History

Definition Of Argumentative Essay


Take not above half a dram at a timein powder absinthium, &c wormwood its several sorts, are all hot and dryin the second or third degrees, the common wormwood is thought to behottest, they all help weakness of the stomach, cleanse choler, killworms, open stoppings, help surfeits, clear the sight, resist poison, cleanse the blood, and secure cloaths from moths abugilissa, &c alkanet the leaves are essaything drying and binding, but inferior in virtue to the roots, to which i refer you acetosa sorrel is moderately cold dry definition of argumentative essay and binding, cuts toughhumours, cools the brain, liver and stomach, cools the blood in fevers, and provokes appetite acanthus bears-breech, or branks ursine, is temperate, essaythingmoist see the root adiantum, album, nigrum maiden hair, white and black they aretemperate, yet drying white maiden hair is that we usually callwall-rue. They both open obstructions, cleanse the breast and lungs ofgross slimy humours, provoke urine, help ruptures and shortness of wind adiantum aurcum politrycum golden maiden-hair its temperature andvirtues are the same with the former. Helps the spleen. Burned, and lyemade with the ashes, keeps the hair from falling off the head agrimonia agrimony galen eupatorium it is hot and dry inthe first degree, binding, it amends the infirmities of the liver, helps such as evacuate blood instead of water, helps inward wounds, opens obstructions outwardly applied it helps old sores, ulcers, &c inwardly, it helps the jaundice and the spleen take a dram of this orthat following, inwardly in white wine, or boil the herb in white wine, and drink the decoction galen, pliny, dioscorides, serapio ageretum hot and dry in the second degree, provokes urine and themenses, dries the brain, opens stoppings, helps the green sickness, andprofits such as have a cold, weak liver. Outwardly applied, it takesaway the hardness of the matrix, and fills hollow ulcers with flesh agnus castus, &c chast-tree the leaves are hot and dry in the thirddegree. Expel wind, consume the seed, cause chastity being only borneabout one. It dissolves swellings of the testicles, being applied tothem, head-ache, and lethargy allajula, lujula, &c wood sorrel it is of the temperature of othersorrel, and held to be more cordial.

The council, constituted of scientific men, working without remuneration inthe interest of scientific medicine and the medical profession, expects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active, sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course j a m a 74:1235 may 11920 the following is the recommendation of the reference committee towhich the report of the board of trustees was referred. “a perusalof the trustees’ report, ‘cooperation of the pharmaceutical houses’, is well worth the time of every member of the profession, and yourcommittee would emphasize the statement of the trustees. ‘thecouncil, constituted of scientific men, working without remunerationin the interest of scientific medicine and the medical professionexpects-- and rightfully-- the cooperation and support of the members ofthat profession what is needed, therefore, is the active sympatheticcooperation of physicians. The cooperation of pharmaceutical houseswill follow as a matter of course ’“your committee would go still further and move that a vote of thanksof the house be extended to those scientific men who have devoted somuch valuable time to the welfare of the association ” j a m a , 74:1322 may 8 1920. From reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1920, p 56 w a puckner, secretary budwell emulsion of cod-liver oil, nos 1 and 2 report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe budwell pharmacal company, lynchburg, virginia, which markets thesepreparations, claims that “no 1” contains cod liver oil, “iodide ofarsenic, ” “iodide of calcium, ” and “iodide of manganese ” “no 2” issaid to contain in addition to the ingredients of no 1, creosotecarbonate and guaiacol it is known that arsenous iodid is decomposed by contact with water itis recognized that creosote carbonate is unstable and prone to liberatecreosote iodide of manganese not being official, the supply on themarket is not controlled in any way. Tests of purity are not prescribedby the pharmacopeia, the national formulary, new and nonofficialremedies or other books of standards therefore doubt must be expressedas to the accuracy of the formulas as given the council cannot acceptsuch statements of composition without further evidence “no 1” is commended for use in “chronic rheumatism, glandular swellings, later forms of