias julapium alexandrinum or julep of alexandria college boil four pounds of rose-water, and one pound of whitesugar into a julep julep of roses is made with damask rose water, inthe very same manner culpeper two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer syrupus de rosis siccis or syrup of dried roses college make four pounds of spring water hot, in which infuse apound of dried roses, by essay at a time, press them out and with twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper syrup of dried roses, strengthens the heart, comforts thespirits, binds the body, helps fluxes, and corrosions, or gnawings ofthe bowels, it strengthens the stomach, and stays vomiting you maytake an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes. After meat if forvomiting syrupus scabiosæ or syrup of scabious college take of the roots of elecampane, and polypodium of theoak, of each two ounces, raisins of the sun stoned an ounce, sebestenstwenty, colt-foot, lungwort, savory, calaminth, of each a handful andan half, liquorice, spanish tobacco, of each half an ounce, the seedsof nettles and cotton, of each three drams, boil them all the rootsbeing infused in white wine the day before in a sufficient quantityof wine and water to eight ounces, strain it, and adding four ouncesof the juice of scabious, and ten ounces of sugar, boil it to a syrup, adding to it twenty drops of oil of sulphur culpeper it is a cleansing syrup appropriated to the breastand lungs, when you perceive them oppressed by flegm, crudites, orstoppings, your remedy is to take now and then a spoonful of thissyrup, it is taken also with good success by such as are itchy, orscabby syrupus de scolopendrio or syrup of hart-tongue college take of hart-tongue three handfuls, polypodium of theoak, the roots of both sorts of bugloss, bark of the roots of capersand tamerisk, of each two ounces, hops, dodder, maiden-hair, bawm, ofeach two handfuls, boil them in nine pounds of spring water to five, and strain it, and with four pounds of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper it helps the stoppings of melancholy, opens obstructionsof the liver and spleen, and is profitable against splenetic evils, andtherefore is a choice remedy for the disease which the vulgar call therickets, or liver-grown. A spoonful in a morning is a precious remedyfor children troubled with that disease men that are troubled with thespleen, which is known by pain and hardness in their left side, maytake three or four spoonfuls, they shall find this one receipt worththe price of the whole book syrupus de stœchade syrup of stœchas college take of stœchas flowers four ounces, rosemary flowers halfan ounce, thyme, calaminth, origanum, of each an ounce and an half, sage, bettony, of each half an ounce, the seeds of rue, peony, andfennel, of each three drams, spring water ten pounds, boil it till halfbe consumed, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, boil it intoa syrup, which perfume with cinnamon, ginger, and calmas aromaticus, ofeach two drams tied up in a rag syrupus de symphyto or syrup of comfrey college take of roots and tops of comfrey, the greater and lesser, of each three handfuls, red roses, bettony, plantain, burnet, knotgrass, scabious, colt foot, of each two handfuls, press the juiceout of them all, being green and bruised, boil it, scum it, and strainit, add its weight of sugar to it that it may be made into a syrup, according to art culpeper the syrup is excellent for all inward wounds and bruises, excoriations, vomitings, spittings, or evacuation of blood, it unitesbroken bones, helps ruptures, and stops the menses. You cannot err intaking of it syrupus violarum or syrup of violets college take of violet flowers fresh and picked, a pound, clearwater made boiling hot, two pounds, shut them up close together intoa new glazed pot, a whole day, then press them hard out, and in twopounds of the liquor dissolve four pounds and three ounces of whitesugar, take away the scum, and so make it into a syrup without boiling syrup of the juice of violets, is made with its double weight of sugar, like the former culpeper this syrup cools and moistens, and that very gently, itcorrects the sharpness of choler, and gives ease in hot vices of thebreast, it quenches thirst in acute fevers, and resist the heat of thedisease. It comforts hot stomachs exceedingly, cools the liver andheart, and resists putrefaction, pestilence, and poison college julep of violets is made of the water of violet flowersand sugar, like julep of roses culpeper it is cooling and pleasant purging syrups syrupus de cichorio cum rhubarbaro or syrup of succory with rhubarb college take of whole barley, the roots of smallage, fennel, andsparagus, of each two ounces, succory, dandelyon, endive, smoothsow-thistles, of each two handfuls, lettuce, liverwort, fumitory, topsof hops, of each one handful, maiden-hair, white and black, cetrachs, liquorice, winter cherries, dodder, of each six drams, to boil thesetake sixteen pounds of spring water, strain the liquor, and boil init six pounds of white sugar, adding towards the end six ounces ofrhubarb, six drams of spikenard, bound up in a thin slack rag the whichcrush often in boiling, and so make it into a syrup according to art culpeper it cleanses the body of venemous humours, as boils, carbuncles, and the like. It prevails against pestilential fevers, itstrengthens the heart and nutritive virtue, purges by