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Essay Conclusion Examples


“acutepain in essay conclusion examples the chest. Acute inflammation in the chest. Persistentlocal pain. ” this might be interpreted as including tuberculosis;pneumonia. Cancer, and appendicitis “lumbago. Sciatica. Articularrheumatism” gonorrheal infections?. name rule 8 -- the name, derived from dolar and liber, suggeststhe claimed action of the preparation the relief of pain rather thanthe drugs said to be presented by it irrational composition rule 10 -- it is quite possible that libradolwill relieve pain in certain instances and that the drug constituentspresent in libradol “regular” make this more effective than “libradolmild” which is “destitute of drug energy”. This, however, is nojustification for the use by physicians of a cataplasm containingor made from skunk cabbage, bloodroot, ipecac, melaleuca oil ofcajeput?. , lobelia, laurus comphora camphor?.

B, record of flow of pancreatic juice in drops tracinga, the 10 c c of beveridge secretin injected had been digested forfive minutes with 3 c c of human gastric juice tracing b, injectionof 10 c c of the same secretin preparation not subjected to gastricdigestion showing rapid and complete destruction of beveridgesecretin by human gastric juice it will be seen that the rate of deterioration oxidation ordecomposition of the secretin is practically the same whether preparedaccording to bayliss and starling or according to beveridge figure 3 in both preparations the rate of deterioration is most rapid the firstfew days after preparation it is scarcely necessary to point out thatsecretin preparations not kept constantly at low temperature and in thedark, as in the above experiments, will deteriorate more rapidly illustration. Fig 3 -- records of carotid blood pressure and flow ofpancreatic juice on intravenous injection of secretin preparations x, injection of 10 c c secretin. B, record of flow of pancreaticjuice in drops tracing a, secretin prepared according to thebeveridge method september 30 i, injection of 10 c c october 2 ii, injection of 10 c c november 30 tracing b, secretin preparedby the bayliss-starling method september 30 iii, injection of10 c c october 2. Iv, injection of 10 c c november 30 showing nogreater stability of beveridge secretion over that of bayliss andstarling why can we hope that the addition of serum or any solution of proteinwill render secretin more stable?. in the intact man or animal undernormal conditions of digestion, secretin reaches the pancreas by wayof the blood, that is, it is in solution in blood does that factrender the secretin stable?. by no means the reader is familiar withthe fact that the response of the pancreas to a single intravenousadministration of secretin is very transitory 5-15 min thecessation of activity is due, not to fatigue of the pancreas, as asecond injection of secretin gives a prompt response of pancreaticsecretion, but to the disappearance of active secretin from the blood in fact, secretin left in the test tube or in the bottle remains activeover a much longer period of time than when introduced into the bloodstream iv beveridge secretin given by mouth to the intact animal has nospecific action on the pancreas -- active secretin prepared accordingto the method of beveridge was fed on an empty stomach to a small dog 5 kilo with permanent fistula of one of the pancreatic ducts oncontrol days we gave the dog a equal quantities of n/10 hcl, and b bread and milk the beveridge secretin was prepared with 0 3 percent hcl and the addition of 0 2 per cent serum the results may bestated by the following summary:giving beveridge secretin by mouth secretin of the number of pancreas for three material fed tests hours following the feeding 150 c c beveridge secretin 6 10 2 c c 150 c c n/10 hcl 5 22 7 c c bread soaked in milk 4 6 6 c c -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the control experiments with pure hydrochloric acid show that thesecretion of pancreatic juice following the introduction of beveridgesecretin into the stomach is due to the acid factor and the proteincontent conclusionsthe patented secretin of beveridge is rendered inactive by gastricjuice, is without effect when given by mouth, and exhibits no greaterstability or keeping qualities than the secretin prepared accordingto bayliss and starling it has no merit as a therapeutic agent it should under no conditions be administered intravenously inman, as it contains deleterious protein split products and livingbacteria -- from the journal a m a , jan 