syphilis, convalescence from scarlet fever, la grippe and malaria, chronic malarial infection, marasmus, joint or other suppuration of standing, diseases of skin, chorea, anaemia, neurasthenia, obstinate neuralgia, scrofulous affections in general, and diarrhea or dysentery subacute or chronic in childhood ”“no 2” is said to be “prepared especially for the treatment of chronic throat, nasal, bronchial and pulmonary diseases ”in the advertising circular statements regarding the variousingredients of budwell emulsion are quoted from obsolete textbooks these statements, for the most writing, do not represent modernopinions on the subject for instance, the circular praises the actionof guaiacol as eliminated directly by the lungs, thus exerting abeneficial local effect and causing bacilli to diminish in numbers orto disappear all of this is directly contradicted in authoritativemodern publications on pharmacology, which hold that the excretion ofguaiacol by the lungs is infinitesimal and its action on bacilli isnil the council held the preparations in conflict with its rules asfollows:1 thesis of the therapeutic claims are exaggerations 2 the method of exploitation amounts to an indirect invitation to thepublic to use these preparations as “consumption cures ”3 the preparations are unscientific, they constitute a reprehensibleinvitation to uncritical prescribing and their use is inimical to thebest interests of the profession and the public it is difficult toimagine in what conditions such a combination would be indicated thesepreparations are a remnant of the days of polypharmacy their use isnot in keeping with present medical thought and practice -- from thejournal a m a , feb 20, 1915 rheumalgine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryrheumalgine eli lilly & co , indianapolis is put up both in tabletform and as a liquid each tablet, or teaspoonful of the liquid, issaid to contain. “strontium salicylate from natural oil 5 gr hexamethylenamin 2 gr colchicine 1/200 gr ”the advertising matter contains several statements regarding theindividual ingredients to which objection must be made it is claimed quoting from hare that strontium salicylate “ is not so disagreeable to the taste as the corresponding sodium salts, and more important still, it is far less apt to disorder the stomach ”“taste” is a difficult subject to dispute. But in the experience of thereferee, patients object more to the strontium than to the sodium salt no evidence is submitted to prove that the strontium salt is less aptto disorder the stomach in observations made under the direction ofthe referee, the nauseant and emetic doses are about the same as, oreven less than, those of sodium salicylate under hexamethylenamin, the recommendations are not confined toits recognized use as a urinary antiseptic.

“gelsemium was originally employed as an arterial sedativeand febrifuge in the malarial fevers of the south, and subsequentlyin sthenic fevers it appears in essay way to depress the bodilytemperature, but it does not appear probable that any advantage to bederived from it will counterbalance the danger attending its employmentin the large doses required in asthma, spasmodic laryngitis, whoopingcough, and nervous cough it has been recommended by bartholow, but islittle used ”that is about as favorable a statement for the drug as is to be foundin the textbooks, and it serves to illustrate how little new there isin this mixture of obsolete drugs that merrell seeks to market as onepossessing extraordinary therapeutic value even though the ingredients, or certain of them, were singly useful inthe treatment of those conditions for which casta-flora is recommended, no one could possibly foresee the effect in any given case of such ajumble of drugs, both active and inert, as is said to be represented inthis preparation the prescribing of such mixtures, the action of whichcannot in any way be foreseen, is plain charlatanism in addition, the various drugs in casta-flora are present in suchproportions that the dose of each of the several ingredients bears norelation to the commonly accepted dose casta-flora is not acceptable for new and nonofficial remedies -- fromthe journal a m a , jan 27, 1917 firwein report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfirwein is a product of the tilden company, new lebanon, n y it issold under the claim that when swallowed it has a “predilection” bothfor the bronchial mucosa and also for the genito-urinary organs toquote. “expectorant, sedative, antispasmodic in the treatment of inflammations of the bronchial and genito-urinary mucosæ ” “firwein being a bland, soothing balsam possesses a wide