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‘i am going to make you see the devil ’” in the face of suchaffirmations, the accused confessed his crime and was condemned othertattoo signs of the grossest emblems of unnatural passion have beenfound among low prostitutes, pederasts, and tribades statistics founded on numerous facts show thesis paper of tattooingof the penis and even of the labia majora in the lowest order ofprostitutes, but these unclean images and revelations of lustfulinstinct do not occur in the same order of frequency as those notedon the forearm, the deltoid, or the inferior extremities so valuableare these marks in their bearing on the class, vocation, character, and tastes of a person that the finding of anchors and ships wouldindicate a sailor. While flags, sabres, cannon, and other warlike signswould indicate a soldier, etc it is also noticeable that in thetattooing practised by lunatics the image relates in essay way to thenature of the peculiar form of mental disease from which they suffer, and it is chiefly among the more severe and incurable paper of mentaldegeneration that these signs are found see dr riva article, “iltatuaggio nel manicomio d’ancona, ” cronica del manicomio d’ancona, november, 1888 almost always the motive that prompts these disfigurements of theskin is the result of impulse, of thoughtlessness, or of orgy, andalmost all the tattooed come to repent of their folly the subjectof détatouage has of late taken a polemic turn in essay of thecontinental journals there are besides thesis paper on record ofsevere accidents and complications following the operation, such assevere inflammation, erysipelas, abscess, and gangrene dr beuchongives statistics of forty-seven paper, in which four were followedby mutilation and eight by death either directly or in consequenceof an amputation a certain proportion of what is known as syphilisinsontium is to be found among the reported statistics of tattooing dr bispham, of philadelphia, informs me that while at blockleyhospital he saw thirty paper of syphilis that had been communicated bythe same tattooer tattooing may essaytimes be accidental i have seen a dewritingmentalclerk with an elongated tattoo on the back of his hand caused byaccidental wounding with an inked pen a bursting shell during anaval engagement has caused a characteristic tattoo on the face of awell-known officer to be seen any day in washington two paper of thebluish-black discoloration of the skin from taking nitrate of silverhave also come under my observation both occurred in medical men, one of whom lives in florida, the other in the district of columbia silver discolorations of this kind are indelible, but i learn fromone of these gentlemen that large doses of iodide of potassium causetemporary fading of the discoloration, which returns on stopping themedicine 591the indelibility of tattoo-marks is such that their traces may beeasily recognized in the cadaver, though in a essaywhat advancedstage of putrefaction they have even been recognized on a gangrenouslimb essaytimes, however, it is impossible to recognize at firstsight whether there has or has not been a tattoo a strong light anda magnifying glass and a microscopic examination of the neighboringganglia to detect the presence of coloring matter may assist inremoving doubt it has been found on the bodies of tattooed cadaversthat the ganglia are filled with grains of coloring matter of thesame nature as that employed in making the tattoo attempts to removetattoo-marks generally leave a vicious scar that is equally indelible an efficacious method is to tattoo the mark with a solution oftannin, which is followed by brushing over with nitrate of silver a red cicatrix follows, and when the epidermis separates the tattoodisappears a better method, however, is by means of the electricneedle already mentioned in speaking of the electrolysis of nævi that a tattoo-mark may disappear by the effects of time and leave notrace is a matter that cooper reports after examining the mutilatedremains of a cadaver, and the statistics of caspar, tardieu, andhutin place it as high as nine in the hundred an officer of theunited states revenue marine lately called my attention to severalsuperficial tattooes on the back of his hand which had disappeared thedeeper ones, however, remained the spontaneous disappearance of atattoo seems to be possible when the operation has been done in sucha superficial way as not to have passed the rete malpighii, or whenthe tattooing has been done with essay substance not very tenacious, as vermilion, which appears to be easily eliminated but when thewritingicles of coloring matter penetrate into the fibro-elastic tissue ofthe derma, the disappearance of the tattoo is rare in seventy-eight individuals tattooed with vermilion alone, hutinfound eleven upon whom the tattoo had disappeared out of one hundredand four tattooes made with a single color, india-ink, writing ink, blue or back, not a single one had completely disappeared the resultsare identical if the tattooes are made with two colors thus in 153tattooes with vermilion and india-ink, one instance showed a fading ofthe black, in another it had completely disappeared, the red being wellmarked. Twenty times the red was writingly effaced, the black being wellmarked. And in sixteen paper the red had completely disappeared, theblack remaining visible 592a tattoo-mark may essaytimes be altered, in which case it provesdeceptive as an index a workman changing his trade seeks to transformthe insignia of his first calling into those of the second, or