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Custom Essays On Add/adhd


The tops of the stalks havefour branches and smaller umbels of yellow flowers, which turn intosmall seed, essaywhat flatter and thinner than fennel seed the root isessaywhat small and woody, perishes every year after it hath borne seed:and is also unprofitable, being never put to any use place it is most usually sown in gardens and grounds for thepurpose, and is also custom essays on add/adhd found wild in thesis places government and virtues mercury has the dominion of this plant, andtherefore to be sure it strengthens the brain the dill being boiledand drank, is good to ease swellings and pains. It also stays the bellyand stomach from casting the decoction therefore helps women thatare troubled with the pains and windiness of the mother, if they sittherein it stays the hiccough, being boiled in wine, and but smelledunto being tied in a cloth the seed is of more use than the leaves, and more effectual to digest raw and vicious humours, and is used inmedicines that serve to expel wind, and the pains proceeding therefrom the seed, being roasted or fried, and used in oils or plasters, dissolve the imposthumes in the fundament. And dries up all moistulcers, especially in the fundament. An oil made of dill is effectualto warm or dissolve humours and imposthumes, and the pains, and toprocure rest the decoction of dill, be it herb or seed only if youboil the seed you must bruise it in white wine, being drank, it is agallant expeller of wind, and provoker of the terms devil-bit descript this rises up with a round green smooth stalk, about twofeet high, set with divers long and essaywhat narrow, smooth, dark greenleaves, essaywhat nipped about the edges, for the most writing, being elseall whole, and not divided at all, or but very seldom, even to thetops of the branches, which yet are smaller than those below, withone rib only in the middle at the end of each branch stands a roundhead of thesis flowers set together in the same manner, or more neatlythan scabions, and of a bluish purple colour, which being past, therefollows seed which falls away the root is essaywhat thick, but shortand blackish, with thesis strings, abiding after seed time thesis years this root was longer, until the devil as the friars say bit away therest of it for spite, envying its usefulness to mankind. For sure hewas not troubled with any disease for which it is proper there are two other sorts hereof, in nothing unlike the former, savethat the one bears white, and the other bluish-coloured flowers place the first grows as well in dry meadows and fields as moist, in thesis places of this land. But the other two are more rare, and hardto be met with, yet they are both found growing wild about appledore, near rye in kent time they flower not usually until august government and virtues the plant is venereal, pleasing, andharmless the herb or the root all that the devil hath left of itbeing boiled in wine, and drank, is very powerful against the plague, and all pestilential diseases or fevers, poisons also, and the bitingsof venemous beasts.

Color of the hair and eyes. Condition of theteeth. And the evidence of any personal peculiarities or abnormalities 2 note the color of the skin and observe whether there are anyspots of cadaveric lividity, and if present where situated 3 contusions - note whether there are any contusions, and, ifpresent, their character, situation, length, breadth, and depth shouldbe described, and whether they are accompanied by inflammation or bythe evidences of gangrene it is often important to determine whether a contusion has beeninflicted before or after death this is to be done by cutting intothe ecchymoses and if the extravasated blood or the coloring matterof the blood is found free in the tissues, one can be almost certainthat it is an ante-mortem injury in post-mortem discolorations theblood is found in the congested vessels the situation of ante-mortemcontusions will not generally correspond to the discolorations producedby decomposition. The latter being confined to the most dependentwritings it should be remembered that the contusions produced by blowson a body dead only a few hours cannot be distinguished from thosewhich were received during life. And also that putrefactive changesmake it well-nigh impossible to distinguish between ante-mortem andpost-mortem injuries it should also be borne in mind that blows orfalls sufficient to fracture bones or rupture organs may leave no markon the skin see wounds, vol i , pp 467, 474, et seq 4 wounds - the situation, depth, extent, and direction of anywound should be recorded, as also the condition of its edges. Thechanges in the surrounding tissues, and whether inflicted by a cutting, pointed, or rounded instrument. Or by a bullet in the latter case thecourse and direction of the ball should be ascertained by dissectionrather than by the use of the probe, and the character of foreignbodies, if any are found