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But no erasure shall be made on account ofhis adopting or refraining from adopting the practice of any writingiculartheory of medicine or surgery, nor on account of conviction for apolitical offence out of her majesty dominions, nor on account of theconviction which ought not in the opinion of the council or committeedisqualify him from the practice of medicine or surgery 41 the council may order to be paid, out of funds at their disposal, such costs as to them may seem just, to any person against whom anycomplaint has been made which, when fully determined, is found to havebeen frivolous and vexatious 42 an entry erased by order of the council shall not be again enteredexcept by order of the council or a judge or court of competentjurisdiction 43 if the council think fit, they may direct the registrar to restore anyentry erased, without a fee, or on payment of a fee not exceeding theregistration fee, as the council may fix 44 the council is authorized to ascertain the facts of any case for theexercise of its powers of erasing and restoring by committee s 45 the act provides in detail for proceedings before such committee46 to 50 no action shall be brought against the council or committee foranything done bona fide under the act appeal from the decision toerase lies to any judge of the court of queen bench for manitoba, and such judge may make such order as to restoration or confirmationof erasure or for further inquiry, and as to costs, as to him may seemright 51 evidence - in a trial under this act the burden of proof as toregistration is on the person charged 53 the production of a certificate that the person named is dulyregistered, certified under the hand of the registrar, is sufficientevidence of registration, and his signature in the capacity ofregistrar is prima facie evidence that he is registrar without proofof signature or that he is registrar 54 the registrar is required to print and publish from time to time underthe direction of the council a correct register of the names andresidences, with medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferredby any college or body, with the date thereof, of all persons appearingon the register as existing on the day of publication 55 the register is called “the manitoba medical register;” a copy thereoffor the time being purporting to be so printed and published is primafacie evidence that the persons specified are registered s 56 in the case of any person whose name does not appear in such copy, acertified copy under the hand of the registrar of the council of theentry of the name of such person on the register is evidence thatsuch person is registered 57 the absence of the name ofany person from such copy is prima facie evidence that he is notregistered 58 practitioner rights - every person registered is entitled accordingto his qualifications to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, orany of them as the case may be, and to demand and recover full costsof suit, reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of any medicine or other medical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patient 59 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights and privileges conferred, and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 60 unregistered persons - it is not lawful for any person not registeredto practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery for hire, gain, or hope ofreward 61 no person is entitled to receive any charge for medical or surgicaladvice or attendance, or the performance of any operation, or forany medicine which he may have prescribed or supplied, unless he beregistered, but this provision does not extend to the sale of any drugor medicine by a licensed chemist or druggist 62 no person can be appointed as a medical officer, physician, orsurgeon in the public service, or in any hospital or other charitableinstitution not supported wholly by voluntary contribution, unless hebe registered 63 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer be registered 64 definition - the expression “legally qualified medical practitioner, ”or any other words importing legal recognition as a medicalpractitioner or member of the medical profession, in any law, isconstrued to mean a person registered under this act 65 immunities - a person registered under this act is exempt from jury andinquest duty if he desire it 66 limitations - no duly registered member of the college of physiciansand surgeons is liable in an action for negligence or malpractice byreason of professional services requested or rendered, unless it becommenced within one year from the termination of such service s 67 examinations - the university of manitoba is the sole examining bodyin medicine, and the council of the university may grant to any persona certificate under the seal of the university that the council ofthe university have been satisfied that the person mentioned in thecertificate is, by way of medical education and otherwise, a properperson to be registered under this act. But such certificate shall notbe granted until the person making such application shall have givenevidence of qualification by undergoing an examination or otherwise, as the statutes of the university require, and the applicant shall inall other respects first comply with the rules and regulations of theuniversity in that behalf 68 homœopathists - until a homœopathic medical college for teachingpurposes is established in manitoba, in the case of candidates wishingto be registered as homœopathists, the full time of attendance uponlectures and hospitals required by the university statutes may be spentin such homœopathic medical colleges in the united states or europe asmay be recognized by the university of manitoba 69 every candidate who at the time of his examination signifies hiswish to be registered as a homœopathic practitioner shall not berequired to pass an examination in materia medica or therapeutics, ortheory or practice of physic, or in surgery or midwifery, except theoperative practical writings thereof, before any examiners other thanthose homœopathic examiners who shall be appointed by the university ofmanitoba 70 unlawful practices - to wilfully procure or attempt to procureregistration by false or fraudulent representation or declaration, ispunishable by a penalty not exceeding $100 to knowingly aid or assisttherein, is punishable by a penalty of from $20 to $50 for each offence73 