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It opens stoppings, provokes urine, helpsdigestion, expels wind, and warms a cold stomach. Use them like grassroots avellanarum of hazel the rind of the tree provokes urine, breaksthe stone. The husks and shells of the nuts, dried and given in powder, stay the immoderate flux of the menses aurantiorum of oranges both these, and also lemons and citrons, are of different qualities. The outward bark, viz what looks red, is hot and dry, the white is cold and moist, the juice colder than it, the seeds hot and dry. The outward bark is that which here i am tospeak to, it is essaywhat hotter than either that of lemons or citrons, therefore it warms a cold stomach more, and expels wind better, butstrengthens not the heart so much berber, &c barberries the rind of the tree according to clœsius, being steeped in wine, and the wine drank, purges choler, and is asingular remedy for the yellow jaundice boil it in white wine anddrink it see the directions at the beginning cassia lignea, &c it is essaything more oily than cinnamon, yet thevirtues being not much different, i refer you thither capparis rad of caper roots see the roots castanearum of chesnuts the bark of the chesnut tree is dry andbinding, and stops fluxes cinnamonum cinnamon, and cassia lignea, are hot and dry in thesecond degree, strengthens the stomach, help digestion, cause a sweetbreath, resist poison, provoke urine, and the menses, cause speedydelivery in women to travail, help coughs and defluxions of humoursupon the lungs, dropsy, and difficulty of urine in ointments it takesaway red pimples, and the like deformities from the face there isscarce a better remedy for women in labour, than a dram of cinnamonnewly beaten into powder, and taken in white wine citrij of pome citrons the outward pill, which i suppose is thatwhich is meant here. It strengthens the heart, resists poison, amendsa stinking breath, helps digestion, comforts a cold stomach ebuli rad of the roots of dwarf-elder, or walwort see the herbs enulæ of elecampane see the roots esulæ rad see the roots fabarum of beans bean cods or pods, as we in sussex call thembeing bruised, the ashes are a sovereign remedy for aches in thejoints, old bruises, gouts, and sciaticas fœniculi rad of fennel roots see the roots, and remember theobservation given in smallage at the beginning of the barks fraxini rad of the bark of ash-tree roots the bark of the tree, helps the rickets, is moderately hot and dry, stays vomiting.

You have at the latter end of the book, the wayof preserving all herbs either in juice, conserve, oil, ointment orplaister, electuary, pills, or troches agrimony descript this has divers long leaves essay greater, essay smallerset upon a stalk, all of them dented about the edges, green above, andgreyish underneath, and a little hairy withal among which arises upusually but one strong, round, hairy, brown stalk, two or three feethigh, with smaller leaves set here and there upon it at the topthereof grow thesis small yellow flowers, one above another, in longspikes. After which come rough heads of seed, hanging downwards, whichwill cleave to and stick upon garments, or any thing that shall rubagainst them the knot is black, long, and essaywhat woody, abiding thesisyears, and shooting afresh every spring. Which root, though small, hatha reasonable good scent place it grows upon banks, near the sides of hedges time it flowers in july and august, the seed being ripe shortlyafter government and virtues it is an herb under jupiter, and the signcancer. And strengthens those writings under the planet and sign, andremoves diseases in them by sympathy, and those under saturn, mars andmercury by antipathy, if they happen in any writing of the body governedby jupiter, or under the signs cancer, sagitarius or pisces, andtherefore must needs be good for the gout, either used outwardly in oilor ointment, or inwardly in an electuary, or syrup, or concerted juice:for which see the latter end of this book it is of a cleansing and cutting faculty, without any manifest heat, moderately drying and binding it opens and cleanses the liver, helpsthe jaundice, and is very beneficial to the bowels, healing all inwardwounds, bruises, hurts, and other distempers the decoction of the herbmade with wine, and drank, is good against the biting and stinging ofserpents, and helps them that make foul, troubled or bloody water this herb also helps the cholic, cleanses the breast, and rids awaythe cough a draught of the decoction taken warm before the fit, first removes, and in time rids away the tertian or quartan agues the leaves and seeds taken in wine, stays the bloody flux. Outwardlyapplied, being stamped with old swine grease, it helps old sores, cancers, and inveterate ulcers, and draws forth thorns and splintersof wood, nails, or any other such things gotten in the flesh it helpsto strengthen the members that be out of joint. And being bruised andapplied, or the juice dropped in it, helps foul and imposthumed ears the distilled water of the herb is good to all the said purposes, either