range of adaptability and increased potency because of its healing virtues and usefulness as an expectorant, sedative and antispasmodic in bronchitis, and inflammation and catarrh of nose, throat and lungs ” “firwein has a special predilection for mucosæ, this being as marked in diseases of the genito-urinary system as it is in the respiratory organs in inflammatory diseases of the genito-urinary organs, its bland, curative properties are exerted in a gratifying degree in cystitis and uritis it is clearly indicated ”little information is given concerning the composition of firwein anold circular says. “firwein contains phosphorus, iodin and bromin finely blended with a balsameous elixir made from the fir tree ”from a more recent circular we quote. “firwein is prepared from the inside fresh green bark of the fir tree ”the label on the product reads. “firwein is pleasantly and effectively blended with salts of iodin and bromin, held in solution with 20 per cent alcohol ”the therapeutic claims made for firwein and the mystery enshroudingits composition make it obvious that the product is intended to appealto those who are either thoughtless or ignorant this is emphasized bythe suggestion that firwein be combined with 1 cod liver oil underthe claim that it will “promote the efficiency of the oil”, with 2whisky for the treatment of bronchorrhea of the aged, and with 3syrup of hypophosphites for the treatment of persistent bronchitis as the composition of firwein is secret, the therapeutic claimsunwarranted, and its use irrational, the council declared itinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies -- from journal a m a , feb 17, 1917 firolyptol plain and firolyptol with kreosote report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfirolyptol, another product of the tilden company, is, we are told, composed of eucalyptol 10 drops, cottonseed oil 1/2 ounce and firweinenough to make 1 ounce as the composition of firwein is secret, itis evident that the composition of firolyptol is also unknown, exceptto the manufacturers “firolyptol with kreosote” is said to contain, in addition to whatever may be the component writings of firolyptol, 10 minims of creosote to each ounce according to an advertisement, firolyptol with kreosote is “antituberculous, antistrumous” and“contains all the desired features of cod liver oil and is readilyassimilated ”the advertisements of “firolyptol plain” and “firolyptol with kreosote”seem to have for their key-note the assertion that cottonseed oilis a writingicularly valuable nutriment and that when combined withconstituents of firolyptol and firolyptol with kreosote becomeswritingicularly valuable to the tuberculous to quote from an advertisingcircular. “now that the reconstructive properties of cottonseed oil are better appreciated by the profession, the advantages that follow the administration of a palatable emulsion of this strengthening and fattening food product are being demonstrated in hundreds of paper where formerly reliance would have been placed in cod liver oil a recent writer says that pure cottonseed oil is the greatest and purest vegetable oil known to chemistry, and will do much toward revolutionizing the treatment of the great white plague if the treatment of tuberculosis could resolve itself into the administration of a fatty substance in a readily assimilated form, there would be no need for any writing of firolyptol but the cottonseed oil the toxic material constantly produced in the system by the germs of tuberculosis tend to expose it more and more to the ravages of the disease, and the physiologic functions of the body suffer a constant depression to neutralize this germ activity with a consequent production of toxins it seems most logical to employ such agents as have demonstrated their suitability for such purposes, for which reason eucalyptol and kreosote with firwein are incorporated in firolyptol ”the assertion that cottonseed oil is an especially valuable formof fat is without warrant, but even if it were true the fat isavailable in cheap and palatable forms in numerous other cottonseedoil products it is unnecessary to discuss the problematic value ofcreosote in the treatment of tuberculosis or the value of eucalyptol now generally abandoned, or even of the secret mixture firwein food and fresh air, not drugs, constitute the fundamentals of thetreatment of tuberculosis, and it is both irrational and detrimental tothe interests of the tuberculous to administer various potent agentsin fixed and unknown amounts with such simple articles of food ascottonseed oil neither of these products is acceptable for new andnonofficial remedies