History

College Personal Narrative Essay Examples


If you make yourconserves of herbs, as of scurvy-grass, wormwood, rue, and the like, college personal narrative essay examples take only the leaves and tender tops for you may beat your heart outbefore you can beat the stalks small and having beaten them, weighthem, and to every pound of them add three pounds of sugar, you cannotbeat them too much 3 conserves of fruits, as of barberries, sloes and the like, is thusmade. First, scald the fruit, then rub the pulp through a thick hairsieve made for the purpose, called a pulping sieve. You may do it for aneed with the back of a spoon. Then take this pulp thus drawn, and addto it its weight of sugar, and no more. Put it into a pewter vessel, and over a charcoal fire. Stir it up and down till the sugar be melted, and your conserve is made 4 thus you have the way of making conserves. The way of keeping themis in earthen pots 5 the dose is usually the quantity of a nutmeg at a time morning andevening, or unless they are purging when you please 6 of conserves, essay keep thesis years, as conserves of roses. Othersbut a year, as conserves of borage, bugloss, cowslips and the like 7 have a care of the working of essay conserves presently after theyare made. Look to them once a day, and stir them about.

Third day, temperature 98 8, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12, and then discharged the case as recovered -- october 31, 1918 asthma:-- proteogen no 4 -- splendid results obtained from a sample of proteogen no 4 three ampoules affected effected?. complete recovery -- october 9, 1918 cancer:-- proteogen no 1 -- mrs b pronounced recovered from cancer by dr o w a , of catlin, after having injections of proteogen no 1 for essay time -- october 4, 1918 eczema:-- proteogen no 5 -- tried no 5 on a patient with eczema, and with happy results have not done anything for him for about five months-- and he is now at his business proteogen no 5 also relieved him of constipation and what he claimed a traumatic stricture of the lower portion of sigmoid flexure he is sure pleased and recommending them to his friends proteogens -- february 17, 1919 syphilis:-- proteogen no 10 -- i am getting such excellent results with the no 10 proteogen for syphilis that i am badly in need of more, as i am treating so thesis paper please send me four dozen c o d -- october 9, 1918 enlarged prostate:-- proteogen no 1 -- have used plantex in four paper, with good results in each case one of them his father, an elderly man -- april 25, 1918 lobar pneumonia:-- proteogen no 12 -- the only case i have used proteogen no 12, was a man who had lobar pneumonia of left lung following influenza after crisis came, patient continued to have slight rise in temperature, cough, and after using 10 doses of your proteogen no 12, temperature was normal, cough very much better, patient began to take on flesh and is still improving -- december 26, 1918 tuberculosis:-- proteogen no 3 -- the doctor writes. The proteogen no 3 sent me worked wonders in my patient the case came under my care when he was too far gone for anything to benefit him a great deal, but the proteogen did for him more than anyone could have expected, yet he died leaving me with a few ampoules to try on the next patient -- september 20, 1918 gonorrheal cystitis:-- proteogen no 11 -- my patient has taken two boxes of your proteogen no 11 given for gonorrheal cystitis of probably two years’ standing and at this writing i consider her almost, if not entirely, cured which i think speaks very highly of your remedy i expect to use more of your preparations in the future -- april 12, 1919 this testimonial, either by clerical error, or because the results were considered remarkable, was repeated elsewhere in the material submitted by the merrell company acute gonorrhea:-- proteogen no 11 -- mr a e r , age 65, weight 140 pounds first attack had had no previous treatment came to me january 2, 1919 had discharge, all acute symptoms, burning, etc gave seventeen injections of proteogen no 11, also mild antiseptic urethral wash discharged on february 15, 1919, clinically cured -- april 11, 1919 epithelioma of buttock -- proteogen no 1 -- i used proteogen no 1 on an epithelioma of buttock essay six months ago with favorable results and no return of symptoms as yet -- april 13, 1919 it is obvious that the proteogen preparations are in conflict withrules 1, 6 and 10, and should not be admitted to “new and nonofficialremedies ” it is recommended that the previous action of thecouncil be allowed to stand and that publication of both reports beauthorized -- from the journal a m a , july 12, 1919 “arsenoven s s ” and “arseno-meth-hyd” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorizes publication of the following report this reportdeclares arsenoven s s of the s s products company and solution ofarsenic and mercury formerly called arseno-meth-hyd of the new yorkintravenous laboratory, inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the council takes this opportunity to repeat its warning against theabuses-- often dangerous-- to which patients are frequently subjectedwhen “intravenous therapy” is employed w a puckner, secretary because of inquiries received, the council took up the consideration ofarsenoven s s and arseno-meth-hyd now sold as solution of arsenicand mercury the preparations having been referred to a committee forconsideration, this committee reported. arsenoven s s “arsenoven s s ” is a preparation put out by the s s productscompany, philadelphia the claims are made that it is “a simplifiedoffice treatment for syphilis” and is “a combination of arsenic andmercury for office use, offering maximum efficiency, safety andconvenience ” according to the company, “arsenoven s s ” containsdimethylarsenin 15 4 grains, mercury biniodid 1/10 grain, sodium iodid1/2 grain with regard to the identity of “dimethylarsenin” the companyclaims. “this product is a compound of cacodylic acid similar tosodium cacodylate but with a more pronounced therapeutic action ” thecommittee recommends to the council that “arsenoven s s ” be declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because of unwarrantedtherapeutic claims arseno-meth-hyd“arseno-meth-hyd, ” is sold by the new york intravenous laboratory, new york city, for the treatment of syphilis it comes in threedosages, 2 gm , 1 5 gm , and 0 7 gm , respectively the claim is madethat “arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm ” contains “2 gm 31 grains