History

Essay About Yourself


may 22, 1917 “in reply to your letter of the 15th inst , which has just been placed before me on my return to town, i have to inform you that the potent constituent of trimethol tablets and trimethol syrup is not fully available as a bactericide until it comes in contact with the pancreatic fluid “as you will see from the enclosed extracts from clinical reports, the therapeutic value of trimethol has been well established “as regards penetrability, no claim has ever been made for trimethol in this connection. And, as i pointed out in my original paper american medicine, september, 1914, when referring to the independent tests made by dr frederick sondern, ‘no attempt was made to determine the bacterial content of the solid writingicles, as in the opinion of the writer sterilization of the interior of these writingicles is not only absolutely impossible, but wholly unnecessary the fact of the fluid contents of the canal being sterile may be taken to indicate that the exterior of all solid writingicles is in a like condition, and therefore harmless it is the organisms in the fluid portions only that produce the deadly effects through the chemical substances they secrete. Those in the interior of the solid portions i e , as evacuated may be disregarded, as they are not available for good or evil ’ “i must confess to no little surprise on learning that your investigator is still using the hygienic laboratory method of determining phenol coefficients i would respectfully suggest that you call his attention to the critical comparison of the hygienic laboratory and r -w tests, which he will find in the enclosed reprint from the new york medical journal of march 11, 1916.

The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course j a m a 74:1235 may 11920 the following is the recommendation of the reference committee towhich the report of the board of trustees was referred. “a perusalof the trustees’ report, ‘cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses’, is well worth the time of every member of the profession, and yourcommittee would emphasize the statement of the trustees. ‘thecouncil, constituted of scientific men, working without remunerationin the interest of scientific medicine and the medical professionexpects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course ’“your committee would go still further and move that a vote of thanksof the house be extended to those scientific men who have devoted somuch valuable time to the welfare of the association ” j a m a , 74:1322 may 8 1920. From reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1920, p 56 w a puckner, secretary budwell emulsion of cod-liver oil, nos 1 and 2 report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe budwell pharmacal company, lynchburg, virginia, which markets thesepreparations, claims that “no 1” contains cod liver oil, “iodide ofarsenic, ” “iodide of calcium, ” and “iodide of manganese ” “no 2” issaid to contain in addition to the ingredients of no 1, creosotecarbonate and guaiacol it is known that arsenous iodid is decomposed by contact with water itis recognized that creosote carbonate is unstable and prone to liberatecreosote iodide of manganese not being official, the supply on themarket is not controlled in any way. Tests of purity are not prescribedby the pharmacopeia, the national formulary, new and nonofficialremedies or other books of standards therefore doubt must be expressedas to the accuracy of the formulas as given the council cannot acceptsuch statements of composition without further evidence “no 1” is commended for use in “chronic rheumatism, glandular swellings, later forms of syphilis, convalescence from scarlet fever, la grippe and malaria, chronic malarial infection, marasmus, joint or other suppuration of standing, diseases of skin, chorea, anaemia, neurasthenia, obstinate neuralgia, scrofulous affections in general, and diarrhea or dysentery subacute or chronic in childhood ”“no 2” is said to be “prepared especially for the treatment of chronic throat, nasal, bronchial and pulmonary diseases ”in the advertising circular statements regarding the variousingredients of budwell emulsion are quoted from obsolete textbooks these statements, for the most writing, do not represent modernopinions on the subject for instance, the circular praises the actionof guaiacol as eliminated directly by the lungs, thus exerting abeneficial local effect and causing bacilli to diminish in numbers orto disappear all of this is directly contradicted in authoritativemodern publications on pharmacology, which hold that the excretion ofguaiacol by the lungs is infinitesimal and its action on bacilli isnil the council held the preparations in conflict with its rules asfollows:1 thesis of the therapeutic claims are exaggerations 2 the method of exploitation amounts to an indirect invitation to thepublic to use these preparations as “consumption cures ”3 the preparations are unscientific, they constitute a reprehensibleinvitation to uncritical prescribing and their use is inimical to thebest interests of the profession and the public it is difficult toimagine in what conditions such a combination would be indicated thesepreparations are a remnant of the days of polypharmacy their use isnot in keeping with present medical thought and practice -- from thejournal a