editorial note -- firwein110 has been advertised to physiciansfor twenty-five or thirty years and it is a sad commentary on theintelligence of our profession that a preparation sold under suchobviously false and misleading, not to say silly, claims, should stillbe in existence firwein is claimed to “prevent waste of tissue” intuberculosis if it had this power, it would have found its placelong ago among the few great agents in drug therapy as a matter offact, firwein has gained virtually no recognition outside of the“literature” of the tilden concern the claims made for firwein are apeculiar mixture of studied candor-- when the truth is not likely tohurt its sale-- and inane vaporing-- when the facts would not redound toits credit the tilden company declares that “firwein stands withouta peer in its class ” but the company adds 10 drops of eucalyptol andessay cottonseed oil to this peerless product and an improvement isborn-- “firolyptol”!. then, to perfect the already perfectly perfected, 10 drops of creosote are added to “firolyptol” and the profession isoffered “firolyptol with kreosote”!. in just what verbal pyrotechnicsthe tilden company might indulge, should it decide to add ten dropsof essaything else to “firolyptol with kreosote, ” one shudders tocontemplate 110 three other tilden products have been the subject of deservedand unfavorable comment in the j a m a. “narkine” in the issue ofoct 24, 1908, “hydrocyanate of iron-tilden” in the issue of june 19, 1909, and “febrisol, ” in the issue of june 29, 1912 the first twoarticles are reprinted in the latest 9th edition of “the propagandafor reform ”if we are accused of exhibiting undue levity in discussing atherapeutic problem, we can only answer that it is impossible toconsider seriously the charlie chaplins of the nostrum world -- fromthe journal a m a , feb 17, 1917 biniodol report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryin accordance with the usages of the council, the report whichappears below along with the reports of the clinical investigationby drs cole and keidel upon which the recommendations of thereferee were based were sent to the manufacturer for comment thereply of the manufacturer contained no evidence which justified thecouncil in modifying the action already taken publication of thereport was therefore authorized w a puckner, secretary biniodol was submitted to the council by the manufacturer, charles c yarbrough, memphis, tenn the manufacturer claims the product is asolution of 1 per cent of red mercuric iodid and 2 75 per cent ofguaiacol in bland vegetable oil it is marketed with the implicationthat it is new and superior to other oil solutions of mercuric iodid for instance. “ it is a straight solution of this mercurial compound, as no alkaline iodide or other chemical is used to bring about the solution ” “ it is probably the first and only one-percent oil solution of straight mercury biniodide made in america ” the manufacturer, in a letter addressed to the secretary of the council, explains. “by straight solution, i mean that the solution of the red mercuric iodid is effected without the aid of any alkaline iodid or other chemicals biniodol was first offered early in 1912 ” “biniodol is, therefore, superior and much to be preferred to other mercurials used for like purposes it is highly active therapeutically, producing the desired effects, usually without the inevitable disadvantages of other mercurials it rarely causes salivation, diarrhea, or other symptoms of mercurial intolerance, even when pushed to full therapeutic effect and when given for a considerable period of time nor does it produce anemia ”the chemical laboratory of the american medical association found thatbiniodol contained 1 per cent of mercuric iodid and 2 5 per cent of guaiacol. Hence the composition is essentially as claimed it isnot true, however, that biniodol is the “first and only one-percentsolution of straight mercury biniodide made in america ” as shownin the journal a m a , dec 9, 1914, p 2247, formulas by lemaireand dunning for making a “straight” solution of mercuric iodid werepublished in this country in 1909 and 1910, respectively moreover, a1 per cent solution of mercuric iodid in oil is on the market and isdescribed in new and nonofficial remedies to determine whether or not biniodol is “superior and much to bepreferred to other mercurials used for like purposes, ” the councilsecured the cooperation of the dewritingment of dermatology andsyphilology of the western reserve university cooperating with thecleveland city hospital, and of the johns hopkins hospital eachreceived three samples, labeled respectively, 1, 2 and 3.