inward or outward, but a great deal weaker it is a most admirable remedy for such whose livers are annoyed eitherby heat or cold the liver is the former of blood, and blood thenourisher of the body, and agrimony a strengthener of the liver i cannot stand to give you a reason in every herb why it cures suchdiseases. But if you please to pursue my judgment in the herb wormwood, you shall find them there, and it will be well worth your while toconsider it in every herb, you shall find them true throughout the book water agrimony it is called in essay countries, water hemp, bastard hemp, and bastardagrimony, eupatorium, and hepatorium, because it strengthens the liver descript the root continues a long time, having thesis long slenderstrings the stalk grows up about two feet high, essaytimes higher they are of a dark purple colour the branches are thesis, growing atdistances the one from the other, the one from the one side of thestalk, the other from the opposite point the leaves are fringed, and much indented at the edges the flowers grow at the top of thebranches, of a brown yellow colour, spotted with black spots, havinga substance within the midst of them like that of a daisy.

Cabbage, fresh raw cabbage, fresh cooked cabbage, dried very slight cabbage, canned very slight swede rutabaga raw expressed juice lettuce spinach dried carrots, fresh raw carrots, dried very slight beetroot, raw, expressed juice less than potatoes, raw potatoes, cooked beans, fresh, scarlet runners, raw onions, cooked at least lemon juice, fresh lemon juice, preserved lime juice, fresh lime juice, preserved very slight orange juice, fresh raspberries apples bananas very slight tomatoes canned nuts miscellaneous. Yeast, dried yeast, extract and autolyzed ?. malt extract in essay specimens our knowledge of vitaminscommenting on the trend of medical research concerning vitamins, thelatest report of the british medical research council says:the present situation is a curious one, upon which posterity willprobably look back with great interest we still have almost noknowledge of the nature of these elusive food substances or of theirmode of action, but we have gained empiric knowledge already of thegreatest practical value for the prevention of scurvy and of othergrave diseases and for the promotion of health and beauty in thepopulation this statement, it will be noted, emphasizes the foundation on whichrests our present use of vitamins from time to time the journalhas commented on our lack of actual knowledge of these mysterioussubstances, emphasizing writingicularly the generally accepted fact thatthe taking of a well-balanced diet results in providing the individualwith such vitamins as are necessary to his growth and nutrition lastweek appeared a brief report of a meeting of the chicago medicalsociety devoted to this subject, and it was gratifying to have theconservative view which the journal has emphasized substantiated bythesis of those who took writing in the discussion moreover, the britishmedical journal, in its leading editorial for february 11, reiteratesthat an abundant supply of vitamins exists in all fresh vegetables, and that a considerable quantity occurs in milk and meat, providedthe latter substances are obtained from animals fed on fresh foods “a normal adult, ” it says, “living on an ordinary diet containing areasonable proportion of fresh vegetables is, therefore, certain ofobtaining a plentiful supply of vitamins ” of all the mass of evidencewhich has accumulated relative to these substances, this fact is thepoint of greatest importance it is, however, very unfortunately, the one point which those commercially inclined are unwilling torecognize -- editorial from the journal a m a , march 11, 1922 the demand for vitaminsthus the british medical journal in its current issue:in spite of the fact that ordinary fresh foods are the simplest, cheapest and richest sources of vitamins, the public apparently demandsto be supplied with vitamins in the form of medicinal products the public “demands” vitamins in pill form!. why?. for the same reasonthat the public, lay or medical, demands thesis things today that itdoes not need-- because the whole trend of modern advertising is towardcreating demands, rather than supplying needs vitamin concentratesare being “demanded” by the public because shrewd and forward-looking“patent medicine” exploiters are using all the subtle arts of modernadvertising to convince the public that it is in serious danger ofvitamin starvation, and that the only hope lies in buying thesealleged concentrates to make up a hypothetical deficiency it seemsinconceivable that a rational man would pay a tremendously high pricefor certain food factors which are already present in his ordinarydiet but he will. And advertising is the reason advertisingcampaigns such as these of the vitamins constitute a vicious circle;an artificial demand is created and then the manufacturer excuses hisbusiness on the ground that he is merely supplying a demand!. as ourbritish contemporary says, “ordinary fresh foods are the simplest, cheapest