History

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Or such unreasonable procedures as the intravenous injectionof milk it is true that milk injections were recommended by essay ofthe german investigators, but they were always used intramuscularly 297 snyder, college paper service r g. A clinical report of nonspecific protein therapyin the treatment of arthritis, arch int med 22. 224 aug 1918 in the treatment of pneumonia, roberts and cary4 have employed avaccine made up of 100 million of each of the following organisms percubic centimeter. Influenza bacilli, pneumococci, staphylococci andstreptococci of this vaccine they injected, intravenously, first0 5 c c , later 1 c c in the series of 200 patients so treated therewas no evidence of injury to the patients in any way the mortality inthis series was 9 5 per cent. In a series of eighty-six patients nottreated with vaccine, the mortality was 31 2 per cent in the untreatedseries, 20 per cent recovered by crisis.

In the others the merest traces were found two years ago a preparation called “iod-izd-oil” was examined this wasclaimed to contain 2 per cent of free iodine in liquid petrolatum at the time of the examination the age of the preparation was notknown, but it had been obtained just prior to the analysis, and wasthought not to be very old the analysis showed that it contained butabout 0 43 per cent of iodine, all of which was in a free state thefact that all of the iodine present was in the free state appearedto indicate that iodine is relatively stable in liquid petrolatumsolutions iocamfen is a liquid composed of iodine, camphor and phenol it wasclaimed to contain 10 per cent of free iodine analysis showed thatit contained 9 3 per cent of total iodine of which 7 5 per cent was present in an uncombined state, 66 1 per cent of camphor and19 7 per cent of phenol after storing for several months a secondassay of iocamfen showed no appreciable loss in iodine content this would indicate that iodine is relatively stable in presenceof phenol and camphor, although immediately after mixing there isessay loss of free iodine the iocamfen ointment was supposed tocontain 50 per cent of iocamfen equivalent to 5 per cent of freeiodine in a lard-wax-cacaobutter base the analysis showed that theointment contained but 0 4 per cent of free iodine, the balancebeing in combination from the results of the examination, and fromcorrespondence with the manufacturers schering and glatz, it becameevident that the only plausible explanation for the loss of free iodinein the preparation of iocamfen ointment from iocamfen lay in thecombination of the free iodine with the ingredients of the ointmentbase it seems likely that the free iodine originally present iniocamfen for the most writing had gradually gone into combination with thefatty substances after the ointment had been prepared the literature was then examined to determine the consensus of opinionconcerning the stability of iodine in iodine ointment in the olderliterature the belief that iodine ointment is unstable appears to bequite general such statements as the following are typical. The ointment should be prepared only when wanted for use, for it undergoes change if kept, losing its deep, orange-brown color, and becoming pale upon its surface 187 187 u s disp , ed 19, p 1315 it is better to prepare it only as it is required for use 188 188 am disp , ed 2, p 2022 this ointment must not be dispensed unless it has recently been prepared 189 189 u s pharmacopeia, ix, p 481 in 1909 lythgoe, 190 of the massachusetts board of health laboratory, reported an examination of four samples of iodine ointment three werefound to be pure, the fourth was low in iodine experiments showedthat iodine ointment deteriorates rapidly. Consequently, no furthercollections of samples were made 190 rep mass bd health, 1909, 41, 477 in 1912 pullen191 reported that he had prepared two specimens ofiodine ointment according to the british pharmacopeia, one beingfrom new lard and the other from a specimen of lard at least 2 yearsold assays for free iodine were carried out immediately after thepreparations were made, and at intervals afterward up to four months the following values were found:191 pharm jour , 1912, 89, 610 sample i sample ii ointment from ointment from new lard, old lard, per cent per cent iodine introduced 4 0 4 0 iodine found immediately after making 3 95 3 38 iodine found after twenty-four hours 3 30 3 15 iodine found on the third day 3 18 2 62 iodine found on the seventh day 3 15 2 46 iodine found on the fourteenth day 3 00 2 45 iodine found after one month 3 00 2 39 iodine found after two months 2 90 2 31 iodine found after four months 2 92 2 26pullen found that the loss in free iodine could be accounted for by theiodine which had gone into combination with the fats of the ointmentbase pullen also found that if the potassium iodide and glycerin wereomitted in the preparation of the ointment, the loss in free iodinewas very rapid, the preparation containing practically no free iodine only 1/20 after a few hours he concludes that the use of potassiumiodide and glycerin is necessary for the preservation of the ointment he obtained specimens of iodine ointment in drug stores, and assayedthem for free iodine it is to be presumed that the ages of the severalspecimens were not known the results are found in the following table. Specimen no 1 2 74 per cent specimen no 2 2 85 per cent specimen no 3 2 62 per cent specimen no 4 2 48 per cent specimen no 5 2 53 per cent specimen no 6 2 79 per cent fried192 prepared iodine ointment according to the u s p viiiformula, and assayed it at intervals his results are tabulatedherewith:192 pharm jour , 1912, 89, 610 per cent iodine introduced 4 00 iodine found immediately after making 3 89 iodine found one hour after making 3 51 iodine found one day after making 3 48 iodine found five days after making 3 06 iodine found ten days after making 2 84 iodine found thirty days after making 2 81 iodine found ninety days after making 2 81 iodine found eight months after making 2 81iodine ointment has been official in the u s pharmacopeia since 1870 briefly, the method now used for making the preparation is as follows. Four gm of iodine, 4 gm of potassium iodide and 12 gm of glycerin are weighed into a tared mortar and the mixture triturated until the iodine and potassium iodide are dissolved and a dark, reddish-brown, syrupy liquid is produced eighty gm of benzoinated lard are then added in small portions and with trituration after each addition the mass is then triturated until of uniform consistence 193193 the time required to complete the process after the initialportion of lard has been added should be about twenty minutes paraffins and paraffin preparations-- table a key. A. Formula b. Substance c. Melting point, u s p d. Ductility limit e.

