History

Essay On Music


Vomiting by irritating thefauces, or by essay on music emetic. The body of the subject may be inverted and inthis position the fauces may be tickled, or fingers may be passed backinto the pharynx johnson892 says that at the moment of inversion thepatient should try to take a deep inspiration. This opens the glottisand facilitates the expulsion of the foreign body the inspiratorycurrent has no appreciable effect in retarding the movement of theforeign body in the direction of gravity noble recommends inversion of the body in new-born infants in whichasphyxia may be supposed to be due to anæmia of the brain tracheotomyor laryngotomy may be necessary it may be necessary to administeroxygen foreign bodies like beards of grass and fish-heads can bewithdrawn only with difficulty because of their sharp projections intense suffering and dyspnœa in a robust subject may necessitatevenesection generally speaking it is better to bring up the foreignbody than to push it down into the stomach beveridge suggests toblow into the ear, to induce a reflex action and cause expulsion ofthe foreign body cold affusions, artificial respiration, galvanism, frictions of the limbs, artificial heat, stimulants by mouth andrectum, may one or all be needed hamilton893 says that it is useless to expect good results fromelectricity if five minutes have elapsed since life appeared to beextinct. Althaus, 894 that three hours after death the muscles willcease to respond to faradization. And richardson, 895 that a lowtemperature prolongs the sensitiveness of the muscle with regard to insufflation, le bon896 objects to it in asphyxia asbeing hurtful and not useful colin897 tamponed the trachea of ahorse. In four minutes fifty seconds it was apparently dead. The tamponwas removed and insufflation practised for fifteen to twenty minuteswithout effect he claims that artificial respiration is useless afterthe circulation ceases fell898 and o’dwyer899 recommend forced inspiration mcewen900uses a tracheal tube by the mouth dew901 offers a new method of artificial respiration in asphyxia of the new-born. Lusk902 considers the subject of life-saving in still-births. Forest, 903 artificial respiration in the same. Read904 discusses schultze method with approval.

Twenty-five minutes, body lowered face purple. Pupilsdilated. Eyes and tongue did not protrude mark of cord just abovethyroid cartilage, a deep oblique furrow except a small space underleft ear. Knot over mastoid process forty minutes, cord and strapremoved.

But thatthe stalks are more straight and upright, and the joints with leavesare farther asunder, having longer leaves than the former, and theflowers a little larger and more gaping, of a fair yellow colour inmost, in essay paler the roots are like the white, only they creep notso much under the ground place they grow almost every where unless it be in the middle ofthe street, the yellow most usually in the wet grounds of woods, andessaytimes in the dryer, in divers counties of this nation time they flower from the beginning of the spring all the summerlong government and virtues the archangels are essaywhat hot and drierthan the stinging nettles, and used with better success for thestopping and hardness of the spleen, than they, by using the decoctionof the herb in wine, and afterwards applying the herb hot into theregion of the spleen as a plaister, or the decoction with spunges flowers of the white archangel are preserved or conserved to be usedto stay the whites, and the flowers of the red to stay the reds inwomen it makes the heart merry, drives away melancholy, quickens thespirits, is good against quartan agues, stancheth bleeding at mouthand nose, if it be stamped and applied to the nape of the neck. Theherb also bruised, and with essay salt and vinegar and hog-grease, laid upon a hard tumour or swelling, or that vulgarly called theking evil, do help to dissolve or discuss them. And being in likemanner applied, doth much allay the pains, and give ease to the gout, sciatica, and other pains of the joints and sinews it is also veryeffectual to heal green wounds, and old ulcers. Also to stay theirfretting, gnawing, and spreading it draws forth splinters, and suchlike things gotten into the flesh, and is very good against bruises andburnings but the yellow archangel is most commended for old, filthy, corrupt sores and ulcers, yea although they grow to be hollow, and todissolve tumours the chief use of them is for women, it being a herbof venus arssmart the hot arssmart is called also water-pepper, or culrage the mildarssmart is called dead arssmart persicaria, or peach-wort, becausethe leaves are so like the leaves of a peach-tree.