12, 1918 need for patent law revision report of the committee on patent-law revision of the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical associationat the present critical time when the efficiency of this nation mustbe raised to the highest point, it is essential that the united statesgovernment should lead in the efforts tending to such increasedefficiency to bring this about the government must protect andstimulate science, art and industry and at the same time curb orprevent waste of the country resources in this field the unitedstates patent office has unlimited power for good and evil-- good, inthe issuance of patent grants for novel devices and substances whichgo to increase national efficiency. Evil, in the granting of patentprotection where such protection is not in the interest of nationalefficiency, conservation of energy and material resources for years the american medical association, in common with thenational pharmaceutical bodies, has been urging amendment of thelaw which governs the issuance of patents on medicinal preparationsand more writingicularly revision of the procedure under which suchpatents are issued at the chicago 1908 meeting of the americanmedical association a special committee of five was appointed bythe house of delegates to study the questions involved, and tocooperate with the association committee on medical legislation inpreparing and securing the enactment of a bill which would correctthe abuses connected with the enforcement of our patent laws thejournal a m a , june 13, 1908, p 2003 this committee presenteda comprehensive report at the atlantic city 1909 meeting of theamerican medical association the journal a m a , june 19, 1909, p 2063 a further report was presented at the st louis 1910meeting of the american medical association the journal a m a , june 18, p 2079 in 1911 the journal a m a , nov 25, 1911, p 1780 the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medicalassociation issued a report which set forth the inadequacy of ourpatent laws as they are administered in relation to medical productswritingicularly against public interestsince that time the council has continued its study of the u s patentlaw as it applies to medicine and has become convinced that in thesisinstances the patent law or its enforcement is contrary to the bestinterest of the public, both as concerns health and prosperity thecouncil feels it a duty at this time to protest against the provisionsof our patent law, or the methods of its enforcement, which permit thegranting of patents without thorough and scientific investigation ofthe claims advanced in such letters patent as one means of improvingconditions the council urges that the u s public health service, the bureau of chemistry, u s dewritingment of agriculture and otherscientific dewritingments of the united states government conversant withmedicines and related subjects be consulted before the issuance ofpatents on medicinal preparations in support of the council contention that the patent law procedurerequires revision, the following is offered. In 1912 a u s patent no 1, 031, 971 was granted on a cresol derivative, metacresyl acetate, a product described in chemical literature in 1903 when the councilinquired as to the grounds for the issuance of a patent for a substanceknown to science, the patent office replied that it was not familiarwith the publication in which metacresyl acetate had been described it seems evident that this patent would not have been issued had theapplication first been submitted to a government dewritingment familiarwith chemical literature an illustration of the granting of a patent on the use of well-knownchemical bodies which present no discovery or originality, is thepatent issued for the use of peroxids, perborates and percarbonates asingredients of tooth powders u s patents nos 760, 397 and 802, 099 regarding these patents the journal of the american medical association sept 20, 1913, p 978 commented. “the patents held by mckesson and robbins give this firm the exclusive right of manufacturing tooth powders containing peroxids, perborates and percarbonates it is another illustration of the unfair monopolies that may be secured under our present patent laws ” granting a patent to a nostrumagain in 1913 u s patent no 1, 081, 069 was granted to a citizenof switzerland a country which does not grant patents on medicinalpreparations for a “composition which is intended to be usedinternally and which confers to the organisms immunity against thefollowing microbial infectious illnesses.