persons not registered, for hire, gain, or the hope of reward, practising or professing to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, or advertising to give advice in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, areliable to a penalty of from $25 to $100 74 a person wilfully or falsely pretending to be a physician, doctorof medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assuming a title, addition, or description other than he actually possesses and islegally entitled to, is liable to a penalty of from $10 to $50 s 75 for a person to assume a title calculated to lead people to infer thathe is registered, or is recognized by law as a physician, surgeon, or accoucheur or a licentiate in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, ispunishable with a penalty of from $25 to $100 76 on prosecution, costs may be awarded in addition to the penalty, andthe offender may be committed to the common jail for one month, unlessthe penalty and costs are sooner paid 78 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant under the act80 limitations - prosecutions are limited to commence within six monthsafter the date of the offence 81 appeal - a person convicted under this act, giving notice of appeal, must before being released give satisfactory security for the penaltyand costs of conviction and appeal 82 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions 84 fees - the council is authorized to determine by by-law an annual fee, which is required to be paid by each member of the college the fee canbe not less than $2, nor more than $5, is payable on january 1st, andmay be recovered as a debt by the college 32 the fee for registration is subject to regulation by the council33 new brunswick medical society - all persons registered under the act constitute thenew brunswick medical society act 1881, c 19, s 2 council - there is a medical council called the council of physiciansand surgeons of new brunswick, of nine legally qualified medicalpractitioners, of not less than seven years’ standing. Four arenominated and appointed by the governor in council, and five by the newbrunswick medical society 3, 5 the secretary of the council is the registrar 7 register, evidence - the registrar is required before may 1st annuallyto print and publish in the royal gazette of the province, and suchother manner as the council shall appoint, a correct register of thenames and residences and medical titles, diplomas, and qualificationsconferred by any college or body, with the dates thereof, of allpersons appearing on the register on the 1st of january the registeris called the medical register. A copy for the time being purporting tobe so printed and published, or a certificate signed by the presidentof the council, and attested by the registrar with the corporate sealof the council, is prima facie evidence that the persons thereinspecified are registered and qualified. The absence of a name from suchcopy or the want of such certificate is prima facie evidence thatsuch person is not registered if a name does not appear on the copy, acertified copy, under the hand of the registrar of the council, of theentry of a name on the register is evidence of registration s 8 entrance upon study - a person beginning or entering on the studyof physic, surgery, or midwifery, for the purpose of qualifying topractise in the province, must have obtained from the council acertificate that he has satisfactorily passed a matriculation orpreliminary examination in the subjects enumerated in the act, unlesshe has passed a matriculation examination for the medical course inarts and science at essay college in great britain, ireland, canada, theunited states of america, or the continent of europe 10 the act prescribes formalities for admission to such preliminaryexamination 10 qualification - subject to the exceptions hereinafter, no personcan lawfully practise physic, surgery, or midwifery unless he beregistered, or unless he shall have received from the council a licenseto practise 11 no person is entitled to registration or license unless he shallsatisfy the council that he has passed a matriculation or preliminaryexamination. That after passing such examination he has followed hisstudies for not less than four years, one of which may be under thedirection of one or more general practitioners duly licensed. Thatduring such four years he has attended at essay university, college, or incorporated school of medicine in good standing, courses oflectures amounting together to not less than twelve months on generalanatomy, on practical anatomy, on surgery, on practice of medicine, on midwifery, on chemistry, on materia medica and pharmacy, and onthe institutes of medicine or physic, and one three-months’ courseof medical jurisprudence.

Boil it to theconsumption of the mussilage, strain it, and add litharge of gold infine powder, one pound and an half. Boil them with a little water overa gentle fire always stirring them to a just thickness culpeper it is an exceeding good remedy for all swellings withoutpain, it softens hardness of the liver and spleen, it is very gentle diachylon ireatum college add one ounce of orris in powder to every pound ofdiachylon simple diachylon magnum college take of mussilage of raisins, fat figs, mastich, mallow-roots, linseeds, and fenugreek-seeds, bird-lime, the juice oforris and squills, of each twelve drams and an half, œsypus or oilof sheep feet an ounce and an half, oil of orris, chamomel, dill, of each eight ounces, litharge of gold in fine powder one pound, turpentine three ounces, per-rozin, yellow wax, of each two ounces, boil the oil with the mussilages and juices to the consumption of thehumidity, strain the oil from the faces, and by adding the lithargeboil it to its consistence. Then add the rozin and wax. Lastly, itbeing removed from the fire, add the turpentine, œsypus and birdlime, make of them a plaister by melting them according to art culpeper it dissolves hardness and inflammations diachylon magnum cum gummi college take of bdellium, sagapenum, amoniacum, of each two ounces, dissolved in wine, and added to the mass of diachylon magnum. Firstboil the gums being dissolved, to the thickness of honey culpeper this is the best to dissolve hard swellings of all thethree diachylon compositum, sive emplaistrum e mussilaginibus or, a plaister of mussilages college take of mussilages of the middle bark of elm, marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed, of each four