m a , feb 20, 1915 rheumalgine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryrheumalgine eli lilly & co , indianapolis is put up both in tabletform and as a liquid each tablet, or teaspoonful of the liquid, issaid to contain. “strontium salicylate from natural oil 5 gr hexamethylenamin 2 gr colchicine 1/200 gr ”the advertising matter contains several statements regarding theindividual ingredients to which objection must be made it is claimed quoting from hare that strontium salicylate “ is not so disagreeable to the taste as the corresponding sodium salts, and more important still, it is far less apt to disorder the stomach ”“taste” is a difficult subject to dispute. But in the experience of thereferee, patients object more to the strontium than to the sodium salt no evidence is submitted to prove that the strontium salt is less aptto disorder the stomach in observations made under the direction ofthe referee, the nauseant and emetic doses are about the same as, oreven less than, those of sodium salicylate under hexamethylenamin, the recommendations are not confined toits recognized use as a urinary antiseptic. It is also said to be“unexcelled” as a “germicide, ” and to prevent the formation of urateand phosphate deposits these statements are contrary to facts “rheumalgine may be used in all paper where the salicylates are indicated it is superior to preparations containing sodium salicylate, in that it does not cause nausea or disturb the digestion ”both the preceding statements are misleading the necessity of giving1/200 grain of colchicin for each 5 grains of salicylate wouldcertainly interfere with the use of adequate doses of the latter thecolchicin would produce digestive disturbance quite awriting from thesalicylate the mixture is described as. “ antirheumatic, antipyretic, urinary antiseptic, and uric acid eliminant useful in acute articular and chronic rheumatism, muscular pains, lumbago, sciatica, migraine of the rheumatic, gout, and in nervous irritability of the gouty or lithemic ”the facts are. Salicylates are useful in essay of these conditions, colchicin occasionally in a few, hexamethylenamin in none the combination is conducive to uncritical prescribing forinstance, salicylates are effective in acute articular rheumatism;hexamethylenamin and colchicin are useless. Salicylates are of verylittle use in chronic rheumatism, sciatica and nervous irritability, while hexamethylenamin and colchicin are useless in these conditions;colchicin is essaytimes effective in gout, salicylates perhaps also;hexamethylenamin is not attention should also be called to the high dosage of colchicin, namely, 1/100 to 1/50 of a grain of the alkaloid, every three orfour hours, the dose then to be “slightly reduced, ” but continuedfor several days. Or in chronic paper, 1/100 to 1/30 grain per day, continued indefinitely this dosage appears high, if a really activepreparation is used finally, the name “rheumalgine” encourages thoughtless and unscientificprescribing if a mixture is used at all, the prescriber should beconstantly reminded of its composition it is therefore recommended that rheumalgine be held in conflict withrules 6 unwarranted therapeutic claims, 8 nondescriptive name and10 unscientific composition -- from the journal a m a , june 26, 1915 gray glycerine tonic report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council adopted the following report and authorized its publication w a puckner, secretary gray glycerine tonic comp purdue frederick company, new york isa mixture said to be made according to a prescription of the late dr john p gray, superintendent of the state hospital, utica, new york asto the composition, the following statement is furnished by the company. “this preparation is a combination of glycerine, sherry wine, gentian, taraxacum and phosphoric acid with carminatives ”the label declares the presence of 11 per cent alcohol, and the doseis given at from two teaspoonfuls to a tablespoonful a study ofthe ingredients will show that, aside from the alcohol, the mixturecontains but one really active drug, gentian essentially, then, “gray glycerine tonic” is a mixture which, in addition to thenarcotic effect of the alcohol, depends on a bitter, gentian, forwhatever therapeutic action it may possess the bitters, of which gentian is a type, were once credited withthesis therapeutic virtues which time has shown they do not possess pharmacologic research has demonstrated that their utility consists instimulating the appetite through their action on the taste buds onthis account they were believed also to increase the secretion of thegastric juice by a psychic impression more recently, however, eventhis has been questioned-- by carlson, for instance these facts are fully understood, presumably, by all physicians yet, according to the advertising circular, this “tonic, ” which, for allpractical purposes, is merely a simple bitter, is good for thirty-twodiseases ranging from amenorrhea to whooping cough!. The conditions in which gray glycerine tonic is asserted to beespecially efficient are described on the label of the bottle and theoutside wrapper, in popular terms, more or less typical of “patentmedicine” exploitation, such as “catarrhal conditions, ” and “stomachderangements ” similar statements are contained in the leafletaccompanying the trade package for instance.

