History

Do My Homework Assignment


Detaches with “pulling ” on heating, readily loses eucalyptol, and a small amount of resinous substance forms in the bottom of the beaker if cerelene be heated to 145 c and cooled, the resulting product no longer has the properties of the original cerelene after two years’ delay on the writing of the manufacturer, the councilauthorized publication declaring cerelene inadmissible for new andnonofficial remedies because its superiority over single paraffinshad not been demonstrated and the unwarranted claims had not beenabandoned -- abstracted from the journal a m a , feb 15, 1919 dr de sanctis’ rheumatic and gout pillsdr desanctis’ rheumatic and gout pills are sold by edward cleaver, 13clerkenwell road, london, england the american agents are e fougeraand co , inc , new york the package is a round pill box and containstwelve pills and a circular, which directs that one pill be taken everyeight hours until relieved in the package there is also a circularadvertising dr desanctis’ gout and rheumatic paint, with directionsfor its use on the cover of a box, which contained six of the retailpackages, is the statement that these pills have been in general usefor nearly 100 years, and that their sale has been built up withoutadvertising desanctis’ pills are round, uncoated, and have a light brown color there was essay variation in the color of different lots, one lot inwritingicular being gray rather than brown a little arrowroot starchwas found in each box, this evidently having been used as a dustingpowder the pills were very hard, rather brittle, but quite difficultto powder the pills were not readily disintegrated by water or dilutedacids, even when warmed, but when warmed with a dilute sodium hydroxidsolution they readily disintegrated ten pills weighed 3 213 gm , an average of 0 3213 gm , or 5 grains thearrowroot starch used as a dusting powder was removed as completely aspossible by rolling the pills in a cloth several dozen pills were thenpowdered and the powder thus obtained used for the analysis a microscopic examination of the powder showed powdered colchicum seedin abundance and also traces of arrowroot starch, no doubt from thatused as the dusting powder since colchicum seed was so abundant, the powder was assayed by theu s pharmacopeial method for colchicum seed u s p ix, p 120, slightly modified so that less of the powdered pills than directedthere could be used in one assay 3 75 gm gave 0 0204 gm of colchicinor 0 54 per cent in a duplicate, 5 gm gave 0 0234 gm of colchicin or0 47 per cent. Average 0 5 per cent the alkaloid obtained had the characteristic appearance and odor ofcolchicin when separated from the seed under these conditions thesolution in water and acid was yellow. The aqueous solution wasintensely bitter, and the yellow color intensified with acids the dryresidue became intensely yellow with concentrated sulphuric acid. Withnitric acid it became violet turning to yellow, and with concentratedsulphuric acid and potassium nitrate it gave a yellowish green color, turning to violet and finally to a wine color all these reactions aretypical of colchicin from 1 gm of the powdered pills there was obtained 0 0425 gm of ash, or 4 25 per cent when the powdered pills were extracted with chloroform in a soxhletapparatus, a very uniform quantity of extract was obtained from 5 gm there was obtained, in one case, 0 581 gm. In another, 0 5755 gm , andin a third, 0 588 gm , the average being 0 5815 gm or 11 63 per cent on still further extracting with alcohol, a small amount of extractivewas obtained, the amount depending on the length of time the extractionwas continued on extracting with hot water the residue left after exhaustion withchloroform and with alcohol, a further extract was obtained in onecase, it amounted to 0 4763 gm or 9 53 per cent , and in another caseit amounted to 0 470 gm , or 9 40 per cent. Average 9 47 per cent in attempting to dry the pills or the above-mentioned chloroformicextract at 100 c , a crystalline sublimate was obtained which had theodor of benzoic acid the crystals were acid, their neutral solutiongave a flesh-colored precipitate with ferric chlorid, and they meltedat 120-121 c this crystalline substance appeared to be benzoic acid the quantity of benzoic acid in this extract was determined by heatingit to about 140 c a current of air was drawn through the flask andthe sublimed benzoic acid collected in a cooled tube the benzoic acidwas washed out of the tube with neutral alcohol, and the solution wastitrated with tenth normal potassium hydroxid in one case, 11 25 c c of tenth-normal alkali was used, indicating 0 1373 gm, of benzoic acid;in another, 12 27 c c , indicating 0 1498 gm of benzoic acid. Average0 1436 gm , or 2 87 per cent in a third case the temperature reached250 c , and there was essay decomposition of the fat in the flask andessay colored material distilled over for this sublimate 15 54 c c oftenth-normal alkali were required after evaporating the alcohol and acidulating the solutions obtainedin the previous experiments, the benzoic acid was extracted withchloroform in the first case, 0 1383 gm was obtained. In the second, 0 1541 gm.