ounces and an half, oil of chamomel, lilies, and dill, of each an ounce and an half, ammoniacum, galbanum, sagapen, opopanax, of each half an ounce, new waxtwenty ounces, turpentine two ounces, saffron two drams, dissolve thegums in wine, and make it into a plaister according to art culpeper it ripens swellings, and breaks them, and cleanses themwhen they are broken it is of a most excellent ripening nature emplaistrum diaphœnicon hot college take of yellow wax two ounces, per-rozin, pitch, of eachfour ounces, oil of roses and nard, of each one ounce, melt themtogether, and add pulp of dates made in wine four ounces, flesh ofquinces boiled in red wine an ounce, then the powders following. Takeof bread twice baked, steeped in wine and dried, two ounces, mastich anounce, frankincense wormwood, red roses, spikenard, of each two dramsand an half, wood of aloes, mace, myrrh, washed aloes, acacia, trochesof gallia moschata, and earth of lemnos, calamus aromaticus, of eachone dram, labdanum three ounces, mix them and make them into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the stomach and liver exceedingly, helpsfluxes, apply it to the places grieved diaphœnicon cold college take of wax four ounces, ship pitch five ounces, labdanumthree ounces and an half, turpentine an ounce and an half, oil of rosesone ounce, melt these, and add pulp of dates almost ripe, boiled inaustere wine four ounces, flesh of quinces in like manner boiled, breadtwice baked often steeped in red wine and dried, of each an ounce, styrax calamitis, acacia, unripe grapes, balaustines, yellow sanders, troches of terra lemnia, myrrh, wood of aloes, of each half an ounce, mastich, red roses, of each an ounce and an half, austere wine asmuch as is sufficient to dissolve the juices, make it into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the belly and liver, helps concoction inthose writings, and distribution of humours, stays vomiting and fluxes emplastrum divinum or, a divine plaster college take of loadstone four ounces, ammoniacum three ounces andthree drams, bdellium two ounces, galbanum, myrrh, of each ten drams, olibanum nine drams, opopanax, mastich, long birthwort, verdigris, of each an ounce, litharge, common oil, of each a pound and an half, new wax eight ounces. Let the litharge in fine powder be boiled withthe oil to a thickness, then add the wax, which being melted, take itfrom the fire, add the gums dissolved in wine and vinegar, strain it, then add the myrrh, mastich, frankincense, birthwort, and loadstone inpowder, last of all the verdigris in powder, and make it into a plasteraccording to art culpeper it is of a cleansing nature, exceeding good againstmalignant ulcers, it consumes corruption, engenders new flesh, andbrings them to a scar emplastrum epispasticum college take of mustard seed, euphorbium, long pepper, of each onedram and an half, stavesacre, pellitory of spain of each two drams, ammoniacum, galbanum, phellium, sagapen, of each three drams, wholecantharides five drams, ship pitch, rozin, yellow wax, of each sixdrams, turpentine as much as is sufficient to make it into a plaster culpeper thesis people use to draw blisters in their necks for thetooth ache, or for rheums in their eyes. If they please to lay aplaster of this there, it will do it emplastrum a nostratibus, flos unguentorum dictum or, flower of ointments college take of rozin, per rozin, yellow wax, sheep suet, of eachhalf a pound, olibanum four ounces, turpentine two ounces and an half, myrrh, mastich, of each an ounce, camphire two drams, white wine half apound, boil them into a plaster culpeper i found this receipt in an old manuscript written in theyear 1513, the quantity of the ingredients very little altered a plaster of gum elemi college take of gum elemi three ounces, per rozin, wax, ammoniacum, of each two ounces, turpentine three ounces and an half, mallaga wineso much as is sufficient. Boil it to the consumption of the wine, thenadd the ammoniacum dissolved in vinegar culpeper the operation is the same with arceus liniment a plaister of lapis calaminaris college take of lapis calaminaris prepared an ounce, litharge twoounces, ceruss half an ounce, tutty a dram, turpentine six drams, whitewax an ounce and an half, stag suet two ounces, frankincense fivedrams, mastich three drams, myrrh two drams, camphire a dram and anhalf, make it up according to art emplastrum ad herniam college take of galls, cypress nuts, pomegranate pills, balaustines, acacia, the seeds of plantain, fleawort, water-cresses, acorn cups, beans torrified, birth-wort long and round, myrtles of eachhalf an ounce let these be powdered, and steeped in rose vinegar fourdays, then torrified and dried, then take of comfrey the greater andlesser, horsetail, woad, cetrach, the roots of osmond royal, fearn, ofeach an ounce, frankincense, myrrh, aloes, mastich, mummy, of each twoounces, bole-ammoniac washed in vinegar, lap, calaminaris prepared, litharge of gold, dragon blood, of each three ounces, ship pitch twopounds, turpentine six ounces, or as much as is sufficient to make itinto a plaster according to art culpeper the plaster is very binding and knitting, appropriated toruptures or burstens, as the title of it specifies, it strengthens thereins and womb, stays abortion, it consolidates wounds, and helps alldiseases coming of cold and moisture emplastrum hystericum college take of bistort roots one pound, wood of aloes, yellowsanders, nutmegs, barberry kernels, rose seeds, of each one ounce, cinnamon, cloves, squinanth, chamomel flowers, of each half an ounce, frankincense, mastich, alipta moschata, gallia moschata, styraxcalamitis, of each one dram, mosch half a dram, yellow wax one poundand an half, turpentine half a pound, moschæleum four ounces, labdanumfour pounds, ship pitch three pounds. Let the labdanum and turpentinebe added to the pitch and wax, being melted, then the styrax, lastlythe rest in powder, and sifted, that they may be made into a plasteraccording to art culpeper the plaster being applied to the navel, is a means towithstand the fits of the mother in such women as are subject to them, by retaining the womb in its place emplastrum de mastich or, a plaster of mastich college take of mastich three ounces, bole-ammoniac washed in blackwine, an ounce and an half, red roses six drams, ivory, myrtle berries, red coral, of each half an ounce, turpentine, colophonia, tachamahacca, labdanum, of each two ounces, yellow wax half a pound, oil of myrtlesfour ounces.

