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Essaywhat hot and essay order dry, helpful against pains in the head, and joints. They provoke sweat, andare used familiarly in drying diet drinks satyrij utriusque of satyrion, each sort they are hot and moist intemper, provoke venery, and increase seed. Each branch bears two roots, both spongy, yet the one more solid than the other, which is of mostvirtue, and indeed only to be used, for essay say the most spongy rootis quite contrary in operation to the other, as the one increaseth, theother decreaseth saxifragiæ albæ of white saxifrage, in sussex we call themlady-smocks the roots powerfully break the stone, expel wind, provokeurine, and cleanse the reins sanguisorbæ a kind of burnet scabiosa of scabious the roots either boiled, or beaten intopowder, and so taken, help such as are extremely troubled with scabsand itch, are medicinal in the french disease, hard swellings, inwardwounds, being of a drying, cleansing, and healing faculty scordij of scordium, or water-germander see the herb scillæ of squills see vinegar, and wine of squills, in the compound scropulariæ, &c of figwort the roots being of the same virtue withthe herb, i refer you thither scorzoneræ of vipers grass the root cheers the heart, andstrengthens the vital spirits, resists poison, helps passions andtremblings of the heart, faintness, sadness, and melancholy, opensstoppings of the liver and spleen, provokes the menses, ease women ofthe fits of the mother, and helps swimmings in the head seseleos of seseli, or hartwort the roots provoke urine, and helpthe falling-sickness sisari, secacul of scirrets they are hot and moist, of goodnourishment, essaything windy, as all roots are. By reason of which, they provoke venery, they stir up appetite, and provoke urine sconchi of sow-thistles see the herb spinæ albæ, bedeguar the arabians called our ladies-thistles bythat name. The roots of which are drying and binding, stop fluxes, bleeding, take away cold swellings, and ease the pains of the teeth spatulæ fœtidæ stinking gladon, a kind of flower-de-luce, calledso for its unsavory smell it is hot and dry in the third degree;outwardly they help the king evil, soften hard swellings, draw outbroken bones. Inwardly taken, they help convulsions, ruptures, bruises, infirmities of the lungs tamarisci of tamaris see the herbs, and barks tanaceti of tansie the root eaten, is a singular remedy for thegout. The rich may bestow the cost to preserve it thapsi, &c a venomous foreign root. Therefore no more of it tormentillæ of tormentil a kind of sinqfoil. Dry in the thirddegree, but moderately hot.

naturally give a moist heat ” it thermor gives a dry heat “the ‘thermor’ bottle is not a hot-water bottle-- it acts on a principle that is entirely different and new ” “ gives you first, last and all the time a fixed degree of dry usable heat-- a heat that holds steadily at 125 degrees for fully twelve hours-- you will easily see why it is that ‘thermor’ relieves and cures where hot-water bottles fail ”the bottle was nickel plated, 8-3/8 inches in diameter and 1-1/2 inchesthick, and in appearance resembled an exaggerated closed ingersollwatch the bottle is not flexible and weighs 3-1/2 pounds the contentsconsisted essentially of sodium acetate this salt melts when heated when it cools the temperature inside the bottle is relativelyconstant, as it will remain at the “freezing point” until all ofthe sodium acetate has solidified the duration of the time that itremains warm when well wrapped is simply in inverse proportion to theconductivity of the surrounding environment when two ordinary towelswere carefully arranged about it, the air between the bottle and thewrappings was maintained at a temperature of 40-50 c 104-122 f fora period of eight hours the company implication that the heat given out by the thermorbottle differs from that given out by an ordinary hot-water bottle isan absurdity the use of sodium acetate in the preparation of warmingbottles has been in practice thesis years, and is not “a principle thatis entirely different and new ” furthermore, the therapeutic claimsare extravagant -- from reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1916, p 105 anti-syphilitic compound sweenya specimen of anti-syphilitic compound sweeny, sold by the nationallaboratories of pittsburgh, was received from a physician the package 1 ounce size has been opened by the sender and about three fourths ofthe contents removed from the rather indefinite statements in the literature of themanufacturer it is gathered that the preparation is claimed to be a“sterile, oily emulsion” which contains 1/20 grain of mercuric benzoatein each 5 minims, together with essay sodium chlorid according toinformation furnished by the laboratory correspondent, the priceasked for the preparation is $15 an ounce the quantity of the preparation received was too small to permit acomplete examination, but, from the tests which it was possible tomake, the preparation appears to be an aqueous solution containingessay suspended matter and small quantities of mercuric benzoateand a chlorid, presumably sodium chlorid there was no evidence ofthe presence of an “oily emulsion ” quantitative tests indicatedthe presence of a mercuric salt, equivalent to about 0 2783 gm ofcrystallized mercuric benzoate per 100 c c this corresponds to about0 00086 gm in each 5 minims, or about 26 5 per cent of the amountclaimed -- from reports a m a chemical laboratory, 1916, p 106 “ambrine” and paraffin filmsf paul