acriminal in order to avoid identity will make a change in the formerinstance the transformation is not difficult to detect, but in thelatter so much care is required to recognize the change that penalscience has relegated the sign to a secondary place as to the length of time since a tattoo-mark has been executed, authorities are that it is impossible to tell after two or three weeks whether a tattoo-mark is real or feigned is easily settled by simplywashing the writing this question, as well as that of the judicialconsequences of such marks, is hardly pertinent to the matter in hand value of professional stigmata the so-called professional signs are of undoubted value in the surfaceexamination for establishing identity, but it does not seem thattheir importance warrants the extreme prolixity given to them by essaycontinental writers, and even by one in the city of mexico, dr joseramos 593 for instance, it is pretended that cataract is more commonamong jewellers because of the fineness of their work. Yet out of 952cataracts, of which a record has been kept, only two paper occurred injewellers besides, there is not one special sign or physical traceleft on the body by which a prostitute may be known, notwithstandingthe fact that in life the collective appearance would seldom deceive anexperienced man only in the case of sodomy, where anal coitus has been frequent, wouldcharacteristic signs be found on anal examination of 446 prostitutes, dr coutagne594 found the signs of post-perineal coitus in 180 he cites the case of a young prostitute presenting the astonishingcontrast of a gaping anus surrounded by characteristic rhagades, withthe genital writings of an extreme freshness, a very narrow vagina, andnon-retracted hymen, constituting by their reunion a still firm ring a fact yet more curious is shown by a specimen in the collection ofthe museum of the laboratory of legal medicine at lyons the genitalorgans of the cadaver of a woman of twenty-eight or thirty years showeda hymen intact and firm, but on examining the anal region it wassurprising to find an infundibuliform deformity with all the signs ofsodomitical habits, which of course rectified the opinion that had beenmade regarding the chastity of this woman thesis of the signs enumerated as peculiar to different callings haveno special anatomical characteristic that is easy to distinguish withprecision, consequently they do not present a degree of certainty orconstancy sufficient to be invoked as strong medico-legal proof ofidentity moreover, the effects of time or treatment may have causedalteration or disappearance of thesis of the signs in question, whichwould at best be of negative rather than of absolute value to arrive at an imwritingial appreciation of the relative value of theprofessional stigmata as signs of identity, a certain number of thesigns should be thrown aside as illusory others, on the contrary, aredurable, special, and constant, and assist in establishing the identityaccordingly as the lesions or alterations are complete or evident. Butit should be borne in mind that the physical alterations and chemicalmodifications resulting from the exercise of certain trades are not inour country so important from a medico-legal point of view as they arein europe, where class distinctions are more defined value of stains and different imprints in the same manner that a very small portion or fragment of the humanbody may suffice to establish the corpus delicti, so will minuteremains or traces, as finger-marks, footprints, and other materialsurroundings, even smells or traces of perfume, be of great assistanceto justice in determining the identity of both culprit and victim, andat the same time throw light on the attendant circumstances of thedeed the traces of a bloody hand or foot, smears of tar or paint, the various spots or stains found on fabrics, instruments, etc , mayinvolve questions of great nicety the relativity of which is apparent, especially in criminal trials newspapers have familiarized the publicwith thesis paper of the kind, in which medical experts have demonstratedblood and other stains with sufficient accuracy and positiveness tosatisfy a jury the cronin case is a notable instance imprints made by finger-tips are known to be singularly persistent in four specimens of inked digit marks of sir william herschel, madein the years 1860, 1874, 1885, and 1888 respectively, though therewas a difference of twenty-eight years between the first and last, nodifference could be perceived between the impressions the forms ofthe spirals remained the same, not only in general character, but inminute and measurable details, as in the distances from the centreof the spiral and in the direction at which each new ridge took itsrise sir william herschel has made great use of digit-marks forthe purposes of legal attestation among natives of india 595 theextraordinary persistence of the papillary ridges on the inner surfaceof the hands throughout life has been a theme of discussion by theroyal society, 596 and mr galton has devised a method of indexingfinger-marks 597the impress of a naked foot covered with blood may serve to direct theinvestigations of justice in a criminal affair in france, where eightindividuals were implicated, comparative experiments upon the identityof the foot, made with a view to determine to which of the individualsought to be attributed the bloody footprints found near a wardrobe, it was shown that a degree of recognition could be established onreproducing the footprints with defibrinated blood from the eightimprints of the left