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Pulserapid and of low tension. Respiration 50. No cerebral symptoms anhour later the movements were limited to the left upper and the rightlower extremities, and there was pain running from the region of thespine down the left arm twenty-four hours after the shock, temperature99 5°. Respiration 40. Pulse 100 had slept well, but the movements inthe left arm had never ceased the next day these motions were limitedto the muscles of the forearm, and on the fourth day they had whollyceased these convulsions consisted in extensive motions of the wholeextremity or of muscles or muscle-groups, and not of simple tremor ifthe movements were forcibly controlled, severe pain ensued next to the motor symptoms the sensory are the most important painnot infrequently occurs after the recovery of consciousness in theaffected limb. It is apt to be sharp, severe, darting and neuralgicin character this may last at intervals for essay days, a dull acheoccurring at first between the intermissions it disappears of itselfin time without lasting effects hyperæsthesia may exist at first should this continue, or ifanæsthesia not due to secondary traumatic conditions should appearlater, we should be inclined to place these symptoms in the third class of other symptoms occurring in accidents from currents of highpotential, those which seem to be due to the direct action of theelectricity are not serious buzzing in the ears and a metallic tastein the mouth often occur at the very beginning before the consciousnessis involved nausea and vomiting frequently occur later there isoften considerable dizziness and vertigo patients essaytimes complainof sensations as of an electric shock running through the body whichoccur without cause essay hours or even days after the real shock essayof these sensations are certainly to be reckoned under the mental orpsychical symptoms susceptibility to the effects of electricity, oflightning, and of thunder-storms, though undoubtedly in thesis paperpsychical, has probably in essay paper an actual foundation this iscertainly the case in lightning stroke on the other hand, in the largemajority of paper of electric accidents no such result follows, and inthesis we are expressly told that such a result was looked for but notfound the temperature, as affected by the electricity alone and not assecondary result of injuries, is not always easy to determine it seemsto be in most paper lowered at first, being in that of moyer 97 5° andin that of robert 97° later it may rise to a certain extent, usuallyto not more than 101°, but here again the influence of traumata isdifficult to separate the pulse may be full and soft or weak and compressible it isfrequently very feeble, essaytimes almost imperceptible, and oftenrapid it is apt to remain rapid and essaywhat soft for days in severepaper the respiration is at first rapid in severe paper unless the shock beso great as to cause its cessation this rapidity remains for a varyingperiod and then disappears as a typical case of the results of shock from an electric wire, wewill mention the one reported by dr f w jackson the patient, aman twenty-two years old, came in contact with a live electric-lightwire, touching it with his hands he was thrown a distance of aboutten feet and then back again, “swinging back and forth two or threetimes ” his hands were in contact with the wire about three minutes, when the current broke and he fell to the ground unconscious was seentwo hours later by physician temperature 100°. Pulse 100, strong andbounding. Pupils dilated. Headache. Nervous and irritable.

And that smith815 mentions the caseof a criminal who was do my homework for free online hung. Chovet tried to save the man by making anopening in the trachea before the execution and introducing a smalltube the man was alive forty-five minutes after the drop, but couldnot be resuscitated, although the surgeon bled him in a small proportion of paper of hanging, homicidal and judicial, death occurs by dislocation of the spine this is said to have beenfirst noticed by the celebrated louis, who states that the parisexecutioner was in the habit of giving a violent rotary movement tothe body of the convict as the trap was sprung, causing a dislocationof the odontoid process and compression of the cord and almost instantdeath taylor816 says that for dislocation the body must be heavy andthe fall long and sudden devergie817 found this to occur in abouttwo per cent of paper it is said that the paris hangman placed theslip-knot under the chin in front, which is as dr haughton suggests death may occur from secondary causes after apparent recovery. Fromcongestion of brain and other lesions of the nervous system. These mayprove fatal at remote periods fracture of the odontoid process according to m de fosse is morecommon than dislocation, and the giving away of the intervertebralsubstance more likely than either of the others the phrenic andother respiratory nerves are likely to be paralyzed. The vertebral andcarotid arteries may be ruptured the medulla oblongata is also likelyto be fatally injured death may also occur from hemorrhage upon thecord, causing pressure besides the ropes used as ligatures in judicial hanging, almost everyconceivable article that could be made into the semblance of a cord hasbeen used by suicides.

