History

Essay Introduction


Cut down essay introduction. The fall caused rupture ofliver 59 ibid , p 539 - drunkard hung himself. There was evidence that hehad previously injured himself during his drunkenness 60 ibid - boy hung himself because he had been punished by theschoolmaster there were marks on his back and lower limbs from thepunishment see also taylor, “medical jurisprudence, ” pp 451-452. Tidy, “medicaljurisprudence, ” incomplete hanging, paper 33 to 36 and 62. Hofmann, “lehrbuch, ” p 538 homicide 61 harvey. Indian med gaz , 1876, xi , p 3 - woman, age 20, feeble her mother-in-law had kicked her. She probably had fainted;supposing her to be dead, the husband hanged her to a tree within halfan hour after the supposed death autopsy. No marks of injury. Obliquemark of cord on right side of neck. Tip of tongue between the teeth;face essaywhat livid.

It opens stoppingsof the liver, and spleen, cleanses the blood, provokes the menses, helps a cold stomach to digest its meat, and is good against the yellowjaundice both smallage and clevers, may be well used in pottage in themorning instead of herbs aparine goose-grass, or clevers. They are meanly hot and dry, cleansing, help the bitings of venomous beasts, keep men bodies fromgrowing too fat, help the yellow jaundice, stay bleeding, fluxes, andhelp green wounds dioscorides, pliny, galen, tragus aspergula odorata wood-roof. Cheers the heart, makes men merry, helps melancholy, and opens the stoppings of the liver aquilegia columbines. Help sore throats, are of a drying, bindingquality argentina silver-weed, or wild tansy. Cold and dry almost in thethird degree.

A disease which melancholy essay introduction persons are subjectunto. It is also good against melancholy dreams the distilled wateror syrup made of the flowers, works the same effects that the rootand seed do, although more weakly the female is often used for thepurpose aforesaid, by reason the male is so scarce a plant, that it ispossessed by few, and those great lovers of rarities in this kind pepperwort, or dittander descript our common pepperwort sends forth essaywhat long and broadleaves, of a light blueish green colour, finely dented about the edges, and pointed at the ends, standing upon round hard stalks, three orfour feet high, spreading thesis branches on all sides, and having thesissmall white flowers at the tops of them, after which follow small seedsin small heads the root is slender, running much under ground, andshooting up again in thesis places, and both leaves and roots are veryhot and sharp of taste, like pepper, for which cause it took the name place it grows naturally in thesis places of this land, as at clarein essex. Also near unto exeter in devonshire.