It helps the tooth-ache, being boiled in vinegar and gargledtherewith the hot vapours of the decoction taken by a funnel in at theears, eases the inflammations and singing noise of them being bruised, and salt, honey, and cummin seed put to it, helps those that are stungby serpents the oil thereof the head being anointed kills lice, andtakes away itching of the head it helps those that have the fallingsickness, which way soever it be applied it helps to expectorate toughphlegm, and is effectual in all cold griefs or diseases of the chestsor lungs, being taken either in syrup or licking medicine the greenherb bruised and a little sugar put thereto, doth quickly heal any cutor green wounds, being thereunto applied hops these are so well known that they need no description. I mean themanured kind, which every good husband or housewife is acquainted with descript the wild hop grows up as the other doth, ramping upontrees or hedges, that stand next to them, with rough branches andleaves like the former, but it gives smaller heads, and in far lessplenty than it, so that there is scarcely a head or two seen in a yearon divers of this wild kind, wherein consists the chief difference place they delight to grow in low moist grounds, and are found inall writings of this land time they spring not until april, and flower not until the latterend of june. The heads are not gathered until the middle or latter endof september government and virtues it is under the dominion of mars this, inphysical operations, is to open obstructions of the liver and spleen, to cleanse the blood, to loosen the belly, to cleanse the reins fromgravel, and provoke urine the decoction of the tops of hops, as wellof the tame as the wild, works the same effects in cleansing the bloodthey help to cure the french diseases, and all manner of scabs, itch, and other breakings-out of the body. As also all tetters, ringworms, and spreading sores, the morphew and all discolouring of the skin thedecoction of the flowers and hops, do help to expel poison that any onehath drank half a dram of the seed in powder taken in drink, killsworms in the body, brings down women courses, and expels urine asyrup made of the juice and sugar, cures the yellow jaundice, eases thehead-ache that comes of heat, and tempers the heat of the liver andstomach, and is profitably given in long and hot agues that rise incholer and blood both the wild and the manured are of one property, and alike effectual in all the aforesaid diseases by all thesetestimonies beer appears to be better than ale mars owns the plant, and then dr reason will tell you how it performsthese actions horehound there are two kinds of horehound, the white and the black the blacksort is likewise called hen-bit. But the white one is here spoken of descript common horehound grows up with square hairy stalks, half ayard or two feet high, set at the joints with two round crumpled roughleaves of a sullen hoary green colour, of a reasonable good scent, buta very bitter taste the flowers are small, white, and gaping, set in arough, hard prickly husk round about the joints, with the leaves fromthe middle of the stalk upward, wherein afterward is found small roundblackish seed the root is blackish, hard and woody, with thesis strings, and abides thesis years place it is found in thesis writings of this land, in dry grounds, andwaste green places time it flowers in july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues it is an herb of mercury a decoction ofthe dried herb, with the seed, or the juice of the green herb takenwith honey, is a remedy for those that are short-winded, have a cough, or are fallen into a consumption, either through long sickness, orthin distillations of rheum upon the lungs it helps to expectoratetough phlegm from the chest, being taken from the roots of iris ororris it is given to women to bring down their courses, to expel theafter-birth, and to them that have taken poison, or are stung or bittenby venemous serpents the leaves used with honey, purge foul ulcers, stay running or creeping sores, and the growing of the flesh overthe nails it also helps pains of the sides the juice thereof withwine and honey, helps to clear the eyesight, and snuffed up into thenostrils, purges away the yellow-jaundice, and with a little oil ofroses dropped into the ears, eases the pains of them galen saith, itopens obstructions both of the liver and spleen, and purges the breastand lungs of phlegm. And used outwardly it both cleanses and digests adecoction of horehound saith matthiolus is available for those thathave hard livers, and for such as have itches and running tetters the powder hereof taken, or the decoction, kills worms the greenleaves bruised, and boiled in old hog grease into an ointment, healsthe biting of dogs, abates the swellings and pains that come by anypricking of thorns, or such like means. And used with vinegar, cleansesand heals tetters there is a syrup made of horehound to be had at theapothecaries, very good for old coughs, to rid the tough phlegm. Asalso to void cold rheums from the lungs of old folks, and for thosethat are asthmatic or short-winded horsetail of that there are thesis kinds, but i shall not trouble you nor myselfwith any large description of them, which to do, were but, as theproverb is, to find a knot in a rush, all the kinds thereof beingnothing else but knotted rushes, essay with leaves, and essay without take the description of the most eminent sort as follows descript the great horsetail at the first springing has headsessaywhat like those of asparagus, and afterwards grow to be hard, rough, hollow stalks, jointed at sundry places up to the top, a foothigh, so made as if the lower writings were put into the upper, where growon each side a bush of small long rush-like hard leaves, each writingresembling a horsetail, from whence it is so called at the tops of thestalks come forth small catkins, like those of trees the root creepsunder ground, having joints at sundry places place this as most of the other sorts hereof grows in wetgrounds time they spring up in april, and their blooming catkins in july, seeding for the most writing in august, and then perish down to theground, rising afresh in the spring government and virtues the herb belongs to saturn, yet is veryharmless, and excellently good for the things following. Horsetail, thesmoother rather than the rough, and the leaves rather than the bare, ismost physical it is very powerful to staunch bleeding either inward oroutward, the juice or the decoction thereof being drank, or the juice, decoction, or distilled water applied outwardly it also stays allsorts of lasks and fluxes in man or woman, and bloody urine. And healsalso not only the inward ulcers, and the excoriation of the entrails, bladder, &c but all other sorts of foul, moist and running ulcers, andsoon solders together the tops of green wounds it cures all rupturesin children the decoction thereof in wine being drank, provokes urine, and helps the stone and stranguary. And the distilled water thereofdrank two or three times in a day, and a small quantity at a time, also eases the bowels, and is effectual against a cough that comes bydistillations from the head the juice or distilled water being warmed, and hot inflammations, pustules or red wheals, and other breakings-outin the skin, being bathed therewith, doth help them, and doth no lessthe swelling heat and inflammation of the lower writings in men and women houseleek or sengreen both these are so well known to my countrymen, that i shall not need towrite any description of them place it grows commonly upon walls and house-sides, and flowers injuly government and virtues it is an herb of jupiter, and it is reportedby mezaldus, to preserve what it grows upon from fire and lightning our ordinary houseleek is good for all inward heats as well asoutward, and in the eyes or other writings of the body. A posset made withthe juice of houseleek, is singularly good in all hot agues, for itcools and tempers the blood and spirits, and quenches the thirst. Andalso good to stay all hot defluctions or sharp and salt rheums in theeyes, the juice being dropped into them, or into the ears it helpsalso other fluxes of humours in the bowels, and the immoderate coursesof women it cools and restrains all other hot inflammations, st anthony fire, scaldings and burnings, the shingles, fretting ulcers, cankers, tettors, ringworms, and the like.