“kalak has accomplished certain unexplainable things for the diabetic and nephritic, and if, in future years, diabetes and nephritis should prove to be constitutional diseases, based upon functionation or its lack, kalak therapy, the embodiment of physiological alkalescence may come into its own, for if acidity retards, alkalinity must normalize functionation ”it is not necessary to quote further in order to insure that everyonewill recognize the great need of kalak it is advised to test the urinefor acidity by means of a group of indicator solutions sent out to thephysicians methyl red is one of these and any urine showing an acidreaction with this is said to be open to suspicion paranitrophenol isanother of the indicators and the explanations given of the behavior ofthe two and the conclusions to be drawn are questionable the methylred solution furnished is too concentrated for proper use and perfectlynormal urines from normal individuals have given a rather marked colorwith it this indicator gives essay color at h 1 2 × 10^{-6} and astrong reaction at 3 × 10^{-3} do my homework for free online to condemn a urine on such a finding isentirely unwarranted sodium bicarbonate is the main constituent of the water the valueof the phosphate in such a combination, with so much calcium, isproblematical in case an alkaline reaction in the intestine is reachedessay of it would be left as insoluble phosphate a few grams ofbicarbonate daily would have equal therapeutic value with this water the advice based on the indications of methyl red and the urine is bad the committee report was sent to the kalak water company for comment the company promised to withdraw the advertising circular referred toin the report and disclaimed responsibility for the accuracy and valueof the set of indicators which it sent out, but, on the whole, theprevious advertising claims were insisted on in view of the absurd and false claims made for the product the councildeclared kalak water inadmissible to n n r -- from reports ofcouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, 1917, p 148 minson soluble iodin “kelpidine” not admitted to n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryminson soluble iodin “kelpidine” was submitted to the council byj j minson, washington, d c , trading as the kelpidine company, with the statement that in future “literature” it was to be known asminson soluble iodin, only the following statement of compositionwas furnished. “minson soluble iodin is essaywhat of an indefinite character, chemically its formula is, iodin 4 per cent , distilled water 6 per cent , and absolute alcohol q s 100 per cent by a process of chilling and heating an iodid of uncertain character is produced, and because of the extreme sensitiveness of the product to chemical tests, it is hard to determine so far as i have been able to judge, however, the result is about 3 or 3-1/2 per cent free iodin and from 1/2 per cent to 1 per cent iodid, possibly ethyl and hydrogen iodid in combination ”the a m a chemical laboratory reports that the preparation is analcoholic solution containing free iodin and iodid, probably hydrogeniodid and ethyl iodid, but that the free iodin content was only2 69 gm per 100 c c it is claimed that the “therapeutic indications” of minson solubleiodin are the “same as those of all iodin and iodid preparations, internally, externally, hypodermically and intravenously. Excepting, however, counter irritation ” it is admitted that there are no“clinical reports” as to the hypodermic and intravenous use, but thebelief is expressed “that in an emergency it is a safe remedy underproper dilution ” it is further claimed that “for all practicalpurposes it is nontoxic and nonirritating” and that “it has none ofthe undesirable features such as is the case with the iodids and theorganic preparations of iodin, proprietary or otherwise ”it was assigned for consideration to the committee on pharmacology, whose referee reported:“according to the information submitted, this is a tincture of iodin;differing from the official tincture in that it is more dilute and inthat hydrogen and ethyl iodid is the solvent in place of potassiumiodid it is practically immaterial for internal administration, whether the cation of the solvent iodid is hydrogen, ethyl, potassiumor sodium it would certainly be inadvisable to inject a preparationcontaining free iodin hypodermically it is not ‘a safe remedy’ forintravenous injection and it would not be nonirritant the statementthat ‘it has none of the undesirable features’ of other iodin compoundsis inherently impossible apparent freedom of any iodin preparationfrom undesirable effects is generally due to the use of small doses such claims are plainly therapeutic exaggerations and therefore inconflict with rule 6 even should these be removed, the preparationmust