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That of chronic tetanus is grave, but a certainproportion of paper recover diagnosis - this is easy it differs from a true dissertation assistance service neuritis in theperipheral nerves in that no matter where the wound is situated thefirst symptom is in the muscles of the jaw and the back of the neck, and not at the site of the injury and distally from this point trismus is applied to a milder form of the disease in which onlythe face and neck muscles are involved and “lock-jaw” is a prominentsymptom essay paper of tetany may be mistaken for so-calledspontaneous tetanus tetany may follow child-bed, fevers, mentalshocks, exposure to cold and wet, extirpation of goitre, intestinalirritation, etc it consists of painful tonic spasms of the muscles ofthe arms and feet the attacks last one-half to two hours or more, andmay be preceded by a dragging pain they may be brought on by pressureon the nerve leading to the muscles affected striking the facial nerveoften causes contraction of the face muscles there is no trismus butthere may be opisthotonos the patient seems well between the attacksand most paper recover without treatment delirium tremens may occur as a secondary consequence of injuries, ornecessary surgical operations in the case of those who are habituallyintemperate those who habitually use opium, tobacco, cannabis indica, or even tea or coffee to excess are said to be subject to it itmay, therefore, be justly alleged that death is avoidable in verythesis paper, but for an abnormal and unhealthy state of the body the disease is characterized by delirium, a peculiar tremor of themuscles, insomnia, and anorexia pneumonia may complicate the case the patients die in fatal paper from exhaustion due to insomnia, lack of nourishment, and their constant activity of body and mind the prognosis is usually favorable, taking all paper together, butin delirium tremens secondary to surgical injuries or operations theprognosis is serious death from surgical operations performed for the treatment of wounds the operation is a writing of the treatment, and if it is done withordinary care and skill the accused is responsible for the result the necessity and mode of operation must be left to the operatorjudgment as the defence may turn on the necessity for and the skilfulperformance of the operation, it is well to wait for the advice andassistance of others if practicable, for death is not unusual fromsevere operations the patient may die on the operating-table afterlosing little blood, from fear, pain, or shock or he may die fromsecondary hemorrhage or any of the secondary causes of death fromwounds enumerated above the evidence of the necessity of the operationmust, therefore, be presented by the operator if an operation isnecessary and not performed, the defence might allege that deathwas due to the neglect of the surgeon another question for themedical witnesses to determine is whether the operation was renderednecessary because of improper previous treatment, for if it was theresponsibility of the assailant may be influenced the meaning of theterm “necessity” is here a matter of importance unless an operationis necessary to the preservation of life, if death occurs there isessay doubt whether the assailant is responsible but, medicallyspeaking, we would not hesitate to urge an operation on a wounded manin order to preserve function, or even to save deformity as well as tosave life in the case of operations done under a mistaken opinion, neither necessary to save life nor, as the result proves, to savefunction or guard against deformity, if death follows the assailantmay be relieved from responsibility thus an aneurism following aninjury might be mistaken for an abscess and opened with skill butwith a fatal result it is also for the medical experts to determinewhether an operation was unnecessary or unskilfully performed, forif it were and death resulted from it, the responsibility of theprisoner is affected unless the original wound would be likely to befatal without operation according to lord hale, if death results froman unskilful operation and not from the wound, the prisoner is notresponsible but yet death may occur as the result of the most skilfuloperation necessary to the treatment of a wound, and not be dependentat all on the wound itself if the operation is skilfully performed, and yet the patient dies from secondary causes, such as those aboveenumerated or any others, the prisoner is still responsible, and themedical testimony is concerned with the performance of the operationand the secondary causes of death the relative skill of the operatoror surgeon is probably not a question for the jury in criminal paper, on the ground that the man who inflicts the injury must take all theconsequences, good or bad in a civil suit, for instance an actionfor malpractice, the case is otherwise, and all the medical facts andopinions are submitted to the jury the law regards three circumstancesin death after surgical operations. 