Detaches with “pulling ” on heating, readily loses eucalyptol, and a small amount of resinous substance forms in the bottom of the beaker if cerelene be heated to 145 c and cooled, the resulting product no longer has the properties of the original cerelene after two years’ delay on the writing of the manufacturer, the councilauthorized publication declaring cerelene inadmissible for new andnonofficial remedies because its superiority over single paraffinshad not been demonstrated and the unwarranted claims had not beenabandoned -- abstracted from essay conclusion examples the journal a m a , feb 15, 1919 dr de sanctis’ rheumatic and gout pillsdr desanctis’ rheumatic and gout pills are sold by edward cleaver, 13clerkenwell road, london, england the american agents are e fougeraand co , inc , new york the package is a round pill box and containstwelve pills and a circular, which directs that one pill be taken everyeight hours until relieved in the package there is also a circularadvertising dr desanctis’ gout and rheumatic paint, with directionsfor its use on the cover of a box, which contained six of the retailpackages, is the statement that these pills have been in general usefor nearly 100 years, and that their sale has been built up withoutadvertising desanctis’ pills are round, uncoated, and have a light brown color there was essay variation in the color of different lots, one lot inwritingicular being gray rather than brown a little arrowroot starchwas found in each box, this evidently having been used as a dustingpowder the pills were very hard, rather brittle, but quite difficultto powder the pills were not readily disintegrated by water or dilutedacids, even when warmed, but when warmed with a dilute sodium hydroxidsolution they readily disintegrated ten pills weighed 3 213 gm , an average of 0 3213 gm , or 5 grains thearrowroot starch used as a dusting powder was removed as completely aspossible by rolling the pills in a cloth several dozen pills were thenpowdered and the powder thus obtained used for the analysis a microscopic examination of the powder showed powdered colchicum seedin abundance and also traces of arrowroot starch, no doubt from thatused as the dusting powder since colchicum seed was so abundant, the powder was assayed by theu s pharmacopeial method for colchicum seed u s p ix, p 120, slightly modified so that less of the powdered pills than directedthere could be used in one assay 3 75 gm gave 0 0204 gm of colchicinor 0 54 per cent in a duplicate, 5 gm gave 0 0234 gm of colchicin or0 47 per cent. Average 0 5 per cent the alkaloid obtained had the characteristic appearance and odor ofcolchicin when separated from the seed under these conditions thesolution in water and acid was yellow. The aqueous solution wasintensely bitter, and the yellow color intensified with acids the dryresidue became intensely yellow with concentrated sulphuric acid. Withnitric acid it became violet turning to yellow, and with concentratedsulphuric acid and potassium nitrate it gave a yellowish green color, turning to violet and finally to a wine color all these reactions aretypical of colchicin from 1 gm of the powdered pills there was obtained 0 0425 gm of ash, or 4 25 per cent when the powdered pills were extracted with chloroform in a soxhletapparatus, a very uniform quantity of extract was obtained from 5 gm there was obtained, in one case, 0 581 gm. In another, 0 5755 gm , andin a third, 0 588 gm , the average being 0 5815 gm or 11 63 per cent on still further extracting with alcohol, a small amount of extractivewas obtained, the amount depending on the length of time the extractionwas continued on extracting with hot water the residue left after exhaustion withchloroform and with alcohol, a further extract was obtained in onecase, it amounted to 0 4763 gm or 9 53 per cent , and in another caseit amounted to 0 470 gm , or 9 40 per cent.