and richest sources of vitamins ”-- editorial from thejournal a m a , march 18, 1922 the william a webster co and the direct pharmaceutical co the following letter from a detroit physician was received a few daysago to the editor:-- i have just received a letter from the direct pharmaceutical co of st louis, mo , quoting prices on drugs which are not more than one half what the leading manufacturers are quoting on the same drugs i have received previous literature from this company but have not done business with them i would be unwilling to prescribe their drugs unless i were satisfied that they are what is claimed for them i would be glad to receive any information regarding this firm that may be available the journal has also received essay letters from physicians regardingthe william a webster co of memphis, tenn , relative to a letter theconcern was sending physicians in the form of a testimonial reproducedin miniature on this page and alleged to be from dr f w p butlerof columbia, s c typical letters on the webster advertising follow. To the editor:-- is there not essay way through which the dignity of the medical profession can be protected from the circulation of such idiotic drivel as the enclosures display?. to the editor:-- i am sending you an example of the sort of “evidence” which essay so-called ethical pharmaceutical houses expect physicians to take for scientific proof it is pathetic that there are essay in our profession who “fall for” such rot i trust you will continue your campaign for honest and intelligent medicine the “evidence” to which one of the correspondents refers and whichanother characterizes as “idiotic drivel” is reproduced on thefollowing page in miniature it is a testimonial for william a webstercompany “ferritonic-woods ”our readers may wonder why we are discussing in one article the williama webster company of memphis, tenn , and the direct pharmaceutical co of st louis the reason is that the direct pharmaceutical co of st louis is apparently merely a sales agency for the william a webstercompany of memphis it appears that orders sent in to the directpharmaceutical co go to memphis to be filled the following information regarding essay of the products that havein the past been put out by the william a webster company should beof interest to the profession in government bulletins issued by thedewritingment of agriculture in october, 1913, there were reported essaypaper of adulteration and misbranding on the writing of the william a webster co , of memphis, tenn a “pure concentrated extract of lemon”shipped by this concern was found by the federal chemists to be coloredwith a coal-tar dye “whereby inferiority was concealed, ” and whilepurporting to be a concentrated lemon extract, “in fact, it was not aconcentrated lemon extract ” essay “pure concentrated extract of banana”was found to have mixed with it an imitation banana flavor and anartificial color so as to “injuriously affect its quality and strength”and so that “its inferiority was concealed ” “pure concentratedextract of pineapple” was found to have had mixed with it “an imitationextract of pineapple artificially colored ” “pure concentrated extractof strawberry” had been mixed with “an imitation strawberry extractartificially colored ” the same bulletins described the case of thegovernment against a shipment of “syrup iron iodide” made by thewebster concern in which the amount of iron iodid was less than halfthat claimed on the label in each of the paper just described, thecompany pleaded guilty and was fined illustration. Reproduction reduced of a testimonial letter sent tophysicians by william a webster company of memphis, tenn those whooperate this concern also have a sales agency in st louis, mo , knownas the direct pharmaceutical co in a similar bulletin issued august, 1914, there were recorded severalmore paper of adulteration and misbranding charged against the williama webster company essay “wine coca leaves” was held adulterated inthat the amount of alcohol present was wrongly declared on the label;it was held misbranded in that while it contained cocain, the labelfailed to bear any statement regarding the quantity of proportion ofthis drug tablets of “acetanilid and sodium bromid compound” werefound deficient in strength “anti-vomit tablets, ” “aspirin tablets, ”“bismuth and calomel tablets, ” “quinin laxative tablets, ” “saloltablets, ” “sodium salicylate tablets, ” “neuralgic tablets, ” “diarrheacalomel pills” and “morphin sulphate hypodermic tablets” were alsomisbranded in that the amount of certain ingredients found in themfailed to tally with the amount declared on the label in all of thesepaper also the william a webster company pleaded guilty and was fined in a government bulletin issued in june, 1917, the same company wascharged with adulterating and misbranding a quantity of aspirin tabletswhich, instead of containing 5 grains as labeled, contained only afraction over 1 grain in this case, too, the company pleaded guiltyand was fined the table that follows briefly summarizes essay of thepaper just referred to.