of sodiumdimethylarsenate cacodylate, u s p and mercury iodid 5 mg 1/12grain” in 5 c c of solution physicians are told. “in primary and early secondary case administer arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm every sixth day and mercury oxycyanide 008 1/8 grain intravenously between each injection ” “in tertiary paper and those of long standing alternate with intravenous injection of sodium iodid 2 gm ”the following claims are made for the alleged effectiveness and safetyof the cacodylate. “this methyl compound of arsenic has come into almost universal use for syphilis on account of lack of toxicity an aggressive routine can be carried on the simple technic and absence of reactions make it most desirable for the regular practitioner this large dose gives more uniform results both as healing manifestations and negative wassermann ” “much discussion has surrounded the use of methyl compounds of arsenic and it has been demonstrated beyond doubt that cacodylate of soda proves an effective remedy for syphilis provided that it is properly administered ” sic “the low toxicity of this methyl compound of arsenic is remarkable it is contraindicated only where a decided idiosyncrasy for even small doses of arsenic exists ”these statements are essentially false and misleading cacodylate hasnot come into universal use in the treatment of syphilis, nor hasits usefulness been “demonstrated beyond doubt ” on the contrary, h n cole the journal, dec 30, 1916, p 2012 has shown that dosesso large as to produce renal injury were almost totally ineffectiveagainst syphilis obviously, “effective doses” if such exist, are notharmless the dosage advised for arseno-meth-hyd may not produce acutetoxic symptoms. Nevertheless smaller doses have produced nephriticphenomena the “arseno-meth-hyd” treatment includes the intravenousinjection of about 1/4 grain of a mercury salt although this is lessthan the usual dose about 1 grain per week, the mercury is probablymore effective than the cacodylate the committee recommends to the council that, because of theunwarranted therapeutic claims, “arseno-meth-hyd” be held inadmissibleto new and nonofficial remedies the council adopted both reports of the committee and declared“arsenoven s s ” and “solution of arsenic and mercury” “arseno-meth-hyd” inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the committee reports on these two products impel the councilagain to call attention to the undesirable and dangerous abuses towhich “intravenous therapy” lends itself there is a distinct fieldfor the intravenous administration of drugs in those paper in whichimmediate drug action is necessary, or when the medicament is likelyto be changed if absorbed through the ordinary channels unless suchindications exist, however, intravenous administration involves notonly inconvenience and expense to the patient, but what is moreimportant, unnecessary danger the fact that indiscriminate intravenousadministration is peculiarly profitable to certain manufacturing housesmakes it all the more necessary for the medical profession to be on itsguard in this matter in this connection it is well worth while to quote the closingparagraph from an editorial on “intravenous therapy” that appeared inthe journal, nov 11, 1916 it is as true today as when it appeared:“intravenous therapy will be most securely advanced if its employmentis restricted to such well defined fields as those mentioned above these fields can be satisfactorily determined only by a scientificpharmacologic study of the action of these drugs when so administeredin animals, as well as in man, under conditions in which the resultsare carefully controlled the intravenous method is an impressive one, approaching in preparation almost to that which goes with a surgicaloperation the patient is usually interested and impressed by thisnew, and, to him, mysterious method there is a psychic element in hisreaction to the injection which is not a factor in his reaction to thesame drug when given by mouth the intravenous injection of a complexmixture would appear to be writingicularly reprehensible little is known, as has been stated, of the results to be expected from intravenoustherapy, even with simple substances the use of complex mixtures willwithout doubt react against the proper use of the method ”after the report on arseno-meth-hyd had been presented to the council, a letter was received from the new york intravenous laboratoryannouncing that the preparation “arseno-meth-hyd” was now called“solution of arsenic and mercury” and expressing a desire to have itsproducts accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies inview of this letter, the committee report on “arseno-meth-hyd” andthe council protest against promiscuous intravenous therapy weresent the new york intravenous laboratory for consideration the reply of the new york intravenous laboratory contained nothingwhich permitted a revision of the preceding report the change of thename of “arseno-meth-hyd” to “solution of arsenic and mercury” meanslittle as the name still does not disclose the important fact that thearsenic is present as sodium cacodylate, nor does it tell the characterof the mercury compound the council voted that “solution of arsenicand mercury” and “arsenoven s s ” be declared inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims advanced for themare unwarranted rule 6 and because the names of these pharmaceuticalpreparations are not descriptive of their composition rule 8 in filing its reply with the council, the new york intravenouslaboratory announced that that document would be circulated to themedical profession this is of course the firm privilege the councilnotes, however, with interest, that the reply is devoted almostentirely to points which were not raised by the council and that itfails to discuss the objections which were actually made the reply constantly confuses the efficiency of cacodylate in anemiaand in syphilis the council report on “arseno-meth-hyd” does notdiscuss or even touch on the question of cacodylates in anemia itis confined to a discussion of the disappointing results obtainedwith cacodylates as such i e , without mercury in the treatmentof syphilis this attempt on the writing of the new york intravenouslaboratory to confuse the issue and to attribute to the councilan opinion that it has never stated or held is an inexcusablemisrepresentation the company in its reply said. “we believe that you have previously stated that a solution cacodylate of soda possesses