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And having firstclarified the honey before you put them essay grammar check in then strained out. Thishoney taken with a liquorice stick, is an excellent remedy for coughs, asthmas, and consumptions of the lungs fruits college winter-cherries, love apples, almonds sweet and bitter, anacardia, oranges, hazel nuts, the oily nut ben, barberries, capers, guinny pepper, figs, carpobalsamum, cloves, cassia fistula, chestnuts, cherries black and red, cicers, white, black and red, pome citrons, coculus indi, colocynthis, currants, cornels or cornelian cherries, cubebs, cucumbers garden and wild, gourds, cynosbatus, cypress, cones, quinces, dates, dwarf-elder, green figs, strawberries, common andturkey galls, acorns, acorn cups, pomegranates, gooseberries, ivy, herb true-love, walnuts, jujubes, juniper berries, bayberries, lemons, oranges, citrons, quinces, pomegranates, lemons, mandrakes, peaches, stramonium, apples, garden and wild, or crabs and apples, musk melons, medlars, mulberries, myrobalans, bellericks, chebs, emblicks, citronand indian, mirtle, berries, water nuts, hazel nuts, chestnuts, cypressnuts, walnuts, nutmegs, fistick nuts, vomiting nuts, olives pickled inbrine, heads of white and black poppies, pompions, peaches, french orkidney beans, pine, cones, white, black, and long pepper, fistick nuts, apples and crabs, prunes, french and damask, sloes, pears, englishcurrants, berries of purging thorn, black berries, raspberries, elderberries, sebastens, services, or checkers, hawthorn berries, pine nuts, water nuts, grapes, gooseberries, raisins, currants culpeper that you may reap benefit by these, be pleased toconsider, that they are essay of themtemperate in respect of heat raisins of the sun, currants, figs, pine nuts, dates, sebastens hot in the first degree sweet almonds, jujubes, cypress nuts, greenhazel nuts, green walnuts hot in the second degree the nut ben, capers, nutmegs, dry walnuts, dry hazel nuts, fistick nuts in the third degree juniper berries, cloves, carpobalsamum, cubebs, anacardium, bitter almonds in the fourth degree pepper, white, black and long, guinny pepper cold in the first degree the flesh of citrons, quinces, pears, prunes, &c in the second gourds, cucumbers, melons, pompions, oranges, lemons, citrons, pomegranates, viz the juice of them, peaches, prunes, galls, apples in the third mandrakes in the fourth stramonium moist in the first degree the flesh of citrons, lemons, oranges, viz the inner rhind which is white, the outer rhind is hot in the second gourds, melons, peaches, prunes, &c dry in the first degree juniper berries in the second the nut ben, capers, pears, fistick nuts, pine nuts, quinces, nutmegs, bay berries in the third cloves, galls, &c in the fourth all sorts of pepper as appropriated to the body of man, so they heat the head. Asanacardia, cubebs, nutmegs the breast bitter almonds, dates, cubebs, hazel nuts, pine nuts, figs, raisins of the sun, jujubes the heart walnuts, nutmegs, juniper berries the stomach sweet almonds, cloves, ben, juniper berries, nutmegs, pine nuts, olives the spleen capers the reins and bladder bitter almonds, juniper berries, cubebs, pinenuts, raisins of the sun the womb walnuts, nutmegs, bayberries, juniper berries cool the breast sebastens, prunes, oranges, lemons the heart oranges, lemons, citrons, pomegranates, quinces, pears the stomach quinces, citruls, cucumbers, gourds, musk melons, pompions, cherries, gooseberries, cornelian cherries, lemons, apples, medlars, oranges, pears, english currants, cervices or checkers the liver those that cool the stomach and barberries the reins and womb those that cool the stomach, and strawberries by their several operations, essaybind as the berries of mirtles, barberries, chestnuts, cornels, or cornelian cherries, quinces, galls, acorns, acorn-cups, medlars, checkers or cervices, pomegranates, nutmegs, olives, pears, peaches discuss capers, all the sorts of pepper extenuate sweet and bitter almonds, bayberries, juniper berries glutinate acorns, acorn cups, dates, raisins of the