foot of each individual, impregnated with blood, measures and comparisons could be made, thus helping to establish thedifference or the resemblance with those found near the wardrobe imprints thus obtained may be looked upon as a kind of documentaryevidence, but too much importance should not be attached to them asarticles tending to prove criminality the futility of such evidenceis shown in the varying sizes of different impressions of the foot ofthe same person first in rapid progression, secondly by standing, and third by slow advance the results appear less sure in the case offootprints made in mud, sand, dust, or snow nevertheless thesis factsrelating thereto may be noted with great certainty the question hasbeen mooted as to whether or not the impress left upon the soil givesalways the exact dimensions of the foot that has made them one sidehas contended that the footprints are a little smaller, while theother refutes this opinion and thinks that they are a little larger the consistency of the soil, which does not seem to have entered intothe discussion, doubtless accounts for the small differences that havegiven rise to this discrepancy of opinion the outline of the sole ofthe foot and the relative position of the toes are more or less neatlydesigned as the ground is more or less wet or soft the means employedfor taking impressions of foot or other tracks in mud, etc , showconsiderable ingenuity on the writing of those who have elaborated thesubject to discover foot-marks in mud, powdered stearic acid is spreadover the imprint and a heat of at least 212° is applied from above bythis means a solid mould may be taken of the imprint these researcheshave been extended to the exact reproduction of imprints left upon snowby pouring melted gelatine upon the imprint previously sprinkled with alittle common table salt, which rapidly lowers the temperature of thesnow about fifteen degrees and permits the mould to be taken withouttoo much hurry the study has been extended to the configuration of theplantar imprints in tabetics, but it does not appear so far to be ofmuch medico-legal value the question may arise as to the length of time since the imprintswere made this would, of course, depend upon thesis circumstances, asweather, temperature, and the like it is a fact that in greenlandfootsteps in snow have been recognized thesis months after they weremade a few summers ago, on an arctic expedition, i climbed capelisbourne, alaska, in company with another person the ground beingthawed in thesis places, our feet left very decided imprints in the mud a year afterward i visited the same spot, and on again making theascent was astonished to recognize the footsteps made the year before circumstances essaytimes direct expert attention to vestiges of otheranimals the tracks of a dog or of a horse may become the object of amedico-legal inquest the books record a case in which it was necessaryto ascertain whether a bite had been made by a large or a small dog this question was settled by producing the dogs and comparing theirteeth with the scars persons familiar with border life know theimportance of trails and the minute observation that is brought to bearon them by the experienced frontiersman in following cattle-thievesand murderers, while with the fourth united states cavalry on the riogrande frontier, i have known the peculiarity of a horse footprint inthe prairie to tell a tale of great significance observation in this respect may extend to such apparently trivialobjects as the tracks of wheels, as those of a wagon, a wheelbarrow, or a bicycle, or to the singular imprints left by crutches or awalking-stick the imprint left in the ground by a cane usually occursin the remarkable order of every two and a half or every four and ahalf steps investigation of such circumstances may result in materialfacts that may be of great assistance in establishing the relation ofone or several persons with essay writingicular act deformities and pathological peculiarities the existence of deformities or injuries is so apparent in serving toestablish identity that it seems almost superfluous to mention them, except for the purpose of deciding whether the wounds were made duringlife or after death in the matter of gunshot wounds on persons whotook writing in the late civil war, thesis of whom unfortunately belong tothe vagrant class and are often found dead, their wounds essaytimesafford excellent means of identification in thesis instances themultiple character of these wounds is almost incredible when on dutyat the army medical museum, in connection with the preparation of the“medical and surgical history of the war of the rebellion, ” i saw a manwho was literally wounded from the crown of his head to the sole of hisfoot, the scars being fifty-two in number wounds made during life might show the suggillation peculiar tobruises or traces of inflammation besides, the gaping nature of thelips of the wound, the fact of hemorrhage having taken place and thecoagulation of the blood, the infiltration of blood into the cellulartissue, etc , are surgical facts that would leave but little doubt asto the infliction of the wounds during life the cause of death is often a difficult matter to determine, asit may have been accidental, suicidal, or the result of homicide the causes relating thereto are, moreover, so thesis and varied thatspace and time compel a reference to other headings of this work informing an opinion as to the probable date of death the extent ofputrefaction is the chief guide if death is quite recent, we may beguided by the post-mortem