1 the necessity of the operation, 2 the competence of the operator, and 3 whether the wound would befatal without operation death may occur from anæsthetics used in an operation without anyrecognizable contributing disease of the patient, or carelessness orlack of skill in the administration of the anæsthetic of course, thequestion of absence of contributing disease on the writing of the patientand of its proper administration must be satisfactorily answered inpaper of death from the anæsthetic in an operation rendered necessaryin the treatment of a wound death from an anæsthetic may occur before, during, or after an operation itself medically speaking, the necessityof the use of an anæsthetic in operations cannot be questioned, andin emergencies where an operation becomes necessary, and not a matterof choice, its use, with special care, is justifiable even withexisting organic disease, which usually contraindicates it as deathmay be alleged to be due to the use of a writingicular anæsthetic, it isalways best in operating on account of an injury which may requirea medico-legal investigation, to use that anæsthetic which is mostgenerally used and indorsed in the writingicular section of country inquestion of course, it is not lawful to operate against the willof a person who preserves consciousness and will it may be addedin this connection that if a medical man be guilty of misconduct, arising either from gross ignorance or criminal inattention, wherebythe patient dies, he is guilty of manslaughter, according to lordellenborough omissions or errors in judgment, to which all are liable, are not criminal iv was the wound made by the instrument described?. It is not often necessary to prove that a weapon was used, though itmay affect the punishment for the use of a weapon implies malice andintention and a greater desire to do injury the prisoner may swearthat no weapon was used when the nature of the wound clearly provesthat one was used the explanation of the prisoner of the origin of thewound may thus be discredited we cannot often swear that a writingicularweapon was used, but only that the wound was made by one similar to itin shape and size thus schwörer tells of the case of a man stabbed inthe face by another the medical witness testified that the wound wascaused by a knife shown at the trial which had a whole blade, but ayear later the point of the knife which had really caused the wound wasdischarged from an abscess in the cheek at the site of the wound thesurgeon thus made a too definite statement in regard to the knife shown it is often very difficult to answer the above question we baseour opinion chiefly on two sources. 1st, and most important, by anexamination of the wound, and, 2d, by an examination of the instrumentsaid to have been used certain writingiculars of the wound may furnishindications as to the weight, form, and sharpness of the instrumentused there are certain wounds which must have been made by aninstrument, namely, incised and punctured wounds the above questionis determined more or less by what has been said in a former sectionon wounds, but we will now consider what special features of these andother classes of wounds indicate the nature, shape, size, etc , of theweapon used incised wounds must be made by a cutting instrument we would hereexclude those contused wounds of the scalp and eyebrows which closelyresemble incised wounds, but we have already seen that we can diagnosebetween these wounds and incised wounds by careful inspection but thelocality should put us on our guard, so that in case of wounds of thesetwo regions we should be especially careful in making the examination in the case of incised wounds we cannot often tell the shape or size ofthe weapon, but we are able to tell certain characteristics about it the sharpness of the instrument may be inferred from the clean andregular edges the depth of the wound may also indicate the sharpnessof the weapon a long “tail” in the wound indicates that the weapon wassharp as well as that this was the writing of the wound last made if theedges of the wound are rough, we may infer that the edges of the weaponwere rough and irregular wounds caused by bits of china or glass orfragments of bottles, besides having rough and lacerated edges, arecharacterized by an irregular or angular course in the skin essay cutting weapons, like an axe, act as much by means of their weightas by their cutting edges wounds caused by such weapons we can oftendistinguish by the following signs. The edges are not as smooth asis the case with a cutting instrument, and they may be more or lesslacerated and show signs of contusion the wound is often deep incomparison with its length, and the ends of the wound abrupt instead ofslanting up from the bottom to the surface the section of resistingorgans and the impression of the edge of the weapon on the bone arefurther signs of the use of such a weapon the form and direction of a wound may possibly give essay indication ofthe form of the instrument for instance, whether it be straight orcurved like a pruning-knife, as in the case cited by vibert636 of awound of the neck which suddenly became deeper toward its extremity andchanged its direction. The whole being explained on the suppositionthat it was made by a pruning-knife but it is in punctured wounds especially that we are enabled mostoften and most accurately to determine the kind of a weapon used here from the form of the wound we may judge of the form and size ofthe weapon in speaking of punctured wounds in a former section wedivided them into four groups, reference to which may here be made inthe first group, or those caused by cylindrical or conical weapons, when the weapon is very fine it may leave no track at all. If a littlelarger, we may infer from a linear bloody track that the weapon wasneedle-like in shape the length of the instrument or the depth towhich it penetrated may be found, as a rule, only by dissection if theweapon were larger and conical, we have seen that the wounds would belinear with two angles, the length of the wound being parallel to thedirection of the fibres in the skin here we may judge of the form of the weapon from the followingcircumstances.