sun, currants expel wind bay berries, juniper berries, nutmegs, all the sorts ofpepper breed seed raisins of the sun, sweet almonds, pine nuts, figs, &c provoke urine winter cherries provoke the terms ivy berries, capers, &c stop the terms barberries, &c resist poison bay berries, juniper berries, walnuts, citrons, commonly called pome citrons, all the sorts of pepper ease pain bay berries, juniper berries, ivy berries, figs, walnuts, raisins, currants, all the sorts of pepper fruits purging choler cassia fistula, citron myrobalans, prunes, tamarinds, raisins melancholy indian myrobalans flegm colocynthis and wild cucumbers purge violently, and thereforenot rashly to be meddled withal. I desire my book should be beneficial, not hurtful to the vulgar, but myrobalans of all sorts, especiallychebs, bellericks and emblicks, purge flegm very gently, and withoutdanger of all these give me leave to commend only one to you as of specialconcernment which is juniper berries seeds college sorrel, agnus castus, marsh-mallows, bishop weed trueand common, amomus, dill, angellica, annis, rose-seed, smallage, columbines, sparagus, arach, oats, oranges, burdocks, bazil, barberries, cotton, bruscus or knee-holly, hemp, cardamoms greater andlesser, carduus benedictus, our lady thistles, bastard, saffron, caraway, spurge greater and lesser, coleworts, onions, the kernels ofcherry stones, chervil, succory, hemlock, citrons, citruls, gardenscurvy-grass, colocynthis, coriander, samphire, cucumbers gardenand wild, gourds, quinces, cummin, cynosbatus, date-stones, carrotsenglish, and cretish, dwarf-elder, endive, rocket, hedge mustard, orobus, beans, fennel, fenugreek, ash-tree keys, fumitory, brooms, grains of paradise, pomegranates, wild rue, alexanders, barley, whitehenbane, st john wort, hyssop, lettice, sharp-pointed-dock, spurge, laurel, lentils, lovage, lemons, ash-tree-keys, linseed, or flaxweed, gromwell, darnel, sweet trefoil, lupines, masterwort, marjoram, mallows, mandrakes, melons, medlars, mezereon, gromwell, sweet navew, nigella, the kernels of cherries, apricots, and peaches, bazil, orobus, rice, panick, poppies white and black, parsnips garden and wild, thorough wax, parsley, english and macedonian, burnet, pease, plantain, peony, leeks, purslain, fleawort, turnips, radishes, sumach, spurge, roses, rue, garden and wild, wormseed, saxifrage, succory, sesami, hartwort, common and cretish, mustard-seed, alexanders, nightshade, steves ager, sumach, treacle, mustard, sweet trefoil, wheat, both thefine flour and the bran, and that which starch is made of, vetches ortares, violets, nettles, common and roman, the stones of grapes, greekwheat, or spelt wheat culpeper that you may receive a little more benefit by these, thanthe bare reading of them, which doth at the most but tell you what theyare. The following method may instruct you what they are good for seeds are hot in the first degree linseed, fenugreek, coriander, rice, gromwell, lupines in the second dill, smallage, orobus, rocket, bazil, nettles in the third bishop weed, annis, amomus, carraway, fennel, andso i believe smallage too, let authors say what they will, for if theherb of smallage be essaywhat hotter than parsley. I know little reasonwhy the seed should not be so hot cardamoms, parsley, cummin, carrots, nigella, navew, hartwort, staves ager in the fourth water-cresses, mustard-seed cold in the first degree barley, &c in the second endive, lettice, purslain, succory, gourds, cucumbers, melons, citruls, pompions, sorrel, nightshade in the third henbane, hemlock, poppies white and black moist in the first degree mallows, &c dry in the first degree beans, fennel, fenugreek, barley, wheat, &c in the second orobus, lentils, rice, poppies, nightshade, and thelike in the third dill, smallages, bishop weed, annis, caraway, cummin, coriander, nigella, gromwell, parsley appropriated to the body of man, and so theyheat the head fennel, marjoram, peony, &c the breast nettles the heart bazil, rue, &c mustard seed, &c the stomach annis, bishop weed, amomus, smallage, cummin, cardamoms, cubebs, grains of paradise the