be held an unessential modification of the official tincture, andtherefore in conflict with rule 10 ”the report was agreed to by the committee and adopted by the counciland minson soluble iodin “kelpidine” declared inadmissible to newand nonofficial remedies -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1917, p 152 nutone report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrynutone nutone company, lowell, mass is a “nutritive tonic” said tohave the following complex composition. Cod liver oil, pure norwegian, 25 per cent malt extract, 9-1/3 per cent beef juice, glycerine, hypophosphite lime, hypophosphite soda, chemically pure, 1-1/2 grs each to the oz fl ext nux vomica, 3/64 of a minimum in each teaspoonful it is advertised with claims that will lead thoughtless physiciansand a confiding public to depend on it in paper in which fresh air, hygienic surroundings and nutritious food are of prime importance a sample package the phrase “as recommended by your physician” andother statements suggest that it is expected to be given the patientby the physician and thus effectively advertise nutone to the publicdescribes nutone as an “agreeable concentrated nutritive tonic emulsionof malt extract, beef juice and cod liver oil, combined with nervetonics and bone nutrients ” emphasizing the nutritive value of this“malt extract, beef juice, and cod liver oil” preparation, it isadvised, “as nutone is rich in nutritive properties, it is well tobegin with one-fourth teaspoonful, gradually increasing to regulardose, which is. Adults, 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls after meals and at bedtime children according to age ” it thus appears that adults are to takethis preparation as a “nutritive” in doses which represent from 3 to12 grains of sugar on the assumption that malt extract may contain asmuch as 50 per cent sugar and 8 to 30 minims of cod liver oil withunstated, but probably equally small, amounts of beef juice a consideration of the negligible food value of nutone as well asof the inefficiency of the other components and the claim that itis indicated in “malnutrition, ” “wasting diseases” and “incipientphthisis” classes nutone with that large group of shotgun mixtureswhich do harm in that dependence is placed on them in conditions inwhich the patient will probably be restored to health if proper medicaland hygienic measures are adopted in time the council declared nutone inadmissible to new and nonofficialremedies because it is an irrational shotgun mixture advertisedindirectly to the public with unwarranted therapeutic claims and anondescriptive therapeutically suggestive name -- from reports ofcouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, 1917, p 154 tri-arsenole, l o compound no 1 and l o compound no 2 report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrytri-arsenole -- according to the advertising of themedical supply company of atlanta, ga , “tri-arsenole” is“merco-arseno-benzo-chloride, ” and the claim is made. “this compound is the result of thesis years’ research the toxicity has been fully tested upon animals before using clinically, the latter having proven such complete success, we take pleasure in presenting it to the public ” “the manufacturers of tri-arsenol, before placing it upon the market, tested it biologically ”tri-arsenole is “recommended and suitable for the treatment of primary, secondary, tertiary and hereditary syphilis it has also been foundvery useful in pellagra and malaria ” the preparation is supplied inampules containing varying amounts of the dry substance it is to bedissolved in water and is to be administered intravenously in theadvertising attention is called to the yellow color of tri-arsenole;this, and the style of package suggest that it is a preparation similarto salvarsan in reply to a request sent the medical supply company for thequantitative composition and chemical formula of the compound“merco-arseno-benzo-chloride” and for the details of the biologic testby which its toxicity is claimed to have been determined and evidencefor its efficiency, the following statement was received. “tri-arsenole no 1 equals to each ampoule, gr sodium chlorid 4-1/2 hydrarg chlor -cor 1/4 arsenous acid 1/4 sodium benzoate 4 hydrastin resinoid 2 tri-arsenole no 2 equals to each ampoule, sodium chlorid 4 hydrarg chlor -cor 1/2 arsenous acid 1/2 sodium benzoate 4 hydrastin resinoid 2 tri-arsenole no 3 equals to each ampoule, sodium chlorid 3-1/2 hydrarg chlor -cor 3/4 arsenous acid 3/4 sodium benzoate 4 hydrastin resinoid 2 tri-arsenole no 4 equals to each ampoule, sodium chlorid 3 hydrarg chlor -cor 1 arsenous acid 1 sodium benzoate 4 hydrastin resinoid 2the request for information regarding the animal experiments said tohave determined the toxicity was ignored, nor were references suppliedto