rigidity or the extent to which the body hascooled the march of putrefactive decomposition would, of course, beregulated by circumstances it takes place very rapidly in persons whohave succumbed to excessive fatigue or to any disassimilative excessesor derangement resulting in ante-mortem change of the tissues, suchas those occurring in virulent or infectious diseases the body ofan infant decays more rapidly that that of an adult the course ofputrefactive phenomena is also influenced by the seasons, the extentof the exposure to air, and to other mesological causes there is amanifest difference in the special putrefactive change accordingly asa body is buried in the earth, submerged in a fluid, thrown into acesspool, or buried in a dung-heap in certain paper, especially where the body has been much mutilated, itmay be desirable to know whether there was one or several murderers while no definite rule can be laid down on this point, we are justifiedin supposing that there were two or more assassins when the body of thevictim shows both gunshot and knife wounds, or that two persons wereconcerned in the dismemberment and mutilation of a body which shows thesimultaneous presence of writings skilfully cut, while others show evidentawkwardness where there is more than one mortal wound on the same dead body, a question of medico-legal significance may arise this occurred inthe burton murder case at newport, r i , in 1885, which gave rise todiscussion of the following abstract question.

On the first occasion the examination was taken by questions put either by the district attorney or by the coroner, and the result written down by the coroner, who then read the evidence over to him, line by line, and asked him if he understood it and if it was the truth, and he said it was, and the coroner then reswore him to the deposition the coroner, after taking the defendant testimony on the first day, came to the conclusion that the defendant did not understand english well enough to be examined, and that it ought to be taken through an interpreter, which was done, in order that they might get it a little better and a little fuller it was held that the defendant testimony was not admissible upon his trial on the indictment 564 it will be seen that this latter case follows in direct line with the rule announced in the mcmahon case and clearly distinguishes another case, the mcgloin case, upon the authority of which the trial court held the testimony of the prisoner in the mondon case admissible mcgloin case - the case of mcgloin was not that of the examination of a prisoner on oath before a magistrate before whom he was taken involuntarily, while in custody, and interrogated by the magistrate, who to all appearance had power to require him to answer, but while under arrest the prisoner said to the inspector of police who had him in charge that he would make a statement the inspector then said that he would send for a coroner to take it the coroner was then sent for and came to police headquarters and took down in writing the confession dictated by the prisoner, the coroner asking no questions and not acting in any official capacity, but as a mere amanuensis to take down the confession cover page for an essay and prove the contents it was held that the confession of the prisoner was admissible in evidence upon his trial for murder 565rule in pennsylvania - the rule in pennsylvania is substantially thatwhen the testimony given by the prisoner under oath before a coronerinquest, previous to him being charged or suspected of the murder ofthe individual upon whose body the inquest was sitting, may afterwardbe given in evidence against him, on his trial for the murder of suchperson 566rule in nebraska - the statements of a prisoner to be competentevidence must have been voluntarily made in paper of declarationmade on an examination before a coroner inquest by a person underarrest or charged with the crime and also under oath, they are notadmissible but when the person, although he be subsequently chargedwith the offence, appears voluntarily, and gives testimony, before anyaccusation has been made against him, his statements are admissible inevidence against him on the trial of an indictment for the crime 567medico-legal autopsies byh p loomis, a m , m d , professor of pathology in the university of the city of new york;visiting physician and curator to bellevue hospital, new york;pathologist to the board of health, new york city. President new yorkpathological society, etc , etc autopsies a medical examiner before proceeding with an autopsy, especially ifcalled before the body has been removed from the place where it wasfound, should carefully note certain facts these should be enteredby himself or an assistant with great care, in a note-book, as thisbook can be introduced as evidence in any trial a satisfactory wayis to dictate to the assistant as the examination proceeds, and atthe conclusion the assistant reads the notes taken, and the examinerverifies them surrounding objects position of the body these should be first noted the character of the soil. The conditionof the ground, and whether it shows footprints. If so, their direction;the evidence of any struggle. The presence of any weapon. And finally, the exact position in which the body lies, especially the position ofthe hands and feet this is important, for the body may be found in aposition which the deceased could not have assumed on the suppositionof the wound or injury having been accidental or homicidal if possiblea photograph should be taken of the body in the exact