Where he is to make an definition of argumentative essay examination of facts, such as thepost-mortem examination of a body, a chemical analysis or anexamination of an alleged insane person, he should insist upon havingplenty of time and full opportunity for doing his work thoroughly heshould take writingicular pains to make his examination open and fair, and, if possible, should invite opposing experts to co-operate with himin it fourth. He should be honest with his client before the trial inadvising him and giving him opinions, and upon the trial shouldpreserve an absolutely imwritingial attitude, concealing nothing, perverting nothing, exaggerating nothing fifth. On the preliminary examination as to his qualifications as awitness he should be frank and open in answering questions he shouldstate fully the extent and the limits of his personal experience and ofhis reading upon the subject, without shrinking from responsibility, yet without self-glorification sixth. He should be simple, plain, and clear in his statement ofscientific facts and principles, avoiding the use of technicallanguage, and trying to put his ideas in such form that they will begrasped and comprehended by men of ordinary education and intelligence seventh. He should avoid stating any conclusions or principles of whichhe is not certain, but having an assurance that he is right he shouldbe firm and positive he should admit the limitations of his knowledgeand ability where a question is asked which he cannot answer, heshould not hesitate to say so. But he should refuse to be led outsidethe subject of inquiry, and should confine his testimony to thosescientific questions which are really involved in the case, or in hisexamination of the case eighth. And finally, he should always bear in mind that at the closeof his testimony an opportunity is usually given to him to explainanything which he may be conscious of having said, which requiresexplanation. And writingial statements which need a qualification to makethem a truth this is the physician opportunity to set himself rightwith the court and with the jury if the course of the examination hasbeen unsatisfactory to him, he can then, by a brief and plain statementof the general points which he has intended to convey by his testimony, sweep away all the confusion and uncertainty arising from the longexamination and cross-examination, and can often succeed in producingfor the first time the impression which he desires to produce, and canpresent the scientific aspects of the case briefly and correctly probably no man was ever so gifted as to be able in practice to carryout all of these principles in giving medical testimony if he could, he would be the ideal expert witness but the principles are, afterall, simple and easily followed in the main any physician who knowshis subject and who has a clear head and the ordinary faculty ofexpression, by observing these principles can make himself invaluableas an expert witness there is no branch of the profession which bringsa broader fame, greater influence, or larger emoluments than this there is no branch, on the other hand, in which men of real abilitymake more lamentable failures chapter vi malpractice definition - malpractice may be defined to be 1st wilful acts on the writing of a physician or surgeon toward a personunder his care, by which such person suffers death or injury;2d acts forbidden by express statute, on the writing of a physician orsurgeon, toward a person under his care, by which such person suffersdeath or injury;3d negligent acts on the writing of a physician or surgeon in treating apatient, by means of which such patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury these various divisions will be considered in the order in which theyare above set forth wilful malpractice - the paper which fall within the first twodivisions of this definition are such acts as render the medicalman liable to punishment in a criminal prosecution, and may notnecessarily, although in essay instances they may, constitute grounds ofliability in a civil suit against him as examples of the first class of paper may be cited those instances, happily not numerous in the annals of the profession, where a physicianor surgeon when treating a female patient has had carnal connectionwith her, representing that he was using that method of treating her tocure her disease such a case was reg v case, 1 eng law & eq , 544 s c , 1 den c c , 580 186honest intent no defence in such paper - in reg v reed, 1 den c c , 377 s c , 2 car & k , 967, it was contended as a defencethat the defendant really believed that he was curing his patient bytreating her in this extraordinary way the court, per