Whethersuch study was in an institution of learning and, if so, its name andlocation custom essays for sale. If not in such institution, where and under whose tutorshipsuch study was prosecuted, the time engaged in the actual practice, if at all, of medicine and surgery or either, and where, and the ageof the applicant at the time of the application, such applicationand affidavit to be filed and preserved of record in the office ofthe secretary of the board at the time and place designated bythe board or at a regular meeting of the board, applicants must beexamined in anatomy, physiology, chemistry, histology, materia medica, therapeutics, preventive medicines, the practice of medicine, surgery, obstetrics, diseases of women and children, of the nervous system, ofthe eye and ear, medical jurisprudence, and such other branches asthe board deem advisable the examination must be both scientific andpractical, and of sufficient severity to test the candidate fitnessto practise medicine and surgery, by written or printed, or writinglywritten and writingly printed, questions and answers, and the same arerequired to be filed and preserved of record in the said secretaryoffice after the examination, if it be satisfactory, the board shallgrant a license, by the consent of not less than five members, exceptas hereinafter provided refusal or revocation - the board may refuse or revoke a license forunprofessional or dishonorable conduct, subject to the right of appeal3 “unprofessional or dishonorable conduct” means. Procuring or aidingor abetting in procuring a criminal abortion. Or employing what arepopularly known as cappers or steerers. Or obtaining any fee on theassurance that a manifestly incurable disease can be permanentlycured. Or wilfully betraying a professional secret. Or advertisementsof medical business in which untruthful and improbable statements aremade. Or advertising any medicine or means whereby the monthly periodsof women can be regulated, or the menses re-established if suppressed;or the conviction of any offence involving moral turpitude.

And it may safely be said that acoroner has no power to appoint a deputy coroner, except where specialprovision is made therefor by statute 516 in england, a coronercourt is a court of record, and it has accordingly been held thattrespass cannot be maintained for turning a person out of a room wherethe coroner is about to take an inquisition 517 but in this country, it may safely be said that a coroner court is not one of record, but of inferior jurisdiction 518 the performance of the functionsof a coroner are judicial in their character. So judicial that he isprotected under the principles which protect judicial officers fromresponsibility in a civil action brought by a private person hisproceedings amount to entries concerning matters of public interest, made under the sanction of an official oath, and in compliance orpresumed compliance of the law 519of his authority to hold an inquest - his authority to hold aninquest is not confined to the body of a person who may have diedwithin his territorial jurisdiction, but extends to all bodiesbrought within his jurisdiction, no matter where death may have takenplace 520 so in any case where, after burial, an inquest becomesnecessary to determine the manner of the death of a person who, dyingin one, is buried in another county, the coroner of the latter countyis the proper officer to hold the inquest 521 a coroner cannot holda second inquest while the first is existing as we have seen, inholding an inquest the coroner performs a judicial duty, and he isfunctus officio as soon as the verdict has been returned he can holdno second inquest in the same case unless the first has been quashedby a court of competent jurisdiction, and a new inquiry ordered hecannot set aside or quash his own inquest if he were allowed to holdtwo inquests, not only might the greatest inconvenience arise from theinconsistent findings of the respective juries, but such a practicewould be liable to great abuse, and as the object of the proceeding ismerely preliminary, the main purpose being to ascertain whether it isprobable that a crime has been committed, and to examine the facts andcircumstances and preserve the evidence, all the ends of this inquiryare answered by one inquisition, super visum corporis we believe noreported case is to be found in this country where a second inquisitionhas been held, the first remaining undischarged, nor is any suchpractice known to or recognized by our laws 522the inquest must be held upon view of the body the coroner can in no case hold an inquest except upon view of thebody this is jurisdictional and cannot be waived by any one he isnot bound to hold an inquest before burial of the body takes place when it has been buried, and he believes an inquest necessary, heis vested with authority to have the body disinterred and hold hisinquest, and if necessary direct a post-mortem examination to bemade, but after having done so, he must cause it to be reburied 523deep interests are involved in the proper discharge of the duties ofcoroners. The character, liberty, and perhaps the life of a citizenaccused of crime on the one hand, and on the other the aiding of publicjustice in establishing the guilt and securing the punishment of theactual criminal thesis of the questions which fall within the scopeof a coroner inquisition are of an intricate and most perplexingcharacter, a correct solution of which can only be arrived at by mindsthe best instructed and habituated to their investigation in thesispaper essay of these questions can be satisfactorily settled by theevidence of persons having cognizance more or less direct of the facts;in others, however, they can only be solved by the facts deduced frompathological anatomy, and other circumstances connected