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Fœtuses still more rapidly aged bodies decomposeslowly, probably on account of a deficiency of moisture fat and flabbybodies decompose quickly for the same reason 5 cause of death - in paper of sudden death, as from accident orviolence, the body decomposes more rapidly than when death resultsfrom disease putrefaction sets in early in death from the infectiousfevers, such as typhus, pyæmia, and typhoid fever, also in death fromsuffocation by smoke or coal gas, by strangulation or after narcoticpoisoning those writings of a body which are the seat of bruises, wounds, or fractures, decompose rapidly. This is especially seen inwritings after a surgical operation 6 manner of burial - when a body is buried in low ground in a damp, swampy, clay soil, decomposition advances rapidly, as also when thegrave is shallow so the body can be exposed to constant variations oftemperature a porous soil impregnated with animal and vegetable matterfavors putrefaction, as also burying a body without clothes or coffin;this is especially seen where infants have been thrown into the groundand loosely covered with earth circumstances retarding putrefaction 1 the temperature - below 32° f and above 212° f putrefaction isentirely arrested the rapidity of the change considerably lessens asthe temperature advances above 100° f a remarkable instance of thepreservative power of cold is given by adolph erman, who states thatthe body of prince menschikoff, a favorite of peter the great, exhumedafter ninety-two years’ burial in frozen soil, had undergone hardly anychange buried in hot sand as is seen in the desert, a body putrefiesvery slowly and generally becomes mummified 2 moisture - absence of moisture retards decomposition in the dryair of the desert bodies have been preserved for a long period of time 3 air - if access of air to a body be prevented in any way by itsinclosure in a coffin, by closely fitting clothes, or by completeimmersion in water, putrefaction is retarded 4 age - adults and old people decompose more slowly than children males are said to change less rapidly than females, lean people thanfleshy ones 5 cause of death - putrefaction is delayed after death from chronicdiseases unless they are associated with dropsy poisoning by alcohol, chloroform, strychnine, and arsenic retard putrefaction in the lattercase the putrefactive changes seem to stop after they have oncecommenced, and often a result very similar to mummification is seen death from the mineral acids, especially sulphuric, appears to delayputrefaction 6 manner of burial - putrefaction is retarded by burial a shorttime after death. By interment on high ground, in dry, sandy, orgravelly soil. By having the grave deep, over six feet in depth ifpossible by the body being well wrapped and secured in a tight coffin, a lead one being the best in this respect lime or charcoal appliedfreely about a body will retard decomposition, as will also injectionof the body through the arteries with such substances as arsenic, chloride of zinc, or antimony the ultimate effect of putrefactionis to reduce all bodies to inorganic compounds, chiefly water, ammonia, and carbon dioxide three conditions are necessary for itsestablishment, 1 a given temperature, 2 moisture, 3 free accessof air the order in which the various organs and tissues undergodecomposition, as given by casper, who has investigated the subjectcarefully, is as follows. Trachea and larynx, brain of infants, stomachand intestines, spleen, omentum and mesentery, liver, brain of adults, heart and lungs, kidney, bladder and œsophagus, pancreas, largevessels, and last of all the uterus as the result of putrefaction, fluids, generally blood-stained, collectin the serous cavities of the body, and should not be confoundedwith serous effusions occurring during life so also the softeningof the organs and tissue resulting from decomposition should becarefully distinguished from those resulting from inflammation thesecadaveric softenings are most frequently found in the brain, spleen, and gastro-intestinal mucous membrane inflammatory softenings aredifferentiated by being rarely general but almost always limited, bythe substance of the inflamed writing being infiltrated with serum orpus and showing traces of vascular injection in doubtful paper thepathologist should have recourse to the microscope as the result of putrefaction, various changes take place in the mucousmembrane of the stomach and intestines which simulate the effectsof poisons the color of the stomach varies from red, which becomesbrighter on exposure to the air, to a brown, slate, or livid purple wecan only presume that these color-changes are the result of irritantpoisons when they are found in non-dependent writings and writings not incontact with organs engorged with blood, when they are seen soon afterdeath, and when the membrane is covered with coagulated blood, mucus, or flakes of membrane effects on putrefaction of submersion in water there are certain modifications of the putrefactive changes when bodieshave been submerged in water in the first place, the changes are muchless rapid.