wildes, c j , brushed aside this contention with scorn, saying. “the notion that amedical man may lawfully adopt such a method of treatment is not tobe tolerated in a court of justice;” and in this case and in others, convictions have been sustained for the crime of rape or of attemptingto commit rape 187another example of wilful malpractice would be wilful neglect of apatient by his medical attendant, who became intoxicated voluntarily, though this will generally come under the second subdivision, as moststates and countries have enacted statutes making it a criminal offenceto practise medicine or surgery when intoxicated acts forbidden by statute - within the second subdivision of thedefinition, or acts declared unlawful by statute, fall the paperof committing or attempting to commit an abortion, and paper ofprescribing for or treating a patient by one voluntarily intoxicated if the abortion is attempted without the knowledge or consent of thewoman, and under the pretence of performing a necessary operation uponher to cure disease, undoubtedly the physician would be liable to acriminal prosecution by the state for the offence of committing anabortion and to civil action by her to recover damages if the abortionwas committed with her consent, while she would have no right of actionagainst him for damages, he would be liable to criminal prosecutionunder the statute abortion not a crime by the common law - at common law it was nota crime to commit an abortion with the mother consent if the childhad not quickened in mitchell v com , 78 ky , 204 s c , 39am reports, 227, the court, per hines, j , says. “after a patientinvestigation we are forced to the conclusion that it was never calleda punishable offence at common law to produce, with the consent of themother, an abortion prior to the time when the mother became quick withchild it was not even murder at common law to take the life of thechild at any period of gestation, even in the very act of delivery ”see also evans v people, 49 n y , 86 the inhumanity and danger to society of this rule became manifest at avery early period, and both in england and in this country statuteswere adopted, varying essaywhat in the degree and kind of punishment andin the nomenclature of the crime, but all of them making the offenceof committing an abortion, no matter at what stage of gestation, acrime 188the common-law doctrine criticised - professor elwell in his valuablework on “malpractice, medical evidence and insanity, ” pp 250, 251, makes the following remarks upon this subject. “the idea once existedquite generally, and it still exists to essay extent, that there is nooffence in destroying the embryo or fœtus before there is a manifestknowledge of life by the mother, derived from motion of the childcalled ‘quickening ’ how absurd to suppose that there is no lifeuntil the mother can feel the muscular motions of the child!. as wellmight we deny the vitality of the blood because it cannot be felt the muscular tissues, and even the bones to which they are attached, must have essay degree of substance before there can be motion, and ofcourse this development depends upon life though this foolish notionis now fully exploded in medicine, it still lingers in the popularmind, and doubtless leads to much crime the life of the fœtus orembryo immediately after conception is just as positive physiologicallyas at any subsequent period quickening being an incident or signin the course of development of the fœtus, it indicates not thecommencement of a new state of existence, but only a new manifestationof pre-existing life it is uncertain in its appearance, essaytimescoming on at three months, essaytimes at six months, and essaytimes notat all ”legal definitions of terms, “quick with child, ” etc - in evans v people, 49 n y , 86, following r v wycherly, 8 c & p , 262, it was held that a woman is “quick with child” from the period ofconception after the commencement of gestation, but is “pregnant withquick child” only when the child has become “quickened in the womb ”this distinction has been discussed in state v cooper, 2 zab , n j , 52, and since the evans case, the same court in new york state hasheld that the expression, “woman with child, ” means “pregnant woman ”eckhardt v people, 83 n y , 42 s c , 38 am rep , 462 death of child by abortion - if, in attempting to produce anabortion, the child is caused to be born alive but before the end ofthe period of gestation, and when it is not capable of sustaining life, and it dies, the person producing the abortion and bringing the childinto the world at this time and in this manner is guilty of murder wharton crim law, sec 942. Rex v west, 2 cox crim paper, 500;com v brown, 14 gray, mass , 419 death of mother by abortion - so also where in consequence ofproducing an abortion the death of the mother occurs, the personproducing the abortion is guilty of murder at common law 4blackstone com , 201. 