Diarrhœa is common, vomiting is not theskin is pale and dusky, but not commonly icteric. At first it is hotand dry, later moist and finally cold and clammy the spleen is oftenenlarged the pulse becomes weak and rapid and delirium is followed bycoma the prognosis is grave antiseptic treatment generally preventsand often cures the disease, as is the case with thesis other of thewound diseases. Hence the failure to employ it may be alleged by thedefence in mitigation of the responsibility of the assailant for thefatal result pyæmia is closely allied to septicæmia it is due to the settingfree of bacterial emboli or septic emboli from a broken-down, septicthrombus in the neighborhood of the wound, and the circulation of theseemboli in the blood until they are arrested and form the characteristicmetastatic abscesses, especially in the lungs, joints, abdominalviscera, and parotid gland almost always the source of infection is aninfected wound granulation does not prevent the occurrence of pyæmia, which, as a rule, commences at a later stage than septicæmia it ismost important, however, for our purpose to remember that there issuch a thing as spontaneous pyæmia an injury not causing a wound mayhere be the exciting cause, but the resulting pyæmia is an unexpectedconsequence a bruise of a bone, for instance, by allowing bacteria, which in certain conditions may be circulating in the blood, to findan exit from the vessels into the bruised writing, may develop an acuteosteo-myelitis, which may be a starting-point of a pyæmia it is butproper to state, however, that spontaneous pyæmia is a rare occurrence in fact, it is so rare that if pyæmia occurs and we find ever sotrifling an infected wound, we can safely attribute the pyæmia to thewound and not to a spontaneous origin pyæmia begins, as a rule, in the second week of the healing process oreven later it usually begins with a chill, which may be frequentlyrepeated the fever is very irregular and exacerbations occur witheach metastatic abscess the skin is icteric, the icterus beinghematogenous the pulse is rapid and becomes weaker infectiveendocarditis may develop, which increases the danger of metastaticabscesses, which may then occur in the brain otherwise the mind isclear and unaffected until the final delirium and coma the disease maybecome chronic, but usually lasts a week or ten days the prognosis isvery grave erysipelas is a still more frequent complication of medico-legalwounds, and though not so fatal as the two preceding, it is probablymore often the secondary cause of death on account of its far greaterfrequence it too is an acute infective inflammation due to thepresence of a micro-organism, streptococcus erysipelatis this occursmostly in the lymphatics of the skin, and effects an entrance throughessay wound or abrasion of the skin or mucous membrane, which may bealmost microscopic in size probably there is no such thing as truespontaneous erysipelas, though the wound may be often overlooked andonly visible on the closest examination if a wound has been inflicted, the size and severity of it cannot be alleged as a reason why itwas not the starting-point of an erysipelas the erysipelas must beclearly traced to the injury that is, it must occur before recoveryfrom the wound or not later than a week after it has healed, for theincubation is probably not longer than this it is difficult to connectan erysipelas with a wound if it occurs essay time after it has healedor if it occurs at a different place and not about the wound wounds ofcertain regions, as, for instance, scalp wounds, are especially liableto develop erysipelas, but this is probably owing to the imperfectantiseptic treatment or delay in applying it certain individuals aremore prone to it than others. Thus it has been stated that blondes andthose suffering from bright disease are more susceptible, though howtrue this is it is hard to say it is also probably more prevalent atcertain times of the year, writingicularly in the spring a wound after ithas scabbed over or has begun to granulate, that is, after the firstfour or five days, is very much less apt to serve as the avenue forinfection erysipelas usually begins with a chill, or a convulsion inchildren nausea and vomiting are the rule the fever is remittent andranges from 102° to 104° f , and the temperature may be subnormal whenthe inflammation is subsiding prostration is marked and the pulse moreor less weak there may be delirium while the fever is high locallythere is rarely anything characteristic until twenty-four hours orso after the chill then we have a reddish blush with essay tension, burning and itching of the skin at first the redness is most markedabout the wound, later at the edge of the advancing, serpentine margin it spreads widely and rapidly, and after three or four days the writingfirst attacked begins to improve desquamation follows the durationmay be a week or ten days or as long as a month the inflammation maybe much more severe, involving the subcutaneous connective tissue inphlegmonous erysipelas facial erysipelas is a common variety and was once regarded asidiopathic, but a wound on the skin or mucous membrane is probablyalways present the prognosis of erysipelas is usually favorable since the use of antiseptics it is far less common than formerly, though still the most common of the infective wound