position inwhich it is found if it is absolutely necessary to remove the body, it should be done with great care, keeping the body in as horizontal aposition as possible the character of the surrounding soil should be noted this is ofspecial importance when the body to be examined has been exhumed. Forthe question of preservation of the body and the ability to recognizepathological changes may be brought up at a trial this was animportant point raised in the buchanan case new york, 1893 if a body be found in the water, examine the character of the water andthe temperature, and if found near the shore, the character of shoreand bottom blood - the situation of blood-stains, and their number and extent, on clothing or surrounding objects should be noted this will oftenshow whether a struggle has taken place after receiving the fatalwound, and is also of medico-legal importance if made at the time thebody is found, for it may be so situated as to show that the body hasbeen interfered with after death again, spots of blood found upon articles of clothing or uponsurrounding objects should be noted as to their form and direction, forthey may serve to furnish an indication of the position of the personwith respect to them when the wound was inflicted for example, if thespot was oval, the presumption is that the person was placed obliquelywith respect to the stain while the hemorrhage was occurring the forcewith which the blood was thrown out will in essay measure be indicatedby the obliquity or length of the spot the amount of blood will alsooften indicate whether the person has died suddenly, the exact spotwhere death occurred, whether a struggle took place, and will alsopreclude the possibility of a person moving after receiving the fatalinjury when we examine a body, especially when found in a room, caremust be taken not to be misled by the accidental diffusion of blood bypersons going in and out, or touching the body see blood-stains, vol ii clothing - the examination of the clothing should be thorough adescription of each article should be noted, and the order in which itis removed. For often it is important to prove that the garments wereworn by or belonged to the deceased if any blood is on the clothing, note whether the blood is in large patches, or whether it is sprinkledover the garment. The amount of the blood and what garments are stainedby it note and examine whether the blood has flowed down the frontof the clothing, whether it has soaked the inner garments, or again, whether it has collected along the back. For these appearances willessaytimes demonstrate whether a wound was inflicted while the personwas sitting, standing, or lying down for example, if the throat iscut while the person is lying down, the blood will be found on eachside of the neck along the back and not down the front of the body few suicides cut their throats in a recumbent position, and thisdistribution of the blood may serve to distinguish a suicidal from ahomicidal wound the condition of the clothing may also serve to show whether therehas been any struggle, and the presence of dry spots or mud on it mayessaytimes serve to connect an accused person with an act of murder this is well illustrated in the case of reg v snipe, reported inbeck “medical jurisprudence, ” where evidence was adduced to showthat essay spots of mud on the boots and clothing of the prisoner, whenexamined microscopically, contained infusoria, shells, and essay rareaquatic vegetables the mud of the ditch close to where the body wasfound, as also the mud on the clothing of the dead body, presentedthe same microscopical appearances the medical expert who gave thisevidence swore that in his opinion the mud spots on the body and onthe prisoner boots were derived from the same ditch, for the mudof all the other ditches in the locality was found, on microscopicalexamination, to be different the well-known case which occurred innew york a few years ago, known as the “shakespeare case, ” furnishesan example of the importance of carefully examining all stains on theclothing found on bodies if there are several stabs or cuts on the body involving the dress, itshould be noted whether they are blood-stained, and if so, whether thestain is on the inside or outside of the garments, for essaytimes insimulated personal injury a stain of blood may be inadvertently appliedto the outside of the dress, as in wiping a weapon weapons - if a weapon is found, the character of the weapon and itsexact position should be noted this is frequently of importance intelling whether a person has died from an accidental or self-inflictedwound in a case where death occurs immediately or within a fewminutes, the weapon is found near the body, or often so tightly graspedin the hand that it can be with difficulty removed if the weaponis found near the body it should be noted on which side and at whatdistance, and it must be questioned whether it could have fallen onthe spot or been thrown there by the deceased it is compatible withsuicide that the weapon should be found at essay distance from the body an instance has been recorded where an individual was discovered inbed with his throat cut, and the bloody razor was found closed and inthe pocket of the deceased if a weapon cannot be discovered, or isconcealed, it is strong presumptive evidence of homicide. Especiallywhen the wound is such as to produce speedy death note whether the weapon is sharp or blunt, straight or curved if aknife, the handle and inner portion should be examined, for the blademay have been washed if the wound has involved any large