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I would not wish any, unless verywell read in physic, to take them inwardly matthiolus, dioscorides ebuli of dwarf elder, walwort, or danewort. Hot and dry in the thirddegree, the roots are as excellent a purge for the dropsy as any underthe sun you may take a dram or two drams if the patient be strong inwhite wine at a time echij of viper bugloss, or wild bugloss this root is cold anddry, good for such as are bitten by venemous beasts, either beingboiled in wine and drank, or bruised and applied to the place. Beingboiled in wine and drank, it encreaseth milk in nurses ellebori, veratri, albi nigri of hellebore white and black the rootof white hellebore, or sneezewort, being grated and snuffed up thenose, causeth sneezing. Kills rats and mice being mixed with theirmeat black hellebore, bears-foot or christmas flower.

Essay useto put to it essay fennel seeds, or annis seeds, or ginger, to correctthat loathing it brings to the essay formats stomach, which is more than needs, itbeing a safe and gentle medicine, fit for all persons, which dailyexperience confirms. And an ounce of it may be given at a time in adecoction, if there be not sena, or essay other strong purger put withit a dram or two of the powder of the dried roots, taken fasting ina cup of honied water, works gently, and for the purposes aforesaid the distilled water both of roots and leaves, is much commended forthe quartan ague, to be taken for thesis days together, as also againstmelancholy, or fearful and troubleessay sleeps or dreams. And with essaysugar-candy dissolved therein, is good against the cough, shortness ofbreath, and wheezings, and those distillations of thin rheum upon thelungs, which cause phthisicks, and oftentimes consumptions the freshroots beaten small, or the powder of the dried roots mixed with honey, and applied to the member that is out of joint, doth much help it. Andapplied also to the nose, cures the disease called polypus, which isa piece of flesh growing therein, which in time stops the passage ofbreath through that nostril. And it helps those clefts or chops thatcome between the fingers or toes the poplar tree there are two sorts of poplars, which are most familiar with us, viz the black and white, both which i shall here describe unto you descript the white poplar grows great, and reasonably high, coveredwith thick, smooth, white bark, especially the branches. Having longleaves cut into several divisions almost like a vine leaf, but notof so deep a green on the upper side, and hoary white underneath, of a reasonable good scent, the whole form representing the form ofcoltsfoot the catkins which it brings forth before the leaves, arelong, and of a faint reddish colour, which fall away, bearing seldomgood seed with them the wood hereof is smooth, soft, and white, veryfinely waved, whereby it is much esteemed the black poplar grows higher and straighter than the white, with agreyish bark, bearing broad green leaves, essaywhat like ivy leaves, notcut in on the edges like the white, but whole and dented, ending in apoint, and not white underneath, hanging by slender long foot stalks, which with the air are continually shaken, like as the aspen leavesare the catkins hereof are greater than those of the white, composedof thesis round green berries, as if they were set together in a longcluster, containing much downy matter, which being ripe, is blown awaywith the wind the clammy buds hereof, before they spread into leaves, are gathered to make unguentum and populneum, and are of a yellowishgreen colour, and essaywhat small, sweet, but strong the wood issmooth, tough, and white, and easy to be cloven on both these treesgrows a sweet kind of musk, which in former times was used to put intosweet ointments place they grow in moist woods, and by water-sides in sundry placesof this land. Yet the white is not so frequent as the other time their time is likewise expressed before. The catkins comingforth before the leaves in the end of summer government and virtues saturn hath dominion over both whitepoplar, saith galen, is of a cleansing property. The weight of anounce in powder, of the bark thereof, being drank, saith dioscorides, is a remedy for those that are troubled with the sciatica, or thestranguary the juice of the leaves dropped warm into the ears, eases the pains in them the young clammy buds or eyes, before theybreak out into leaves, bruised, and a little honey put to them, is agood medicine for a dull sight the black poplar is held to be morecooling than the white, and therefore the leaves bruised with vinegarand applied, help the gout the seed drank in vinegar, is held goodagainst the falling-sickness the water that drops from the hollowplaces of this tree, takes away warts, pushes, wheals, and other thelike breakings-out of the body the young black poplar buds, saithmatthiolus, are much used by women to beautify their hair, bruisingthem with fresh butter, straining them after they have been kept foressay time in the sun the ointment called populneon, which is made ofthis poplar, is singularly good for all heat and inflammations in anywriting of the body, and tempers the heat of wounds it is much used todry up the milk of women breasts when they have