liver annis, fennel, bishop weed, amomus, smallage, sparagus, cummin, caraway, carrots the spleen annis, caraway, water-cresses the reins and bladder cicers, rocket, saxifrage, nettles, gromwell the womb peony, rue the joints water-cresses, rue, mustard-seed cool the head lettice, purslain, white poppies the breast white poppies, violets the heart orange, lemon, citron and sorrel seeds lastly, the four greater and four lesser cold seeds, which you may findin the beginning of the compositions, as also the seed of white andblack poppies cool the liver and spleen, reins and bladder, womb andjoints according to operation essay seedsbind, as rose-seeds, barberries, shepherd purse, purslain, &c discuss dill, carrots, linseeds, fenugreek, nigella, &c cleanse beans, orobus, barley, lupines, nettles, &c mollify linseed, or flax seed, fenugreek seed, mallows, nigella harden purslain seed, &c suppure linseed, fenugreek seed, darnel, barley husked, commonlycalled french barley glutinate orobus, lupines, darnel, &c expel wind annis, dill, smallage, caraway, cummin, carrots, fennel, nigella, parsley, hartwort, wormseed breed seed rocket, beans, cicers, ash tree keys provoke the menses amomus, sparagus, annis, fennel, bishop weed, cicers, carrots, smallage, parsley, lovage, hartwort break the stone mallows, marsh-mallows, gromwell, &c stop the terms rose seeds, cummin, burdock, &c resist poison bishop weed, annis, smallage, cardamoms, oranges, lemons, citrons, fennel, &c ease pain dill, amomus, cardamoms, cummin, carrots, orobus, fenugreek, linseed, gromwell, parsley, panick assuage swellings linseed, fenugreek seeds, marsh-mallows, mallows, coriander, barley, lupines, darnel, &c * * * * *the college tells you a tale that there are such things in rerumnatura, as these, gums, rozins, balsams, and juices made thick, viz college juices of wormwood and maudlin, acacia, aloes, lees of oil, assafœtida, balsam of peru and india. Bdellium, benzoin, camphire, caranna, colophonia, juice of maudlin, euphorbium, lees of wine, leesof oil, gums of galbanum, amoniacum, anime, arabick, cherry trees, copal, elemy, juniper, ivy, plumb trees, cambuge, hypocystis, labdanum, lacca, liquid amber, manna, mastich, myrrh, olibanum, opium, opopanax, pice-bitumen, pitch of the cedar of greece, liquid and dry rozins offir-tree, larch-tree, pine tree, pine-fruit, mastich venice and cyprusturpentine sugar, white, red, and christaline, or sugar candy whiteand red, sagapen, juniper, gum, sanguis draconis, sarcocolla, scamony, styrax, liquid and calamitis, tacha, mahacca, tartar, frankincense, olibanum, tragaganth, birdlime culpeper that my country may receive more benefit than ever thecollege of physicians intended them from these, i shall treat of themseverally 1 of the juices 2 of the gums and rosins concrete juices, or juices made thick, are eithertemperate, as, juice of liquorice, white starch hot in the first degree sugar in the second labdanum in the third benzoin, assafœtida cold in the third degree sanguis draconis, acacia in the third hypocistis in the fourth opium, and yet essay authors think opium is hot becauseof its bitter taste aloes and manna purge choler gently. And scamony doth purge cholerviolently, that it is no ways fit for a vulgar man use, for itcorrodes the bowels opopoanax purges flegm very gently white starch gently levigates or makes smooth such writings as arerough, syrup of violets being made thick with it and so taken on thepoint of a knife, helps coughs, roughness of the throat, wheezing, excoriations of the bowels, the bloody-flux juice of liquorice helps roughness of the trachea arteria, whichis in plain english called the windpipe, the roughness of which causescoughs and hoarseness, difficulty of breathing, &c it allays the heatof the stomach and liver, eases pains, soreness and roughness of thereins and bladder, it quencheth thirst, and strengthens the stomachexceedingly. It may easily be carried about in one pocket, and eat alittle now and then sugar cleanses and digests, takes away roughness of the tongue, itstrengthens the reins and bladder, being weakened.