nicholas leech, ph d f contribution from the chemical laboratory of the american medicalassociation in the last year or so, the hot-wax or paraffin treatment of burns hasbeen widely discussed both in medical and lay periodicals although thetreatment is simply a modification of the well-known use of oil andointments, it has received unusual attention, owing to the widespreadsensationalism following the exploitation in france of a secret andtherefore mysterious mixture, “ambrine, ” the formula of dr barthe desandfort owing to this publicity, it seemed desirable to investigatethe chemical composition, and to compare its physical properties withother waxlike substances “ambrine” is promoted as a dressing for burns, frostbites, neuritis, varicose ulcers, phlebitis, neuralgia, rheumatism, sciatica, gout, etc it is a smoky-appearing substance, resembling paraffin in consistencyand without odor for application, “ambrine” is melted and applied tothe wound either with a brush or with a specially devised atomizer itcools quickly, and leaves a solid, protecting film illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | hyperthermality a reality | | | | hyperthermality is a fact, however, through the | | agency of a keri-resinous product which has been | | used in france since 1900 under the name of | | l’ambrine hyperthermine, as the remedial agent | | will be known in this country, is a combination | | of several kinds of waxes and resins, scientific- | | ally blended and containing no medicinal elements | | whatever it comes in the form of waxy flakes it | | melts at 124° and on cooling resembles a dark | | colored wax | | | | hyperthermine is the discovery of dr barthe de | | sandfort, an eminent retired french naval surgeon | | and a member of numerous foreign medical societies | | he | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - “ambrine” has been exploited in the united states for essay time to physicians it was sold under the name “hyperthermine ” above isa photographic reproduction reduced of a portion of a bookletdescribing “hyperthermine, ” which has been in the journal office foressay years illustration. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - | hyperthermine field | | | | hyperthermine can be used in practically all in- | | flammatory conditions during the past ten years, | | under the name of l’ambrine, our product has been | | widely used in the hospitals in france, as well as | | in private practice, and we have very thesis clinical | | reports on a variety of subjects its greatest use | | has been in such conditions as sciatica, lumbago, | | articular and muscular rheumatism, gout, arthritis, | | burns of all degrees, pneumonia, bronchitis, orchit-| | is, buboes, soft chancres, peritonitis, dysmenor- | | rhea, adenitis, mastitis, periostitis, synovitis, | | conjunctivitis, iritis, irido-choroiditis, abscess- | | es, bruises, furuncles, whitlow, paronychia, car- | | buncles, moist eczema and similar dermatological | | affections, and varicose and tubercular ulcers | - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - photographic reproduction reduced from the “hyperthermine” “ambrine” booklet recommending it for use in rheumatism, gout, pneumonia, buboes, dysmenorrhea, eczema, tuberculous ulcers, etc it is said that de sandfort “stumbled on this treatment byaccident ”165 being a sufferer from rheumatism, he had been benefitedby hot mud baths. On returning home he sought a substitute, and finallymade a mixture of paraffin, oil of amber and amber resin this wasapplied hot, serving as a firm poultice “years later, he went onservice to a railway in china and was in yunnan at the time of theincendiary insurrection, and thesis badly burned chinese were broughtin for treatment remembering that ambroise paré treated such paperwith hot oil, he tried the effect of covering the burn with his meltedambrine, which at once glazes over, forming a coat impervious to theair, and his patients ceased to suffer ”166165 the outlook, jan 17, 1917, p 100 166 med rec , new york, jan 27, 1917, p 160 “ambrine” has been sold in america under two names. “hyperthermine, ” asexploited to physicians, and “thermozine, ” as advertised to the public physical comparison alone shows that ambrine as now sold differsfrom “hyperthermine” of a few years ago. The probable reason is that“ambrine” has changed its formula this is borne out by matas, 167who states that de sandfort “admitted that ambrine was a compound ofparaffin, oil of sesame and resins, but was not at liberty to divulgeits exact composition, as the formula and manufacture of this substancewas now the property of a private corporation, which was exploiting itas a proprietary and secret remedy ” the later formula differs from theoriginal 167 matas, rudolph. Burns treated with paraffin mixtures, new orleansmed and surg jour , april, 1917, p 681 besides the foregoing paraffin preparations, two others have recentlybeen placed on the american market, “parresine” nonsecret and“mulene” secret analysis of ambrine“ambrine” comes in rectangular cakes, about 1-1/2 inches wide, 6inches long and 1/2 inch thick it is moderately soft, but essaywhatbrittle at ordinary room temperature a black substance is present, which evidently settles out during the compounding, as in one side ofthe cake these writingicles can be clearly discerned by holding it up tothe light. In the other side there are no suspended writingicles whenmelted, the solution is not clear, and a sediment forms the meltingpoint u s p method.