weaned their children poppy of this i shall describe three kinds, viz the white and black ofthe garden, and the erratic wild poppy, or corn rose descript the white poppy hath at first four or five whitish greenleaves lying upon the ground, which rise with the stalk, compassingit at the bottom of them, and are very large, much cut or torn on theedges, and dented also besides. The stalk, which is usually four orfive feet high, hath essaytimes no branches at the top, and usually buttwo or three at most, bearing every one but one head wrapped up in athin skin, which bows down before it is ready to blow, and then rising, and being broken, the flowers within it spreading itself open, andconsisting of four very large, white, round leaves, with thesis whitishround threads in the middle, set about a small, round, green head, having a crown, or star-like cover at the head thereof, which growingripe, becomes as large as a great apple, wherein are contained a greatnumber of small round seeds, in several writingitions or divisions nextunto the shell, the middle thereof remaining hollow, and empty thewhole plant, both leaves, stalks, and heads, while they are fresh, young, and green, yield a milk when they are broken, of an unpleasantbitter taste, almost ready to provoke casting, and of a strong headysmell, which being condensed, is called opium the root is white andwoody, perishing as soon as it hath given ripe seed the black poppy little differs from the former, until it bears itsflower, which is essaywhat less, and of a black purplish colour, butwithout any purple spots in the bottom of the leaf the head of theseed is much less than the former, and opens itself a little roundabout the top, under the crown, so that the seed, which is very black, will fall out, if one turn the head thereof downward the wild poppy, or corn rose, hath long and narrow leaves, very muchcut in on the edges into thesis divisions, of a light green colour, essaytimes hairy withal the stalk is blackish and hairy also, but notso tall as the garden kind, having essay such like leaves thereon togrow below, writinged into three or four branches essaytimes, whereon growsmall hairy heads bowing down before the skin break, wherein the floweris inclosed, which when it is fully blown open, is of a fair yellowishred or crimson colour, and in essay much paler, without any spot in thebottom of the leaves, having thesis black soft threads in the middle, compassing a small green head, which when it is ripe, is not biggerthan one little finger end, wherein is contained much black seedssmaller than that of the garden the root perishes every year, andsprings again of its own sowing of this kind there is one lesser inall writings thereof, and differs in nothing else place the garden kinds do not naturally grow wild in any place, butall are sown in gardens where they grow the wild poppy or corn rose, is plentifully enough, and thesis times toomuch so in the corn fields of all counties through this land, and alsoon ditch banks, and by hedge sides the smaller wild kind is also foundin corn fields, and also in essay other places, but not so plentifullyas the former time the garden kinds are usually sown in the spring, which thenflower about the end of may, and essaywhat earlier, if they spring oftheir own sowing the wild kind flower usually from may until july, and the seed of themis ripe soon after the flowering government and virtues the herb is lunar, and of the juice of itis made opium. Only for lucre of money they cheat you, and tell you itis a kind of tear, or essay such like thing, that drops from poppieswhen they weep, and that is essaywhere beyond the seas, i know not wherebeyond the moon the garden poppy heads with seeds made into a syrup, is frequently, and to good effect used to procure rest, and sleep, inthe sick and weak, and to stay catarrhs and defluxions of thin rheumsfrom the head into the stomach and lungs, causing a continual cough, the fore-runner of a consumption. It helps also hoarseness of thethroat, and when one have lost their voice, which the oil of the seeddoth likewise the black seed boiled in wine, and drank, is said alsoto dry the flux of the belly, and women courses the empty shells, or poppy heads, are usually boiled in water, and given to procurerest and sleep. So doth the leaves in the same manner. As also if thehead and temples be bathed with the decoction warm, or with the oilof poppies, the green leaves or the heads bruised and applied witha little vinegar, or made into a poultice with barley-meal or hoggrease, cools and tempers all inflammations, as also the disease calledst anthony fire it is generally used in treacle and mithridate, andin all other medicines that are made to procure rest and sleep, and toease pains in the head as well as in other writings it is also used tocool inflammations, agues, or frenzies, or to stay defluxions whichcause a cough, or consumptions, and also other fluxes of the belly orwomen courses. It is also put into hollow teeth, to ease the pain, and hath been found by experience to ease the pains of the gout the wild poppy, or corn rose as matthiolus saith is good to preventthe falling-sickness the syrup made with the flower, is with goodeffect given to those that have the pleurisy.