no more action than so much water in other words, it was inert now you try to show that it produces renal injury ”the council has never declared that cacodylates are inert in thereport it is merely stated “that doses so large as to produce renalinjury were almost totally ineffective against syphilis ” neitherhas the council stated that cacodylate is “peculiarly dangerous ” infact the absolute toxicity of cacodylates is low but cole resultswere quoted as a caution that “effective” doses are not harmless agreat portion of the remainder of the reply is devoted to disparagingarsphenamin-- a product that is not involved in this action of thecouncil, and one about which the physician is amply informed amongst other wholly extraneous matters, the firm “reply” tried toresurrect the pepsin pancreatin controversy this also has nothingto do with the efficiency or harmlessness of sodium cacodylate inorder to dispose of the matter, however, it may be pointed out thatthe implications are entirely misleading the work which is quotedagainst the council was undertaken by the council itself, to clarifyobscurities in the older data the outcome of these new investigationsshowed the essential correctness of the deductions from the older work, namely, that pancreatin is destroyed by pepsin-hydrochloric acid dr long work to which the firm reply evidently refers, showed thatunder favorable conditions, namely, when protected by an excess ofprotein, essay trypsin may escape destruction in the stomach. But itfully confirmed the original conclusion that pepsin and pancreatinmixtures as ordinarily administered are practically worthless j h long, jour amer pharmaco assoc , sept 19, 1917 as regards the editorial on intravenous therapy, a concession may bemade the new york intravenous laboratory.

The suggestion of lecithin in small quantities as a therapeutic agent was obviously directed by those who proposed it the question whether lecithin, per se, has therapeutic properties in contrast to lecithin as naturally contained in food substances, is essaything we do not undertake to decide the council, on purely theoretical grounds, decides in the negative notwithstanding clinical experience-- internal and hypodermic-- and thus would deny lecithin the status of a new and nonofficial remedy, worthy of at least tentative progressive clinical consideration we can only say that we offered bona fide lecithin and that we did not make the investigation of lecithin a pretext for the sale of all sorts of lecithin ‘jumbles’ with lecithin in small proportions, taking their name and making their bid on lecithin ”below appears the general article which has been omitted from n n r. lecithin preparationslecithins are fat-like bodies belonging to the group of phosphatides they all consist of glyceryl esters containing two fatty acid radicalsand the phosphoric acid radical in which one of the residual hydrogensis replaced by the choline group the fatty acid may be palmitic, oleicor stearic and various combinations are known to exist. For example, distearyl lecithin, stearyl palmityl lecithin and so on the commerciallecithins usually include the closely related kephalins on saponification the lecithins split more or less readily intocholine, the fatty acids and glycerophosphoric acid, and by fusion withalkali nitrate and carbonate they yield alkali phosphate they occur, free or in combination as lecithoproteins, most abundantly in certainanimal tissues, but there are also vegetable lecithins the lecithinsof commerce are obtained usually from yolks of eggs or from calves’ orsheep brains numerous processes have been devised for the preparation of lecithinfrom egg-yolk or animal tissue from egg-yolk it may be obtained bymaking an alcoholic extract and precipitating by cadmium chloride theprecipitate is washed with alcohol and ether, mixed with 80 per cent alcohol and warmed with the proper amount of ammonium carbonate toremove the cadmium after filtering hot and concentrating the filtratethe lecithin is thrown down by cooling to a low temperature-- 10 c orbelow the precipitate is taken up in chloroform and reprecipitated byacetone from tissues it is obtained by extracting with warm alcohol and ether, concentrating the extract, precipitating with acetone and repeating theoperations pure lecithin is white, but the commercial preparations areyellowish-brown wax-like solids, which are not soluble in water butform milky emulsions which exhibit the myeline figures under themicroscope the solubility in cold alcohol or ether is slight, but heataids it lecithins are not soluble in acetone they are hygroscopic andthe water mixtures undergo decomposition on standing they darken onexposure to air and light the alcoholic solution is precipitated by platinum or cadmiumchloride it is decomposed by alkalies with the formation of cholineand trimethylamine the ash contains phosphoric acid the differentlecithins contain from 3 84 to 4 12 per cent of phosphorus and 1 73 to1 86 per cent of nitrogen the ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus shouldbe at 1 to 2 21 lecithin is incompatible with alkalies. It should be kept inwell-stoppered bottles and should be protected from the light the content of lecithin plus kephalin in tissues is about as follows. per cent egg-yolk 8 to 12 egg-white 0 1 to 0 2 liver 2 0 to 3 0 kidney 2 0 to 3 6 lung 2 0 to 3 0 pancreas 2 0 to 3 0actions and uses -- the lecithin preparations have been recommendedin thesis pathologic conditions, especially in malnutrition and sexualdebility moderate doses are said to bring about a marked retention ofnitrogen and phosphorus, but satisfactory proof of this is lacking itis extremely unlikely that the small doses which have been recommendedin pill or tablet form or in emulsions can have any perceptible action, in view of the fact that thesis of our natural foods contain much greaterweights of available lecithins than the medicinal doses provide thereis no good basis for the statement that the free lecithin has a greaterfood value or is more readily assimilated than is the substance asfound in eggs or tissue the reverse proposition is much more likelyto be true, especially when it is considered that the commercialpreparations are usually essaywhat altered or decomposed in the processof separation dosage -- given by the mouth in the form of pills, tablets orglycero-alcoholic emulsions the amount of actual lecithin ingestedin this way is usually small because of the doubtful purity of theoriginal preparation several doses, as commonly