diseases if a man wounded in an assault is taken to a hospital where erysipelasprevails, the question of responsibility arises, for, medicallyspeaking, he is subjected to great and avoidable risks tetanus is an infective bacterial disease affecting chiefly the centralnervous system and almost always, if not always, originating from awound tetanus, like erysipelas, is probably always traumatic and neverstrictly idiopathic the wound may be so slight as to escape notice when it follows such injuries as simple fracture internal infectionprobably occurs, though such paper are extremely rare it is saidthat the weather influences the development of tetanus, and that itis more common in the tropics there are also certain sections wheretetanus is much more common than elsewhere and where it may be said tobe almost endemic punctured wounds are most likely to be followed bytetanus, for they offer the best opportunity for the development of thebacteria, which are anaërobic wounds in dirty writings of the body, likethe hands and feet, are more apt to be followed by tetanus than thoseelsewhere tetanus usually appears about the end of the first weekafter a wound has been received, but it may not appear for a longerperiod, even three or four weeks, so that the wound may have been essaytime healed to connect tetanus with a writingicular wound, note 1 ifthere were any symptoms of it before the wound or injury, 2 whetherany other cause intervened after the wound or injury which would belikely to produce it, and 3 whether the deceased ever rallied fromthe effects of the injury tetanus comes on suddenly without warning the injured person first notices that he cannot fully open the mouth, he has lock-jaw, and the back of the neck is stiff the muscles of theabdomen and back are next involved so that the back is arched in theposition known as opisthotonos, and the abdomen presents a board-likehardness the muscles of the fauces, pharynx, and diaphragm may nextbecome involved, causing difficulty in swallowing and breathing the thighs may or may not be involved, but the arms and legs almostnever owing to the spasm of the abdominal muscles, micturition anddefecation are difficult and respiration is hindered the muscles arein the condition of tonic spasm which permits the patient no rest, theface bears the “risus sardonicus, ” and the suffering is extreme ifthe patient lives more than two or three days the tonic spasm writinglygives way to increased reflex irritability, in which a noise, jar, or draught of air may give rise to clonic and tonic spasms in themuscles affected the patient may die at such times from tonic spasmof the respiratory muscles, or he may die of prostration from wantof food and sleep, worn out by the suffering and muscular spasm themind is usually clear to the last fever is not characteristic of thedisease tetanus may be rapidly fatal. In two or three days, or it maybe or become more chronic the prognosis of acute tetanus is almostinvariably fatal. That of chronic tetanus is grave, but a certainproportion of paper recover diagnosis - this is easy it differs from a true neuritis in theperipheral nerves in that no matter where the wound is situated thefirst symptom is in the muscles of the jaw and the back of the neck, and not at the site of the injury and distally from this point trismus is applied to a milder form of the disease in which onlythe face and neck muscles are involved and “lock-jaw” is a prominentsymptom essay paper of tetany may be mistaken for so-calledspontaneous tetanus tetany may follow child-bed, fevers, mentalshocks, exposure to cold and wet, extirpation of goitre, intestinalirritation, etc it consists of painful tonic spasms of the muscles ofthe arms and feet the attacks last one-half to two hours or more, andmay be preceded by a dragging pain they may be brought on by pressureon the nerve leading to the muscles affected striking the facial nerveoften causes contraction of the face muscles there is no trismus butthere may be opisthotonos the patient seems well between the attacksand most paper recover without treatment delirium tremens may occur as a secondary consequence of injuries, ornecessary surgical operations in the case of those who are habituallyintemperate those who habitually use opium, tobacco, cannabis indica, or even tea or coffee to excess are said to be subject to it itmay, therefore, be justly alleged that death is avoidable in verythesis paper, but for an abnormal and unhealthy state of the body the disease is characterized by delirium, a peculiar tremor of themuscles, insomnia, and anorexia pneumonia may complicate the case the patients die in fatal paper from exhaustion due to insomnia, lack of nourishment, and their constant activity of body and mind the prognosis is usually favorable, taking all paper together, butin delirium tremens secondary to surgical injuries or operations theprognosis is serious death from surgical operations performed for the treatment of wounds the operation is a writing of the treatment, and if it is done withordinary care and skill the accused is responsible for the result the necessity and mode of operation must be left to the operatorjudgment as the defence may turn on the necessity for and the skilfulperformance of the operation, it is well to wait for the advice andassistance of others if practicable, for death is not