Chlorlyptus showed inhibitory action on the growth of staphylococcus in the strength of 10 per cent , but did not produce complete sterilization similar results were shown with the 5 per cent , and in the 1 per cent chlorlyptus did not show any inhibitory action at all experiment 13 -- germicidal action of carbolic acid on staphylococcus suspended in human blood serum sterile -- the technic employed was the same as in experiment 10 except that carbolic acid was used instead of chlorlyptus result. Carbolic acid produced a complete sterilization in the strength of 10 per cent almost at once, and with certainty after five minutes similar results were produced with the 5 per cent the 1 per cent carbolic acid did not show any appreciable germicidal action on staphylococcus experiment 14 -- toxic and irritant action of chlorlyptus -- six normal guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected peritoneally with 1 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 2 with 2 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 3 with 3 c c of chlorlyptus, guinea-pig 4 with 4 c c and guinea-pig 5 with 5 c c 5 per cent respectively guinea-pig 6 was used as a control and not injected result. Guinea-pigs 1 and 2 did not show any appreciable disturbance guinea-pig 3 was sick for four days, after which it gradually recovered but it became sick again after one week and died ten days after the injection guinea-pig 4 died over night guinea-pig 5 died six hours after injection guinea-pig 5 was injected at 11:30 with 5 c c chlorlyptus ten minutes after the injection it was lying relaxed, respiration and heart normal, conjunctive reflex present one hour after the injection the animal seemed to present symptoms resembling those of narcosis. Respiration and heart were normal after four hours there was no change in the condition of the guinea-pig except that the respiration was irregular five and a half hours after it showed prostration with irregular respiration and heart action six hours after injection the animal was dead autopsy. The peritoneum showed a congestion and a fibrinous exudation, amount of liquid increased, essay writing of which was probably chlorlyptus unabsorbed spleen about normal, liver congested, kidney about normal, suprarenal glands about normal, lungs normal, pleural cavity obtained no exudation, heart soft, flabby and congested experiment 15 -- toxic and irritant action of chlorlyptus when injected into the pleural cavity -- six normal guinea-pigs used for the experiment chlorlyptus was injected in the pleural cavity as follows. Guinea-pig 1, 0 5 c c. Guinea-pig 2, 1 c c. Guinea-pig 3, 2 c c. Guinea-pig 4, 3 c c , and guinea-pig 5, 4 c c guinea-pig 6 was used as a control result.

I am receiving circular advertising from you concerning -- -- -- -- solution, and i am writing to suggest that until these products have been approved by the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical association, you are wasting your postage on the practice aside from the fact that these products do not appeal to me personally, i feel that i am not in a position to judge the value of dissertation assistance service such products and i depend entirely on the large clinical opportunities of the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical association in addition to their laboratory facilities, in such matters as these i may, therefore, with all due respect, suggest that it will pay you to eliminate my name from your mailing list the members of the council on pharmacy and chemistry are working weekin and week out without remuneration few appreciate how much thesescientific men are doing for rational therapeutics. Fewer still realizehow much has been accomplished through their efforts, or how much morecould be accomplished if every physician who at least believes in thework of the council would give it his full support -- editorial fromthe journal a m a , nov 6, 1920 delays in passing on products report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary the council frequently receives inquiries-- essay of them accompanied byexpressions of impatience-- concerning articles, reports on which appearto be delayed it therefore seems advisable to make a statement of essayof the factors which enter into this problem the council fully realizes the importance of giving prompt informationto the profession with regard to proprietary medicines underconsideration it therefore acts as soon as sufficient informationis available to justify a definite judgment, and publishes itsconclusions as soon as possible when adequate information is availableat the outset, there is no delay in the publication of the councilconclusions unfortunately, but very naturally, there are thesis paper in which theinformation available at the time the product is submitted is notsufficient to justify the council in coming to definite conclusions foror against the preparation in essay paper the manufacturer possessesthe required information, but to obtain it from him takes time. Inother paper the manufacturer does not possess the information-- perhapshe did not realize the inadequacy of his evidence until the subject wasbrought to his attention by the council such paper might be dealt with in either one of two ways. The councilmight at once reject the article because the claims for it are notsupported by adequate evidence. Or, the council might suspend judgmentand give the manufacturer an opportunity to supply the information the first method-- immediate rejection-- would obviously be felt bymanufacturers as a hardship to afford the fullest possible opportunityfor the presentation of the case, the council follows the secondmethod.