clinical reports demonstrating the value of the product the council declared tri-arsenole inadmissible to new and nonofficialremedies because of conflict with the rules as follows:in the absence of details of the method used, the claim that thepreparation has been tested biologically is in conflict with rule 2, which requires that for preparations claimed to be physiologicallystandardized the method of testing must be published so as to permit ofcontrol by independent investigators the claims that “merco-arseno-benzo-chloride” is “the result of thesisyears research, ” that its “toxicity has been fully tested upon animalsbefore using clinically” and that clinical use has “proven suchcomplete success” have not been substantiated by evidence and must beheld as unwarranted the name is in conflict with rule 8, which requires that pharmaceuticalmixtures shall bear names descriptive of their composition further, the name “tri-arsenole” by its similarity to diarsenol, the canadianbrand of arseno-phenolamin hydrochlorid, suggests that thispharmaceutical mixture is a chemical compound similar to salvarsan moreover, the danger of confusion is increased by the addition ofthe hydrastis preparation which imwritings a yellow color like that ofsalvarsan to the solution obtained when the colorless mercury andarsenic compounds of the mixture are dissolved again, the synonym“merco-arseno-benzo-chloride” conveys the false impression thattri-arsenole is a definite chemical compound the label does not declare the poisonous constituents claimed tobe contained in the mixture. Namely, “arsenous acid” and corrosivemercuric chlorid rule 7 there is no evidence that arsenous acid arsenic trioxid usedintravenously is efficient and safe as a spirocheticide, and theadministration of this drug in conjunction with mercuric chloridin fixed proportion is irrational and dangerous-- writingicularly sobecause of the implied similarity of tri-arsenole to arsenphenolaminhydrochlorid salvarsan, diarsenol rule 10 l o compound no 1 and l o compound no 2 -- in submitting thesepreparations to the council, the medical supply company stated that“no 1” was “composed of the following ingredients. Chloral, camphor, menthol, iodin, and oil of gualtheria, incorporated in a fatty base each ounce contains fifteen grains of chloral hydrate, nine grainsof resublimed iodine ” “no 2” was said to have the same compositionas “no 1” except that the oil of gaultheria had been omitted themedical supply company was informed that the rules of the councilrequired declaration of the amounts of each therapeutic constituentof pharmaceutical mixtures and that, therefore, in addition to theinformation furnished the amounts of camphor, menthol and oil ofgualtheria should be given for “no 1” and the amount of camphor andmenthol for “no 2 ” the following reply was received. “l o compound no 1 equals to each tube, chloral hydrate gr 15 camphor gr 22 menthol gr 7-1/2 iodin resublime gr 3-2/3 oil of gaultheria m 3 petrolatum, q s oz 1 l o compound no 2, the same as above formula for l o c no 1, except the oil of gaultheria which is omitted ”it should be noted that when the preparations were submitted each ounceof the preparation was claimed to contain 9 grains of iodin, whilein the subsequent letter the company declares that they contain only3-2/3 grains to the ounce if it be assumed that the unit intendedis the avoirdupois ounce, the preparation should contain 2 06 percent of iodin according to the first statement and 0 84 per cent ofiodin according to the second statement while the dark color of thepreparations suggested the presence of appreciable amounts of freeiodin, the a m a chemical laboratory reported that an examination ofthe specimens submitted by the medical supply company showed that “no 1” and “no 2” each contained but 0 033 per cent of free iodin. Henceboth preparations are in conflict with rule 1 for both preparations the labels suggest their use for the treatmentof “septic wounds, burns, pustular processes of all varieties, andespecially bronchial troubles ” this constitutes a conflict with rule4 regarding no 1 the advertising circular included with the tradepackage asserts. “its merits have been practically demonstrated in the following conditions we invite your especial attention to its use in diseases of the thoracic cavity, especially bronchitis and pneumonia, rheumatism, lumbago, migraine, neuralgia, orchitis, balanitis, enlarged glands or any disturbance of the lymphatic system, anti-galactagogue, or wherever analgesic action is required ”“no 2” is said to be especially adapted to the needs of the surgeon, it “can be applied in any wound either aseptic or infected ” it isasserted that the usual method of preparing patients for operation maybe discarded and that patients may be operated on after application ofthis ointment.