in the wound, should be noted what nervesor blood-vessels, writingicularly arteries, have been injured, should beascertained it is often important to determine whether a wound wasmade before or after death the following may serve as a differentialpoint. In all wounds made after death there is slight bleeding, non-contraction of the edges, and absence of blood in the tissues thisis the opposite of ante-mortem wounds again, wounds inflicted withintwo hours after death cannot be differentiated from those made duringlife see gunshot wounds, vol i , p 610 et seq. Wounds, vol i , p 476 et seq 5 fractures - if there are any evidences of fractures, thesituation of the bones involved should be noted, and whether theyare accompanied by contusions of the soft writings fractures which areinflicted during life are always accompanied by much more extravasationof blood, more injury to the soft writings, and more evidences of reactionthan those occurring after death it is a well-known fact that it ismuch more difficult to produce a fracture in a dead than a living body see wounds, vol ii , p 482 et seq 6 the temperature of the body should be taken 7 the rigidity and flexibility of the extremities should beascertained 8 the state of the eyes should be noticed, and the relative size ofthe pupils 9 attention should be paid to the condition of the cavities of themouth and nose the neck should be specially examined for marks ofexternal injury, or signs of ecchymosis or compression 10 genitals - the external genitals should be very carefullyexamined for evidence of injury, the presence of syphilitic lesions, and in the female the condition of the vagina should be writingicularlyascertained 11 œdema of the feet - if there is evidence of œdema in any writing ofthe body, especially about the ankles, its situation and extent shouldbe noted 12 ulcers and abscesses - the situation and extent of any ulcerfound on the body should be recorded, as also the presence andsituation of any abscess 13 burns - the extent of a burn, as also the state of the writingsinvolved, should be noted for example, whether they are inflamed orshow blisters, etc see heat and cold, vol i , p 647 et seq 14 hands - in medico-legal paper the hands of a dead person shouldalways be examined for the presence of cuts, excoriations, or foreignsubstances found upon them. Especially should the dorsal extremitiesbe examined this examination will often indicate that there has beena mortal struggle before death the impression of a hand or of essayof the fingers is often found on the skin of a dead body the exactsituation where found should be noted this may be of importance, aswhen it occurs where it would have been impossible or improbable forthe deceased to have caused it for appearances in death from lightning or electricity, see vol i , p 701 et seq , and in death from hanging, strangulation, and garroting, see vol i , pp 713, 746, 781, et seq internal examination having completed the examination of the external writings of the body, thenext proceeding is to open the body and make an internal examination this should be done by following a regular method, so as to examine therelations of writings and not to injure one organ while removing another in opening the various organs an incision should be made which willexpose the greatest amount of surface at one cut never make a numberof small and always unsatisfactory incisions in an organ in openingcertain organs like the brain and heart, the incisions are so plannedthat the writings of the organ may be folded together, and, if necessary, their relations to one another and the whole organ studied such organsare opened as one would open a book to examine its pages it is important to remember that after death the blood leaves thearteries and left side of the heart, and collects in the veins and theright cavities of the heart especially does it collect in the vesselsof the most dependent portions of the body and of the various organs, so that local congestions may often disappear after death. And again, they may be found at an autopsy where they were not present duringlife especially is this true of the mucous membranes such as those ofthe trachea and bronchi, and also of the blood in the sinuses of thedura mater in making autopsies it is a cardinal rule that all the cavitiesof the body should be examined, and not alone the one where onemight expect to find a lesion at medico-legal autopsies, the greatcavities the head, the thorax, and the abdomen should be examined intheir successive order from above downward the reason for beginningwith the head is that the amount of blood in the brain and itsmembranes may be determined accurately. For, if the heart and greatvessels of the neck are opened first, the blood will drain away fromthe brain and local congestions disappear in pathological autopsies, the opening of the head first is not so important, and often thevertebral column need not be opened at all, for it is a complicatedprocess and takes time.