And upon itscertificate the board of regents licenses the student to practise, andhis examination papers are filed in the office of the board of regentsand become a matter of record these provisions have been enlarged andmodified slightly by various statutes since enacted they are all nowembodied in chapter 601 of laws of 1893 they will be found carefullysynopsized below penal provisions in new york state - the new york penal code, whichwent into effect in 1882, enacted that a person practising medicine orsurgery, or pretending to be a physician or surgeon, without a licenseor a diploma from essay chartered school, should be deemed guilty of amisdemeanor punishable by fine or imprisonment penal code, section356. And the same statute, 357, made it a misdemeanor for a person, whether licensed or not, to practise medicine or surgery, or do anyother act as a physician or surgeon, while intoxicated, by which thelife of any person is endangered or his health seriously affected 155giving “patented” medicines no exception - at one time an attempt wasmade to claim, that under the patent laws of the united states a personhad the right to administer patent medicines without being punishablefor practising without a license, but this doctrine was repudiated bythe courts thompson v staats, 15 wend , 395. Jordan v overseers, etc , 4 ohio, 295 courts may compel granting of license - a person who is qualifiedand complies with reasonable rules of a licensing body, can compelsuch body to license him this was held to be the law in the case ofthe people ex rel bartlett v the medical society of the countyof erie, which is also an important authority in respect to a vexedquestion of medical ethics it appeared in that case that under thegeneral laws of new york in regard to the organization of medicalsocieties, a medical society had refused to receive as a member aperson otherwise qualified, because he had advertised in the publicprints a certain cure, including a mechanical appliance used intreating throat troubles. It being forbidden by the code of ethics ofthe american medical association, which the county medical societyhad adopted as one of its by-laws, that a physician or surgeon shouldadvertise the court of appeals of the state of new york held that thisconstituted no defence to a proceeding instituted by such person toobtain a mandamus compelling the society to admit him to membership, ifotherwise qualified 156it has also been decided that a medical society had no right to makea by-law establishing a fixed fee-bill, or tariff of charges, andproviding for the expulsion of a member charging at a different ratethan that prescribed such a by-law was declared unreasonable and voidin the case of people v medical society of erie county, 24 barb , 570 the effect of these decisions was, so far as they affect the validityof by-laws, attempted to be avoided in that state by chapter 445 oflaws of 1866, by which it is expressly enacted that the county medicalsocieties of the state of new york may make such rules and by-laws asthey see fit, “not inconsistent with the laws of said state, and mayenforce them by expulsion or other discipline ” it may be considereddoubtful whether this legislation can accomplish its purpose in thecase of the adoption of a by-law void as against public policy no writingicular schools recognized by the courts - the general trend ofthe decisions in all the states, whenever any questions in referenceto schools of medicine have been before our courts, is to avoidrecognizing any writingicular system or school the theory of the newyork courts upon this subject is well expressed by the liberal-mindedand learned judge daly in the new york court of common pleas, in thecase of corsi v maretzek, 4 e d smith, 1-5 in that case it wasclaimed that a certificate of incapacity because of sickness, givenby a “homœopathic” physician to an opera-singer, was not binding itwas argued that the employment of a “homœopathic” physician under thecontract did not fulfil a provision thereof which required the event ofthe singer sickness to be certified to by “a doctor, ” to be appointedby the director the court said. “the system pursued by the practitioner is immaterial the law has nothing to do with writingicular systems their relativemerit may become the subject of inquiry, when the skill or ability ofa practitioner in any given case is to be passed upon as a matter offact but the law does not, and cannot, supply any positive rules forthe interpretation of medical science it is not one of those certainor exact sciences in which truths become established and fixed, butis essentially progressive in its nature, enlarging with the growthof human experience, and subject to those changes and revolutionsincident to any branch of human inquiry, the laws of which are notfully ascertained the labors of the anatomist, the physiologist, andthe chemist have contributed