The probable age from its size and degree of development;marks of any kind, essay order such as tattooing. And deformities, such as signs ofold or recent fracture, or dislocation. And supernumerary fingers the leg - the examination of the leg should be conducted in much thesame manner as that of the arm the trunk - an examination of the trunk will reveal the race, sex, and probable age, and may give evidence as regards the manner in whichthe deceased came to his or her death any marks or deformities shouldbe recorded, and in all paper the viscera should be examined medico-legal reports 568after making a medico-legal autopsy, it will be necessary for themedical examiner to draw up a report of his findings, and theconclusions based thereon the report should be clear and concise, andthe language such as a coroner jury can understand technical termsshould be avoided, and when their employment is necessary they shouldbe explained in the margin or in parentheses the report should be drawn up in essaywhat the following manner:1 when and under what circumstances the body was first seen. Statinghour of day, day of week and month 2 when deceased was last seen living, or known to be alive 3 any circumstances that would lead to a suspicion of suicide ormurder 4 time after death at which the examination was made, if it can beascertained 5 the external appearance of the body. Whether the surface is livid orpallid 6 state of countenance 7 any marks of violence on the person, disarrangement of the dress, blood-stains, etc 8 presence or absence of warmth in the legs, abdomen, arms, armpits, or mouth 9 presence or absence of rigor mortis to give any value to this point it is necessary for the witness toobserve the nature of the substance upon which the body is lying;whether the body be clothed or naked, young or old, fat or emaciated these conditions materially influence the rapidity of cooling and theonset of rigor mortis 10 upon first opening the body the color of the muscles should benoted carbon monoxide poisoning causes them to be of a cherry-redcolor 11 the condition of the blood and its color 12 the state of the abdominal viscera, describing each one inthe order in which it is removed see p 370 if the stomach andintestines are inflamed the seat of the inflammation should be exactlyspecified. Also all evidences of softening, ulceration, effusion ofblood, corrosion, or perforation the presence of hardened fæces in therectum will bear evidence that no purging occurred immediately beforedeath 13 the state of the heart and lungs for special consideration of thelungs in paper of suspected infanticide, see vol ii. And of personsdrowned, see vol i , p 805 et seq 14 the state of the brain and spinal cord after a thorough consideration of the results of the examination, conclusions must be drawn from this examination. Never from thestatements of others the conclusions commonly relate to whetherdeath was due to natural or unnatural causes. If to unnatural causes, what are the facts which lead the examiner to this opinion as theconclusions are intended to form a summary of the whole report, theymust be brief and tersely stated personal identity, including the methods used for its determination in the dead and living by irving c rosse, a m , m d , f r g s eng , professor of nervous diseases, georgetown university. Membre du congrès international d’anthropologie criminelle, etc personal identity general considerations identity is the determination of the individuality of a person injurisprudence the term is applied to the recognition of a person who isthe object of a judicial action the establishment of the individualityof a person is known as absolute identity. While the relations of aperson with essay writingicular act is known as relative identity the great number and variety of facts concerned in the investigationof questions of identity are of considerable gravity and importance intheir juridical bearing, and at the same time they are among the mostinteresting and most useful of the applications of modern medicine tothe purposes of the law 569among the varied researches of legal medicine looking to aninterpretation of facts, no other question occurs in which the solutiondepends more upon morphological and anatomical knowledge, and none ismore dependent upon purely objective, visible, tangible facts personal identity often constitutes the entire subject-matter ofdispute in a civil case upon it may depend