with the deadbody, the cause of the extinction of life in which is the subject ofthe inquest in massachusetts office of coroner abolished - indeed, inmassachusetts the office of coroner was abolished in 1877, and thegovernor was invested with power, and it is his duty, to appoint, byand with the advice and consent of the council, able and discreet men, learned in the science of medicine, to be medical examiners, whoseduties are to make examinations as provided in the statute upon theview of the dead bodies of such persons only as are supposed to havecome to their death by violence 524coroner may employ professional skill - a thorough examination aidedby professional skill is in general absolutely necessary to the properadministration of justice it would no doubt be strange if a coronerhad no authority to pledge the responsibility of the county for thecompensation of all auxiliary services which are necessary to theproper execution of his office, and which he can by no other meanscommand. For instance, when his duty requires him to disinter a body, he cannot be expected to do it with his own hands, or by hands paidfor with his means indeed it has been said that, in this enlightenedage, a coroner who would consign to the grave the body over which hehad held an inquest, without availing himself of the lights which themedical science has placed within his reach, would in most paper fallshort of what his official duty requires 525 it is the generallyaccepted view of the law now that it is the duty of a coroner holdingan inquest super visum corporis to avail himself of professionalskill and aid, and his contract will bind the county to the payment ofa reasonable compensation for making a post-mortem examination 526post-mortem examination whether such examination should take place before the coroner hasempanelled a jury seems to be an open question we would venture theopinion that it should not, inasmuch as the jury ought to see andview the body in the same condition, as near as may be, as it waswhen found, and not after it has been mutilated, as it must need beby a post-mortem examination it is, however, settled that the postmortem should not be in the presence of the jury, and that they are tobe instructed by the testimony of the physicians who are designatedby the coroner to make the examination 527 the coroner right todissect the dead body of a human being does not extend to all paper such a power could be wielded with the most injurious effects upon acommunity his power to dissect is confined to those paper where he isauthorized by law to hold an inquest upon the body but a post-mortemexamination, conducted by surgeons employed by a coroner holding aninquest, is not a writing of the inquest in such a sense as that everycitizen has a right freely to attend it at common law it was essentialto the validity of a coroner inquisition that the jury should viewthe body and so is our law but it was never required that the bodyshould be dissected in any case it is discretionary with the coronerto cause a dissection to be made, and to select the surgeons he hasalso a discretion to determine whether any person, and what persons, may be present besides the surgeons not even the jurors have aright to witness the examination they are to be informed of what itdiscloses by the testimony of the surgeons indeed, no person has aright to be present at the post-mortem examination upon the ground thathe is suspected of having caused the death he loses no legal right bybeing excluded he has no right to dissect the body if the coronerjury pronounce him guilty, the inquest, like the indictment of a grandjury, simply makes him liable to arrest 528massachusetts statutory provisions the statute law of massachusetts has already been referred to ithas abolished the office of coroner and in its place put medicalexaminers, so called, who are presumed to be learned in the scienceof medicine their powers, however, are not co-extensive with thoseof coroners a medical examiner cannot hold an inquest he cannothold an autopsy without being thereto authorized in writing by thedistrict attorney, mayor, or selectmen of the district, city, or townwhere a dead body lies he can only upon receiving notice that therehas been found, or is lying within the county, the dead body of aperson who is supposed to have come to his death by violence, repairto the place where such body lies, view and take charge of the same if he deems a further examination necessary and is authorized so todo, he must make an autopsy in the presence of two or more discreetpersons, whose attendance he may compel by subpœna if necessary, andhe must then carefully reduce or cause to be reduced to writing everyfact and circumstance tending to show the condition of the body andthe cause and manner of death, together with the names and addressesof the witnesses if he deems it necessary, he may employ a chemistto aid in the examination of the body or of substances supposed tohave caused or contributed to the death, 529 the record of whichhe must subscribe 530 such an autopsy does not, however, uponthe trial of an accused render other competent evidence, as to thecondition and appearance of the dead body at the time of the autopsy, inadmissible 531 the autopsy may be followed by an inquest held, notby the examiner, but by a justice of the district, police, or municipalcourt for the district or city in which the body lies, or a trialjustice one of these functionaries must hold an inquest upon beingnotified by a medical examiner that in his opinion a death was causedby violence, and after hearing the testimony draw up and sign a reportand issue process for apprehension of a person charged by the reportwith the commission of an offence, if he is not in custody 532even though a medical examiner reports that a death was not causedby