“1 it would appear that cacodylates are not the best form in which to administer arsenic cacodylates in therapeutic doses exert but a feeble action small quantities may be reduced to cacodyl ch₂₄as₂, and varying amounts to inorganic arsenic the amount transformed to arsenic is apparently unknown and probably varies in different individuals on these grounds alone the use of the cacodylates where an arsenic effect is desired seems dubious “2 the amounts of iron and cacodylates contained in the doses recommended are small when compared with the usual doses of either iron or cacodylate the amount of iron in the iron cacodylate preparations is small, about 0036 gram per dose, while the preparations admitted to ‘useful drugs’ contain much larger amounts per dose recommended the list follows. Massa ferri carbonates fe per dose 042 gm pilulae ferri carbonates " 058 gm tinctura ferri chloride " 022 gm ferri et ammonii citrae " 042 gm “the approximate amount of arsenic in iron cacodylate in the commonly recommended doses varies from 012 gm to 0 024 gm , while the amount of arsenic in sodium cacodylate in the recommended doses varies between 021 and 35 gms it would seem that a much more rational method of administration of these two drugs would be separately, in which case a better control over the dosage is possible “3 the referee has been unable to secure reliable clinical evidence that iron cacodylate is a serviceable preparation a search of the available literature for the past fifteen years has been made, also drs edsall, longcope, stengel, hoover, phillips and miller have been consulted these physicians know nothing of its use “4 in view of the above, it appears to the referee that iron cacodylate is an irrational and useless method of the administration of iron and arsenic ”the council adopted the report of the referee and directed that ironcacodylate be omitted from the 1921 edition of new and nonofficialremedies -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1920, p 62 libradol report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized for publication the following report whichexplains why libradol was found ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies w a puckner, secretary libradol is manufactured by lloyd bros , cincinnati according to acircular a “readily removable” label which accompanies the tradepackage, its “uses” are. “in colds, croup and acute bronchitis inlocal congestions. In lung trouble, in acute inflammations of this orany other organ, especially if pain or soreness be present in lumbago, sciatica, or in rheumatic pains of the joints or muscles applied tothe forehead, it induces sleep ”libradol is offered in two forms, “libradol mild” for infants andsupersensitive persons which is said to be “destitute of drug energy”and libradol “regular” which is “highly medicated, ” the “constituents”being “dracontium, sanguinaria, cephaelis, melaleuca, lobelia, laurus, capsicum, tobacco ”according to a circular, “the sanitary plasma libradol” is a“homogeneous, highly medicated, and exceedingly potent compound, inplastic form, ” which “carries the energies of its drug constituentsand the high antiseptic qualities of laurus camphora and melaleuca ”it is stated. “the drug influence of libradol is necessarily differentfrom that of any known single member of the materia medica but yet, no mystery either in medicine or of pharmacy is claimed as a writing ofits composition or process of manufacture it is a thing peculiar toitself, the result of the study of the drugs from which it is derivedand compounded these drugs may be studied at leisure by whoever caresto do so ”the following information bearing on the composition of libradol wasfurnished by lloyd brothers in response to a request from the councilto aid in the consideration of the preparation. “‘compound lobelia powder’ has been, since 1852, official in the american dispensatory, in the first edition of which 1852 its formula is given, as follows. “‘take of lobelia, in powder, twelve ounces. Bloodroot and skunk cabbage, in powder, of each, six ounces. Ipecacuanha, eight ounces. Capsicus, in powder, two ounces mix them ’ “this preparation came increasingly into demand with the eclectic profession, the principal use for which it was first employed as an emetic, being finally displaced by its local application in bronchial pneumonia troubles, when sprinkled on a greased cloth and applied to the chest ” “in 1898, dr finley ellingwood petitioned lloyd brothers to make for him, in plasma form, ready for application, a compound carrying the ingredients of the old ‘compound lobelia powder, ’ strengthened by the addition of melaleuca leucadendron, laurus camphora and nicotiana tabacum experiments not very encouraging in a pharmaceutical sense were made, and it was not until repeated requests had been made that a product