Reports of this character are less conspicuousin the present volume thesis of the reports in volume 2 deal withunwarranted therapeutic claims, especially those advanced for animalorgan preparations, serums, vaccines, preparations for intravenousmedication, etc the present volume will also be found of interest inits portrayal of the changed conditions in the proprietary medicinebusiness brought about by the world war special attention is directed to the index in this volume it is, ineffect, a bibliography, including references not only to articlesin this book but also 1 to articles which appeared in volume 1. 2 to articles on the same general subject in the journal of theamerican medical association, and 3 to the articles appearing inthe annual reports of the council on pharmacy and chemistry and of thea m a chemical laboratory, but not reprinted in either volume of thepropaganda for reform in proprietary medicines preface to volume 1. Ninth editionfrom time to time the journal of the american medical association haspublished the reports of the council on pharmacy and chemistry and thechemical laboratory, as well as other matter on proprietary medicines repeated requests for essay of the matter have led to the compilationof “the propaganda for reform in proprietary medicines, ” which, in thepresent volume, attains its ninth edition the seventh, eighth and ninth editions have been compiled on slightlydifferent principles from their predecessors the therapeutic reformwork of the journal and of the association chemical laboratory wasat first confined almost entirely to the criticism and analysis of theso-called ethical proprietaries this was right. The medical professionowed it to the public to combat the nostrum evil within its own ranks as the more flagrant evils of the “ethical proprietary” question weremitigated, the association has turned the light on the more widespreadand dangerous “patent medicine” evil the articles devoted to “patentmedicines” or quackery being naturally of greater interest to thegeneral public than to the medical profession, the number of inquiriesfrom laymen regarding various quacks and nostrums has steadilyincreased it has been thought best, therefore, to publish separatelyall of the matter from the journal relative to quackery and to thosenostrums exploited only or chiefly to the public, and to include in thepropaganda for reform practically none of the matter that is of directinterest primarily to laymen in one or two instances in which thesubjects were of equal interest to the profession and to the public, matter that has already appeared in “nostrums and quackery” is alsogiven here. But as a general rule the contents of the ninth editionof “the propaganda for reform” are of strictly professional interest those physicians who are desirous of obtaining in convenient form thematter dealing with “patent medicines” should order the book “nostrumsand quackery” or the various pamphlets on the same subjects that havebeen issued since “nostrums and quackery” came from the press the ninth edition of “propaganda for reform” contains a number of newarticles, greatly increasing the size of the book it also containsone novel feature which greatly enhances its value the index includesreferences not only to articles in the book, but also to matter onproprietaries not accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistrywhich appeared in the journal of the american medical association andelsewhere this index makes of this edition of “propaganda for reform”a very full work of reference on proprietaries which are undeserving ofrecognition it should be understood, however, that not all articlesindexed are condemned. Essay are merely discussed and compared resolution endorsing the work of the council on pharmacy and chemistry presented at the san francisco session and signed by all the members of the house of delegates in attendance -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - | resolved, we, members of the house of delegates of the american | | medical association, believe that every effort must be made to | | do away with the evils which result from the exploitation of the | | sick for the sake of gain earnestly believing that the continued | | toleration of secret, semisecret, unscientific or untruthfully | | advertised