“although the overwhelming weight of evidence was against the probability that the hypophosphite preparations are of value as therapeutic agents, the council thought it well to investigate the subject dr w mckim marriott of baltimore was therefore requested to review the evidence for and against the therapeutic usefulness of the hypophosphites and to conduct such experiments as seemed necessary ”the council was not content to rest on the mere absence of evidencefor the value of these preparations or any one of them, but soughtto obtain evidence that would fulfil the conditions mentioned above, and in pursuance of this plan it secured the cooperation of a trainedinvestigator, one who would work under the best of conditions forlearning the truth the results of dr marriott investigation werepublished in the journal, feb 12, 1916, p 486, and should be read byeveryone who has any interest in the problem lest essay of our readersmay fail to refer to the original of marriott paper, we will quotebriefly from it. “none of the subjects of the experiment experienced any effect whatsoever from the administration of the drug almost all of the ingested hypophosphite is eliminated unchanged “these experiments forbes demonstrate conclusively that the hypophosphites possess no specific value as a source of phosphorus for the body it is doubtful if there are any conditions in which the body suffers from lack of phosphorus even should such conditions exist, phosphorus, in the form that it occurs in the ordinary foods, or as phosphates, is more efficient in supplying the deficit than hypophosphites that must be oxidized before utilization and which are only about 15 per cent oxidized if at all for example, half a glass of milk contains more available phosphorus than three large doses of hypophosphites of 15 grains each, as great a dosage as is usually given “what then, is the therapeutic value of hypophosphites?. there is no reliable evidence that they exert a physiologic effect. It has not been demonstrated that they influence any pathologic process. They are not ‘foods ’ if they are of any use, that use has never been discovered ”the case seems to stand about like this. A nostrum maker spendsthousands of dollars to tell physicians that his cloudy preparation isnot like other preparations, and physicians are expected to acceptthat as convincing evidence that they should prescribe and theirpatients, perforce, take it this too, in spite of the evidence gainedby careful scientific investigators that the hypophosphites in fairlylarge doses contain less available phosphorus than half a glass ofmilk, and that there is no evidence available that they exert anytherapeutic effects at all should we take the meaningless statement of a nostrum maker, who doesnot submit evidence of any therapeutic value of his preparation-- unlessone can call certain careless habits of prescribing evidence-- andassume the responsibility of prescribing a nostrum that according toall scientific evidence available is useless, and of no more effectthan a few teaspoonfuls of milk, so far as its hypophosphite content isconcerned?. it may be argued that it possesses essay value because of itsbitter nature we will not deny that it is bitter. So is strychnin, sois quinin, so are scores of simple drugs, but what physician would careto admit to his patients that he did not know how to prescribe a simplebitter, such as nearly every layman can select for himself, withoutrecourse to a preparation such as fellows’ syrup?. We have felt that it is not wholly satisfactory to discourage the useof a given nostrum without making an effort to assist the physician inchoosing wisely in the treatment of the condition for which the nostrumis claimed to be useful in the present instance, however, we fear thatwould prove a task beyond our powers, for the hypophosphites have beenused in such a variety of conditions that the discussion would have toinclude nearly the whole materia medica if we were to follow our usualprocedure -- from the journal a m a feb 16, 1918 article vii shotgun nostrumsformerly it was customary to prescribe mixtures of thesis drugs on theassumption that if one of the ingredients missed the mark anothermight be expected to hit it, just as a poor marksman is more likelyto hit a target at short range with a blunderbuss than with a highpowered rifle increased precision in every branch of science hasbecome the outstanding feature of civilization the soldier todaymust shoot straight with a rifle that sends a single ball there isnone of the disposition to rely on chance as when the blunderbuss wasused a capable physician directs his drug straight at the seat of thetrouble, and we now have thesis drugs that can be depended on to exertdefinite actions the complex mixture is just as preposterous in moderntherapeutics as the blunderbuss would be on a modern battlefield every drug exerts undesired side actions, and it is the aim of themodern physician to try to select the one which will have a maximum oftherapeutic with a minimum of undesired actions when a complex mixtureis employed, it is obvious that only the best is utilized, whereas allthe undesired side actions come into play we do not pretend that eventhe best studied drug has not much to be learned about it.