administered, wouldbe required to furnish the amount of lecithin present in a smallegg -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 122 proprietary names for liquid petrolatum report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has accepted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary a former report of the council liquid petrolatum or “russian mineraloil, ” report council pharm and chem , the journal, may 30, 1914, p 1740 called attention to the large number of concerns that wereplacing on the market liquid petrolatum as a proprietary under coinednames since then the number of such products has increased thecouncil has been requested by several concerns to consider theirproducts put out under proprietary brand names the rules of the council affirm that “the application of ‘trade names’to official or established nonproprietary substances tends to confusionand fosters thesis abuses ” in accordance with this general ruling, the council has invariably refused to countenance proprietary namesapplied to liquid petrolatum the council holds that proprietary orcoined names for this substance are detrimental to medical progress, since they are sure to foster the impression that the writingicularproduct is different from liquid petrolatum manufacturers have beenadvised that there is no objection to distinguishing their productsby the addition of their firm name or the initial representing thefirm name. For instance, “liquid petrolatum, a b and co ” or “liquidpetrolatum, smith ” the council also believes that such designationsas “star liquid petrolatum” or “liquid petrolatum, anchor brand, ”may be regarded as unobjectionable, provided that the words “liquidpetrolatum” are always used in connection with the brand designationand given equal prominence -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1915, p 127 seng report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary seng sultan drug co , st louis is called by the manufacturers. “ a palatable preparation of panax ginseng in an aromatic vehicle ”regarding ginseng panax quinquefolia the united statesdispensatory, nineteenth edition, page 1603, says. “the extraordinary medicinal virtues formerly ascribed to ginseng had no other existence than in the imagination of the chinese it is little more than a demulcent, and in this country is not employed as a medicine ”no discussion of ginseng is to be found in the more recently publishedbooks on pharmacology, materia medica and therapeutics, evidentlybecause their authors agree with this estimate on the other hand, physicians are told through the medium ofadvertisements appearing in medical journals that seng is. “an efficient remedy in all affections in which the gastro-intestinal glands need stimulating “exceptionally useful in atonic indigestion, malnutrition, convalescence from the acute diseases, and all digestive disorders characterized by deranged or depressed functions ” woman medical journal, july, 1914 according to the label, seng is indicated in “indigestion, ”“malassimilation, ” “malnutrition” and “wasting diseases ” it is alsostated-- though the preparation is admitted to contain 18 per cent ofalcohol-- that to give babies “ten to fifteen drops in water or milkduring feeding” is a proper procedure and that “for colic, flatulency, etc , the dose for an adult or child may be repeated every half houruntil relieved ”the following are essay of the exaggerated therapeutic claims made forthis preparation of a worthless drug. “as a result of its administration the gastro-intestinal secretions are augmented, the digestion of food is substantially increased, and fermentative processes are promptly overcome ” “seng will specifically encourage the secretion of the juices in the entire alimentary tract ”the formula furnished for seng is non-quantitative and thereforemeaningless the preparation is exploited in a manner to encourageits ill-advised use by the public, and exaggerated and unwarrantedtherapeutic claims are made for it the use of an inefficient orworthless drug like ginseng, moreover, is detrimental to rationaltherapeutics the council therefore voted that seng be refusedrecognition for conflict with rules 1, 4, 6 and 10 -- from reports ofcouncil on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 129 frosst blaud capsules report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfrosst blaud capsules and frosst blaud, arsenic and strychninecapsules were submitted to the council by c e frosst & co , montreal, canada this firm claims, on the authority of the report of a firm ofanalytical chemists, that. “ of three leading blaud preparations bought by us on the open market, the iron in frosst blaud capsules showed the highest percentage of ferrous carbonate ”the chemical laboratory of the american medical association found thisclaim unjustified the laboratory reported that there was no especialdifference in the ferrous iron content of the various blaud pills foundon the market, and that among ten specimens examined, the total ironcontent was the lowest in the frosst specimen in view of this thecouncil refused recognition to frosst blaud capsules and frosstblaud, arsenic and strychnine capsules -- from reports of council onpharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 164 tyree elixir of buchu and hyoscyamus compound report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryeach dessertspoonful of this preparation is said to represent buchu leaves 3-1/2 grains uva ursi 1-1/8 grains pareira brava 1-1/8 grains hyoscyamus 1-1/2 grains hops 1-1/2 grains acetate potash 7-1/2 grains spirits nitre 5 grains alcohol 5 per cent by volume”the manufacturer, j s tyree, washington, d c , offers this formulato the medical profession with the following claim. “approximate composition made sic by quantitative and qualitative analysis of the finished product ”it is also claimed that “an even greater advantage of tyree buchu and hyoscyamus compound over other drugs, lies in the fact that every constituent of the former is required to conform to a fixed standard of active principle strength. Hence the results derivable from it are absolutely uniform ”these pretentious claims of scientific accuracy look rather absurd tochemists thesis of the substances present in buchu, hops, hyoscyamus, uva ursi and pareira brava are also present in other drugs. Hence itwould never occur to a pharmaceutical chemist to try to ascertain thecomposition of such a mixture as tyree elixir by “quantitative andqualitative analysis of