an immense storehouse of facts. But themanner in which this knowledge is to be applied in the treatment andcure of diseases has been, and will probably continue to be, open todiversity of opinion no one system of practice has been uniformlyfollowed, but physicians from the days of hippocrates have been dividedinto opposing sects and schools the sects of the dogmatists and theempirics divided the ancient world for centuries, until the rise ofthe methodics, who, in their turn, gave way to innumerable sects theories of practice, believed to be infallible in one age, have beenutterly rejected in another for thirteen centuries europe yieldedto the authority of galen he was implicitly followed his practicestrictly pursued everything that seemed to conflict with his preceptswas rejected. And yet, in the revolutions of medical opinion, theworks of this undoubtedly great man were publicly burned by paracelsusand his disciples. And for centuries following, the medical worldwas divided between the galenists and the chemists, until a completeascendency over both was obtained by the sect of the vitalists thisstate of things has been occasioned by the circumstance that medicalpractitioners have often been more given to the formation of theoriesupon the nature of disease and the mode of its treatment, than tothat careful observation and patient accumulation of facts, by which, in other sciences, the phenomena of nature have been unravelled iam far from undervaluing the great benefits conferred upon mankindby the study of medicine, and have no wish to minister to any vulgarprejudice against a useful and learned profession, but it is not to beoverlooked that, as an art, it has been characterized, in a greaterdegree, by fluctuations of opinion as to its principles and the modeof its practice, than, perhaps, any other pursuit that it has beendistinguished by the constant promulgation and explosion of theories, that it has alternated between the advancement of new doctrines andthe revival of old ones, and that its professors in every age havebeen noted for the tenacity with which they have clung to opinions, and the unanimity with which they have resisted the introduction ofvaluable discoveries they still continue to disagree in respect to thetreatment of diseases as old as the human race. And at the present day, when great advances have been made in all dewritingments of knowledge, aradical and fundamental difference divides the allopathist from thefollowers of hahnemann, to say nothing of those who believe in thesovereign instrumentality of water “in fact, nothing comparatively is known of the philosophy of disease its eradication or cure, where the result of human agency is, inthe great majority of instances, attributable rather to the carefulobservation, judgment and experience of the writingicular practitioner, than to the application of general or established methods available toall the popular axiom, that ‘doctors differ, ’ is as true now as itever was, and as long as it continues to be so, it is impossible forthe law to recognize any class of practitioners, or the followers ofany writingicular system or method of treatment, as exclusively entitledto be regarded as doctors in adverting to the conflicting viewsand differences of opinion, that exist and have ever existed in thepractice of the healing art, it is not to call in question the valueof learned, skilful and experienced physicians, but merely to showthe error of attempting, in the present state of medical science, to recognize, as matter of law, any one system of practice, or ofdeclaring that the practitioner who follows a writingicular system is adoctor, and that one who pursues a different method is not ” and seealso white v carroll, 42 n y , 161. Ordronaux’ “jurisprudence ofmedicine, ” 27 this decision was prior to the statute of 1874 and the provisions ofthe penal code before noted since those statutes, it is a misdemeanorto practise except as permitted by the provisions of those statutes in new york and elsewhere practitioner without license cannot sue andrecover for his fees since the passage of the new york act of 1844 laws of 1844, p 406, there has been no precise statutory provision in that state prohibitingin terms persons who practise physic or surgery without a license, from suing to obtain a recovery for services performed but this is oflittle consequence, for, as we have already stated, so practising hasbeen declared to be a misdemeanor by the penal code of new york it is a well-settled principle that when any act is declared by statuteto be criminal, a contract calling for the performance of such an actis illegal and void the early english authorities on this point arefully collated in wheeler v russell 17 metc , mass , 258, and thelater english and american paper may be found in “american and englishcyclopædia of law, ” title “contracts, ” vol iii , p 872 et seq.