In this sectionare articles dealing with matters of interest to the medical professionbut not coming strictly under the classification of essay grammar check proprietarymedicinal preparations a comparison of the material that has appeared in volume 1 of thepropaganda for reform with that which appears in this volume willreveal the changing conditions in the proprietary medicine field thesisof the reports in the first volume brought out the fact that medicinalpreparations were at that time foisted on the profession with falseclaims of composition. Reports of this character are less conspicuousin the present volume thesis of the reports in volume 2 deal withunwarranted therapeutic claims, especially those advanced for animalorgan preparations, serums, vaccines, preparations for intravenousmedication, etc the present volume will also be found of interest inits portrayal of the changed conditions in the proprietary medicinebusiness brought about by the world war special attention is directed to the index in this volume it is, ineffect, a bibliography, including references not only to articlesin this book but also 1 to articles which appeared in volume 1. 2 to articles on the same general subject in the journal of theamerican medical association, and 3 to the articles appearing inthe annual reports of the council on pharmacy and chemistry and of thea m a chemical laboratory, but not reprinted in either volume of thepropaganda for reform in proprietary medicines preface to volume 1. Ninth editionfrom time to time the journal of the american medical association haspublished the reports of the council on pharmacy and chemistry and thechemical laboratory, as well as other matter on proprietary medicines repeated requests for essay of the matter have led to the compilationof “the propaganda for reform in proprietary medicines, ” which, in thepresent volume, attains its ninth edition the seventh, eighth and ninth editions have been compiled on slightlydifferent principles from their predecessors the therapeutic reformwork of the journal and of the association chemical laboratory wasat first confined almost entirely to the criticism and analysis of theso-called ethical proprietaries this was right. The medical professionowed it to the public to combat the nostrum evil within its own ranks as the more flagrant evils of the “ethical proprietary” question weremitigated, the association has turned the light on the more widespreadand dangerous “patent medicine” evil the articles devoted to “patentmedicines” or quackery being naturally of greater interest to thegeneral public than to the medical profession, the number of inquiriesfrom laymen regarding various quacks and nostrums has steadilyincreased it has been thought best, therefore, to publish separatelyall of the matter from the journal relative to quackery and to thosenostrums exploited only or chiefly to the public, and to include in thepropaganda for reform practically none of the matter that is of directinterest primarily to laymen in one or two instances in which thesubjects were of equal interest to the profession and to the public, matter that has already appeared in “nostrums and quackery” is alsogiven here. But as a general rule the contents of the ninth editionof “the propaganda for reform” are of strictly professional interest those physicians who are desirous of obtaining in convenient form thematter dealing with “patent medicines” should order the book “nostrumsand quackery” or the various pamphlets on the same subjects that havebeen issued since “nostrums and quackery” came from the press the ninth edition of “propaganda for reform” contains a number of newarticles, greatly increasing the size of the book it also containsone novel feature which greatly enhances its value the index includesreferences not only to articles in the book, but also to matter onproprietaries not accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistrywhich appeared in the journal of the american medical association andelsewhere this index makes of this edition of “propaganda for reform”a very full work of reference on proprietaries which are undeserving ofrecognition it should be understood, however, that not all articlesindexed are condemned. Essay are merely discussed and compared resolution endorsing the work of the council on pharmacy and chemistry presented at the san francisco session and signed by all the members of the house of delegates in attendance -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - | resolved, we, members of the house of delegates of the american | | medical association, believe that every effort must be made to | | do away with the evils which result from the exploitation of the | | sick for the sake of gain earnestly believing that the continued | | toleration of secret, semisecret, unscientific or untruthfully | | advertised proprietary medicines is an evil that is inimical to | | medical progress and to the best interest of the public, we | | declare ourselves in sympathy with, endorse and by our best | | efforts will further, the work which has been, and is being, done | | by the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical | | association in the attempt to eliminate this evil | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - table of contents writing i.