Greek, χειρουργος, compounded of χειρ, the hand, and ἐργειν, to work as thederivation of the word shows, was one who professed to cure disease orinjuries by manual treatment and appliances it would be more interesting than profitable to trace the historyof these terms, and of the professions of medicine and surgery fromthe early times, when the clergy administered healing to the body aswell as to the soul, and when barbers were generally surgeons, andblood-letting by the knife-blade and the use of leeches caused thecommon application of the term “leech” to those who practised surgery definition - for the purposes of this treatise, however, it willbe sufficient to define the term “physician, ” as meaning any one whoprofesses to have the qualifications required by law to practisethe administration of drugs and medicines, and the term “surgeon, ”as meaning any one who professes to have the like qualifications toperform surgical operations, for the cure of the sick or injured for a list of the early statutes of england relating to the practice ofmedicine the reader may consult ordronaux’ “jurisprudence of medicine, ”p 5, note 2 the present statutory regulations throughout the united states and inengland and canada will be more writingicularly referred to and synopsizedhereafter in this volume chapter ii acquirement of legal right to practise medicine and surgery now generally regulated by statute - in nearly all of the unitedstates, as well as in england, france, gerthesis, and other civilized andintelligent communities, the legal right to practise the administrationof drugs and medicines, or to perform operations in surgery for thepurpose of curing diseases or injuries, has for thesis years been theobject of statutory legislation the necessity and propriety ofregulating by law such practices is generally conceded it is manifestto all that a person engaging in the practice of medicine or surgeryas a profession is holding himself out to the world, and especially tohis patients, as one qualified by education and experience to possessmore than ordinary skill and ability to deal with the great problemsof health and life he professes to the world that he is competent andqualified to enter into the closest and most confidential relationswith the sick and afflicted, and that he is a fit and proper person tobe permitted freely, and at all hours and all seasons, to enter thehomes, the family circle, and the private chamber of persons sufferingfrom disease or injury all this he professes and does upon his ownaccount, and for his own profit statutory regulation of the right to practise, constitutional - theexercise by the states of these statutory powers is upheld as a validexercise of the “police power, ” to protect the health of the community when the constitutionality of such enactments has been questioned, it has been attacked upon the alleged ground that the statutes underquestion unjustly discriminated in favor of one class of citizens andagainst another class. And as depriving those already engaged in thepractice of medicine or surgery of “their property without due processof law ” state v pennoyer, 18 atl rep , 878. Ex writinge spinney, 10 nev , 323. People v fulda, 52 hun n y , 65-67. Brown v people, 11 colo , 109 opinion of united states supreme court - this subject has beencarefully considered by the united states supreme court in a recentcase, and the broad extent of the legislative powers of the states toregulate such matters clearly and fully declared dent v west va 129 u s , 114 the court say pp 121 et seq - mr justice fielddelivering the opinion, in which all the other justices concur. “theunconstitutionality asserted consists in its the statutes allegedconflict with the clause of the fourteenth amendment, which declaresthat no state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law. The denial to the defendant of the right topractise his profession, without the certificate required, constitutingthe deprivation of his vested right and estate in his profession, whichhe had previously acquired “it is undoubtedly the right of every citizen of the united statesto follow any lawful calling, business, or profession he may choose, subject only to such restrictions as are imposed upon all personsof like age, sex, and condition this right may in thesis respects beconsidered as a distinguishing feature of our republican institutions here all vocations are open to every one on like conditions all maybe pursued as sources of livelihood, essay requiring years of study andgreat learning for their successful prosecution the interest, or, as it is essaytimes termed, the estate acquired in them, that is, theright to continue their prosecution, is often of great value to thepossessors, and cannot be arbitrarily taken from them, any more thantheir real or personal property can be thus taken but there is noarbitrary deprivation of such right where its exercise is not permittedbecause of a failure to comply with conditions imposed by the statefor the protection of society the power of the state to provide forthe general welfare of its people authorizes it to prescribe all suchregulations as, in its judgment, will