stool and urine, it makes a man have a good stomach to his meat, and provokes sleep but by my author leave, i never accounted purges to be proper physicin pestilential fevers. This i believe, the syrup cleanses the liverwell, and is exceeding good for such as are troubled with hypocondriacmelancholy the strong may take two ounces at a time, the weak, one, oryou may mix an ounce of it with the decoction of senna syrupus de epithymo or syrup of epithimum college take of epithimum twenty drams, mirobalans, citron, andindian of each fifteen drams, emblicks, belloricks, polypodium, liquorice, agrick, thyme, calaminth, bugloss, stœchas of each sixdrams, dodder, fumitory, of each ten drams, red roses, annis-seeds andsweet fennel seeds of each two drams and an half, sweet prunes ten, raisins of the sun stoned four ounces, tamarinds two ounces and anhalf, after twenty-four hours infusion in ten pints of spring water, boil it away to six, then take it from the fire and strain it, and withfive pounds of fine sugar boil it into syrup according to art culpeper it is best to put in the dodder, stœchas and agarick, towards the latter end of the decoction it purges melancholy, andother humours, it strengthens the stomach and liver, cleanses the bodyof addust choler and addust blood, as also of salt humours, and helpsdiseases proceeding from these, as scabs, itch, tetters, ringworms, leprosy, &c a man may take two ounces at a time, or add one ounce tothe decoction of epithimum syrupus e floribus persicorum or syrup of peach-flowers college take of fresh peach-flowers a pound, steep them a whole dayin three pounds of warm water, then boil a little and strain it out, repeat this infusion five times in the same liquor, in three pounds ofwhich dissolve two pounds and an half of sugar and boil it into a syrup culpeper it is a gentle purger of choler, and may be given even infevers to draw away the sharp choleric humours syrupus de pomis purgans or syrup of apples purging college take of the juice of sweet smelling apples two pounds, thejuice of borrage and bugloss of each one pound and an half, senna twoounces, annis seeds half an ounce, saffron one dram, let the senna besteeped in the juices twenty-four hours, and after a boil or two strainit, and with two pounds of white sugar boil it to a syrup accordingto art, the saffron being tied up in a rag, and often crushed in theboiling culpeper the syrup is a cooling purge, and tends to rectify thedistempers of the blood, it purges choler and melancholy, and thereforemust needs be effectual both in yellow and black jaundice, madness, scurf, leprosy, and scabs, it is very gentle the dose is from oneounce to three, according as the body is in age and strength an ounceof it in the morning is excellent for such children as break out inscabs syrupus de pomis magistralis or syrup of apples magisterial college take of the juice and water of apples of each a poundand an half, the juice and water of borrage and bugloss of each nineounces, senna half a pound, annis seeds, and sweet fennel seeds, ofeach three drams, epithimum of crete, two ounces, agarick, rhubarb, ofeach half an ounce, ginger, mace, of each four scruples, cinnamon twoscruples, saffron half a dram, infuse the rhubarb and cinnamon awritingby itself, in white wine and juice of apples, of each two ounces, letall the rest, the saffron excepted, be steeped in the waters abovementioned, and the next day put in the juices, which being boiled, scummed, and strained, then with four ounces of white sugar boil itinto a syrup, crushing the saffron in it being tied up in a linen rag, the infusion of the rhubarb being added at the latter end culpeper out of doubt this is a gallant syrup to purge choler andmelancholy, and to resist madness syrupus de rhubarbaro or syrup of rhubarb college take of the best rhubarb and senna of each two ounces andan half, violet flowers a handful, cinnamon one dram and an half, ginger half a dram, bettony, succory and bugloss water of each onepound and an half, let them be mixed together warm all night, and inthe morning strained and boiled into a syrup, with two pounds of whitesugar, adding towards the end four ounces of syrup of roses culpeper it cleanses choler and melancholy very gently, and istherefore fit for children, old people, and weak bodies you may add anounce of it to the decoction of epithimum or to the decoction of senna syrupus rosaceus solutivus or syrup of roses solutive college take of spring water boiling hot four pounds, damask roseleaves fresh, as thesis as the water will contain. Let them remain twelvehours in infusion, close stopped. Then press them out and put in freshrose leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time. Take six writings of this liquor, and with fourwritings of white sugar, boil it to a syrup according to art culpeper it loosens the belly, and gently brings out choler andflegm, but leaves a binding quality behind it syrupus e succo rosarum or syrup of the juice of roses college it is prepared without steeping, only with the juice ofdamask roses pressed out, and clarified, and an equal proportion ofsugar added to it culpeper this is like the other syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum agarico or syrup of roses solutive with agarick college take of agarick cut thin an ounce, ginger two drams, sal gem one dram, polipodium bruised two ounces, sprinkle them with whitewine and steep them two days over warm ashes, in