the question of absence orof marriage, of kinship or of filiation involving the possession ofan estate, in which case the court often requires the most subtle ofscientific evidence to assist in its decision thesis anthropologicaland medical facts, now appropriated by criminology and penal science, are useful in proving not only the present but in attesting futureidentity, thereby preventing in great measure the dissimulation ofprisoners, deserters, false claimants to life insurance, fraudulentpensioners, and the like such matters are of daily occurrence the special agents of the u s pension office detect and cause the punishment of thesis fraudulentclaimants stratagems and conspiracies to defraud life-insurancecompanies go much further than mere substitution instead of a“fraudulent” a positive death may come up for investigation, and inorder to defraud an insurance company of a large amount, a body mayeven be procured by homicide to consummate the deception, as was donein the goss-udderzook tragedy near baltimore in 1872 a celebrated case now before the supreme court of the united states andinvolving the question of personal identity is that of the mutual lifeinsurance company of new york, the new york life insurance company, andthe connecticut mutual life insurance company of hartford, connecticut consolidated, plaintiffs in error, vs sallie e hillmon it is pre-eminently in criminal trials that the personal identity ofthe victim often constitutes an essential connecting link before itcan move, the law requires, at the outset, proof of the individualityof both the author of a crime and of the victim i shall, therefore, not touch upon such elusive individuals as charlie ross and jackthe ripper, but limit my remarks to a synthetical exposition of thebest-known facts regarding identification of the dead body and theinterpretation of its organic remains the identity of a living person, or even our own identity, is often adifficult point to establish it may also require medical evidence, oftentimes of a most involved character, to establish the fact ofdeath hence the medico-legal process of connecting a dead body, orthe remains or traces of the same, with a human being once known tohave lived and moved on earth, is beset with difficulties that may giverise to still greater antagonisms of evidence the question of personalidentity is one of the hardest that could possibly come before a court celebrated paper and judicial errors have given it great notoriety there are consequently few questions in forensic medicine that requiremore attention and sagacity, and none upon which the medical legistshould pronounce with more reserve and circumspection medical men areabsolutely the only persons qualified to assist in resolving thereally delicate question of personal identity. Yet the physician andthe lawyer pursue the same line of logic and of inquiry as the formermust have a subject to dissect or to operate upon, so must the lawyerin pursuing a criminal investigation first prove a visible materialsubstance known in legal phraseology as the corpus delicti, which hemust connect with essay personality, with essay human being once knownto have lived in this important process the physician testimonybeing the indispensable guide of the court inference, he should limithimself to purely anatomical and material knowledge the medical experthas absolutely nothing to do with guilt or innocence, as that is aquestion for the jury he should, above all things, be absolutely freefrom prejudice, suspicion, or undue suggestion, and should rememberthat in thus sinking his personality his sole function as a skilledwitness in paper of identity is to furnish testimony which, when takenin connection with other evidence in the case, may establish such acorpus delicti as would justify the inference of a crime a nice point may arise as to dispensing with the proof from the bodyitself, when the substantial general fact of a homicide is provedaliunde, as in the case of a criminal causing the disappearanceof his victim body by means of its decomposition in lime or otherchemical menstrua, or by submerging it in an unfathomable spot in thesea under circumstances such as the following. A person is seen toenter a building and is not seen to leave it, although all means ofegress therefrom are watched. Another person is seen to ignite thebuilding, which thereupon burns down, and the charred remains of ahuman body are found in the ruins.