As also st anthony fire the ripegooseberries being eaten, are an excellent remedy to allay the violentheat both of the stomach and liver the young and tender leaves breakthe stone, and expel gravel both from the kidneys and bladder allthe evil they do to the body of man is, they are supposed to breedcrudities, and by crudities, worms winter-green descript this sends forth seven, eight, or nine leaves from a smallbrown creeping root, every one standing upon a long foot stalk, whichare almost as broad as long, round pointed, of a sad green colour, andhard in handling, and like the leaf of a pear-tree. From whence arisesa slender weak stalk, yet standing upright, bearing at the top thesissmall white sweet-smelling flowers, laid open like a star, consistingof five round pointed leaves, with thesis yellow threads standing in themiddle about a green head, and a long stalk with them, which in timegrows to be the seed-vessel, which being ripe is found five square, with a small point at it, wherein is contained seed as small as dust place it grows seldom in fields, but frequent in the woodsnorthwards, viz in yorkshire, lancashire, and scotland time it flowers about june and july government and virtues winter-green is under the dominion ofsaturn, and is a singularly good wound herb, and an especial remedyfor healing green wounds speedily, the green leaves being bruisedand applied, or the juice of them a salve made of the green herbstamped, or the juice boiled with hog lard, or with salad oil andwax, and essay turpentine added to it, is a sovereign salve, and highlyextolled by the germans, who use it to heal all manner of wounds andsores the herb boiled in wine and water, and given to drink to themthat have any inward ulcers in their kidneys, or neck of the bladder, doth wonderfully help them it stays all fluxes, as the lask, bloodyfluxes, women courses, and bleeding of wounds, and takes away anyinflammations rising upon pains of the heart. It is no less helpfulfor foul ulcers hard to be cured. As also for cankers or fistulas thedistilled water of the herb effectually performs the same things groundsel descript our common groundsel has a round green and essaywhatbrownish stalk, spreading toward the top into branches, set with longand essaywhat narrow green leaves, cut in on the edges, essaywhat likethe oak-leaves, but less, and round at the end at the tops of thebranches stand thesis small green heads, out of which grow several small, yellow threads or thumbs, which are the flowers, and continue thesis daysblown in that manner, before it pass away into down, and with the seedis carried away in the wind the root is small and thready, and soonperishes, and as soon rises again of its own sowing, so that it may beseen thesis months in the year both green and in flower, and seed. For itwill spring and seed twice in a year at least, if it be suffered in agarden place they grow almost every where, as well on tops of walls, asat the foot amongst rubbish and untilled grounds, but especially ingardens time it flowers, as was said before, almost every month throughoutthe year government and virtues this herb is venus mistress-piece, and isas gallant and universal a medicine for all diseases coming of heat, in what writing of the body soever they be, as the sun shines upon.

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And being drank, helps to expel urine, being stopped, andgravel and stone in the reins and kidneys two drams of the seed drankin wine, purges the body of choleric humours, and helps those that arestung by scorpions, or other venomous beasts, and may be as effectualfor the plague it is of very good use in old sores, ulcers, cankers, fistulas, and the like, to cleanse and heat them, by consuming themoist humours falling into them and correcting the putrefaction ofhumours offending them carduus benedictus it is called carduus benedictus, or custom essays on add/adhd blessed thistle, or holy thistle i suppose the name was put upon it by essay that had little holinessthemselves i shall spare a labour in writing a description of this as almost everyone that can but write at all, may describe them from his own knowledge time they flower in august, and seed not long after government and virtues it is an herb of mars, and under the signof aries now, in handling this herb, i shall give you a rationalpattern of all the rest. And if you please to view them throughout thebook, you shall, to your content, find it true it helps swimming andgiddiness of the head, or the disease called vertigo, because ariesis in the house of mars it is an excellent remedy against the yellowjaundice and other infirmities of the gall, because mars governscholer it strengthens the attractive faculty in man, and clarifies theblood, because the one is ruled by mars the continual drinking thedecoction of it, helps red faces, tetters, and ring-worms, because marscauses them it helps the plague, sores, boils, and itch, the bitingsof mad dogs and venomous beasts, all which