proprietary medicines is an evil that is inimical to | | medical progress and to the best interest of the public, we | | declare ourselves in sympathy with, endorse and by our best | | efforts will further, the work which has been, and is being, done | | by the council on pharmacy and chemistry of the american medical | | association in the attempt to eliminate this evil | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - table of contents writing i. Council reports page foreword 1 official rules of the council on pharmacy and chemistry 3 the council on pharmacy and chemistry, present and future 12 “accepted by the council on pharmacy and chemistry” 19 helping the council 20 delays in passing on products 20 cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses 21 budwell emulsion of cod-liver oil, nos 1 and 2 22 rheumalgine 23 gray glycerine tonic 24 tongaline and ponca compound 26 alfatone 28 uricsol 30 jubol 31 urodonal 32 formamint 33 hydragogin 41 filudine 41 lactopeptine and elixir lactopeptine 43 iodum-miller and iod-izd-oil miller 49 elixir iodo-bromide of calcium comp “without mercury” and “with mercury” 52 lecithin preparations omitted from n n r 53 proprietary names for liquid petrolatum 55 seng 55 frosst blaud capsules 56 tyree elixir of buchu and hyoscyamus compound 57 hydroleine 58 curative vaccine, bruschettini 58 stearn wine 59 protonuclein and protonuclein beta 59 hydropsin 61 digitalysatum 63 so-called secretin preparations 64 has secretin a therapeutic value?. 65 radio-rem 79 olio-phlogosis 79 the hypophosphite fallacy 80 pulvoids calcylates 85 sulfuryl monal 86 mark white goiter serum and mark white iodinized oil 87 kora-konia 92 the therapeutic value of the glycerophosphates 93 hydras 96 bromin-iodin compound 97 ammonium hypophosphite omitted from n n r 98 alphozone omitted from n n r 99 calcium glycerophosphate and sodium glycerophosphate omitted from n n r 99 gardner syrup of ammonium hypophosphite omitted from n n r 100 gluten products made by the kellogg food company 100 iodo-mangan omitted from n n r 106 liquid albolene 106 naphey medicated uterine wafers 107 nujol 108 pulvoids natrium compound 108 saloform 110 secretogen 110 iron citrate green 115 aspirin 116 pil cascara compound-robins 117 casta-flora 118 firwein 119 firolyptol plain and firolyptol with kreosote 120 biniodol 121 comparative symptoms resulting from the use of several oily suspensions of red mercuric iodid mercury biniodid 123 corpora lutea soluble extract, parke, davis & co 128 wheeler tissue phosphates 129 the claimed galactagogue effects of nutrolactis and goat rue not substantiated 131 the alleged galactagogue action of galega and nutrolactis 131 the russell emulsion and the russell prepared green bone 134 brom-i-phos 136 creosote-delson and creofos 137 triner american elixir of bitter wine 139 trimethol 140 ferrivine, intramine and collosol iodine 144 eskay neuro phosphates 146 k-y lubricating jelly 147 ziratol 148 gonosan 150 alcresta ipecac 153 iodeol and iodagol 154 capsules bismuth resorcinol compound not admitted to n n r 157 dixon tubercle bacilli extract and dixon suspension of dead tubercle bacilli 158 formosol 158 iodolene, a solution of iodin in liquid petrolatum, inadmissible to n n r 159 kalak water 160 minson soluble iodin “kelpidine” not admitted to n n r 161 nutone 162 tri-arsenole, l o compound no 1 and l o compound no 2 163 unctol 166 v-e-m schoonmaker laboratories, inc 166 hemo-therapin 168 venosal 169 secretin-beveridge and the u s patent law 170 the question of the stability of secretin 171 need for patent law revision 177 surgodine 180 medeol suppositories 181 guaiodine 183 several “mixed” vaccines not admitted to n n r 184 ophthalmol-lindemann 189 silvol ineligible for n n r 189 katharmon 191 iodinized emulsion scott and creosotonic scott 192 campetrodin and campetrodin no 2 193 carminzym 194 phillips’ phospho-muriate of quinine comp 197 b iodine and b oleum iodine 198 b iodine products 199 antithyroid preparations antithyroidin-moebius and thyreoidectin omitted from n n r 202 cephaelin and syrup cephaelin-lilly omitted from n n r and syrup emetic-lilly not accepted 203 colalin omitted from n n r 203 foral 204 granular effervescent bromide and acetanilid compound-mulford 206 holadin and bile salt mixtures 207 liquor