1 bishop crim law, 328 in essay of thestates, however, these offences are declared to be only manslaughter further consideration of the subject of abortion will be had under thattitle in another writing of this work statutes generally except abortions necessary to save life - itshould be noted here, however, that nearly all the statutes whichdefine and punish the crime of abortion, or the crime of manslaughteror murder committed in consequence of abortion, declare that when it isnecessary to produce a miscarriage in order to save life, the act ofdoing so is excepted from the effect of the statute negligent malpractice - under the third subdivision of thedefinition, viz , when by reason of the negligent acts on the writingof the physician or surgeon the patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury, may be placed the most numerous paper of malpractice, accordingto the generally accepted meaning of the term criminal liability for negligent malpractice - it is manifest thatnot every degree of negligence which causes death or injury ought torender the physician or surgeon liable to indictment and punishmentfor a crime the general theory of the criminal law is based upon thedoctrine that in order to constitute a crime there must be eitheran intent to do the wrong, or such a degree of negligence in theperformance of a given act as to supply the place of the intent to dowrong, and require punishment for the protection of society, upon theground that the carelessness of the defendant is so great as to makeit necessary and proper to punish him, in order to deter others fromfollowing his example doctrine of leading case of com v thompson - in com v thompson 6 mass , 134, parsons, c j , observes. “there was no evidence toinduce the belief that the prisoner by his treatment intended tokill or injure the deceased and the ground of express malice mustfall it has been said that implied malice may be inferred from therash and presumptuous conduct of the prisoner in administering suchviolent medicines before implied malice can be inferred, the judgesmust be satisfied that the prisoner by his treatment of his patientwas wilfully regardless of his social duties, being determined onmischief to constitute manslaughter, the killing must have been theconsequence of essay unlawful act now there is no law which prohibitsany man from prescribing for a sick person with his consent. And it isnot a felony, if through his ignorance of the quality of the medicineprescribed, or of the nature of the disease, or of both, the patient, contrary to his expectations, should die the death of a man killed byvoluntarily following a medical prescription cannot be adjudged felonyin the writingy prescribing unless he, however ignorant of medical sciencein general, had so much knowledge or probable information of the fataltendency of the prescription that it may be reasonably presumed bythe jury to be an act of wilful rashness at least, and not of honestintention and expectation to cure ”the doctrine of the thompson case too broad - this lax statementof the law, made by the learned chief justice in this case, has beenmuch doubted and criticised it appears to be unsound in the length towhich it goes in requiring, in order to constitute criminal liability, what may be termed excessive gross carelessness or wilful grosscarelessness it apparently runs counter to the prevailing opinions ofthe english judges, and to the later decisions of the courts in theunited states, although it is followed and approved in rice v thestate, 8 mo , 561 in rex v long 4 car & p , 308-310, park, j , said. “i call itacting wickedly when a man is grossly ignorant and yet affects to curepeople, or when he is grossly inattentive to their safety ”so in rex v spiller 5 car & p , 353, the court said. “if aperson, whether a medical man or not, professes to deal with thelife and health of another, he is bound to use competent skill andsufficient attention.

  • mettaton essay answers
  • thematic analysis essay
  • essay about school
  • homework websites
  • buy a speech no plagiarism
  • thesis in an essay
  • exploratory essay outline
  • what is a critique essay
  • research paper sale
  • critical thinking essay example
  • informal essay definition
  • pay to do my term paper
  • can i buy a research paper without getting caught
  • how to write an essay
  • which type of essay does not require that you examine and analyze secondary source documents?