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thelife history of pineoleum is that of the typical nostrum epidemics, of course, are utilized as opportunities for pushing the product in1911 a essay examples card was sent out featuring “a special lagrippe offer”. In 1916the profession was circularized recommending pineoleum as “the idealprophylactic” in infantile paralysis. During the past year influenzahas again been the selling point the case described by dr lambert is not the first example of themisuse of names and statements of physicians last december thepineoleum concern was sending out an advertising card in which dr mccoy of the united states public health service was quoted asrecommending pineoleum as the “bulwark of prevention” and “battery ofrelief” in influenza of course, dr mccoy never said anything of thesort a protest against this writingicular falsehood resulted in anothercard being sent out several months later by the pineoleum peoplepurporting to explain and apologize for the misquotations and puttingthe blame on the printer the “apology” ended with a postscript inlarger and bolder face type than the body of the card that urgedphysicians to “secure our liberal introductory advertising propositionon improved oil nebulizer outfits ” from the standpoint of publicityfor pineoleum, the “explanation and apology” was doubtless as good anadvertisement as the original card of misrepresentation -- ed -- fromthe journal a m a , nov 1, 1919 “proteal therapy” and henry smith williams to the editor:-- will you please advise as to the success and safeness in using the proteal treatment for tuberculosis by henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east 40th street, new york?. c p burchard, alamogordo, n m to the editor:-- kindly send me any available information on “the proteal treatment for cancer ” an article by dr henry smith williams, 120 west 32 street, new york city, in april hearst has caused relatives to request its use in a case of carcinoma of the liver under my care m m reppard, middlebourne, w va to the editor:-- i am enclosing a leaflet, mailed to me on request, by dr henry smith williams of new york city, who published a series of articles during the last year in hearst magazine on “proteal therapy ” if you have investigated this man and his proteal treatment, i should like to know the result of your findings i am a consumptive and am, therefore, writingicularly interested in its alleged benefactions for the treatment of tuberculosis michael a long, glen lake sanitarium, hopkins, minn to the editor:-- what information can you give me regarding henry smith williams, m d , ll d , 104 east fortieth street, new york, and the therapeutic value of the “proteal therapy” that he has originated?. m d baker, m d , san jose, calif the above letters are selected from thesis received on the subject henry smith williams is better known in the journalistic world thanin the field of scientific medicine he was graduated by the chicagomedical college in 1884 in the thirteen issues of medical directoriesof the united states that have been published during the past thirtyyears dr williams’ name does not appear-- except for the issues of1890 and 1893-- until the 1914 edition so far as we have been ableto find, dr williams had not until 1915 contributed any articles tomedical journals the catalog of the surgeon general library containsno reference to any articles of dr williams except those that haveappeared in popular magazines the volumes of the index medicus from1907 until 1914, inclusive, also contain no references to any articlesby him in medical journals the journal‘s author index to currentmedical literature from 1900 to 1914, inclusive, fails to record anyarticles by dr williams in medical journals dr williams’ articles, however, in popular magazines have been voluminous and numerous essaytimes his articles have been under his own name and essaytimesunder the nom de plume, “stoddard goodhue, m d ” under the latter namethe cosmopolitan published articles on “adding years to your life, ”“battle of the microbes, ” “do you choose your children?. ” and “what isthe matter with your brain?. ” under his own name articles have appearedin popular magazines on such subjects as “burbank way with flowers, ”“every woman her own burbank, ” “why not live forever?.