unusual fromsevere operations the patient may die on the operating-table afterlosing little blood, from fear, pain, or shock or he may die fromsecondary hemorrhage or any of the secondary causes of death fromwounds enumerated above the evidence of the necessity of the operationmust, therefore, be presented by the operator if an operation isnecessary and not performed, the defence might allege that deathwas due to the neglect of the surgeon another question for themedical witnesses to determine is whether the operation was renderednecessary because of improper previous treatment, for if it was theresponsibility of the assailant may be influenced the meaning of theterm “necessity” is here a matter of importance unless an operationis necessary to the preservation of life, if death occurs there isessay doubt whether the assailant is responsible but, medicallyspeaking, we would not hesitate to urge an operation on a wounded manin order to preserve function, or even to save deformity as well as tosave life in the case of operations done under a mistaken opinion, neither necessary to save life nor, as the result proves, to savefunction or guard against deformity, if death follows the assailantmay be relieved from responsibility thus an aneurism following aninjury might be mistaken for an abscess and opened with skill butwith a fatal result it is also for the medical experts to determinewhether an operation was unnecessary or unskilfully performed, forif it were and death resulted from it, the responsibility of theprisoner is affected unless the original wound would be likely to befatal without operation according to lord hale, if death results froman unskilful operation and not from the wound, the prisoner is notresponsible but yet death may occur as the result of the most skilfuloperation necessary to the treatment of a wound, and not be dependentat all on the wound itself if the operation is skilfully performed, and yet the patient dies from secondary causes, such as those aboveenumerated or any others, the prisoner is still responsible, and themedical testimony is concerned with the performance of the operationand the secondary causes of death the relative skill of the operatoror surgeon is probably not a question for the jury in criminal paper, on the ground that the man who inflicts the injury must take all theconsequences, good or bad in a civil suit, for instance an actionfor malpractice, the case is otherwise, and all the medical facts andopinions are submitted to the jury the law regards three circumstancesin death after surgical operations. 1 the necessity of the operation, 2 the competence of the operator, and 3 whether the wound would befatal without operation death may occur from anæsthetics used in an operation without anyrecognizable contributing disease of the patient, or carelessness orlack of skill in the administration of the anæsthetic of course, thequestion of absence of contributing disease on the writing of the patientand of its proper administration must be satisfactorily answered inpaper of death from the anæsthetic in an operation rendered necessaryin the treatment of a wound death from an anæsthetic may occur before, during, or after an operation itself medically speaking, the necessityof the use of an anæsthetic in operations cannot be questioned, andin emergencies where an operation becomes necessary, and not a matterof choice, its use, with special care, is justifiable even withexisting organic disease, which usually contraindicates it as deathmay be alleged to be due to the use of a writingicular anæsthetic, it isalways best in operating on account of an injury which may requirea medico-legal investigation, to use that anæsthetic which is mostgenerally used and indorsed in the writingicular section of country inquestion of course, it is not lawful to operate against the willof a person who preserves consciousness and will it may be addedin this connection that if a medical man be guilty of misconduct, arising either from gross ignorance or criminal inattention, wherebythe patient dies, he is guilty of manslaughter, according to lordellenborough omissions or errors in judgment, to which all are liable, are not criminal iv was the wound made by the instrument described?. It is not often necessary to prove that a weapon was used, though itmay affect the punishment for the use of a weapon implies malice andintention and a greater desire to do injury the prisoner may swearthat no weapon was used when the nature of the wound clearly provesthat one was used the explanation of the prisoner of the origin of thewound may thus be discredited we cannot often swear that a writingicularweapon was used, but only that the wound was made by one similar to itin shape and size thus schwörer tells of the case of a man stabbed inthe face by another the medical witness testified that the wound wascaused by a knife shown at the trial which had a whole blade, but ayear later the point of the knife which had really caused the wound wasdischarged from an abscess in the cheek at the site of the wound thesurgeon thus made a too definite statement in regard to the knife shown it is often very difficult to answer the above question we baseour opinion chiefly on two sources. 