the finished product, ” much less to determinethe “active principle strength” of each ingredient, for no methods areknown by which this can be done it is claimed that, because of the care exercised in making tyreeelixir “ the results derivable from it are absolutely uniform ”a moment reflection, however, must compel any physician to attributethis statement, on the most charitable construction, to sheerignorance of course, even a definite chemical principle, such asquinin, does not exert uniform clinical action, for clinical conditionsvary, and accordingly the patient may or may not be cured it is simplypreposterous to claim that the clinical results obtained from suchsubstances as hops, pareira brava, buchu and uva ursi are absolutelyuniform a peculiarly vicious claim is that the elixir renders the mucoussurfaces of the genito-urinary tract “hostile to the multiplication ofthe gonococci ” since infection with the gonococcus produces the direstresults, any claim which means in plain english that the remedy assistsin producing a cure or in preventing infection with that organismcannot be condemned too strongly uva ursi, to be sure, has essay slightantiseptic action but it is devoid of any curative action in gonorrheaand the minute amounts that are present in the tyree elixir are of nomore protective value against gonorrheal infection than a grain ofhexamethylenamin would be it is further claimed that the elixir is a “specific” for “inflammationof the bladder, bright disease, renal colic, suppurative nephritis, acute cystitis, urethritis, catarrh of the bladder it would beinteresting to know what distinction the manufacturer draws between‘inflammation of the bladder, ’ ‘cystitis’ and ‘catarrh of thebladder’, acidemia, edema, vesical catarrh of old age, lithemia” andthat ascites and anasarca “can be reduced greatly to the satisfactionof the patient, and honor of the physician” by using a mixture oftyree elixir and infusion of digitalis such claims as these do notmerit serious discussion, for they carry their own refutation it is recommended that tyree elixir of buchu and hyoscyamus compoundbe held in conflict with rules 5, 6 and 10 and that publication ofthis report be authorized -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1915, p 167 hydroleine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryhydroleine charles n crittenton company, new york is a cod liveroil emulsion said to contain 45 per cent of cod liver oil, a trace ofsalicylic acid and 18-1/2 grains of “pancreatin, etc , ” per ounce theadvertising claims are based largely on the theory that cod liver oilis “that writingicular fat which dietetic experience and physiologicalchemistry have proved to be most digestible ” as a matter of fact, while the superior digestibility of cod liver oil over other oils hasoften been asserted, neither “dietetic experience” nor “physiologicalchemistry” have “proved” this by definite observations the crittentoncompany claims that it is more readily split than other oils thisis probably not true, easy emulsification of the raw oil being oftenconfounded with easy splitting this latter claim, however, is offeredin justification of the name “hydroleine, ” which the crittenton companyinterprets as “hydrated oil ” a circular wrapped around the bottlecontains the assertion that “cod liver oil has long been held in highesteem by the medical profession for the treatment of a large number ofserious diseases ” this recommendation is likely to lead the public toplace undue reliance on hydroleine in the grave conditions mentioned the preparation is in conflict with the rules of the council inasmuchas its name does not indicate its composition, unwarranted therapeuticclaims are made for it, and the exploitation is likely to give thepublic unwarranted confidence in its value the council therefore heldhydroleine ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies -- from reportsof council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1915, p 171 curative vaccine, bruschettini report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrycurative vaccine, bruschettini, manufactured by a bruschettini, genoa, italy, is claimed to have the properties “of acting directly on thetubercular bacillus, bringing directly into the field and determining ahyperproduction of antibacillar and antitoxic substances ” the use ofthe preparation is said to be indicated in “all forms of tuberculosis ”a referee reported to the council that he had examined the availableinformation and believed that the use of this product had nosatisfactory experimental basis the method of preparation appears tobe based more on theoretical considerations than on experimental basis on the recommendation of the committee on serums and vaccines thecouncil voted that curative vaccine, bruschettini, be not acceptedbecause 1 the method used for the production of the vaccine was notsatisfactorily stated. 2 the theory on which its use is based has notbeen satisfactorily confirmed, and 3 the value of the product is notupheld by satisfactory clinical evidence the council findings, in accordance with its procedure, were sentto the manufacturers for comment his reply was considered by a newreferee who found that the matter presented did not warrant a revisionof the council conclusions accordingly the council directedpublication of its findings -- from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1915, p 176 stearns’ wine report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfrederick stearns & co market a preparation known as “stearns’ wine, ”“stearns’ wine of cod liver ext with peptonate of iron, ” and as “vinumext morrhuae, stearns ” the constituents are said to be “concentratedextract of fresh cod livers, ” “peptonate of iron” and a “fine qualityof prime sherry wine” containing 18 per cent of alcohol this preparation was at one time marketed through the medicalprofession, but is now advertised direct to the public in typical“patent medicine” style the label on a recently purchased bottle ofstearns’ wine contains the following statements. “stearns wine is an ideal tonic for elderly people, for weak, pale and delicate children and convalescents “stearns wine has for thesis years been successfully prescribed in the treatment of general or nervous exhaustion, anemia, malnutrition, loss of appetite, loss of sleep, faulty circulation and impoverished blood supply ”the scope of the recommendations for the preparation is furtherindicated in a booklet accompanying the bottle, which begins.