secure or tend to secure themagainst the consequences of ignorance and incapacity as well as ofdeception and fraud as one means to this end it has been the practiceof different states, from time immemorial, to exact in thesis pursuitsa certain degree of skill and learning upon which the community mayconfidently rely, their possession being generally ascertained uponan examination of the writingies by competent persons, or inferred froma certificate to them in the form of a diploma or license from aninstitution established for instruction on the subjects, scientificand otherwise, with which such pursuits have to deal the nature andextent of the qualifications required must depend primarily upon thejudgment of the state as to their necessity if they are appropriateto the calling or profession, and attainable by reasonable study orapplication, no objection to their validity can be raised because oftheir stringency or difficulty it is only when they have no relationto such calling or profession, or are unattainable by such reasonablestudy and application, that they can operate to deprive one of hisright to pursue a lawful vocation “few professions require more careful preparation by one who seeksto enter it than that of medicine it has to deal with all thosesubtle and mysterious influences upon which health and life depend, and requires not only a knowledge of the properties of vegetable andmineral substances, but of the human body in all its complicatedwritings, and their relation to each other, as well as their influenceupon the mind the physician must be able to detect readily thepresence of disease, and prescribe appropriate remedies for itsremoval every one may have occasion to consult him, but comparativelyfew can judge of the qualifications of learning and skill which hepossesses reliance must be placed upon the assurance given by hislicense, issued by an authority competent to judge in that respect, that he possesses the requisite qualifications due consideration, therefore, for the protection of society, may well induce the state toexclude from practice those who have not such a license, or who arefound upon examination not to be fully qualified the same reasonswhich control in imposing conditions, upon compliance with which thephysician is allowed to practise in the first instance, may call forfurther conditions as new modes of treating disease are discovered, ora more thorough acquaintance is obtained of the remedial propertiesof vegetable and mineral substances, or a more accurate knowledgeis acquired of the human system and of the agencies by which it isaffected it would not be deemed a matter for serious discussion thata knowledge of the new acquisitions of the profession, as it from timeto time advances in its attainments for the relief of the sick andsuffering, should be required for continuance in its practice, butfor the earnestness with which the plaintiff in error insists that, by being compelled to obtain the certificate required, and preventedfrom continuing in his practice without it, he is deprived of his rightand estate in his profession without due process of law we perceivenothing in the statute which indicates an intention of the legislatureto deprive one of any of his rights no one has a right to practisemedicine without having the necessary qualifications of learning andskill. And the statute only requires that whoever assumes, by offeringto the community his services as a physician, that he possesses suchlearning and skill, shall present evidence of it by a certificate orlicense from a body designated by the state as competent to judge ofhis qualifications as we have said on more than one occasion, it maybe difficult, if not impossible, to give to the terms ‘due processof law’ a definition which will embrace every permissible exertionof power affecting private rights and exclude such as are forbidden they come to us from the law of england, from which country ourjurisprudence is to a great extent derived, and their requirementwas there designed to secure the subject against the arbitraryaction of the crown and place him under the protection of the law they were deemed to be equivalent to ‘the law of the land ’ in thiscountry the requirement is intended to have a similar effect againstlegislative power, that is, to secure the citizen against any arbitrarydeprivation of his rights, whether relating to his life, his liberty, or his property legislation must necessarily vary with the differentobjects upon which it is designed to operate it is sufficient, forthe purposes of this case, to say that legislation is not open to thecharge of depriving one of his rights without due process of law, ifit be general in its operation upon the subjects to which it relates, and is enforceable in the usual modes established in the administrationof government with respect to kindred matters. That is, by process orproceedings adapted to the nature of the case ”early common-law rule concerning suits by physicians the common-law rule was that the physician could not sue and recoverfor his services, though he might for the medicines he furnished thetheory of the law followed the etiquette of his