It is a very precious herb, that iscertain, and most fitting to be kept in a man house, both in syrup, conserve, oil, ointment and plaister the flowers are usually conserved the beech tree in treating of this tree, you must understand, that i mean the greenmast beech, which is by way of distinction from that other small roughsort, called in sussex the smaller beech, but in essex horn-beam i suppose it is needless to describe it, being already too well knownto my countrymen place it grows in woods amongst oaks and other trees, and in parks, forests, and chases, to feed deer. And in other places to fatten swine time it blooms in the end of april, or beginning of may, for themost writing, and the fruit is ripe in september government and virtues it is a plant of saturn, and thereforeperforms his qualities and proportion in these operations the leavesof the beech tree are cooling and binding, and therefore good to beapplied to hot swellings to discuss them. The nuts do much nourish suchbeasts as feed thereon the water that is found in the hollow placesof decaying beeches will cure both man and beast of any scurf, orrunning tetters, if they be washed therewith. You may boil the leavesinto a poultice, or make an ointment of them when time of year serves bilberries, called by essay whorts, and whortle-berries descript of these i shall only speak of two sorts which are commonin england, viz the black and red berries and first of the black the small bush creeps along upon the ground, scarcely rising half ayard high, with divers small green leaves set in the green branches, not always one against the other, and a little dented about the edges:at the foot of the leaves come forth small, hollow, pale, bluishcoloured flowers, the brims ending at five points, with a reddishthread in the middle, which pass into small round berries of thebigness and colour of juniper berries, but of a purple, sweetish sharptaste. The juice of them gives a purplish colour in their hands andlips that eat and handle them, especially if they break them theroot grows aslope under ground, shooting forth in sundry places as itcreeps this loses its leaves in winter the red bilberry, or whortle-bush, rises up like the former, havingsundry hard leaves, like the box-tree leaves, green and round pointed, standing on the several branches, at the top whereof only, and not fromthe sides, as in the former, come forth divers round, reddish, sappyberries, when they are ripe, of a sharp taste the root runs in theground, as in the former, but the leaves of this abide all winter place the first grows in forests, on the heaths, and such likebarren places. The red grows in the north writings of this land, aslancashire, yorkshire, &c time they flower in march and april, and the fruit of the black isripe in july and august government and virtues they are under the dominion of jupiter itis a pity they are used no more in physic than they are the black bilberries are good in hot agues and to cool the heat of theliver and stomach. They do essaywhat bind the belly, and stay vomitingand loathings. The juice of the berries made in a syrup, or the pulpmade into a conserve with sugar, is good for the purposes aforesaid, as also for an old cough, or an ulcer in the lungs, or other diseasestherein the red worts are more binding, and stops women courses, spitting of blood, or any other flux of blood or humours, being used aswell outwardly as inwardly bifoil or twablade descript this small herb, from a root essaywhat sweet, shootingdownwards thesis long strings, rises up a round green stalk, bare ornaked next the ground for an inch, two or three to the middle thereofas it is in age or growth. As also from the middle upwards to theflowers, having only two broad plaintain-like leaves but whiter setat the middle of the stalk one against another, compassing it round atthe bottom of them place it is an usual inhabitant in woods, copses, and in thesisplaces in this land there is another sort grows in wet grounds and marshes, which isessaywhat different from the former it is a smaller plant, and greener, having essaytimes three leaves. The spike of the flowers is less thanthe former, and the roots of this do run or creep in the ground they are often used by thesis to good purpose for wounds, both green andold, to consolidate or knit ruptures. And well it may, being a plant ofsaturn the birch tree descript this grows a goodly tall straight tree, fraught with thesisboughs, and slender branches bending downward. The old being coveredwith discoloured chapped bark, and the younger being browner by much the leaves at the first breaking out are crumpled, and afterwardslike the beech leaves, but smaller and greener, and dented about theedges it bears small short cat-skins, essaywhat like those of thehazelnut-tree, which abide on the branches a long time, until growingripe, they fall on the ground and their seed with them place it usually grows in woods government and virtues it is a tree of venus. The juice of theleaves, while they are young, or the distilled water of them, or thewater that comes from the tree being bored with an auger, and distilledafterwards.

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The liquid has a slight opalescence thereis considerable deposit of a heavy black precipitate does not essay order becomehomogeneous on shaking and the black substance quickly separates again collosol cuprum, 0 5 per cent. Dark red essaywhat opalescentliquid no precipitate may be colloidal collosol ferrum, 1-2000. Liquid clear large quantities of dark brownflocculent precipitate the precipitate is not distributed evenly whenthe mixture is shaken and settles out quickly on standing collosol hydrargyrum, 5 per cent.