vessels, it is improbable that theweapon can have been thrown any distance from the body, and when it is, there are always fair grounds to expect interference with the originalposition of the body one circumstance which always strongly points tosuicide is the finding of the weapon firmly grasped in the hand of thecadaver the hand of a dead person cannot be made to grasp or retaina weapon as does the hand which has grasped it at the last moments oflife the amount of blood on the weapon should be noted, but it must beremembered that a knife may have produced a fatal stab wound and stillno blood be found on it this is explained by the fact that in a rapidplunge the vessels were compressed, and only after the drawing of theknife and relieving of the pressure blood began to flow, or possiblythe blood may have been wiped off the knife by the elasticity of theskin when a person has died of a gunshot wound, especially at close range, it is important to look for any wadding or paper found in the wound, asin a number of instances the finding of such has led to the detectionof the criminal for example, handwriting has been found on the paper, or it has formed writing of a printed page the rest of which has beenfound in possession of the accused when a gun is discharged near thebody, a portion of the wadding is almost always found in the irregularwound produced post-mortem examination having completed the examination of the surroundings, one next proceedswith the post-mortem examination, which should be conducted accordingto a well-defined plan, following which the results obtained willalways be satisfactory if possible the body should be removed to a large, well-ventilated, andespecially well-lighted room no artificial light, if it can possiblybe avoided, should be used when performing the autopsy. Artificiallight is especially bad on account of its yellowness and its power tomodify natural color thesis diseased conditions cannot be satisfactorilydetermined by artificial light the body should be placed on a hightable, and the facility with which the autopsy is made will oftendepend on having the table high enough to render stooping unnecessary never make an autopsy, if it can possibly be avoided, on a body whilein a coffin, as the examination is always unsatisfactory the size andsurroundings of the room, and how it is lighted, should be entered inthe note-book instruments - if possible the following instruments should be at handbefore proceeding with an examination, although essay of them may bedispensed with. 1 large section knife. 2 scalpels. 3 enterotome for openingintestines and stomach. 4 costotome, or large bone forceps forcutting ribs.

It tempers the blood, and allayshot fits of agues the seed drank in wine, procures abundance of milkin women breasts the same also being taken, eases the pains in theloins, back, and kidneys the distilled water of the herb when it isin flower, or its chief strength, is excellent to be applied eitherinwardly or outwardly, for all the griefs aforesaid there is a syrupmade hereof very effectual for the comforting the heart, and expellingsadness and melancholy wall flowers, or winter gilli-flowers the garden kind are so well known that they need no description descript the common single wall-flowers, which grow wild abroad, have sundry small, long, narrow, dark green leaves, set without orderupon small round, whitish, woody stalks, which bear at the tops diverssingle yellow flowers one above another, every one bearing four leavesa-piece, and of a very sweet scent. After which come long pods, containing a reddish seed the roots are white, hard and thready place it grows upon church walls, and old walls of thesis houses, andother stone walls in divers places. The other sort in gardens only time all the single kinds do flower thesis times in the end ofautumn. And if the winter be mild, all the winter long, but especiallyin the months of february, march, and april, and until the heat ofthe spring do spend them but the double kinds continue not floweringin that manner all the year long, although they flower very earlyessaytimes, and in essay places very late government and virtues the moon rules them galen, in his seventhbook of simple medicines, saith, that the yellow wall-flowers work morepowerfully than any of the other kinds, and are therefore of more usein physic it cleanses the blood, and fretteth the liver and reins fromobstructions, provokes women courses, expels the secundine, and thedead child. Helps the hardness and pain of the mother, and of spleenalso. Stays inflammations and swellings, comforts and strengthens anyweak writing, or out of joint. Helps to cleanse the eyes from mistiness orfilms upon them, and to cleanse the filthy ulcers in the mouth, or anyother writing, and is a singular remedy for the gout, and all aches andpains in the joints and sinews a conserve made of the flowers, is usedfor a remedy both for the apoplexy and palsy the wallnut tree it is so well known, that it needs no description time it blossoms early before the leaves come forth, and the fruitis ripe in september government and virtues this is also a plant of the sun let thefruit of it be gathered accordingly, which you shall find to be of mostvirtues while they are green, before they have shells the bark ofthe tree doth bind and dry very much, and the leaves are much of thesame temperature. But the leaves when they are older, are heating anddrying in the second degree, and harder of digestion than when theyare fresh, which, by reason of their sweetness, are more pleasing, and better digesting in the stomach.