Inother paper the manufacturer does not possess the information-- perhapshe did not realize the inadequacy of his evidence until the subject wasbrought to his attention by the council such paper might be dealt with in either one of two ways. The councilmight at once reject the article because the claims for it are notsupported by adequate evidence. Or, the council might suspend judgmentand give the manufacturer an opportunity to supply the information the first method-- immediate rejection-- would obviously be felt bymanufacturers as a hardship to afford the fullest possible opportunityfor the presentation of the case, the council follows the secondmethod. That is, it suspends judgment and withholds publication ofa report until reasonable time has been afforded for furnishing therequired information, provided the manufacturer or agent appears tobe making honest and diligent efforts to supply it the collectionand compilation of such information is essaytimes a lengthy process, especially when the products are of foreign manufacture although it would be easier for the council to render an immediatedecision than to assist manufacturers to supply the data necessary forthe formation of an authoritative judgment, the council cannot yield toimportunities for hasty action it must rely on the medical professionto bear in mind that the character of a product under considerationby the council has not yet been determined the council holds that, during this stage, a product is suitable, at most, for experimentaluse -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 119 cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryin reply to the suggestion made last year by president bevan that thereshould be closer cooperation between the large pharmaceutical housesand the council on pharmacy and chemistry, the council submitted to theboard of trustees of the american medical association the statementwhich appears below. “cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses. At the opening meeting of the house of delegates last year, president arthur dean bevan suggested the desirability of greater cooperation between the large pharmaceutical houses and the council on pharmacy and chemistry the need of such cooperation has been recognized by the council from the first in no one direction has the council made greater effort than in its endeavor to secure the fullest cooperation of the various pharmaceutical houses the difficulty has been, and always must be, the fundamental antagonism between objectives that are largely commercial on the one hand and purely scientific on the other nevertheless, the council has always believed-- and has acted on the belief-- that there is a possible middle ground wherein the interests of therapeutics would not be injured but would go hand in hand with a commercial development based on enlightened self-interest “the profits to be made by a pharmaceutical house from the sale of a staple drug-- a pharmacopeial, national formulary, or nonproprietary preparation-- which enters into free competition with other drugs of the same kind, are moderate. The profits to be made from the sale of a proprietary medicine on which the manufacturer holds a monopoly are usually large-- essaytimes enormous there are, broadly, two kinds of proprietary preparations advertised to physicians. One represents laborious research ending in the production of a new medicinal chemical. This product can be patented and the manufacturer can obtain a seventeen-year monopoly on its manufacture and sale the other represents no research but comprises simple mixtures-- frequently of the “shotgun” variety-- of well known pharmaceuticals, or biologic products sold under trade names as these do not represent anything new or original the manufacturer is unable to obtain a patent, but by means of the trade name he can and does obtain a perpetual monopoly this, from a business standpoint, is more valuable than the limited monopoly granted by a patent it is not surprising that proprietary remedies of the latter type flourish so long as physicians unthinkingly accept and prescribe them solely on the manufacturer valuation “the council has practically the undivided support of manufacturers of medicinal chemicals. That is, of proprietaries of the first mentioned type but pharmaceutical firms which have found it profitable to promote proprietaries of the second type-- “specialties, ” unscientific or ordinary mixtures of pharmaceuticals or biologic products sold under trade names-- have not supported the council “when the council was organized, it was hoped and believed that all the large pharmaceutical houses would find it possible and desirable, if not actually more profitable, to shape their business methods so as to make their proprietary and other articles conform to those conservative standards on which the council bases its rules, and thus render such articles acceptable for new and nonofficial remedies it soon developed, however, that the methods of the pseudochemical companies, whose sales propaganda in the interest of unscientific nostrums with its attending damage to scientific medicine had led to the establishment of the council, had found their lodgment in most of the pharmaceutical houses it was a genuine disappointment to the council to find that essay of the large and old-established firms were not only unwilling to cooperate with the council, but in