If present essay formats at all, hydrastis canadensis goldenseal is there only in very small amounts a circular wrapped with the trade package of katharmon contained thefollowing, palpably unwarranted, claims. “internally it is very useful in acute indigestion, gastric catarrh, diarrhoea and cholera infantum ” “ it has demonstrated its remarkable curative effects, not only in preventing unhealthy conditions of fresh wounds, but also in correcting the decaying of putrefactive processes peculiar to the body under certain circumstances it has, further, a remarkable efficacy in surface inflammations, whether produced by accident or disease, and is an indispensable remedy in the affections of the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, stomach, bowels, vagina, uterus, urethra, bladder and rectum ”katharmon is in conflict with rules 1 and 4 of the council on pharmacyand chemistry because of its indefinite and secret composition andthe method of advertising it indirectly to the public. It is inconflict with rules 10, 6 and 8, in that it is an irrational shotgunmixture sold under unwarranted therapeutic claims and under a namenondescriptive of its composition -- from the journal a m a , aug 10, 1918 iodinized emulsion scott and creosotonic scott report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry“iodinized emulsion scott” and “creosotonic scott” are proprietarypreparations of the dawson pharmacal company, dawson springs, ky thelatter preparation used to be known as “iodinized emulsion scott withhypophosphites, guaiacol and creosote ” in 1907 these preparations wereconsidered by the council and found inadmissible to new and nonofficialremedies examination of the preparations having been again requested, the council considered them anew because the composition and claimshad been changed essaywhat and because at the previous consideration noreport was published the reports which appear below were sent to the dawson pharmacalcompany for comment before publication in reply the company offered torevise its claims for the preparations the council replied that thereport sent explained that both preparations are irrational mixtures, and hence a revision of the claims would not make them eligible for newand nonofficial remedies it advised that publication of the reportwould be withheld sixty days and that it would be revised if newinformation or evidence was submitted permitting such revision afterexpiration of the stipulated postponement, the dawson pharmacal companywrote that no new advertising matter had been prepared, but that theold circulars were not being sent out as these irrational preparations were still sold and advertised to themedical profession and presumably used by essay physicians, the councildirected publication of its report with this explanation w a puckner, secretary iodinized emulsion scottthe label for iodinized emulsion scott declares. “each fluidram contains. Alcohol, m 4-3/4. Rectified ol of turpentine, m 3-1/2. Iodin, gr 1/8. Phenol, gr 1/2. Glycerine and elixir lactated pepsin with aromatic oils in the form of a perfect emulsion ”a circular which gives what is asserted to be the composition ofiodinized emulsion, declares that, among other ingredients, eachfluidram contains “one and three quarters m tincture of iodine ”both the statement on the label that the preparation contains “iodin”and the one in the circular that tincture of iodin is present in theproduct are incorrect, for the a m a chemical laboratory reportsthat no free iodin could be detected in the preparation, and that itresponded to tests for iodid instead an advertising circular for iodinized emulsion scott makesunwarranted claims for the therapeutic properties of the constituents for example. “ the great usefulness of turpentine in diseases, especially of the intestinal infection, such as the meteorism and tympanites of typhoid ”and this absurdity.

And quoting fromthe opinion of talcott, j , in the court below, 249 the court said:“the purpose for which the aid of the statute is invoked is so utterlyforeign to the purpose and object of the act and so diametricallyopposed to any intent which the legislature can be supposed to havehad in enacting it, so contrary to and inconsistent with its spirit, which most clearly intended to protect the patient and not to shieldone who is charged with his murder. That in such a case the statute isnot to be so construed as to be used as a weapon of defence to a writingyso charged instead of a protection to his victim ” accordingly it washeld that the evidence was not to be excluded under the statute butthe rule is still applicable to criminal actions in a later case, where the accused was indicted for abortion, the same court held, thatwhere the patient was living and the disclosure tended to convict hertoo of crime or to cast discredit and disgrace upon her, the evidenceof her physician as to information acquired by him in attendanceupon her was inadmissible in the trial of the man charged with thecrime 250 in a still later case, 251 the general term of the supremecourt held, where the accused was on trial for murder and he hadconfided to a physician what he had done, that the physician could notdisclose the confidence the rule deducible from these decisions seemsto be that in new york the privilege extends to criminal actions, eventhough they be trials for murder, and even though the person accusedbe the patient, but that the statute will be applied only for theprotection of the patient, and where it is apparent that no injury canpossibly be done to the patient or his memory by the admission of theevidence, and the interests of justice demand the disclosure, for thepunishment of a person for an injury done to the patient involving aviolation of the criminal law, and the patient is not alive to waivethe privilege, that the disclosure is not forbidden in new york efforts have been made to exclude from the operation ofthe statute other classes of actions, to which it has been urged thatthe reasons for the enactment do not apply, or in which the mischiefalleged to be wrought by its enforcement has been suggested as groundfor believing that the legislature could not have intended to includethem of these, actions for divorce on the ground of adultery are oneclass. But it has been held that they constitute no exception 252testamentary causes - in new york it was long supposed that