was at last satisfactorily prepared and forwarded to dr ellingwood 1900, with no thought other than that of serving him personally in his practice this product he used and commended to his professional friends, and under his commendation it came into professional demand ”an examination of the information submitted by lloyd brothers showedlibradol to be in conflict with the principles and rules that govern inthe acceptance of articles for new and nonofficial remedies as follows:composition rule 1 -- the information which has been receivedgives little idea of the actual composition of the preparation. Forexample, the statement that libradol “carries the energies of its drugconstituents and the high antiseptic qualities of laurus camphoraand melaleuca” gives no indication as to the writing or writings of thelaurus camphora or melaleuca employed if the statement is correct, that libradol “is a homogeneous, highly medicated, and exceedinglypotent compound, ” it is essential that the several potent ingredientsbe stated clearly and not merely hinted at by their qualities otherconflicts with rule 1 might be enumerated, but the foregoing citationsstate the direct conflict. And this has not been removed, although aninquiry was sent to lloyd brothers for a statement of the amount ofeach potent ingredient in a given quantity of libradol indirect advertising rule 4 -- the recommendation for the use oflibradol in the treatment of colds, bronchitis, lumbago, sciatica andrheumatic pains, which accompanies the trade package, is prone tolead the public to depend on it in paper where definite treatment isimperative unwarranted therapeutic claims rule 6 -- libradol is recommended ina great variety of conditions and is especially claimed not only torelieve pain, but to remove the cause of pain this is explained asfollows. “in the study of the physiological action of thesis drugs, itwas found that the constituent remedies in this combination exerciseda most salutary influence, not only upon the sensibility of the nervesinvolved, but upon the capillary circulation within the diseased area, the muscular structures therein included, and, subsequently, upon thecourse of the advancement of the congestive and inflammatory processes, and upon secretion, exudation, adhesion, induration, hypertrophy, suppuration and excretion ”granting, for the sake of argument, that carefully controlledexperimental clinical evidence were available to substantiate thisstatement with reference to a single case of pain, the statementwould be misleading when considered as a general explanation of thepreparation relieving pain by removing the cause of pain when takenin connection with the conditions for which it is recommended and inwhich pain is even a minor symptom still, if pain were relieved inthese paper by removing the cause, the patient would be cured of theconditions which give rise to the pain, and these include. “acutepain in the chest. Acute inflammation in the chest.

Between the bone and the larynx, do my homework assignment 31. Over the larynx, 8. Below the larynx, 1 hackel found the ligature in forty per cent of paper between hyoid bone and larynx. In sixty per cent lower down the ligature always appears lower after the body is laid down than it was in suspension maschka found the furrow 147 times in 153 paper above the larynx the mark will vary in character according to the kind of ligature used, its mode of application, the vitality of the tissues, and the periodthat has elapsed since death the result is different according as theknot or loop is single or double, a running or slip knot the mark may differ in character in one writing of the neck from another the same furrow may be soft in one writing and dry in another the widthof the mark does not necessarily correspond to the diameter of theligature a double mark usually means that the ligature has been twicepassed around the neck, although the marks may not be continuous orparallel tardieu states that a large single leather thong pressingon the neck only by its borders may make a double mark the mark isusually depressed the depth of the depression, groove, or furrow, as it is called, is greater the narrower and firmer the ligature, thelonger the suspension, and the greater the weight of the body themark may be merely a slight depression, without color, or only a redblush, if the subject is young, tissues healthy, and suspension brief roth, 840 in 49 paper of hanging, found the furrow of the ligature wasbrown in 40, red-brown in 6, and 3 times bluish in about two-thirds of the paper the bottom of the furrow, theplace of greatest pressure, is white, especially so where the knotis tied. While the edges of the furrow are usually slightly raisedand red or livid if the subject is very fat, there may be only aslight depression harvey841 says that this hard, white, shining, translucent