  • article writers wanted
  • definition essay on beauty
  • reflection essay
  • order to write assignment top 10
  • best content article writing services
  • essay on sports

This i am sure, cabbages areextremely windy, definition of argumentative essay whether you take them as meat or as medicine. Yea, as windy meat as can be eaten, unless you eat bag-pipes or bellows, and they are but seldom eaten in our days. And colewort flowers areessaything more tolerable, and the wholeessayr food of the two the moonchallenges the dominion of this herb the sea coleworts descript this has divers essaywhat long and broad large and thickwrinkled leaves, essaywhat crumpled about the edges, and growing eachupon a thick footstalks very brittle, of a greyish green colour, fromamong which rises up a strong thick stalk, two feet high and better, with essay leaves thereon to the top, where it branches forth much. Andon every branch stands a large bush of pale whitish flowers, consistingof four leaves a-piece. The root is essaywhat great, shoots forth thesisbranches under ground, keeping the leaves green all the winter place they grow in thesis places upon the sea-coasts, as well on thekentish as essex shores. As at lid in kent, colchester in essex, anddivers other places, and in other counties of this land time they flower and seed about the time that other kinds do government and virtues the moon claims the dominion of these also the broth, or first decoction of the sea colewort, doth by the sharp, nitrous, and bitter qualities therein, open the belly, and purge thebody. It cleanses and digests more powerfully than the other kind. Theseed hereof, bruised and drank, kills worms the leaves or the juice ofthem applied to sores or ulcers, cleanses and heals them, and dissolvesswellings, and takes away inflammations calamint, or mountain-mint descript this is a small herb, seldom rising above a foot high, with square hairy, and woody stalks, and two small hoary leaves set ata joint, about the height of marjoram, or not much bigger, a littledented about the edges, and of a very fierce or quick scent, as thewhole herb is. The flowers stand at several spaces of the stalk, fromthe middle almost upwards, which are small and gaping like to those ofthe mints, of a pale bluish colour. After which follow small, roundblackish seed the root is small and woody, with divers small stringsspreading within the ground, and dies not, but abides thesis years place it grows on heaths, and uplands, and dry grounds, in thesisplaces of this land time they flower in july and their seed is ripe quickly after government and virtues it is an herb of mercury, and a strongone too, therefore excellent good in all afflictions of the brain the decoction of the herb being drank, brings down women courses, and provokes urine it is profitable for those that are bursten, ortroubled with convulsions or cramps, with shortness of breath, orcholeric torments and pains in their bellies or stomach. It also helpsthe yellow-jaundice, and stays vomiting, being taken in wine takenwith salt and honey, it kills all manner of worms in the body ithelps such as have the leprosy, either taken inwardly, drinking wheyafter it, or the green herb outwardly applied it hinders conceptionin women, but either burned or strewed in the chamber, it drives awayvenomous serpents it takes away black and blue marks in the face, andmakes black scars become well coloured, if the green herb not thedry be boiled in wine, and laid to the place, or the place washedtherewith being applied to the hucklebone, by continuance of time, itspends the humours, which cause the pain of the sciatica the juicebeing dropped into the ears, kills the worms in them the leaves boiledin wine, and drank, provoke sweat, and open obstructions of the liverand spleen it helps them that have a tertian ague the body beingfirst purged by taking away the cold fits the decoction hereof, withessay sugar put thereto afterwards, is very profitable for those thatbe troubled with the over-flowing of the gall, and that have an oldcough, and that are scarce able to breathe by shortness of their wind;that have any cold distemper in their bowels, and are troubled withthe hardness or the spleen, for all which purposes, both the powder, called diacaluminthes, and the compound syrup of calamint are the mosteffectual let no women be too busy with it, for it works very violentupon the feminine writing camomile it is so well known every where, that it is but lost time and labour todescribe it the virtues thereof are as follow a decoction made of camomile, and drank, takes away all pains andstitches in the side the flowers of camomile beaten, and made up intoballs with gill, drive away all sorts of agues, if the writing grieved beanointed with that oil, taken from the flowers, from the crown of thehead to the sole of the foot, and afterwards laid to sweat in his bed, and that he sweats well this is nechessor, an egyptian, medicine itis profitable for all sorts of agues that come either from phlegm, ormelancholy, or from an inflammation of the bowels, being applied whenthe humours causing them shall be concocted.