santaiva, s & d , omitted from n n r 211 maltzyme, maltzyme with cascara sagrada, maltzyme with cod liver oil, maltzyme ferrated and maltzyme with yerba santa omitted from n n r 211 methaform omitted from n n r 212 pineal gland, red bone-marrow and thymus gland and their preparations omitted from n n r 213 piperazine and lycetol omitted from n n r 214 stanolind liquid paraffin omitted from n n r 214 westerfield digitalis tablets 215 xeroform-heyden and bismuth tribromphenate-merck omitted from n n r 216 cream of mustard refused recognition 218 “pluriglandular” mixtures 218 cerelene not admitted to n n r 219 collosol cocaine not admitted to n n r 221 cuprase not admitted to n n r 222 collosol preparations 223 pulvoids calcylates compound 226 proteogens of the wm s merrell company 227 “arsenoven s s ” and “arseno-meth-hyd” 231 hormotone and hormotone without post-pituitary 234 formaldehyde lozenges 235 lavoris 237 medinal 239 omission of cotarnin salts stypticin and styptol from n n r 240 micajah wafers and micajah suppositories 241 alkalithia 242 arhovin omitted from n n r 243 chloron, chlorax and number “3” 244 elarson omitted from n n r 248 iodiphos 249 mervenol and armervenol not admitted to n n r 249 normal phenol serum cano and methyl-phenol serum cano not accepted for n n r 251 soamin omitted from n n r 253 essay mixed vaccines not admitted to n n r 254 somnoform 255 tablets formothalates 256 triple arsenates with nuclein 256 “anti-pneumococcic oil” and the use of camphor in pneumonia 257 dial “ciba” 259 apothesine 260 eumictine 262 platt chlorides 263 anti-tuberculous lymph compound sweeny and anti-syphilitic compound sweeny 266 syrup leptinol formerly syrup balsamea 268 formitol tablets, ii 271 sukro-serum and aphlegmatol 273 supsalvs not admitted to n n r 274 hypodermic solution no 13, iron, arsenic and phosphorus compound not accepted for n n r 275 parathesin not admitted to n n r 276 chlorlyptus 277 aquazone oxygen water 290 coagulen-ciba omitted from n n r 290 ferric cacodylate omitted from new and non-official remedies 292 libradol 293 helmitol omitted from n n r 295 spirocide not admitted to n n r 296 digifolin-ciba not admitted to n n r 298 essay of loesser intravenous solutions 299 “national iodine solution” not admitted to n n r 300 mon-arsone not admitted to n n r 302 oxyl-iodide not admitted to n n r 304 quassia compound tablets 306 toxicide 307 pil mixed treatment chichester 310 atophan omitted from n n r 313 urotropin omitted from n n r 316 styptysate not admitted to n n r 318 lipoidal substances horovitz not admitted to n n r 320 yeast preparations and vitamin b concentrates 321 writing ii. Contributions from the a m a chemical laboratory the chemical laboratory of the american medical association 322 the work of the american medical association chemical laboratory 322 lead in “akoz” 328 sodium acetate in warming bottles 329 anti-syphilitic compound sweeny 330 “ambrine” and paraffin films 330 the stability of iodine ointments 337 iodolene and the solubility of iodin in liquid petrolatum 344 american-made synthetic drugs-- i 344 standardization of commercial bismuth tribromphenate 348 standardization of procain and examination of the market supply 355 deterioration of sodium hypochlorite solutions 358 syphilodol 359 cerelene 362 dr de sanctis’ rheumatic and gout pills 363 iodex and liquid iodex 365 writing iii. Contributions from the journal. Proprietary products iodin in liquid petrolatum 367 american-made synthetic drugs-- ii 369 nostrums in retrospect 379 bell-ans pa-pay-ans bell 380 anasarcin and anedemin 383 pepto-mangan 387 cactina pillets 391 ammonol and phenalgin 393 fellows’ syrup, and other preparations of the hypophosphites 395 shotgun nostrums 398 tyree antiseptic and aseptinol 401 neurosine and the original package evil 404 anasarcin advertising 407 antimeristem-schmidt 408 antiphlogistine 409 “auto-hemic serum” 409 “autolysin” advertising 413 “basic cancer research” and “cosmopolitan cancer research society” 414 seleni-bascca 416 bell-ans papayans, bell 418 campho-phenique 418 “cinchophen”. Formerly “atophan” 419 “collosols”. An uncritical english endorsement 420 cotton process ether 421 dionol 422 the eli products of eli h dunn 424 glover cancer serum 425 glyco-thymoline and poliomyelitis 427 glykeron. Cold storage