Althoughspermatozoids have been observed at ninety-four years the structureof the spermatic cord at different periods of life from the lastof intra-uterine to the first of extra-uterine life, in puberty, and in old age, is accompanied by characteristic modifications ofdevelopment and regression, which are of interest on the question ofmedico-forensic diagnosis of identity, as shown by dr pellacani 586congenital deformity of the genital writings, as epispadias orhypospadias. Marks of circumcision, useful in india to identifymussulmans above eleven years. Traces of disease that may have leftextensive cicatrices, as phagadenic chancre, suppurating buboes, etc , may also furnish characteristics of evidential value entire cadaver dead but a short time in the case of a body that has been dead a short time only, recognitionfrom the features, even by the nearest relatives, is often a matterof the greatest difficulty the change produced in the color and formof the body, especially after drowning, is a formidable obstacle toidentification by likeness and general type of face pages could befilled with the mere mention of the multiplied instances of mistakenidentity of the living, thesis of whom have been punished because theyhad the misfortune to resemble essay one else how much more careful, then, should be the medical examination of the remains in the progressof decay, with the distortion and discoloration of the features, andthe consequent change or destruction of the peculiar expression ofthe countenance by which human features are usually distinguished andidentified among the innumerable instances of mistaken personal identity and paperof resemblance mentioned in history and fable, from the time of ulyssesdown to the days of rip van winkle dog schneider, it appears thatthis animal is credited with more sagacity than man in the matter ofrecognizing his master even after years of absence indeed, recognitionby animals may be considered a proof of identity thesis persons canrecall instances of the kind, though perhaps not so dramatic as the oneof the dog in the odyssey, who recognized his master after twenty yearsof absence and died immediately thereafter as a matter of fact, time and circumstances will so alter resemblanceas to account for essay of these most striking proofs of the fallibilityof human testimony that we see illustrated in chapters on mistakenidentity we easily forget the true image of persons and things, and time promptly modifies them the evidence of the senses may beso little trusted in this regard that father, mother, husband, andnurse may attest a false identity in the case of their own children a nurse has been known to testify to the identity of the severed headof a woman whom thirteen other persons were sure they recognized fromcharacteristic signs, when the supposed victim put in an appearance andthus attested her own existence the head of the unrecognized victim ofthis strange controversy is preserved in the museum of the strassburgfaculty in another case of historical notoriety in france, forty witnesses oneach side swore to the personality.

Scum it all thewhile it boils, and when it is sufficiently boiled, whilst it is hot, strain it again through a woollen cloth, but press it not thus youhave the syrup perfected 3dly, syrups made of juice, are usually made of such herbs as are fullof juice, and indeed they are better made into a syrup this way thanany other. The operation is thus. Having beaten the herb in a stonemortar, with a wooden pestle, press out the juice, and clarify it, asyou are taught before in the juices. Then let the juice boil away tillabout a quarter of it be consumed. To a pint of this add a pound ofsugar, and when it is boiled, strain it through a woollen cloth, as wetaught you before, and keep it for your use 3 if you make a syrup of roots that are any thing hard, as parsley, fennel, and grass roots, &c when you have bruised them, lay them insteep essay time in that water which you intend to boil them in hot, sowill the virtue the better come out 4 keep your syrups either in glasses or stone pots, and stop them notwith cork nor bladder, unless you would have the glass break, and thesyrup lost, only bind paper about the mouth 5 all syrups, if well made, continue a year with essay advantage. Yetsuch as are made by infusion, keep shortest chapter iii of juleps 1 juleps were first invented, as i suppose, in arabia. And my reasonis, because the word julep is an arabic word 2 it signifies only a pleasant potion, as is vulgarly used by such asare sick, and want help, or such as are in health, and want no moneyto quench thirst 3 now-a-day it is commonly used 1 to prepare the body for purgation 2 to open obstructions and the pores 3 to digest tough humours 4 to qualify hot distempers, &c 4 simple juleps, for i have nothing to say to compounds here arethus made. Take a pint of such distilled water, as conduces to the cureof your distemper, which this treatise will plentifully furnish youwith, to which add two ounces of syrup, conducing to the same effect. I shall give you rules for it in the next chapter mix them together, and drink a draught of it at your pleasure if you love tart things, add ten drops of oil of vitriol to your pint, and shake it together, and it will have a fine grateful taste 5 all juleps are made for present use. And therefore it is in vain tospeak of their duration chapter