violence, and the district attorney or the attorney-general isof a contrary opinion, either one may, notwithstanding such report, direct an inquest to be held in accordance with the provisions of thestatute 533new york statutory provisions in new york the powers and duties of coroners are defined by statute coroners in the city of new york are governed by a special act relatingto that city exclusively for the state at large it is providedthat whenever a coroner is informed that a person has been killedor dangerously wounded by another, or has suddenly died under suchcircumstances as to afford a reasonable ground to suspect that hisdeath has been occasioned by the act of another by criminal means, orhas committed suicide, he must go to the place where the person is, andforthwith inquire into the cause of the death or wounding, and summonnot less than nine nor more than fifteen persons, qualified by law toserve as jurors, if such death or wounding be of a criminal nature, toappear before him forthwith at a specified place, to inquire into thecause of death or wound, and if it appears from the evidence taken orduring the inquisition, that any person or persons are chargeable withthe killing or wounding, or that there is probable cause to believethat any person or persons are chargeable therewith, and if they arenot in custody the coroner must forthwith issue a warrant for thearrest of the person or persons charged with such killing or wounding, who must be arraigned before the coroner for examination, and thecoroner has power to commit the person or persons so arrested to awaitthe result of the inquisition a coroner is disqualified from actingas such in any case where the person killed or dangerously wounded isa co-employee with the coroner of any person or persons, associationor corporation, or where it appears that the killing or woundinghas been occasioned, directly or indirectly, by the employer of thecoroner 534 it is further provided that whenever a convict shalldie in any state prison, it shall be the duty of the inspector havingcharge of the prison and of the warden, physician, and chaplain of theprison, if they or either of them shall have reason to believe thatthe death of the convict arose from any other than ordinary sickness, to call upon the coroner having jurisdiction to hold an inquest uponthe body of such deceased convict 535 the new york criminal codefurther provides that when six or more of the jurors appear, they mustbe sworn by the coroner to inquire who the person was, and when, where, and by what means he came to his death or was wounded as the case maybe, and into the circumstances attending the death or wounding, andto render a true verdict thereon according to the evidence offered tothem or arising from the inspection of the body 536 the coroner mayissue subpœnas for and summon and examine as witnesses every personwho in his opinion, or that of any of the jury, has any knowledge ofthe facts. And he must summon as a witness a surgeon or physician, who must, in the presence of the jury, inspect the body, and give aprofessional opinion as to the cause of the death or wounding 537 thejury, after inspecting the body and hearing the testimony, must rendertheir verdict, and certify it by an inquisition in writing, signed bythem, and setting forth who the person killed or wounded is, and when, where, and by what means he came to his death or was wounded, and ifhe were killed or wounded, or his death were occasioned by the act ofanother by criminal means, who is guilty thereof, in so far as by suchinquisition they have been able to ascertain 538 the testimony of thewitnesses examined before the coroner jury must be reduced to writingby the coroner, or under his direction, and must be forthwith filed byhim, with the inquisition, in the office of the clerk of the court ofsessions of the county, or of a city court having power to inquire intothe offence by the intervention of a grand jury 539if, however, the defendant be arrested before the inquisition can befiled, the coroner must deliver it with the testimony to the magistratebefore whom the defendant is brought 540 if the jury find thatthe person was killed or wounded by another under circumstances notexcusable or justifiable by law, or that his death was occasioned bythe act of another by criminal means, and the writingy committing the actbe ascertained by the inquisition and is not in custody, the coronermust issue a warrant signed by him with his name of office, for thearrest of the person charged 541 the coroner has power to compelthe attendance of a witness and testify, and he may punish a witnessfor disobedience, as upon a subpœna issued by a magistrate 542 thecoroner warrant may be served in any county. And the officer servingit must proceed thereon, in all respects, as upon a warrant of arreston an information, except that when served in another county it neednot be indorsed by a magistrate of that county 543 when the defendantis brought before the coroner, he must proceed to examine the chargecontained in the inquisition or information, and hold the defendant toanswer, or discharge him therefrom, in all respects as upon a warrantof arrest on an information 544ii the jury and inquest jurors must be sworn by coroner - the jurors summoned by a coroner toattend an inquest must be from the county or jurisdiction wherein thecoroner is empowered to act he cannot proceed with the inquest untilhe has summoned and sworn the jury the jurors are not challengeable, and therefore they should be carefully selected and sworn by thecoroner himself his duties are judicial and he can only take aninquest super visum corporis, and an inquest in which the jury is notsworn by himself is absolutely void and of no effect 545they must investigate and determine the facts - after being swornby the