a pound and an half ofthe infusion of damask roses prescribed before, and with one pound ofsugar boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it purges flegm from the head, relieves the sensesoppressed by it, provokes the menses, purges the stomach and liver, and provokes urine syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum helleboro or syrup of roses solutive with hellebore college take of the bark of all the myrobalans, of each fourounces, bruise them grossly, and steep them twenty-four hours in twelvepounds of the infusion of roses before spoken, senna, epithimum, polypodium of the oak, of each four ounces, cloves an ounce, citronseeds, liquorice, of each four ounces, the bark of black helleboreroots six drams, let the fourth writing of the liquor gently exhale, strain it, and with five pounds of sugar, and sixteen drams of rhubarbtied up in a linen rag, make it into a syrup according to art culpeper the syrup, rightly used, purges melancholy, resistsmadness syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum senna or syrup of roses solutive with senna college take of senna six ounces, caraway, and sweet fennel seeds, of each three drams, sprinkle them with white wine, and infuse them twodays in three pounds of the infusion of roses aforesaid, then strainit, and with two pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup culpeper it purges the body of choler and melancholy, and expelsthe relics a disease hath left behind it. The dose is from one ounceto two, you may take it in a decoction of senna, it leaves a bindingquality behind it syrupus de spina cervina or syrup of purging thorn college take of the berries of purging thorn, gathered inseptember, as thesis as you will, bruise them in a stone mortar, andpress out the juice, let the fourth writing of it evaporate away in abath, then to two pounds of it add sixteen ounces of white sugar, boil it into a syrup, which perfume with mastich, cinnamon, nutmegs, anni-seeds in fine powder, of each three drams syrups made with vinegar and honey mel anthosatum or honey of rosemary flowers college take of fresh rosemary flowers a pound, clarified honeythree pounds, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in thesun, keep them for use culpeper it hath the same virtues with rosemary flowers, to which irefer you, only by reason of the honey it may be essaywhat cleansing mel helleboratum or honey helleborated college take of white hellebore roots bruised a pound, clear waterfourteen pounds, after three days infusion, boil it till half beconsumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pounds of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey mel mercuriale or honey of mercury college boil three pounds of the juice of mercury, with two poundsof honey to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as an emollient in clysters mel mororum, vel diamoron or honey of mulberries college take of the juice of mulberries and blackberries, beforethey be ripe, gathered before the sun be up, of each a pound and ahalf, honey two pounds, boil them to their due thickness culpeper it is vulgarly known to be good for sore mouths, as alsoto cool inflammations there mel nuceum, alias, diacarion et dianucum or honey of nuts college take of the juice of the outward bark of green walnuts, gathered in the dog days two pounds, boil it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is a good preservative in pestilential times, aspoonful being taken as soon as you are up mel passalatum or honey of raisins college take of raisins of the sun cleansed from the stones twopounds, steep them in six pounds of warm water, the next day boil ithalf away, and press it strongly, and with two pounds of honey, let theexpressed liquor boil to its thickness culpeper it is a pretty pleasing medicine for such as are inconsumptions, and are bound in body mel rosatum commune, sive foliatum or common honey of roses college take of red roses not quite open two pounds, honey sixpounds, set them in the sun according to art mel rosatum colatum or honey of roses strained college take of the best clarified honey ten pounds, juice of freshred roses one pound, set it handessayly over the fire, and when itbegins to boil, put in four pounds of fresh red roses, the whites beingcut off. The juice being consumed by boiling and stirring, strain itand keep it for use culpeper they are both used for diseases in the mouth mel rosatum solutivum or honey of roses solutive college take of the often infusion of damask roses five pounds, honey rightly clarified four pounds, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as a laxative in clysters, and essay use it tocleanse wounds college after the same manner is prepared honey of the infusion ofred roses mel scilliticum or honey of squils college take one squil full of juice, cut in bits, and put it in aglass vessel, the mouth close stopped, and covered with a skin, set inthe sun forty days, to wit, twenty before and after the rising of thedog star, then open the vessel, and take the juice which lies at thebottom, and preserve it with the best honey college honey of violets is prepared like as honey of roses oxymel, simple college take of the best honey four pounds, clear water and whitewine vinegar, of each two pounds, boil them in an earthen vessel, taking the scum off with a wooden scummer, till it be come to theconsistence of a syrup culpeper it cuts flegm, and it is