thesis instances exhibited a definite antagonism to the council work “the object-- and duty-- of the officers of pharmaceutical houses is primarily to pay dividends to their stockholders through skilful advertising or the persuasiveness of “detail men, ” they are able to induce physicians to prescribe their controlled products, on which there are large profits, even though such products have not only not been accepted by the council, but in thesis instances, have been disapproved is it any wonder that concerns which put out such products are indifferent or openly antagonistic to the work of the council?. the matter is largely one of business policy when the medical profession as a unit will support the council in its work, then such firms will find it good business policy to accede to dr bevan suggestion-- but not before ”evidently the problem resolves itself into this. The council, constituted of scientific men, working without remuneration inthe interest of scientific medicine and the medical profession, expects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active, sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course j a m a 74:1235 may 11920 the following is the recommendation of the reference committee towhich the report of the board of trustees was referred. “a perusalof the trustees’ report, ‘cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses’, is well worth the time of every member of the profession, and yourcommittee would emphasize the statement of the trustees. ‘thecouncil, constituted of scientific men, working without remunerationin the interest of scientific medicine and the medical professionexpects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course ’“your committee would go still further and move that a vote of thanksof the house be extended to those scientific men who have devoted somuch valuable time to the welfare of the association ” j a m a , 74:1322 may 8 1920. From reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1920, p 56 w a puckner, secretary budwell emulsion of cod-liver oil, nos 1 and 2 report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe budwell pharmacal company, lynchburg, virginia, which markets thesepreparations, claims that “no 1” contains cod liver oil, “iodide ofarsenic, ” “iodide of calcium, ” and “iodide of manganese ” “no 2” issaid to contain in addition to the ingredients of no 1, creosotecarbonate and guaiacol it is known that arsenous iodid is decomposed by contact with water itis recognized that creosote carbonate is unstable and prone to liberatecreosote iodide of manganese not being official, the supply on themarket is not controlled in any way. Tests of purity are not prescribedby the pharmacopeia, the national formulary, new and nonofficialremedies or other books of standards therefore doubt must be expressedas to the accuracy of the formulas as given the council cannot acceptsuch statements of composition without further evidence “no 1” is commended for use in “chronic rheumatism, glandular swellings, later forms of syphilis, convalescence from scarlet fever, la grippe and malaria, chronic malarial infection, marasmus, joint or other suppuration of standing, diseases of skin, chorea, anaemia, neurasthenia, obstinate neuralgia, scrofulous affections in general, and diarrhea or dysentery subacute or chronic in childhood ”“no 2” is said to be “prepared especially for the treatment of chronic throat, nasal, bronchial and pulmonary diseases ”in the advertising circular statements regarding the variousingredients of budwell emulsion are quoted from obsolete textbooks these statements, for the most writing, do not represent modernopinions on the subject for instance, the circular praises the actionof guaiacol as eliminated directly by the lungs, thus exerting abeneficial local effect and causing bacilli to diminish in numbers orto disappear all of this is directly contradicted in authoritativemodern publications on pharmacology, which hold that the excretion ofguaiacol by the lungs is infinitesimal and its action on bacilli isnil the council held the preparations in conflict with its rules asfollows:1 thesis of the therapeutic claims are exaggerations 2 the method of exploitation amounts to an indirect invitation to thepublic to use these preparations as “consumption cures ”3 the preparations are unscientific, they constitute a reprehensibleinvitation to uncritical prescribing and their use is inimical to thebest interests of the profession and the public it is difficult toimagine in what conditions such a combination would be indicated thesepreparations are a remnant of the days of polypharmacy their use isnot in keeping with present medical thought and practice -- from thejournal a m a , feb 20, 1915 rheumalgine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryrheumalgine eli lilly & co , indianapolis is put up both in tabletform and as a liquid each tablet, or teaspoonful of the liquid, issaid to contain. “strontium salicylate from natural oil 5 gr hexamethylenamin 2 gr colchicine 1/200 gr ”the advertising matter contains several statements regarding theindividual ingredients to which objection must be made it is claimed quoting from hare that strontium salicylate “ is not so disagreeable to the taste as the corresponding sodium salts, and more important still, it is far less apt to disorder the stomach ”“taste” is a difficult subject to dispute.