band from compression of the connective tissue is the firststage of the parchment or vellum skin, and is chiefly noticed in freshbodies the borders are swollen and œdematous, called by lacassagne“bourrelet de sillon ”the skin beyond the furrow is usually violet authors differ as towhether this is due to congestion or hemorrhage roth842 in 49 paperfound swelling below the furrow 27 times hackel found ecchymoses abovethe mark in thirty-five per cent of the paper of hanging hofmannthinks that the lividity of the upper border of the furrow is due tothe stopping of the venous blood descending from the head the dry, hard, yellowish-brown, or reddish-brown “parchment” furrow, described by writers, is said to be common ogston843 found it inone-third of his paper it is found only when the body has remainedsuspended for several hours after death. Indeed, may be produced byapplying the ligature to the cadaver. Is not at all, therefore, a proofof suspension during life liman states that constriction by a ligatureeven for essay time does not necessarily cause a mummified or excoriatedfurrow he saw paper in which the mark was soft, flat, scarcelycolored, but little interrupted, and not parchmenty the parchment skinseems to depend very much upon a previous excoriation of the skin itsappearance can be prevented or delayed by examining a body soon afterdeath or by rehanging it. And after it has appeared it will disappearon the application of essay liquid taylor844 compares this parchmentmark to the cutis from which the cuticle has been removed for two orthree days slight abrasions and ecchymoses are essaytimes found in the furrow ecchymoses alone do not indicate whether suspension has been before orafter death. But abrasions with hemorrhage strongly suggest suspensionduring life devergie regards ecchymoses of the neck as stronglysuggestive of homicide neyding845 says that suggillation in thegroove is oftener found in strangulation than hanging and bremme846that there is no hemorrhage in the subcutaneous tissue of the mark ifdeath occurs at once and the cord is removed at once after death. Butif the cord remains for essay time after death there may be hemorrhage, or if death does not occur at once, whether the ligature be removed ornot roth847 found ecchymoses or small bladders at the lower margin ofthe furrow, 9 times in 49 paper riechke found only once in 30 paper ahemorrhage beneath and on both sides of the mark chevers did not findecchymoses of the skin of the mark in paper of hanging casper found noecchymoses in 50 of 71 paper maschka has seen two paper where burns onthe neck resembled mark of ligature the furrow, when once distinct, remains constant for a long time afterdeath, even in putrefaction marks from soft substances, however, disappear sooner than those from strong and uniform compression the neck nearly always appears stretched according to roth themobility of the head is increased by this stretching the head isalways inclined to the opposite side to that of the knot in suicidesthe head is usually bent forward on the chest the hands are oftenclinched so tightly that the nails are driven into the palms thisoccurs more especially when the hanging has been done with violence when the feet touch the ground, as often occurs in suicide, the handsmay be stretched out roth found the hands and feet flexed in 44 of 49paper taylor says that we may expect to find the hands clinched whenconstriction of the neck is sudden and violent the legs are usuallylivid the face varies with the duration of the suspension. At first it ispale, afterward livid. Congested and swollen, if the subject has beenlong suspended roth found the face pale in 43 of 49 paper in aboutone-half the paper the features are calm and placid syncope maschkafound the lips bluish in 98 of 153 paper the eyes are often prominent, staring, and congested, and usually the pupils are dilated lacassagneand maschka848 look upon ecchymoses of the eyelids and conjunctivæ, “piqueté scarlatin, ” as important as favoring the idea of hangingor strangulation roth found in 49 paper the eyelids closed 28 times;half open, 12. Congested in 6. Ecchymosed in 2 pupils dilated in 31;narrowed in 2 dilated in 97½ per cent of ogston paper paper 85, 86. Rupture of crystalline lens harvey849 says the blood was foundflowing from the ear in 6 paper of nearly 1, 500, but no details weregiven ogston, one case hofmann saw a case in which there was bleedingfrom the ears he says this is not due, as has been supposed, torupture of the tympanic membrane, but to hemorrhage from subcutaneousvessels case 27 the tongue is usually livid and swollen, especially at the base according to tidy, dr guy looks on this as showing that suspensiontook place very probably during life in about one-third of the paperthe tongue is protruded and compressed between the teeth.