1st, and most important, by anexamination of the wound, and, 2d, by an examination of the instrumentsaid to have been used certain writingiculars of the wound may furnishindications as to the weight, form, and sharpness of the instrumentused there are certain wounds which must have been made by aninstrument, namely, incised and punctured wounds the above questionis determined more or less by what has been said in a former sectionon wounds, but we will now consider what special features of these andother classes of wounds indicate the nature, shape, size, etc , of theweapon used incised wounds must be made by a cutting instrument we would hereexclude those contused wounds of the scalp and eyebrows which closelyresemble incised wounds, but we have already seen that we can diagnosebetween these wounds and incised wounds by careful inspection but thelocality should put us on our guard, so that in case of wounds of thesetwo regions we should be especially careful in making the examination in the case of incised wounds we cannot often tell the shape or size ofthe weapon, but we are able to tell certain characteristics about it the sharpness of the instrument may be inferred from the clean andregular edges the depth of the wound may also indicate the sharpnessof the weapon a long “tail” in the wound indicates that the weapon wassharp as well as that this was the writing of the wound last made if theedges of the wound are rough, we may infer that the edges of the weaponwere rough and irregular wounds caused by bits of china or glass orfragments of bottles, besides having rough and lacerated edges, arecharacterized by an irregular or angular course in the skin essay cutting weapons, like an axe, act as much by means of their weightas by their cutting edges wounds caused by such weapons we can oftendistinguish by the following signs. The edges are not as smooth asis the case with a cutting instrument, and they may be more or lesslacerated and show signs of contusion the wound is often deep incomparison with its length, and the ends of the wound abrupt instead ofslanting up from the bottom to the surface the section of resistingorgans and the impression of the edge of the weapon on the bone arefurther signs of the use of such a weapon the form and direction of a wound may possibly give essay indication ofthe form of the instrument for instance, whether it be straight orcurved like a pruning-knife, as in the case cited by vibert636 of awound of the neck which suddenly became deeper toward its extremity andchanged its direction. The whole being explained on the suppositionthat it was made by a pruning-knife but it is in punctured wounds especially that we are enabled mostoften and most accurately to determine the kind of a weapon used here from the form of the wound we may judge of the form and size ofthe weapon in speaking of punctured wounds in a former section wedivided them into four groups, reference to which may here be made inthe first group, or those caused by cylindrical or conical weapons, when the weapon is very fine it may leave no track at all.

"oh, that is the lightship " i thought at the time it was a peculiar character for a lightship, but dismissed the thought, thinking, "different ships, different fashions "rose had told the british colonel that this signal was a german torpedo boat with which he had arranged a meeting, and that the colonel had gone inside to tell the rest of the prisoner passengers, which would give them all a scare he also suggested that i should go inside and tell them it was a u-boat, and that i recognised the sound of her signal i laughed, and told him i had made so thesis remarks regarding the blockade that i was afraid to speak to them shortly after this i went into my cabin and essay about yourself was standing looking out of the port-hole and talking to my wife, when i noticed that we had altered our course, by the bearing of the fog signal, and knew that rose wanted to pass the lightship close aboard suddenly i felt the vessel smell the bottom i looked at the wife and said. "holy poker!. i thought i felt her smell the bottom " no sooner had i said this than the igotz mendi ran slap bang on the beach, about 350 yards off shore and less than half mile away from the lighthouse rose's mistaking the lighthouse signal for the lightship's signal was a lucky piece of business for us because i knew for an absolute certainty when i felt the igotz mendi had taken the beach that it would require the assistance of a powerful tug to get her off again i guess we all realised just how much this stranding meant to us, and the very nearness of freedom kept everybody quiet and busy with his own thoughts and plans i know that for one i had decided to get over the side and swim for it, provided the vessel should give any indications of getting off the beach right after the stranding, the weather being foggy, we were allowed on deck one of the neutral sailors, a dane named jensen, identified the spot where we were ashore and gave me the good news that the little town of skagen was only about two miles distant, and that one of the best life-saving crews in europe was stationed there sure enough, in about an hour a life-boat drew up alongside we were all chased inside again rose invited the captain of the life-boat on board, and took him into the chart room just above the saloon for a drink and talk our lady prisoners immediately commenced playing a game of "button, button, who's got the