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like the tyree product, this, too, is essentially a mixtureof zinc sulphate and boric acid, with minute amounts of phenol, eucalyptol, menthol and thymol, to say nothing of a dash of salicylicacid this official article has at least the virtue of constancy ofstrength, composition and purity assured under the federal food anddrugs act -- from the journal a m a , may 17, 1919 wheeler tissue phosphates “the commissioner of health directs me to call to your attention the enclosed advertisement issued by t b wheeler, m d , company, montreal, canada, in which the name of the association journal is being used ”accompanying this brief note to the journal from the secretary of dr haven emerson, commissioner of the dewritingment of health of the cityof new york, was a four page leaflet devoted to the exploitation of“wheeler tissue phosphates ” the trend of the circular is to leadthe average reader to infer that the journal of the american medicalassociation has endorsed wheeler tissue phosphates for example, indescribing the preparation one reads. “it embodies the best recent scientific opinion concerning the treatment of the disease tuberculosis as stated by the official journal a m a ”elsewhere in the circular the journal criticisms of thehypophosphites and the glycerophosphates proprietary preparationswhich are competitors of the wheeler product are quoted and twistedinto a tribute to the ingredients of wheeler tissue phosphates garbling quotations, distorting statements, separating phrases fromtheir contexts and omitting qualifying clauses, all for the purposeof making out a case for essay proprietary remedy is a trick as old asquackery itself that it should be used in advertising wheeler tissuephosphates is entirely fitting obviously, the t b wheeler, m d , company esteems the opinion of the journal on pharmacologic matters this being the case, it should, in the interest of truth and scientificaccuracy, publish in its advertising circulars just what the journalhas said about wheeler tissue phosphates it could not do this betterthan by quoting from a recent editorial note which commented on areport of the chemical laboratory on this preparation here is writing ofthe the journal comment. “‘wheeler tissue phosphates’ is an unscientific shotgun mixture whose most active and powerful drug is the alcohol it contains that it was not years ago relegated to the realms of obsolete and discarded preparations is a commentary alike on the lack of scientific discrimination and on the power of advertising ”here we have “wheeler tissue phosphates” stripped of the verbalcamouflage with which its exploiters have invested it -- editorialfrom the journal a m a , sept 22, 1917 briefer paragraphs alcresta lotion to the editor:-- what is the composition of alcresta lotion?. l t a hotten, m d , paris, idaho according to a circular in our files, “alcresta dental lotion-libby”contains “emetin, the active amebicidal principle of ipecac, togetherwith benzoic acid, thymol, eucalyptol and aromatics ” the theorythat emetin is an active amebicide against pyorrhea alveolaris hasbeen exploded in this connection, it is interesting to note thatthe firm does not list the product in the latest catalogue in ourfiles -- query from the journal a m a , oct 29, 1921 calcidin tablets abbott to the editor:-- what is the composition of calcidin tablets abbott and what is their value?. j s answer -- calcidin is claimed to be a mixture of iodin, lime and starch in contact with water, the iodin and lime react to form calcium iodidand calcium iodate by the acid of the gastric juice, the calcium iodidand calcium iodate are decomposed with liberation of free iodin theadministration of calcidin tablets amounts to giving free elementaryiodin in the past, the advertising for calcidin has contained theunwarranted claim more or less directly that it was the most effectiveand only noninjurious preparation of iodin for internal use, and thatit possesses all of the valuable properties of the iodin with all ofthe objectionable effects left out so far as we know, the effectsproduced by the administration of free iodin do not differ from thoseproduced by the administration of iodids and, therefore, calcidin hasno advantage over the iodids, such as sodium iodid -- query in thejournal a m a , sept 25, 1920 di-crotalin treatment of epilepsy to the editor:-- do you have any literature or information relative to the di-crotalin treatment for epilepsy?. i will be very grateful if you can furnish information as to method of preparation, rationale of the treatment, etc r c decker, captain, m r c , u s soldiers’ home, washington, d c answer -- di-crotalin is a rattlesnake venom preparation sold by theswan-myers company of indianapolis as a “treatment for epilepsy, chorea, bronchial asthma, chronic or hereditary nervous headache, nervous prostration incident to change of life, hysteria-mania, insomnia, neurasthenia, etc ” dr thomas j mays of philadelphiaadvocated the use of rattlesnake venom for tuberculosis later hisformer assistant, dr r h spangler, used the same material in thetreatment of epilepsy that any measure of success sufficient tojustify the adoption of the rattlesnake venom or crotalin treatmentfor epilepsy has resulted is not to be concluded from the availablereports still less evidence is there for the use of rattlesnakevenom in the list of conditions for which the swan-myers company hasrecommended its preparation there are a number of good reasons why acautious physician will shun the administration of this treatment andadvise against it j f anderson, working in the hygienic laboratoryof the united states public health service, reported a death from thecrotalin treatment in consequence of infection, and reports that themarket supply of crotalin solution and crotalin tablets is highlycontaminated he also found both crotalin and crotalin solution tovary in activity the use of rattlesnake venom was discussed in thejournal, march 15, 1913, p 850 -- query in the journal a m a , aug 17, 1918 estivin to the editor:-- what is “estevin, ” or essaything like that?.