Lastly, mix one ounceof julep of alexandria, and a spoonful of cinnamon water with eachpound culpeper aqua protheriacalis, signifies a water for treacle, sothen if you put diascoridum to it, it is a water for diascoridum. Wellthen, we will take it for a general water for all physick aqua caponis or capon water college take a capon the guts being pulled out, cut in pieces, thefat being taken away, boiled in a sufficient quantity of spring-waterin a close vessel, take of this broth three pounds borrage andviolet-water, of each a pound and a half, white wine one pound, redrose leaves two drams and an half, the flowers of borrage, violets andbugloss, of each one dram, pieces of bread, hot out of the oven, halfa pound, cinnamon bruised, half an ounce, distil it in a glass stillaccording to art culpeper the simples are most of them appropriated to the heart, and in truth the composition greatly nourishes and strengthens suchas are in consumptions, and restores lost strength, either by feversor other sickness. It is a sovereign remedy for hectic fevers, andmarasmos, which is nothing else but a consumption coming from them letsuch as are subject to these diseases, hold it for a jewel aqua limacum magistr or water of snails college take of the juice of ground ivy, colt-foot, scabious, lungwort, of each one pound and a half, the juice of purslain, plantain, ambrosia, paul bettony, of each a pound, hog blood, whitewine, of each four pounds, garden snails, two pound, dried tobaccoleaves eight, powder of liquorice two ounces, of elecampane half anounce, of orris an ounce, cotton seeds an ounce and a half, the greatercold seeds, annis seeds of each six drams, saffron one dram, theflowers of red roses, six pugils, of violets and borrage, of each fourpugils, steep them three days warm, and then distil them in a glassstill, in sand culpeper it purges the lungs of flegm and helps consumptions there if you should happen to live where no better nor readier medicine canbe gotten, you may use this aqua scordii composita or compound water of scordium college take of the juice of goat rue, sorrel, scordium, citrons, of each one pound, london treacle, half a pound, steep it three days, and distil it in sand culpeper a tasterful taken in the morning, preserves from ill airs aqua mariæ college take of sugar candy a pound, canary wine six ounces, rosewater four ounces. Boil it well into a syrup, and add to it imperialwater two pounds, ambergreese, musk, of each eighteen grains, saffronfifteen grains, yellow sanders infused in imperial water, two drams;make a clear water of it aqua papaveries composita or poppy water compound college take of red poppies four pounds, sprinkle them with whitewine two pounds, then distil them in a common still, let the distilledwater be poured upon fresh flowers and repeated three times. To whichdistilled water add two nutmegs sliced, red poppy flowers a pugil, sugar two ounces, set it in the sun to give it a pleasing sharpness;if the sharpness be more than you would have it, put essay of the samewater to it which was not set in the sun aqua juglandium composita or walnut water compound college take of green walnuts a pound and an half, radish roots onepound, green asarabacca six ounces, radish seeds, six ounces let allof them, being bruised, be steeped in three pounds of white wine forthree days, then distilled in a leaden still till they be dry tinctures tinctura croci or tincture of saffron college take two drams of saffron, eight ounces of treacle water, digest them six days, then strain it culpeper see the virtues of treacle water, and then know that thisstrengthens the heart essaything more, and keeps melancholy vapoursthence by drinking a spoonful of it every morning tinctura castorii or tincture of castoreum college take of castoreum in powder half an ounce, spirit ofcastoreum half a pound, digest them ten days cold, strain it, and keepthe liquor for tincture culpeper a learned invention!. ’tis essaything more prevalent thanthe spirit tinctura fragroram or tincture of strawberries college take of ripe wood-strawberries two pounds, put them ina phial, and put so much small spirits of wine to them, that it mayovertop them the thickness of four fingers, stop the vessel close, andset it in the sun two days, then strain it, and press it but gently;pour this spirit to as thesis fresh strawberries, repeat this six times, at last keep the clear liquor for your use culpeper a fine thing for gentlemen that have nothing else to dowith their money, and it will have a lovely look to please their eyes tinctura scordii or tincture of scordium college take of the leaves of scordium gathered in a dry time, half a pound, digest them in six pounds of small spirits of wine, in avessel well stopped, for three days, press them out gently, and repeatthe infusion three times, and keep the clarified liquor for use so is made tincture of celandine, rest-harrow, and rosa-solis culpeper see the herbs for the virtues, and then take notice thatthese are better for cold