iv of decoctions 1 all the difference between decoctions, and syrups made by decoction, is this. Syrups are made to keep, decoctions only for present use. Foryou can hardly keep a decoction a week at any time. If the weather behot, not half so long 2 decoctions are made of leaves, roots, flowers, seeds, fruits orbarks, conducing to the cure of the disease you make them for. Are madein the same manner as we shewed you in syrups 3 decoctions made with wine last longer than such as are made withwater. And if you take your decoction to cleanse the passages of theurine, or open obstructions, your best way is to make it with whitewine instead of water, because this is penetrating 4 decoctions are of most use in such diseases as lie in the passagesof the body, as the stomach, bowels, kidneys, passages of urine andbladder, because decoctions pass quicker to those places than any otherform of medicines 5 if you will sweeten your decoction with sugar, or any syrup fit forthe occasion you take it for, which is better, you may, and no harm 6 if in a decoction, you boil both roots, herbs, flowers, and seedtogether, let the roots boil a good while first, because they retaintheir virtue longest. Then the next in order by the same rule, viz 1 barks 2 the herbs 3 the seeds 4 the flowers 5 the spices, ifyou put any in, because their virtues come soonest out 7 such things as by boiling cause sliminess to a decoction, as figs, quince-seed, linseed, &c your best way is, after you have bruisedthem, to tie them up in a linen rag, as you tie up calf brains, andso boil them 8 keep all decoctions in a glass close stopped, and in the coolerplace you keep them, the longer they will last ere they be sour lastly, the usual dose to be given at one time, is usually two, three, four, or five ounces, according to the age and strength of the patient, the season of the year, the strength of the medicine, and the qualityof the disease chapter v of oils 1 oil olive, which is commonly known by the name of sallad oil, isuppose, because it is usually eaten with sallads by them that love it, if it be pressed out of ripe olives, according to galen, is temperate, and exceeds in no one quality 2 of oils, essay are simple, and essay are compound 3 simple oils, are such as are made of fruits or seeds by expression, as oil of sweet and bitter almonds, linseed and rape-seed oil, &c ofwhich see in my dispensatory 4 compound oils, are made of oil of olives, and other simples, imagineherbs, flowers, roots, &c 5 the way of making them is this. Having bruised the herbs or flowersyou would make your oil of, put them into an earthen pot, and to two orthree handfuls of them pour a pint of oil, cover the pot with a paper, set it in the sun about a fortnight or so, according as the sun is inhotness. Then having warmed it very well by the fire, press out theherb, &c very hard in a press, and add as thesis more herbs to the sameoil. Bruise the herbs i mean not the oil in like manner, set them inthe sun as before.

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Then take it out and boil it a little. Thenwhilst it is hot, strain it out, pressing it out very hard in a press:to this grease add as thesis more herbs bruised as before. Let them standin like manner as long, then boil them as you did the former. If youthink your ointment is not strong enough, you may do it the third andfourth time. Yet this i will tell you, the fuller of juice the herbsare, the sooner will your ointment be strong. The last time you boilit, boil it so long till your herbs be crisp, and the juice consumed, then strain it pressing it hard in a press, and to every pound ofointment add two ounces of turpentine, and as much wax, because greaseis offensive to wounds, as well as oil 2 ointments are vulgarly known to be kept in pots, and will last abovea year, essay above two years chapter xi of plaisters 1 the greeks made their plaisters of divers simples, and put metalsinto the most of them, if not all. For having reduced their metals intopowder, they mixed them with that fatty substance whereof the rest ofthe plaister consisted, whilst it was thus hot, continually stirringit up and down, lest it should sink to the bottom. So they continuallystirred it till it was stiff. Then they made it up in rolls, which whenthey needed for use, they could melt by the fire again 2 the arabians made up theirs with oil and fat, which needed not solong boiling 3 the greeks emplaisters consisted of these ingredients, metals, stones, divers sorts of earth, feces, juices, liquors, seeds, roots, herbs, excrements of creatures, wax, rosin, gums chapter xii of poultices 1 poultices are those kind of things which the latins callcataplasmata, and our learned fellows, that if they can read english, that all, call them cataplasms, because ’tis a crabbed word fewunderstand. It is indeed a very fine kind of medicine to ripen sores 2 they are made of herbs and roots, fitted for the disease, andmembers afflicted, being chopped small, and boiled in water almost toa jelly. Then by adding a little barleymeal, or meal of lupins, and alittle oil, or rough sweet suet, which i hold to be better, spread upona cloth and apply to the grieved places 3 their use is to ease pain, to break sores, to cool inflammations, to dissolve hardness, to ease the spleen, to concoct humours, anddissipate swellings 4 i beseech you take this caution along with you.