Therefore we commend it as a wholeessay medicine for soundnessof body, preservation of health, and vigour of mind thus galen acetum theriacale, norimberg or treacle vinegar college take of the roots of celandine the greater, one ounceand a half. The roots of angelica, masterwort, gentian, bistort, valerian, burnet, white dittany, elecampane, zedoary, of each one dram, of plantain the greater one dram and a half, the leaves of mousear, sage, scabious, scordium, dittany of crete, carduus, of each half anhandful, barks and seeds of citrons, of each half a dram, bole amoniacone dram, saffron three drams, of these let the saffron, hart-horn, dittany, and bole, be tied up in a rag, and steeped with the thingsbefore mentioned, in five pints of vinegar, for certain days by atemperate heat in a glass well stopped, strain it, and add six drams ofthe best treacle to it, shake it together, and keep it for your use acetum theriacale or treacle vinegar college add to the description of treacle water, clove-gilliflowerstwo ounces, lavender flowers an ounce and a half, rose, and elderflower vinegar, of each four pounds, digest it without boiling, threedays, then strain it through hippocrates’ sleeve culpeper see treacle water for the virtues, only this is more cool, a little more fantastical decoctions decoctum commune pro clystere or a common decoction for a clyster college take of mallows, violets, pellitory, beets, and mercury, chamomel flowers, of each one handful, sweet fennel seeds half anounce, linseeds two drams, boil them in a sufficient quantity of commonwater to a pound culpeper this is the common decoction for all clysters, accordingto the quality of the humour abounding, so you may add what simples, orsyrups, or electuaries you please. Only half a score linseeds, and ahandful of chamomel flowers are added decoctum epythimi or a decoction of epithimum college take of myrobalans, chebs, and inds, of each half anounce, stœchas, raisins of the sun stoned, epithimum, senna, of eachone ounce, fumitory half an ounce, maudlin five drams, polipodium sixdrams, turbith half an ounce, whey made with goat milk, or heifermilk four pounds, let them all boil to two pounds, the epithimumexcepted, which boil but a second or two, then take it from the fire, and add black hellebore one dram and an half, agerick half a dram, sal gem one dram and an half, steep them ten hours, then press it stronglyout culpeper it purges melancholy, as also choler, it resists madness, and all diseases coming of melancholy, and therefore let melancholypeople esteem it as a jewel decoctum sennæ gereonis or a decoction of senna college take of senna two ounces, pollipodium half an ounce, gingerone dram, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, sebestens, prunes, ofeach twelve, the flowers of borrage, violets, roses, and rosemary, ofeach two drams, boil them in four pounds of water till half be consumed culpeper it is a common decoction for any purge, by adding othersimples or compounds to it, according to the quality of the humour youwould have purged, yet, in itself, it chiefly purges melancholy decoctum pectorale or a pectoral decoction college take of raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce, sebestens, jujubes, of each fifteen, dates six, figs four, french barley oneounce, liquorice half an ounce, maiden-hair, hyssop, scabious, colt-foot, of each one handful, boil them in three pounds of watertill two remain culpeper the medicine is chiefly appropriated to the lungs, and therefore causes a clear voice, a long wind, resists coughs, hoarseness, asthmas, &c you may drink a quarter of a pint of it everymorning, without keeping to any diet, for it purges not i shall quote essay syrups fitting to be mixed with it, when i come tothe syrups decoctum trumaticum college take of agrimony, mugwort, wild angelica, st john wort, mousear, of each two handfuls, wormwood half a handful, southernwood, bettony, bugloss, comfrey the greater and lesser, roots and all, avens, both sorts of plantain, sanicle, tormentil with the roots, the buds ofbarberries and oak, of each a handful, all these being gathered in mayand june and diligently dried, let them be cut and put up in skins orpapers against the time of use, then take of the forenamed herbs threehandfuls, boil them in four pounds of conduit water and two pounds ofwhite wine gently till half be consumed, strain it, and a pound ofhoney being added to it, let it be scummed and kept for use culpeper if sight of a medicine will do you good, this is as liketo do it as any i know syrups altering syrups culpeper reader, before we begin with the writingicular syrups, ithink good to advertise thee of these few things, which concern thenature, making, and use of syrups in general 1 a syrup is a medicineof a liquid body, compounded of decoction, infusion, or juice, withsugar or honey, and brought by the heat of the fire, into the thicknessof honey 2 because all honey is not of a thickness, understand newhoney, which of all other is thinnest 3 the reason why decoctions, infusions, juices, are thus used, is, because thereby, first, they willkeep the longer secondly, they will taste the better 4 in boilingsyrups have a great care of their just consistence, for if you boilthem too much they will candy, if too little, they will sour 5 allsimple syrups have the virtues of the simples they are made of, and arefar more convenient for weak people, and delicate stomachs syrupus de absinthio simplex or syrup of wormwood simple the college take of the clarified juice of common wormwood, clarified sugar, of each four pounds, make it into a syrup accordingto art after the same manner, are prepared simple syrups of betony, borrage, bugloss, carduus, chamomel, succory, endive, hedge-mustard, strawberries, fumitory, ground ivy, st john