stomachs, old bodies tinctura theriacalis vulgo aqua theriacalis ludg per infus or tincture of treacle college take of canary wine often times distilled, vinegar in whichhalf an ounce of rue seeds have been boiled, two pounds choice treacle, the best mithridate, of each half a pound. Mix them and set them in thesun, or heat of a bath, digest them, and keep the water for use tinctura cinnamoni, vulgo, aqua clareta cinnam or tincture of cinnamon college take of bruised cinnamon two ounces, rectified spirits ofwine two pounds, infuse them four days in a large glass stopped withcork and bladder, shake it twice a day, then dissolve half a pound ofsugar candy by itself in two pounds of rose water, mix both liquors, into which hang a nodule containing, ambergris half a scruple, muskfour grains tinctura viridis or a green tincture college take of verdigris, half an ounce, auripigmentum sixdrams, alum three drams, boil them in a pound of white wine till halfbe consumed, adding, after it is cold, the water of red roses, andnightshade, of each six ounces culpeper this was made to cleanse ulcers, but i fancy it not aqua aluminosa magistralis college take of plantain and red rose water, of each a pound, rochalum and sublimatum, of each two drams. Let the alum and sublimatum, being in powder, boil in the waters, in a vessel with a narrow mouthtill half be consumed, when it has stood five days, strain it physical wines vinum absynthitis or wormwood wine college take a handful of dried wormwood, for every gallon ofwine, stop it in a vessel close, and so let it remain in steep. So isprepared wine of rosemary flowers, and eye-bright culpeper it helps cold stomachs, breaks wind, helps the windcholic, strengthens the stomach, kills worms, and helps the greensickness rosemary-flower wine, is made after the same manner it is good againstall cold diseases of the head, consumes flegm, strengthens the gums andteeth eye-bright wine is made after the same manner it wonderfully clearsthe sight being drank, and revives the sight of elderly men. A cup ofit in the morning is worth a pair of spectacles all other wines are prepared in the same manner the best way of taking any of these wines is, to drink a draught ofthem every morning you may, if you find your body old or cold, makewine of any other herb, the virtues of which you desire. And make itand take it in the same manner vinum cerassorum nigrorum or wine of black cherries college take a gallon of black cherries, keep it in a vessel closestopped till it begin to work, then filter it, and an ounce of sugarbeing added to every pound, let pass through hippocrates’ sleeve, andkeep in a vessel close stopped for use vinum helleboratum or helleborated wine college take of white hellebore cut small, four ounces, spanishwine two pounds, steep it in the sun in a phial close stopped, in thedog days, or other hot weather vinum rubellum college take of stibium, in powder, one ounce, cloves sliced twodrams, claret wine two pounds, keep it in a phial close shut vinum benedictum college take of crocus metallorum, in powder, one ounce, mace onedram, spanish wine one pound and an half, steep it vinum antimoniale or antimonial wine college take of regulus of antimony, in powder, four ounces, steepit in three pounds of white wine in a glass well stopped, after thefirst shaking let the regulus settle culpeper these last mentioned are vomits, and vomits are fittingmedicines for but a few, the mouth being ordained to take innourishment, not to cast out excrements, and to regulate a man bodyin vomiting. And doses of vomits require a deeper study in physic, than i doubt the generality of people yet have. I omit it therefore atthis time, not because i grudge it my country, but because i would notwillingly have them do themselves a mischief, i shall shortly teachthem in what diseases vomits may be used, and then, and not till then, the use of vomits vinum scilliticum or wine of squills college take of a white squill of the mountains, gathered about therising of the dog star, cut it in thin pieces, and dried for a month, one pound, put it in a glass bottle, and pour to it eight pounds offrench wine, and when it hath stood so four days, take out the squill the virtues of this are the same with vinegar of squills, only it ishotter physical vinegars acetum distillatum or distilled vinegar college fill a glass or stone alembick with the best vinegar to thethird writing, separate the flegm with a gentle fire, then encrease thefire by degrees, and perform the work acetum rosarum or rose vinegar college take of red rose buds, gathered in a dry time, the whitescut off, dried in the shade three or four days, one pound, vinegareight sextaries, set them in the sun forty days, then strain out theroses, and repeat the infusion with fresh ones after the same manner is made vinegar of elder flowers, rosemaryflowers, and clove-gilliflowers culpeper for the virtues of all vinegars, take this one onlyobservation, they carry the same virtues with the flowers whereof