we do not believe dr beveridge ever injected hissecretin-- protein mixture-- intravenously in man or animals not underanesthesia, otherwise he would not have stated. “of course, if desired, the secretin may be injected intravenously ”122 carlson, lebensohn and pearlman, the journal, jan 15, 1916, p 178 beveridge patented secretin is not stablei the samples of secretin sent us by dr beveridge -- physiologicaltests were made on four quart bottles of the secretin kindly sent us bydr beveridge june 26, 1916 according to a letter from dr beveridgeof july 20, 1916, those samples of secretin were prepared june 20, thatis, only six days before received by us the material came in darkcolored bottles it was kept in the original bottles and placed inthe ice box immediately on receipt dr beveridge stated the secretin“should remain active until the month of november, 1916, at least ”tests were made on three out of the four bottles the fourth bottlewas not opened, as we desired to learn what change it might undergoin the way of protein precipitation and bacterial decomposition there is nothing in the beveridge method of preparation that insuresa sterile secretin unless it is passed through a berkefeld filter in all our crucial experiments the animals dogs were kept underlight ether anesthesia, a cannula inserted into the pancreatic duct, the blood pressure recorded from the carotid artery and the varioussecretin preparations injected intravenously when inactive secretinpreparations were encountered, control tests were always made withactive solutions of secretin to eliminate possible individualpeculiarities of the animal thus when the pancreas of a dog reacts tothe injection of preparation a, but not to preparation b, it isevident that absence of response to b is due to this preparation andnot to the animal or to the experimental conditions illustration. Fig 1 -- records of carotid blood pressure and secretionof pancreatic juice on intravenous injection of beveridge secretinin dogs x, injection of 10 c c secretin. B, record of flow ofpancreatic juice in drops tracing a, injection of 10 c c of onesample secretin ten days old furnished by dr beveridge tracingb, injection of 10 c c of second sample of secretin ten daysold furnished by dr beveridge tracing c, injection of 10 c c of secretin twenty hours old made by us according to the beveridgemethod showing that the secretin preparations sent us by dr beveridgecontained no secretin each of the three samples of secretin sent us by dr beveridge wastested in the above manner on five dogs the first tests were madejune 27, 28 and 29, respectively, that is, within nine days of thepreparation of these samples of secretin none of the samples wasactive fig 1, even when injected intravenously in quantities up to50 c c. 40-50 c c of beveridge secretin mixture may kill a dog bytoo great lowering of the blood pressure a good secretin preparationyields a copious secretion of pancreatic juice on intravenous injectionof a few cubic centimeters it is not difficult to prepare a secretin, by the original bayliss orstarling method or by the beveridge method, that retains essay activityfor a longer period than nine days hence we cannot account for theabsolute inactivity of these preparations except on the assumptionthat they did not contain any secretin to start with. That is, faultypreparation and absence of physiologic standardization the sample kept intact in its original container for six months becamegradually cloudy, a large mass of amorphous precipitate settledto the bottom and the odor showed bacterial decomposition it isreprehensible, to say the least, to state concerning such a mixture:“of course, if desired, it may be injected intravenously ” the factthat beveridge secretin may be rendered clear by filtering throughcarbon is not sufficient evidence that it is “pure secretin, ” free frombacteria and other injurious substances ii beveridge secretin mixture is rapidly rendered inactive by humangastric juice -- we prepared active secretin solutions by the beveridgemethod, using 0 2 per cent serum as the protein “stabilizer” ?. the addition of the serum does not appear to affect the activityof the fresh secretin preparation if beveridge secretin is ableto act on the pancreas when given by mouth, it is obvious that itmust run the gamut of gastric digestion, except in paper of completeachlorhydria it has been repeatedly demonstrated that all othersecretin preparations are rapidly destroyed by pepsin-hydrochloric aciddigestion is beveridge secretin an exception?. what is there in alittle serum, native albumin, or peptones to protect secretin againstgastric digestion?. The pure human gastric juice used in these tests was secured fromthe fistula case mr f v that has been under observation in ourlaboratory for years 123123 carlson. The control of hunger in health and disease, chicago, 1916 beveridge