profession and forbadehim from making a specific contract for pay for his services, andobliged him to receive what his patient chose to give him, which wascalled his “honorarium ”the early common-law rule no longer in force - as time went on thistheory vanished from the law for thesis years it has lost its placeamong the rules of professional etiquette in its stead statutoryprovisions have been adopted which forbid a recovery for servicesperformed by persons not legally authorized to practise the right tocontract with the patient or with those who employ the medical man, andhis remedies to enforce such contracts, will be treated of hereafter statutory regulations in new york state - most of the states of theunited states have enacted statutory regulations prescribing in oneform or another the necessary qualifications which entitle a physicianor surgeon to practise, and prescribing penalties for practisingwithout having complied with such statutory requirements in the stateof new york such matters were regulated for the first time by statutein 1787 this was followed by a general enactment on the subject ofthe organization of county medical societies, and of state medicalsocieties having boards of censors, to whom was committed the power toexamine applicants for license to practise, and of issuing licenses laws of 1813, p 94 this law remained in force, with certainmodifications, until 1844, when all acts regulating the practiceof medicine and surgery were repealed a history of the statutoryregulations in new york state up to the act of 1844 on this subjectwill be found in the case of bailey v mogg, 4 denio, 60 154at the time of the passage of the act of 1813, and for thesis yearsafterward, nearly all of the physicians in new york state practisedin accordance with the theories and precepts of what is now calledthe regular or allopathic school of medicine that act provided thatthe physicians in the respective counties of the state of new yorkshould meet in the respective counties and organize county medicalsocieties as a consequence of the fact that the physicians of that daywere chiefly of the allopathic school, they necessarily obtained thecontrol of the county medical societies and state medical societies hence it became difficult, if not impossible, for physicians whowished to practise upon other theories and tenets than those obtainingin that school, to obtain licenses to do so with the growth of thehomœopathic school of medicine and the eclectic school of medicine, came applications to the legislature asking for those practising underthose schools the same rights and privileges of organizing county andstate societies as had been extended to physicians generally by theact of 1813. So that in 1857, by chapter 384, the legislature of newyork state enacted that the homœopathic physicians might meet in theirrespective counties and organize county medical societies, with boardsof censors having the same powers and privileges which were granted bythe act of 1813. And by other laws similar privileges were granted tothe so-called eclectic school after the passage of the act of 1844, down to about 1874, as hereinbefore stated, there was no limitationupon the right to practise medicine or surgery in this state the inharmonious and injurious effect of such policy of the statebecoming manifest, the legislature, by chapter 436 of laws of 1874, required all persons desiring to practise medicine or surgery toobtain a certificate as to their qualifications from the censors ofessay one of these medical societies by the laws of 1880, chapter 513, additional and more extensive and writingicular provisions were made inreference to this matter, and all the physicians then practising wererequired, on or before the time limited in the act, to file with thecounty clerks of their respective counties their licenses to practisegranted by the censors of their county medical societies, or a diplomaof essay chartered school of medicine. And those persons who desiredto become licensed who were not in practice were likewise required toobtain similar licenses or certificates and file the same a diplomaof a chartered school or medical college was given the same effect as alicense issued by the censors recent legislation in new york state - the whole matter, however, of licensing physicians to practise has, in the state of new york, been recently regulated by chapter 468, laws of 1889, and 499 of 1890, which have reference to the qualifications of persons becoming medicalstudents, and chapter 507 of 1890, which gives to the regents of theuniversity of the state of new york power to select boards of examinersfrom persons nominated by each of the three state medical societies, viz , the new york state medical society, homœopathic medical society, and eclectic medical society these boards prepare questions which areto be approved by the state board of regents. Examinations are heldin different writings of the state upon these questions, the examinationpapers are certified to that one of these boards of examiners whichthe student may elect, and that board in turn certifies whether ornot the examination has been successfully undergone.