wort, hops, mercury, mousear, plantain, apples, purslain, rasberries, sage, scabious, scordium, houseleek, colt-foot, paul bettony, and other juices notsour culpeper see the simples, and then you may easily know both theirvirtues, and also that they are pleasanter and fitter for delicatestomachs when they are made into syrups syrupus de absinthio compositus or syrup of wormwood compound college take of common wormwood meanly dry, half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, indian spikenard three drams, old white wine, juice ofquinces, of each two pounds and an half, steep them a whole day in anearthen vessel, then boil them gently, and strain it, and by adding twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper mesue is followed verbatim in this. And the receipt isappropriated to cold and flegmatic stomachs, and it is an admirableremedy for it, for it strengthens both stomach and liver, as alsothe instruments of concoction, a spoonful taken in the morning, isadmirable for such as have a weak digestion, it provokes an appetite toone victuals, it prevails against the yellow iaundice, breaks wind, purges humours by urine syrupus de acetosus simplex or syrup of vinegar simple college take of clear water four pounds, white sugar five pounds, boil them in a glazed vessel over a gentle fire, scumming it till halfthe water be consumed, then by putting in two pounds of white winevinegar by degrees, perfect the syrup culpeper that is, only melt the sugar with the vinegar over thefire, scum it, but boil it not syrupus acetosus simplicior or syrup of vinegar more simple college take of white sugar five pounds, white wine vinegar twopounds, by melting it in a bath, make it into a syrup culpeper of these two syrups let every one use which he finds byexperience to be best. The difference is but little they both of themcut flegm, as also tough, hard viscous humours in the stomach. Theycool the body, quench thirst, provoke urine, and prepare the stomachbefore the taking of a vomit if you take it as a preparative for anemetic, take half an ounce of it when you go to bed the night beforeyou intend it to operate, it will work the easier, but if for any ofthe foregoing occasions, take it with a liquorice stick syrupus acetosus compositus or syrup of vinegar compound college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, endive, of eachthree ounces, the seeds of annis, smallage, fennel, of each one ounce, of endive half an ounce, clear water six pounds, boil it gently in anearthen vessel till half the water be consumed, then strain and clarifyit, and with three pounds of sugar, and a pound and a half of whitewine vinegar, boil it into a syrup culpeper this in my opinion is a gallant syrup for such whosebodies are stuffed either with flegm, or tough humours, for it opensobstructions or stoppings both of the stomach, liver, spleen, andreins. It cuts and brings away tough flegm and choler, and is thereforea special remedy for such as have a stuffing at their stomach syrupus de agno casto or syrup of agnus castus college take of the seeds of rue and hemp, of each half a dram, of endive, lettice, purslain, gourds, melons, of each two drams, offleawort half an ounce, of agnus castus four ounces, the flowers ofwater lilies, the leaves of mints, of each half a handful, decoctionof seeds of lentils, and coriander seeds, of each half an ounce, threepounds of the decoction, boil them all over a gentle fire till twopounds be consumed, add to the residue, being strained, two ounces ofjuice of lemons, a pound and a half of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper a pretty syrup, and good for little syrupus de althæa or syrup of marsh-mallows college take of roots of marsh-mallows, two ounces, the roots ofgrass asparagus, liquorice, raisins of the sun stoned, of each halfan ounce, the tops of mallows, marsh-mallows, pellitory of the wall, burnet, plantain, maiden-hair white and black, of each a handful, redcicers an ounce, of the four greater and four lesser cold seeds, ofeach three drams, boil them in six pounds of clear water till fourremain, which being strained, boil into a syrup with four pounds ofwhite sugar culpeper it is a fine cooling, opening, slipery syrup, and chieflycommendable for the cholic, stone, or gravel, in the kidneys or bladder syrupus de ammoniaca or syrup of ammoniacum college take of maudlin and cetrach, of each four handfuls, commonwormwood an ounce, the roots of succory, sparagus, bark of caper roots, of each two ounces, after due preparation steep them twenty-four hoursin three ounces of white wine, radish and fumitory water, of each twopounds, then boil it away to one pound eight ounces, let it settle, in four ounces of which, whilst it is warm, dissolve by itself gumammoniacum, first dissolved in white wine vinegar, two ounces, boil therest with a pound and an half of white sugar into a syrup, adding themixtures of the gum at the end culpeper it cools the liver, and opens obstructions both of it andthe spleen, helps old surfeits, and such like diseases, as scabs, itch, leprosy, and what else proceed from the liver over heated you may takean ounce at a time syrupus de artemisia or syrup of mugwort college take of mugwort two handfuls, pennyroyal, calaminth, origanum, bawm, arsmart, dittany of crete, savin, marjoram, germander, st john wort, camepitis, featherfew with the flowers, centaury theless, rue, bettony, bugloss, of each a handful, the roots of fennel, smallage, parsley, sparagus, bruscus, saxifrage, elecampane, cypress, madder, orris, peony, of each an ounce, juniper berries, the seeds oflovage, parsley, smallage, annis, nigella, carpobalsamum or cubebs, costus, cassia lignea, cardamoms, calamus aromaticus, the roots ofasarabacca, pellitory of spain, valerian, of each half an