a good preparative against avomit oxymel compound college take of the bark of the root of fennel, smallage, parsley, bruscus, asparagus, of each two ounces, the seeds of fennel, smallage, parsley, annis, of each one ounce, steep them all the roots beingfirst cleansed and the seeds bruised in six pounds of clear waterand a pound and a half of wine vinegar, the next day boil it to theconsumption of the third writing, boil the rest being strained, with threepounds of honey into a liquid syrup according to art culpeper first having bruised the roots and seeds, boil them in thewater till half be consumed, then strain it and add the honey, and whenit is almost boiled enough, add the vinegar oxymel helleboratum or oxymel helleborated college take of rue, thyme, dittany of crete, hyssop, pennyroyal, horehound, carduus, the roots of celtick, spikenard without leaves, the inner bark of elders, of each a handful, mountain calaminth twopugils, the seeds of annis, fennel, bazil, roman nettles, dill, ofeach two drams, the roots of angelica, marsh-mallows, aron, squillsprepared, birthwort, long, round, and climbing, turbith, english orris, costus, polypodium, lemon pills, of each an ounce, the strings of blackhellebore, spurge, agerick, added at the end of the decoction, of eachtwo drams, the bark of white hellebore half an ounce, let all of thembeing dried and bruised, be digested in a glass, or glazed vesselclose stopped, in the heat of the sun, or of a furnace, posca, made ofequal writings of water and vinegar, eight pounds, sapa two ounces, threedays being expired, boil it little more than half away, strain it, pressing it gently, and add to the liquor a pound and a half of honeyroses, wherein two ounces of citron pills have been infused, boil it tothe thickness of honey, and perfume it with cloves, saffron, ginger, galanga, mace, of each a dram oxymel julianizans college take of the bark of caper roots, the roots of orris, fennel, parsley, bruscus, chicory, sparagus, cypress, of each half anounce, the leaves of harts-tongue, schænanth, tamarisk, of each half ahandful, sweet fennel seed half an ounce, infuse them in three poundsof posca, which is essaything sour, afterwards boil it till half beconsumed, strain it, and with honey and sugar clarified, of each half apound, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper this medicine is very opening, very good againsthypocondriac melancholy, and as fit a medicine as can be for thatdisease in children called the rickets college oxymel of squills simple, is made of three pounds ofclarified honey. Vinegar of squills two pounds, boil them according toart culpeper it cuts and divides humours that are tough and viscous, and therefore helps the stomach and bowels afflicted by such humours, and sour belchings if you take but a spoonful in the morning, an ablebody will think enough oxymel scilliticum compositus or oxymel of squills compound college take of origanum, dried hyssop, thyme, lovage, cardamomsthe less, stœchas, of each five drams, boil them in three pounds ofwater to one, strain it and with two pounds of honey, honey of raisinshalf a pound, juice of briony five ounces, vinegar of squills a poundand a half, boil it, and scum it according to art culpeper this is good against the falling-sickness, megrim, head-ache, vertigo, or swimming in the head, and if these be occasionedby the stomach as thesis times they are, it helps the lungs obstructed byhumour, and is good for women not well cleansed after labour, it opensthe passage of the womb syrup of purslain mesue college take of the seeds of purslain grossly bruised, half apound, of the juice of endive, boiled and clarified, two pounds, sugartwo pounds, vinegar nine ounces, infuse the seeds in the juice ofendive twenty-four hours, afterwards boil it half away with a gentlefire, then strain it, and boil it with the sugar to the consistence ofa syrup, adding the vinegar towards the latter end of the decoction culpeper it is a pretty cooling syrup, fit for any hot diseaseincident to the stomach, reins, bladder, matrix, or liver. It thickensflegm, cools the blood, and provokes sleep you may take an ounce of itat a time when you have occasion compound syrup of colt-foot renod college take six handfuls of green colt-foot, two handfuls ofmaiden-hair, one handful of hyssop, and two ounces of liquorice, boilthem in four pints, either of rain or spring water till the fourth writingbe consumed, then strain it, and clarify it, to which add three poundsof white sugar, boil it to the perfect consistence of a syrup culpeper the composition is appropriated to the lungs, andtherefore helps the infirmities, weaknesses, or failings thereof aswant of voice, difficulty of breathing, coughs, hoarseness, catharrs, &c the way of taking it is with a liquorice-stick, or if you please, you may add an ounce of it to the pectoral decoction before mentioned syrup of poppies, the lesser composition college take of the heads of white poppies and black, when both ofthem are green, of each six ounces, the seeds of lettice, the flowersof violets, of each one ounce, boil them in eight pints of water tillthe virtue is out of the heads.

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Compt rend soc de biol 54:620, 1902 45 enriquez and hallion. Presse méd 1:105, 1903 46 delezenne and frouin. Compt rend soc de biol 56:319, 1904 47 bottazzi and gabrielli. Arch internat de physiol 111:156, 1905 48 enriquez and hallion.