thepolicy of the law excepted probate proceedings. It was so held bythe surrogate of new york city;253 and also by the general termof the supreme court, 254 by which it was stated that the practicehad prevailed for a half-century in will paper, 255 but the courtof appeals, 256 has decided that testamentary paper constitute noexception to the rule, the judge who delivered the opinion statingthat there is no more reason for allowing secret ailments of a patientto be brought to light in a contest over his will than in any othercase, and that if mischief be wrought by the law the remedy lies withthe legislature and not with the courts the legislature has sinceafforded the remedy, 257 but not to the extent of adopting the rule ofthe earlier paper in indiana, in an action to set aside a will, thetestimony of the testator physician has been excluded 258 and inmichigan and missouri it seems that testamentary paper are no exceptionto the general rule 259lunacy and habitual drunkenness - it has been claimed in new yorkthat inquisitions of lunacy are an exception, and recently it has beenheld that the alleged lunatic physician may testify as to his mentalcondition because no one is better qualified to testify, 260 but thisdecision seems to be at variance with the principle of the decisionsof the court of appeals with reference to testamentary paper, andpresents no satisfactory reason for a distinction in a similar case inthe supreme court, chambers, it was held that a medical attendant at anasylum could not testify 261 it has also been held that a physiciancannot make an affidavit as to the appearance and condition of hispatient to support a petition for the appointment of a committee forhim as an habitual drunkard 262fraud - still another class of actions in which contending principleshave been invoked to make an exception in the law of privilege, isactions on life-insurance contracts the contract of insurance isuberrimæ fidei, and the defence of fraud in the application isfrequently interposed to defeat a claim under a policy medicaltestimony would often be the most satisfactory evidence to establishthe fraud, and efforts have been made to introduce it under thatexcuse, but without avail in the case of dilleber vs home lifeinsurance company, in the supreme court of new york at generalterm, 263 the question seems to have been directly before thecourt, and davis, p j , dissenting, insisted that the suppressionof a physician testimony ought not to be permitted so as to coverup a fraud, but the majority of the court held otherwise.

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Potter v virgil, 67 barb , 578. Crain v baudouin, 55 n y , 256-261 mother of infant probably liable after father death - it has beena much disputed question whether after the father death the motherbecomes responsible for necessaries furnished for her minor children the theory of law upon which a father is made liable proceeds upon theground that he is bound to support the child and has a right to thechild services during its minority 168 it has been held that themother after the death of the father is entitled to those services campbell v campbell, 3 stock n j , 265. Cain v dewitt, 8iowa, 116. Furman v van size, 56 n y , 435-439, disapprovingbentley v richtmeyer 4 comstock, 38, and approving in re ryder, 11 paige, 185 if she is entitled to the services of her child, shemust be bound to support and care for it. And so it was held in furmanv van size cited above estates of insane persons liable in a proper case - persons ofunsound mind are liable for necessaries furnished for their benefit, and can be made to pay therefor at reasonable and proper rates, butthey cannot make contracts for a specific rate it is always a questionof fact as to what sum should be charged against their estates, if theyhave any master not liable for services rendered servant without specialcontract - in the case of master and servant, while at common law asbetween a master and servant the master was bound to provide medicineand food for the servant when the servant was an inmate of the masterhouse, this is an obligation which a third person could not enforce, and the master can only be held liable for services rendered to theservant, upon proof of a specific contract with him to pay for them case of crain v baudouin considered - the case of crain v baudouin, supra, affords an interesting discussion before the highest court of new york state, as to the question as to how far a father calling a physician for an adult child for whom he is not bound to provide, although lying sick at the father house, can be held liable for the services rendered upon such call in that case the plaintiff attended as a physician upon the daughter of the defendant, who was sick at his house the daughter was of full age, married and living with her husband, but was brought from that of her husband to that of her father in order that she might be under the care of her mother defendant was present when plaintiff made his calls, gave the latter a history of the patient illness, and received directions as to her treatment he told others of the frequency and length of the plaintiff visits, and of his opinion of the case, without any disclaimer of liability the court held, however, that these facts were insufficient to imply a promise on the father writing to pay for the services, and that the additional facts that the defendant consented to the calling in of a consulting physician, and that a bill was sent in by the plaintiff, unless acknowledged and acquiesced in by defendant, or that he had before this employed other physicians, were also insufficient to raise an implication of law of such a promise to pay the plaintiff relied in his argument upon the fact that the patient was a daughter of the defendant, but the court held that any presumption which might arise from this had the daughter been under age, was overcome by the fact that she was past a majority, and was married and lived with her husband and children the plaintiff also relied to support his cause of action upon the interest exhibited by the defendant in the course of treatment pursued, and the other facts as to the presence of the defendant when the plaintiff made his professional calls alone and in consultation. His receiving directions as to treatment. His recognition to others of the fact that the plaintiff was in attendance.