For thesis diseases beginso insidiously that the moment of the attack is completely beyondprecise definition in such a case one did the best that could be done, and probably took as the moment of attack the first complaints of thepatient regarding his disorder after the appearance of the disease wasdated in such a manner, the heavenly body, in the ascendant at thisperiod, was then ascertained. Thus, the position and the course and thephases of the moon, the relations of sun and moon to the twelve signsof the zodiac, and the planets would be noted it was necessary toobserve whether the moon was in opposition, quadrature, or conjunctionto the planets while she stood in the sign of this or that figure ofthe zodiac from these observations clear conclusions were first drawnregarding the general condition, the character, the duration, and theprognosis of the affection these conclusions, however, were by nomeans satisfactory as yet an attempt was therefore made to obtain amuch more detailed insight into the causes, complications, and therapyof the case in question by means of astrology, and such information wasabundantly provided in the medicina astrologica in the first place, the fact that sun, moon, planets, and the signsof the zodiac shared the rule over the various organs of the body, and furnished positive intimations regarding the cause of the diseasein question, made it unnecessary for the physician to trouble himselfat all with an examination of the patient in order to ascertain causeand localization of the affection one glance at the conjunctions ofthe stars was sufficient to show which organ of the patient happenedto be endangered by the celestial constellation if an individualcomplained, for instance, of disturbed digestion, and if the heavenlybody that presided over the liver presented any remarkable phenomena, naturally only the liver was responsible for the case in question, and the diagnosis was made complications were to be expected if thestars which controlled the circulation of blood and mucus showedunfavorable signs it was even possible for the physician well versedin astrology to determine in advance the period of time at which theoccurrence of such humoral complications might be expected, as he hadlearned that the various hours of the day and of the night were toexert a powerful influence upon the juices of the body for instance, almanzor explains that the first three hours of day and of night arein closest relation to the blood, whereas the second quarters of dayand of night hold sway over the yellow, the third over the black bile, and the last quarters, finally, over the mucus however, notonly were the various hours of great importance to the course of thedisease, but certain days of the disease so-called critical days wereof still greater significance it is true, the doctrine of thesecritical days was by no means the property of medicina astrologica, but the corpus hippocraticum already contained a book περὶχρίησὶμων but the followers of hippocrates had developed thistheory only from humoro-pathological premises, and galen, in his workχρήἱσιμαι ἡμέραι, had only included astrology in order to explainand to prove the entire doctrine of crises compare also sudhoff hecalculated in accordance with moon weeks and months, and in such amanner that a week counted six days and seventeen and one-half hours, and the month of the moon only twenty-six days and twenty-two hours the seventh, fourteenth, twentieth, and twenty-seventh days were tobe considered critical days of the first order “contemplate, ” saysgalen, “the critical days in the course of the moon in the angles ofa geometrical figure of sixteen sides. If you find these angles in afavorable constellation, the patient will fare well. Badly, however, if evil signs prevail ” but not only were certain hours and certaindays of the week said to exert an important astrological influence uponthe human body, such an influence was ascribed also to certain years such years were called “anni scansiles” that is, “climacteric ” theexpression “anni climacterici” was also used, but this designationhas nothing in common with the modern conception of the climacteric it was believed that the condition of the body underwent a thoroughrevolution during these climacteric years, and that a new stage, as itwere, of organic life was reached heinrich von rantzau, the astronomicaristocrat and statesman, accordingly defines the climacteric yearsas “anni, in quibus ad sequentis temporis constitutionem sese vertatætas et inflectat ” therefore, such years should in themselves harbordangers for corporeal existence, and offer no favorable prospect forthe course of diseases two kinds of such climacteric years were distinguished one kind wasbrought about by multiplication with the figure 7, and they werecalled anni hebdomatici, or climacterici stricte sic dicta accordingly, these were the years 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63 these nine years formed the climactericus parvus, whereas the years77, 84, 91, 98, 105, 112, 119, 126 were called the climactericusmagnus a multiplication which extended further, to 171, reachedthe climactericus maximus the other kind of climacteric years wasobtained by multiplication with 9, and such years were called annienneatici, or decretorii these were the years 9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90, 99, 108, etc however, these climacteric years did not all present the same dangers, but the peril inherent in them varied considerably it was determinedby the multiplicator, and here especially the 3 and the 7 played avery fatal rôle the 21st year of life 3 × 7, and the 27th 3 × 9, were one grade higher in the scale of dangers than those obtained byother multiplicators still more dangerous were those years arrived atby ascending in spaces of three hebdomads. Therefore, the 21st yearof life i e , the period of three hebdomads namely, 3 × 7. The 42dyear, as a period of 2 × 3 hebdomads i e , 2 × 21. The 63d year oflife, as a period of 3 hebdomads i e , 3 × 21. 84 to 4 × 21. 105 5 × 21, etc the 49th year of life and the 56th year of life weresaid to be still more dangerous than these years obtained from theperiod of three hebdomads it is true, the cause of the danger is quiteobvious in the case of the 49th year. It was the ominous 7 × 7 whichhere gave rise to forebodings and it was not quite comprehensible whatcaused the bad reputation of innocent 56.

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Make them into a plaster according to art culpeper it is very good in green wounds and shootings a key to galen method of physic the general use of physic i shall desire thee, whoever thou art, that intendest the noble thoughtoo much abused study essay introduction of physic, to mind heedfully these followingrules. Which being well understood, shew thee the key of galen andhippocrates their method of physic. He that useth their method, andis not heedful of these rules, may soon cure one disease, and causeanother more desperate that thou mayest understand what i intend, it is to discover in ageneral way of the manifest virtues of medicines i say of the manifest virtues, and qualities, viz such as areobvious to the senses, especially to the taste and smell. For it hathbeen the practice of most physicians, in these latter ages as well asours, to say, when they cannot give, nor are minded to study a reason, why an herb, plant, &c hath such an operation, or produces such aneffect in the body of man. It doth it by an hidden quality, for theynot minding the whole creation, as one united body, not knowing whatbelongs to astral influence, not regarding that excellent harmonythe only wise god hath made in a composition of contraries in theknowledge of which consists the whole ground and foundation of physicare totally led astray by tradition it is the manifest qualities of medicines that here i am to speak to, and you may be pleased to behold it in this order section 1 of the temperature of medicines section 2 of the appropriation of medicines section 3 of the properties of medicines section i of the temperature of medicines herbs, plants, and other medicines manifestly operate, either by heat, coldness, dryness, or moisture, for the world being composed of sothesis qualities, they and only they can be found in the world, and themixtures of them one with another but that they may appear as clear as the sun when he is upon themeridian, i shall treat of them severally, and in this order 1 of medicines temperate 2 of medicines hot 3 of medicines cold 4 of medicines moist 5 of medicines dry of medicines temperate if the world be composed of extremes, then it acts by extremes, foras the man is, so is his work.