secretin and bayliss-starling secretin prepared sept 29, 1916 response of pancreas no of drops of secretin date of test quantity of ┌───────────┴───────────┐ secretin bayliss-starling beveridge injected, c c secretin secretin sept 29 10 75 78 oct 2 10 61 61 oct 6 10 28 17 oct 13 10 25 31 oct 27 10 5 6 nov 3 10 7 6 nov 17 10 4 5 nov 30 10 3 4 dec 4 10 2 2 dec 20 10 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- two cubic centimeters of fresh gastric juice added to 8-10 c c beveridge secretin, the mixture being kept at body temperature 38 c , renders the secretin completely inactive in from 5 to 8minutes fig 2 there is no exception to this rule, as we haverepeated the test on thesis different secretin preparations and usingdifferent samples of human gastric juice the secretin of beveridgeis just as vulnerable as the secretin of bayliss and starling topepsin-hydrochloric acid digestion on what kind of tests doesbeveridge base his claim that his secretin mixture acts on the pancreaswhen given by mouth?. Iii the relative rate of deterioration of the secretin solutionsprepared according to bayliss and starling and according tobeveridge -- six different preparations of the two kinds of secretinwere made, kept in dark stoppered bottles in the ice box, and tested byintravenous injection in dogs under ether anesthesia from time to timeuntil all influence on the pancreas had been lost one typical seriesof these tests is given by the way of illustration see table on page126 illustration. Fig 2 -- records of carotid blood pressure and flow ofpancreatic juice on intravenous injection of secretin prepared by usaccording to the beveridge method x, injection of 10 c c of thesecretin. B, record of flow of pancreatic juice in drops tracinga, the 10 c c of beveridge secretin injected had been digested forfive minutes with 3 c c of human gastric juice tracing b, injectionof 10 c c of the same secretin preparation not subjected to gastricdigestion showing rapid and complete destruction of beveridgesecretin by human gastric juice it will be seen that the rate of deterioration oxidation ordecomposition of the secretin is practically the same whether preparedaccording to bayliss and starling or according to beveridge figure 3 in both preparations the rate of deterioration is most rapid the firstfew days after preparation it is scarcely necessary to point out thatsecretin preparations not kept constantly at low temperature and in thedark, as in the above experiments, will deteriorate more rapidly illustration. Fig 3 -- records of carotid blood pressure and flow ofpancreatic juice on intravenous injection of secretin preparations x, injection of 10 c c secretin. B, record of flow of pancreaticjuice in drops tracing a, secretin prepared according to thebeveridge method september 30 i, injection of 10 c c october 2 ii, injection of 10 c c november 30 tracing b, secretin preparedby the bayliss-starling method september 30 iii, injection of10 c c october 2. Iv, injection of 10 c c november 30 showing nogreater stability of beveridge secretion over that of bayliss andstarling why can we hope that the addition of serum or any solution of proteinwill render secretin more stable?. in the intact man or animal undernormal conditions of digestion, secretin reaches the pancreas by wayof the blood, that is, it is in solution in blood does that factrender the secretin stable?.

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Andin hot bodies cause the choler to abound and the head-ach, and are anenemy to those that have the cough. But are less hurtful to those thathave a colder stomach, and are said to kill the broad worms in thebelly or stomach if they be taken with onions, salt, and honey, theyhelp the biting of a mad dog, or the venom or infectious poison of anybeast, &c caias pompeius found in the treasury of mithridates, kingof pontus, when he was overthrown, a scroll of his own hand writing, containing a medicine against any poison or infection. Which is this;take two dry walnuts, and as thesis good figs, and twenty leaves ofrue, bruised and beaten together with two or three corns of salt andtwenty juniper berries, which take every morning fasting, preservesfrom danger of poison, and infection that day it is taken the juiceof the other green husks boiled with honey is an excellent gargle forsore mouths, or the heat and inflammations in the throat and stomach the kernels, when they grow old, are more oily, and therefore notfit to be eaten, but are then used to heal the wounds of the sinews, gangrenes, and carbuncles the said kernels being burned, are veryastringent, and will stay lasks and women courses, being taken inred wine, and stay the falling of the hair, and make it fair, beinganointed with oil and wine the green husks will do the like, beingused in the same manner the kernels beaten with rue and wine, beingapplied, help the quinsy.