theyare made, only as we said of wines, that they were better for coldbodies then the bare simples whereof they are made. So are vinegarsfor hot bodies besides, vinegars are often, nay, most commonly usedexternally, viz to bathe the place, then look amongst the simples, and see what place of the body the simple is appropriated to, and youcannot but know both what vinegar to use, and to what place to apply it acetum scilliticum or vinegar of squils college take of that writing of the squill which is between theoutward bark and the bottom, cut in thin slices, and placed thirty orforty days in the sun or essay remiss heat, then a pound of them beingcut small with a knife made of ivory or essay white wood being put ina vessel, and six pounds of vinegar put to them. Set the vessel, beingclose stopped, in the sun thirty or forty days, afterwards strain it, and keep it for use culpeper a little of this medicine being taken in the morningfasting, and walking half an hour after, preserves the body in health, to extreme old age, as sanius tried, who using no other medicine butthis, lived in perfect health till one hundred and seventeen years ofage it makes the digestion good, a long wind, a clear voice, an acutesight, a good colour, it suffers no offensive thing to remain in thebody, neither wind, flegm, choler, melancholy, dung, nor urine, butbrings them forth. It brings forth filth though it lie in the bones, ittakes away salt and sour belchings, though a man be never so licentiousin diet, he shall feel no harm. It hath cured such as have thephthisic, that have been given over by all physicians. It cures suchas have the falling sickness, gouts, and diseases and swellings of thejoints. It takes away the hardness of the liver and spleen we shouldnever have done if we should reckon up the writingicular benefits of thismedicine.

  • law school admission essay service
  • i need someone to write my paper
  • dissertation editing help
  • how to write an essay fast
  • review of homework services
  • a good title for an essay
  • writing process essay
  • apa format for an essay
  • pay to do my assignment
  • technical writing services
  • buy good essay
  • how to be a better essay writer
  • why this college essay sample
  • do my homework how good is write my papers
  • college application essay samples
  • essay format apa
  • professional essay writers raleigh
  • help writing a annotated bibliography
  • essay define
  • essay writing service on
  • i want to buy essays online

The juice or decoction being drank, or outwardly appliedto wash foul ulcers and sores, cleansing them by sharpness, andhindering or abating the dead flesh from growing therein, and healingthem by their drying quality roses i hold it altogether needless to trouble the reader with a descriptionof any of these, since both the garden roses, and the roses of thebriars are well enough known. Take therefore the virtues of them asfollows. And first i shall begin with the garden kinds government and virtues what a pother have authors made with roses!. What a racket have they kept?. i shall add, red roses are under jupiter, damask under venus, white under the moon, and provence under the kingof france the white and red roses are cooling and drying, and yet thewhite is taken to exceed the red in both the properties, but is seldomused inwardly in any medicine. The bitterness in the roses when theyare fresh, especially the juice, purges choler, and watery humours. Butbeing dried, and that heat which caused the bitterness being consumed, they have then a binding and astringent quality. Those also that arenot full blown, do both cool and bind more than those that are fullblown, and the white rose more than the red the decoction of redroses made with wine and used, is very good for the head-ache, andpains in the eyes, ears, throat, and gums. As also for the fundament, the lower writing of the belly and the matrix, being bathed or put intothem the same decoction with the roses remaining in it, is profitablyapplied to the region of the heart to ease the inflammation therein;as also st anthony fire, and other diseases of the stomach beingdried and beaten to powder, and taken in steeled wine or water, ithelps to stay women courses the yellow threads in the middle ofthe roses which are erroneously called the rose seed being powderedand drank in the distilled water of quinces, stays the overflowing ofwomen courses, and doth wonderfully stay the defluctions of rheumupon the gums and teeth, preserving them from corruption, and fasteningthem if they be loose, being washed and gargled therewith, and essayvinegar of squills added thereto the heads with the seed being usedin powder, or in a decoction, stays the lask and spitting of blood red roses do strengthen the heart, the stomach and the liver, and theretentive faculty. They mitigate the pains that arise from heat, assuage inflammations, procure rest and sleep, stay both whites andreds in women, the gonorrhea, or running of the reins, and fluxes ofthe belly.