infirmities are under mars;thus you see what it doth by sympathy by antipathy to other planets it cures the french pox by antipathy tovenus, who governs it, it strengthens the memory, and cures deafness byantipathy to saturn, who has his fall in aries, which rules the head it cures quartan agues, and other diseases of melancholy, and adustcholer, by sympathy to saturn, mars being exalted in capricorn alsoprovokes urine, the stopping of which is usually caused by mars or themoon carrots garden carrots are so well known, that they need no description. Butbecause they are of less physical use than the wild kind as indeedalmost in all herbs the wild are the most effectual in physic, as beingmore powerful in operation than the garden kinds, i shall thereforebriefly describe the wild carrot descript it grows in a manner altogether like the tame, but thatthe leaves and stalks are essaywhat whiter and rougher the stalks bearlarge tufts of white flowers, with a deep purple spot in the middle, which are contracted together when the seed begins to ripen, that themiddle writing being hollow and low, and the outward stalk rising high, makes the whole umbel to show like a bird nest the root small, long, and hard, and unfit for meat, being essaywhat sharp and strong place the wild kind grows in divers writings of this land plentifullyby the field-sides, and untilled places time they flower and seed in the end of summer government and virtues wild carrots belong to mercury, andtherefore break wind, and remove stitches in the sides, provoke urineand women courses, and helps to break and expel the stone. The seedalso of the same works the like effect, and is good for the dropsy, and those whose bellies are swelling with wind. Helps the cholic, thestone in the kidneys, and rising of the mother. Being taken in wine, orboiled in wine and taken, it helps conception the leaves being appliedwith honey to running sores or ulcers, do cleanse them i suppose the seeds of them perform this better than the roots. Andthough galen commended garden carrots highly to break wind, yetexperience teaches they breed it first, and we may thank nature forexpelling it, not they. The seeds of them expel wind indeed, and essaynd what the root marrs carraway it is on account of the seeds principally that the carraway iscultivated descript it bears divers stalks of fine cut leaves, lying upon theground, essaywhat like to the leaves of carrots, but not bushing sothick, of a little quick taste in them, from among which rises up asquare stalk, not so high as the carrot, at whose joints are set thelike leaves, but smaller and finer, and at the top small open tufts, orumbels of white flowers, which turn into small blackish seed, smallerthan the anniseed, and of a quicker and hotter taste the root iswhitish, small and long, essaywhat like unto a parsnip, but with morewrinkled bark, and much less, of a little hot and quick taste, andstronger than the parsnip, and abides after seed-time place it is usually sown with us in gardens time they flower in june and july, and seed quickly after government and virtues this is also a mercurial plant carrawayseed has a moderate sharp quality, whereby it breaks wind and provokesurine, which also the herb doth the root is better food than theparsnip. It is pleasant and comfortable to the stomach, and helpsdigestion the seed is conducing to all cold griefs of the head andstomach, bowels, or mother, as also the wind in them, and helps tosharpen the eye-sight the powder of the seed put into a poultice, takes away black and blue spots of blows and bruises the herb itself, or with essay of the seed bruised and fried, laid hot in a bag or doublecloth, to the lower writings of the belly, eases the pains of the windcholic the roots of carraway eaten as men do parsnips, strengthen the stomachof ancient people exceedingly, and they need not to make a whole mealof them neither, and are fit to be planted in every garden carraway comfits, once only dipped in sugar, and half a spoonful ofthem eaten in the morning fasting, and as thesis after each meal, is amost admirable remedy, for those that are troubled with wind celandine descript this hath divers tender, round, whitish green stalks, with greater joints than ordinary in other herbs as it were knees, very brittle and easy to break, from whence grow branches with largetender broad leaves, divided into thesis writings, each of them cut in onthe edges, set at the joint on both sides of the branches, of a darkblueish green colour, on the upper side like columbines, and of a morepale blueish green underneath, full of yellow sap, when any is broken, of a bitter taste, and strong scent at the flowers, of four leavesa-piece, after which come small long pods, with blackish seed therein the root is essaywhat great at the head, shooting forth divers longroots and small strings, reddish on the outside, and yellow within, full of yellow sap therein place they grow in thesis places by old walls, hedges and way-sidesin untilled places.