ounce, beingcleansed, cut, and bruised, let them be infused twenty-four hours infourteen pounds of clear water, and boiled till half be consumed, beingtaken off from the fire, and rubbed between your hands whilst it iswarm, strain it, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, sharpvinegar four ounces, boil it to a syrup, and perfume it with cinnamonand spikenard, of each three drams culpeper it helps the passion of the matrix, and retains it inits place, it dissolves the coldness, wind, and pains thereof. Itstrengthens the nerves, opens the pores, corrects the blood, itcorrects and provokes the menses you may take a spoonful of it at atime syrupus de betonica compositus or syrup of bettony compound college take of bettony three handfuls, marjoram four handfuls anda half, thyme, red roses, of each a handful, violets, stœchas, sage, of each half a handful, the seeds of fennel, annis, and ammi, of eachhalf an ounce, the roots of peons, polypodium, and fennel, of each fivedrams, boil them in six pounds of river water, to three pounds, strainit, and add juice of bettony two pounds, sugar three pounds and a half, make it into a syrup culpeper it helps diseases coming of cold, both in the head andstomach, as also such as come of wind, vertigos, madness. It concoctsmelancholy, it provokes the menses, and so doth the simple syrup morethan the compound syrupus byzantinus, simple college take of the juice of the leaves of endive and smallage, of each two pounds, of hops and bugloss, of each one pound, boil themtogether and scum them, and to the clarified liquor, add four pounds ofwhite sugar, to as much of the juices, and with a gentle fire boil itto a syrup syrupus byzantinus, compound college take of the juices so ordered as in the former, fourpounds, in which boil red roses, two ounces, liquorice half an ounce, the seeds of annis, fennel, and smallage, of each three drams, spikenard two drams, strain it, and to the three pounds remaining, add two pounds of vinegar, four pounds of sugar, make it into a syrupaccording to art culpeper they both of them viz both simple and compoundopen stoppings of the stomach, liver, and spleen, help the ricketsin children, cut and bring away tough flegm, and help the yellowjaundice you may take them with a liquorice stick, or take a spoonfulin the morning fasting syrupus botryos or syrup of oak of jerusalem college take of oak of jerusalem, hedge-mustard, nettles, of eachtwo handfuls, colt-foot, one handful and a half, boil them in asufficient quantity of clear water till half be consumed. To two poundsof the decoction, add two pounds of the juice of turnips baked in anoven in a close pot, and with three pounds of white sugar, boil it intoa syrup culpeper this syrup was composed against coughs, shortness ofbreath, and other the like infirmities of the breast proceeding ofcold, for which if you can get it you may take it with a liquoricestick syrupus capillorum veneris or syrup of maiden-hair college take of liquorice two ounces, maiden-hair five ounces, steep them a natural day in four pounds of warm water, then aftergentle boiling, and strong straining, with a pound and a half of finesugar make it into a syrup culpeper it opens stoppings of the stomach, strengthens the lungs, and helps the infirmities of them this may be taken also either witha liquorice stick, or mixed with the pectoral decoction like syrup ofcoltsfoot syrupus cardiacus, vel julepum cardiacum or a cordial syrup college take of rhenish wine two pounds, rose water two ounces anda half, cloves two scruples, cinnamon half a dram, ginger two scruples, sugar three ounces and a half, boil it to the consistence of a julep, adding ambergris three grains, musk one grain culpeper if you would have this julep keep long, you may put inmore sugar, and yet if close stopped, it will not easily corruptbecause it is made up only of wine, indeed the wisest way is to orderthe quantity of sugar according to the palate of him that takes it itrestores such as are in consumptions, comforts the heart, cherishes thedrooping spirits, and is of an opening quality, thereby carrying awaythose vapours which might otherwise annoy the brain and heart. You maytake an ounce at a time, or two if you please syrupus infusionis florum cariophillorum or syrup of clove-gilliflowers college take a pound of clove-gilliflowers, the whites being cutoff, infuse them a whole night in two pounds of water, then with fourpounds of sugar melted in it, make it into a syrup without boiling culpeper this syrup is a fine temperate syrup. It strengthens theheart, liver, and stomach.

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The fall caused rupture ofliver 59 ibid , p 539 - drunkard hung himself. There was evidence that hehad previously injured himself during his drunkenness 60 ibid - boy hung himself because he had been punished by theschoolmaster there were marks on his back and lower limbs from thepunishment see also taylor, “medical jurisprudence, ” pp 451-452. Tidy, “medicaljurisprudence, ” incomplete hanging, paper 33 to 36 and 62. Hofmann, “lehrbuch, ” p 538 homicide 61 harvey. Indian med gaz , 1876, xi , p 3 - woman, age 20, feeble her mother-in-law had kicked her. She probably had fainted;supposing her to be dead, the husband hanged her to a tree within halfan hour after the supposed death autopsy. No marks of injury. Obliquemark of cord on right side of neck. Tip of tongue between the teeth;face essaywhat livid. Right side of heart full of dark blood. Lungscongested posteriorly 62 ibid , p 4 - woman, age 38 rope close under the chin passedupward behind the ears head bent on chest large wound above clavicle under the rope was a depression made after death but no hemorrhage much blood in abdomen and a hole in the liver kidney bruised andblackened right lung torn through.