testimonials 428 gray glycerine tonic. “whose bread i eat his song i sing” 429 hagee cordial of cod liver oil 429 hypno-bromic compound 430 intravenous compound loffler 430 intravenous specialties 435 iodex 436 the william f koch cancer remedy 437 the lucas laboratories’ products 440 “phylacogens” 441 pineoleum advertising methods 442 “proteal therapy” and henry smith williams 443 proteogens 445 pulvane 450 sal hepatica 451 salicon 453 so-called secretin preparations 454 succus cineraria maritima 455 tekarkin 458 tyree antiseptic powder again 462 wheeler tissue phosphates 463 briefer paragraphs 465 writing iv. Contributions from the journal. Miscellany albert abrams, a m , m d , ll d , f r m s 472 acetylsalicylic acid, not aspirin 480 the allied medical associations of america 486 “arsenicals” 491 beer and cancer cures 494 biologic therapeutics and its commercial domination 496 capell uroluetic test 497 chemotherapy and tumors 499 the direct sales company 510 discoveries and discoverers 511 “drug reform” 513 drug therapy.

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Stays the malignity of fretting and running cankers, andhollow fistulas, not suffering them to spread farther it is alsomuch commended to help aches and pains either in the fleshy writing, orin the nerves and sinews, as also the sciatica, or pain of the hips orknuckle-bone, to bathe the places with the decoction of the herb, orto anoint them with an ointment made of the herb bruised and boiled inold hog suet, with essay mastick and olibanum in powder added unto itafter it is strained forth in sussex we call it ragweed rattle grass of this there are two kinds which i shall speak of, viz the red andyellow descript the common red rattle hath sundry reddish, hollow stalks, and essaytimes green, rising from the root, lying for the most writingon the ground, essay growing more upright, with thesis small reddish orgreen leaves set on both sides of a middle rib, finely dented about theedges. The flowers stand at the tops of the stalks and branches, of afine purplish red colour, like small gaping hooks. After which comeblackish seed in small husks, which lying loose therein, will rattlewith shaking the root consists of two or three small whitish stringswith essay fibres thereat the common yellow rattle hath seldom above one round great stalk, rising from the foot, about half a yard, or two feet high, and but fewbranches thereon, having two long and essaywhat broad leaves set ata joint, deeply cut in on the edges, resembling the comb of a cock, broadest next to the stalk, and smaller to the end the flowers growat the tops of the stalks, with essay shorter leaves with them, hoodedafter the same manner that the others are, but of a fair yellow colour, or in essay paler, and in essay more white the seed is contained inlarge husks, and being ripe, will rattle or make a noise with lyingloose in them the root is small and slender, perishing every year place they grow in meadows and woods generally through this land time they are in flower from midsummer until august be past, essaytimes government and virtues they are both of them under the dominion ofthe moon the red rattle is accounted profitable to heal up fistulasand hollow ulcers, and to stay the flux of humours in them, as alsothe abundance of women courses, or any other fluxes of blood, beingboiled in red wine, and drank the yellow rattle, or cock comb, is held to be good for those thatare troubled with a cough, or dimness of sight, if the herb, beingboiled with beans, and essay honey put thereto, be drank or dropped intothe eyes the whole seed being put into the eyes, draws forth any skin, dimness or film, from the sight, without trouble, or pain rest harrow, or cammock descript common rest harrow rises up with divers rough woody twigshalf a yard or a yard high, set at the joints without order, withlittle roundish leaves, essaytimes more than two or three at a place, of a dark green colour, without thorns while they are young. Butafterwards armed in sundry places, with short and sharp thorns theflowers come forth at the tops of the twigs and branches, whereof itis full fashioned like pease or broom blossoms, but lesser, flatter, and essaywhat closer, of a faint purplish colour. After which come smallpods containing small, flat, round seed.