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And hairy underneath the root is long, and spreadsunderground, being in essay places no bigger than one finger, inothers much bigger, blackish on the outside, and whitish within, of abitter and unpleasant taste place and time they grow in low and wet grounds by essay conclusion examples rivers and watersides their flower as is said rising and decaying in february andmarch, before their leaves, which appear in april government and virtues it is under the dominion of the sun, andtherefore is a great strengthener of the heart, and clearer of thevital spirit the roots thereof are by long experience found to bevery available against the plague and pestilential fevers by provokingsweat. If the powder thereof be taken in wine, it also resists theforce of any other poison the root hereof taken with zedoary andangelica, or without them, helps the rising of the mother thedecoction of the root in wine, is singularly good for those that wheesemuch, or are short-winded it provokes urine also, and women courses, and kills the flat and broad worms in the belly the powder of the rootdoth wonderfully help to dry up the moisture of the sores that are hardto be cured, and takes away all spots and blemishes of the skin itwere well if gentlewomen would keep this root preserved, to help theirpoor neighbours it is fit the rich should help the poor, for the poorcannot help themselves the burdock they are also called personata, and loppy-major, great burdock andclod-bur it is so well known, even by the little boys, who pull offthe burs to throw and stick upon each other, that i shall spare towrite any description of it place they grow plentifully by ditches and water-sides, and by thehighways almost everywhere through this land government and virtues venus challenges this herb for her own, andby its leaf or seed you may draw the womb which way you please, eitherupwards by applying it to the crown of the head, in case it falls out;or downwards in fits of the mother, by applying it to the soles of thefeet. Or if you would stay it in its place, apply it to the navel, and that is one good way to stay the child in it the burdock leavesare cooling, moderately drying, and discussing withal, whereby it isgood for old ulcers and sores a dram of the roots taken with pinekernels, helps them that spit foul, mattery, and bloody phlegm theleaves applied to the places troubled with the shrinking of the sinewsor arteries, gives much ease the juice of the leaves, or rather theroots themselves, given to drink with old wine, doth wonderfully helpthe biting of any serpents. And the root beaten with a little salt, andlaid on the place, suddenly eases the pain thereof, and helps thosethat are bit by a mad dog the juice of the leaves being drank withhoney, provokes urine, and remedies the pain of the bladder the seedbeing drank in wine forty days together, doth wonderfully help thesciatica the leaves bruised with the white of an egg, and applied toany place burnt with fire, takes out the fire, gives sudden ease, andheals it up afterwards the decoction of them fomented on any frettingsore, or canker, stays the corroding quality, which must be afterwardsanointed with an ointment made of the same liquor, hog-grease, nitre, and vinegar boiled together the roots may be preserved withsugar, and taken fasting, or at other times, for the same purposes, andfor consumptions, the stone, and the lask the seed is much commendedto break the stone, and cause it to be expelled by urine, and is oftenused with other seeds and things to that purpose cabbages and coleworts i shall spare labour in writing a description of these, since almostevery one that can but write at all, may describe them from his ownknowledge, they being generally so well known, that descriptions arealtogether needless place they are generally planted in gardens time their flower time is towards the middle, or end of july, andthe seed is ripe in august government and virtues the cabbages or coleworts boiled gentlyin broth, and eaten, do open the body, but the second decoction dothbind the body the juice thereof drank in wine, helps those that arebitten by an adder, and the decoction of the flowers brings downwomen courses. Being taken with honey, it recovers hoarseness, orloss of the voice the often eating of them well boiled, helps thosethat are entering into a consumption the pulp of the middle ribs ofcoleworts boiled in almond milk, and made up into an electuary withhoney, being taken often, is very profitable for those that are puffyand short winded being boiled twice, an old cock boiled in the brothand drank, it helps the pains and the obstructions of the liver andspleen, and the stone in the kidneys the juice boiled with honey, anddropped into the corner of the eyes, clears the sight, by consumingany film or clouds beginning to dim it. It also consumes the cankersgrowing therein they are much commended, being eaten before meat tokeep one from surfeiting, as also from being drunk with too much wine, or quickly to make a man sober again that was drunk before for asthey say there is such an antipathy or enmity between the vine and thecoleworts, that the one will die where the other grows the decoctionof coleworts takes away the pain and ache, and allays the swelling ofsores and gouty legs and knees, wherein thesis gross and watery humoursare fallen, the place being bathed therewith warm it helps also oldand filthy sores, being bathed therewith, and heals all small scabs, pushes, and wheals, that break out in the skin the ashes of colewortstalks mixed with old hog-grease, are very effectual to anoint thesides of those that have had long pains therein, or any other placepained with melancholy and windy humours this was surely chrysippusgod, and therefore he wrote a whole volume on them and their virtues, and that none of the least neither, for he would be no small fool. Heappropriates them to every writing of the body, and to every disease inevery writing.