coroner they must investigate and determine and are the solearbiters of the facts. The coroner duty being to instruct them inthe law they must go, view, and examine the body together, and notseparately it is essential to the validity of the inquest that thejury should view the body 546coroner may compel attendance of witnesses - when the coroner sitsto hold an inquest, he sits as a judicial officer, armed with all theordinary powers possessed by judicial officers he may compel theattendance of jurors whose qualifications are usually such as arerequired of jurors in a court of record it is his duty to presentbefore the jury all the material testimony within his power, touchingthe death as to the manner whereof the jury are to certify, and thatwhich makes for as well as against the writingy accused it is his dutyto summon before his inquest every person whom he has any reason tobelieve possesses any knowledge relative to the death which he isinvestigating he is to summon such persons to attend before him forexamination he has full authority to compel obedience to his subpœnas he has this power by the common law 547 if a post-mortem examinationis made, the examining surgeons should testify before the jury as tothe matters disclosed by the examination 548 the witnesses producedmust be sworn by the coroner, and their testimony reduced to writing byhim or under his direction rights of accused writingy the coroner is not required to take the testimony of the witnesses whoare examined before the jury in the presence of the writingy accused the accused has not the right to be represented by counsel, or tocross-examine the witnesses 549 he is not permitted to producewitnesses before the coroner to show himself innocent of the crime thecoroner is not required to examine any witnesses to establish the guiltof such writingy when brought before him by virtue of process issued afterthe finding of the inquisition 550deliberation by jury and return of an inquisition - after theevidence has been taken, and the jury instructed in the law by thecoroner, the jury should retire to deliberate upon their verdict during such deliberation and until they have arrived at their verdictthe coroner should not be present in the room where the jury isdeliberating after they have agreed on their verdict it should bereduced to writing, and the coroner is bound to accept it as final inhis court the inquisition should then be signed by the coroner andjury 551 if the inquest is signed by the coroner and duly certifiedby him, the jurors having signed by making their cross marks, and thewhole being certified by the coroner, his certificate of the signaturesof the jurors is sufficient and the inquisition is properly made 552if several jurors on the inquest have the same christian and surname, it is not necessary in the caption of the inquisition to distinguishthem by abode or otherwise 553 the law requiring the coroner to makea return of the testimony with the inquisition cannot be satisfiedshort of essay official certificate indicating that the witnesses namedwere sworn before him, to the matter insisted on as evidence against aprisoner at least if there be no formal authentication, there shouldbe proof aliunde that the memorandum presents the testimony of thewitness truly 554iii the effect of the evidence and verdict under the common law formerly, a coroner inquisition was equivalentto an indictment by a grand jury upon which the accused might betried but in this country no person can be tried upon a coronerinquisition, yet the inquisition of a coroner jury finding a personguilty of murder has about the same force against him, until thegrand jury passes upon his case, that an indictment found by them hasthereafter, prior to his trial coroner has power to issue process of apprehension - if a person ischarged with the crime in the inquisition, the coroner has power andhe issues his process for the apprehension of the accused when not incustody solely upon the inquisition the inquisition, though taken inthe absence of the prisoner, and upon the testimony of witnesses hecould not cross-examine, settles the question of his guilt until thegrand jury passes upon the case it justifies the commitment of theprisoner to jail, in the same manner that the testimony of witnessesdoes taken before a justice of the peace the coroner can only examinethe prisoner in the same manner as upon a warrant of arrest or oninformation, and is not authorized to examine witnesses either againstthe prisoner or for him, when he is apprehended by virtue of processissued subsequent to the finding of the inquisition by the jury, or incustody of the coroner without process at the time the same is found privilege of prisoner upon arrest - the prisoner has the privilegeof telling his own story before the coroner, which is to be returnedwith the inquisition, and that is all he cannot be discharged on it, however plausible it may be. And he has not the privilege of proving ittrue before the coroner he should, therefore, not be discharged, andhe cannot have the case investigated again before it is passed upon bythe grand jury 555under the provisions of the new york criminal code the defendantagainst whom an inquisition has been found by a coroner jury isentitled to a hearing before a magistrate, whether he has been arrestedbefore the inquisition has been filed or is arrested after such filing under the provisions of sec 779, in the case of a defendant who hasbeen arrested before the inquisition can be filed, the prisoner isentitled to be examined before the magistrate, before whom he may bebrought, as provided in sec 781, and in the case of a prisoner who hasnot been arrested until after the inquisition was filed, under secs 781 and 783 the defendant is entitled to be heard before a magistratein all respects as upon a