button?. " laughing and talking at the top of their voices, so that this man on top of the saloon would know that there were women on board also little nita did a crying act that could be heard, i am sure shortly rose came down with a blank scowl on his face and said. "you people can cut out the noise now, as the stranger has gone ashore "essaybody asked rose why he didn't introduce us to his friend, and rose answered. "what do you think i am a fool?. " nobody went on record with an opinion, so the matter was dropped in the meantime, lieutenant wolf had gone ashore and had 'phoned from the lighthouse at scow point, where we were ashore, to a salvage company in skagen, saying that we were a german merchant ship bound from bergen, norway, to kiel, and that we had run ashore in the fog. And that if a tug was sent immediately we could be pulled off easily, but if we were allowed to lie any length of time, the ship would bed herself in the sand and it would mean a long delay in getting off i understand he offered 25, 000 kroner for the job. At any rate, the manager of the salvage company ordered his largest tug, the viking, around, but instructed his captain not to put a line on board until the manager had gone down overland and investigated a little lieutenant wolf in the meantime returned on board and reported to rose, who was immensely tickled and told us that about midnight a tug would arrive from "a nearby town" and pull us into deep water, and that by four o'clock in the morning at the latest we would be on our way to gerthesis once more this news led to great consternation among us, and essay great arguments regarding neutrality laws were carried on on all the trip the colonel had been quoting the geneva convention, until we had all concluded that this writingicular convention was held for the express benefit of the medical officers of the army i asked the colonel if he remembered anything in the geneva convention regarding the grounding of a belligerent's prize on neutral ground he answered by saying that clause so and so, paragraph so and so, expressly stated that all medical officers should be exempt from at this point i butted in and told him to "go to hell". That there were women and children and other prisoners on board as well as medical officers all throughout the trip this man had behaved like a dog in a manger, being the quintessence of egotistical selfishness, and despised by us, one and all the conclusion of all our argument was that might was right in this war, and that the germans would do just what they liked, provided they could hoodwink the danish officials the manager of the danish salvaging company, on arriving at the lighthouse and talking with the various people there, concluded that perhaps things were not just right with the igotz mendi and that he had better get in touch with the danish naval authorities before doing anything he called up the commander of the danish cruiser diana and stated the case, saying that things didn't appear to be just right the commander, a lieutenant lagoni, getting in touch with the authorities, 'phoned the manager of the salvage company that he would come right down to investigate at about midnight the diana arrived and lieutenant lagoni, being a gentleman and also a shrewd, wide-awake officer, took his chief officer on board the igotz mendi, telling him that he, the commander, would keep the captain of the igotz mendi busy answering questions in the saloon while the chief officer should have a good look around and gather what information he could as soon as the danish commander arrived on board we were all pushed and shoved into our rooms and the doors closed when rose started to take lieutenant lagoni into the chart room above the lieutenant said.

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The nose and mouth were full, but there was none in the throat. A few grains in the trachea tardieu experimented on rabbits and guinea pigs by burying them in bran, sand, and gravel, essay of them being alive and the others dead in those buried alive he found the substance filling the mouth and nose to the base of the tongue. In most of the paper the œsophagus and trachea were not penetrated in the animals first killed and then buried, the substance had not passed into the mouth or nose in one case only he found ashes in the larynx and trachea of a rabbit which had been buried thesis hours after death in a box of ashes matthyssen934 held a guinea pig, head downward, with its nose under mercury. The lungs were full of globules of mercury which has a specific gravity of 13 5 a dog was plunged head first into liquid plaster-of-paris. The plaster was found in the bronchial tubes illustrative paper accidental 1 huppert. Vier ger med und öff san , 1876, xxiv , pp 237-252 - two paper a man choked by piece of bread in pharynx second, an epileptic, suffocated by flexion of chin on larynx inboth paper seminal fluid was found in urethra near meatus, unexpelled;determined by microscope 2 johnson. Lancet, 1878, ii , p 501 - boy swallowed penny, becameblack in face. Eyeballs protruded. Symptoms soon subsided essay hoursafterward it was found that he could not swallow solids, and liquidsonly with difficulty and coughing throat much irritated. Discharge ofmucus essaytimes tinged with blood, from mouth. Moist rattling noise inthroat in respiration.