warrant of arrest on an information themagistrate must proceed to examine the charge contained in theinquisition, and hold the defendant to answer or discharge himtherefrom 556 the information is the allegation made to a magistratethat a person has been guilty of essay designated crime 557 when evidence taken before coroner of a writingy charged with crime admissible in evidence upon his trial subsequently there is nothing which distinguishes between the proceedings of acoroner inquest and any other official proceedings taken andreturned in the discharge of official duty as to their admissibility inevidence a witness, therefore, may be contradicted by the productionof a deposition thus given by him before a coroner 558 but the lineis sharply drawn in what paper the testimony of a witness examinedbefore a coroner inquest can be used on his subsequent trial, and inwhat paper it cannot when a coroner inquest is held before it hasbeen ascertained that a crime has been committed, or before any personhas been arrested charged with the crime, and a witness is called andsworn before the coroner jury, the testimony of that witness, shouldhe afterward be charged with the crime, may be used against him on histrial, and the mere fact that at the time of his examination he wasaware that a crime was suspected, and that he was suspected of beingthe criminal, will not prevent his being regarded as a mere witness, whose testimony may be afterward given in evidence against himself if he desires to protect himself he must claim his privilege butif, at the time of his examination, it appears that a crime has beencommitted, and that he is in custody as the supposed criminal, heis not regarded merely as a witness, but as a writingy accused, calledbefore a tribunal vested with power to investigate preliminarily thequestion of his guilt, and he is to be treated in the same manner asif brought before a committing magistrate, and an examination nottaken in conformity with the statute cannot be used against him on histrial for the offence 559 so the doctrine as to silence being takenas an implied admission of the truth of allegations spoken or utteredin the presence of a person, does not apply to silence at a judicialproceeding or hearing, and since the proceedings at a coroner inquestare of a judicial character, what there transpired must be consideredas a writing of the proceedings 560 the leading paper which have beenbefore the new york court of appeals upon this important question, and from which that court has finally deduced that rule, may be herereferred to hendrickson case - in the first case the wife of the defendant died suddenly in the morning, and in the evening of the same day a coroner inquest was held the defendant was called and sworn as a witness upon the inquest at that time it did not appear that any crime had been committed, or that the defendant had been charged with any crime, or even suspected, except so far as the nature of essay of the questions asked of him might indicate such a suspicion on his subsequent trial on an indictment for the murder of his wife, the statements made by him at the coroner inquest were held admissible, on the ground that he was not examined as a writingy charged with the crime, that it had not appeared even that a crime had been committed, and that he had simply testified as a witness on the inquiry as to the cause of the death 561 mcmahon case - following this came the mcmahon case, in which it appeared that the defendant was arrested by a constable, without warrant, on a charge of having murdered his wife the constable took him before the coroner, who was holding an inquest on the body, by whom he was sworn and examined as a witness it was held that the evidence thus given was not admissible on the prisoner trial for the murder, and his conviction was reversed upon that ground 562 teachout case - the doctrine of this case was more clearly defined and essaywhat limited in a later case, the teachout case in that case the defendant appeared at the coroner inquest in pursuance of a sub-pœna to testify, and voluntarily attended.

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“all that i can say regarding the serum is that it is made from the blood of goats with thyroid affection, and it has been found that the serum from these goats has antibodies which control, or has curative effect upon thyroid affections when injected into thyroid glands of either humans or animals as to the iodinised oil, it is only an adjunct or side treatment which is not always used or indicated, and will only be furnished to the physician for use in case in his judgment his patient needs it we shall also advise the use of quinin when indicated ”the council was referred custom essays for sale for further information to a paper by rachelwatkins, m d , published in the illinois medical journal it is tobe noted, incidentally, that the letterheads used by white in hiscorrespondence bore in one corner the notation “rachel watkins, m d , practice limited to goiter and other disorders of the thyroid glands, ”and in the other, “mark white, goiter research ”the information regarding the composition of this goiter treatment, asfurnished in dr watkins’ paper, was to this effect. “the medical treatment consists of the administration of a blood serum derived from a thyrodized goat formula. Iodine 0 16 grams according to a correction by mark white, this should read 0 26 gm , oil 0 25 c c , serum q s 1 c c ”this description of the treatment differs from that furnished to thecouncil by mark white in that here the iodin and oil appear to becombined with the serum dr watkins’ “formula” implies that the iodinis a routine medication, thus contradicting white statement, which, in turn, is at variance with the statements made in submitting thetreatment illustration.