You maytake an ounce at a time, or two if you please syrupus infusionis florum cariophillorum or syrup of clove-gilliflowers college take a pound of clove-gilliflowers, the whites being cutoff, infuse them a whole night in two pounds of water, then with fourpounds college paper service of sugar melted in it, make it into a syrup without boiling culpeper this syrup is a fine temperate syrup. It strengthens theheart, liver, and stomach. It refreshes the vital spirits, and is agood cordial in fevers. And usually mixed with other cordials, you canhardly err in taking it, it is so harmless a syrup syrupus de cinnamomo or syrup of cinnamon college take of cinnamon grossly bruised, four ounces, steep it inwhite wine, and small cinnamon water, of each half a pound, three days, in a glass, by a gentle heat. Strain it, and with a pound and a half ofsugar, boil it gently to a syrup culpeper it refreshes the vital spirits exceedingly, and cheersboth heart and stomach languishing through cold, it helps digestionexceedingly, and strengthens the whole body you may take a spoonful ata time in a cordial college thus also you may conveniently prepare syrups but onlywith white wine, of annis seeds, sweet fennel seeds, cloves, nutmegs, ginger, &c syrupus acetositatis citriorum or syrup of juice of citrons college take of the juice of citrons, strained without expression, and cleansed, a pound, sugar two pounds, make it into a syrup likesyrup of clove-gilliflowers culpeper it prevails against all diseases proceeding from choler, or heat of blood, fevers, both pestilential, and not pestilential. Itresists poison, cools the blood, quenches thirst, cures the vertigo, ordizziness in the head college after the same manner is made syrups of grapes, oranges, barberries, cherries, quinces, lemons, woodsorrel, mulberries, sorrel, english currants, and other sour juices culpeper if you look the simples you may see the virtues of them:they all cool and comfort the heart, and strengthen the stomach, syrupof quinces stays vomiting, so doth all syrup of grapes syrupus corticum citriorum or syrup of citron pills college take of fresh yellow citron pills five ounces, the berriesof chermes, or the juice of them brought over to us, two drams, springwater four pounds, steep them all night, boil them till half beconsumed, taking off the scum, strain it, and with two pounds and ahalf of sugar boiled it into a syrup. Let half of it be without musk, but perfume the other half with three grains of musk tied up in a rag culpeper it strengthens the stomach, resists poison, strengthensthe heart, and resists the passions thereof, palpitation, faintings, swoonings. It strengthens the vital spirits, restores such as are inconsumptions, and hectic fevers, and strengthens nature much you maytake a spoonful at a time syrupus e coralliis simplex or syrup of coral simple college take of red coral in very fine powder four ounces, dissolveit in clarified juice of barberries in the heat of a bath, a pound, ina glass well stopped with wax and cork, a digestion being made three orfour days, pour off what is dissolved, put in fresh clarified juice, and proceed as before, repeat this so often till all the coral bedissolved. Lastly, to one pound of this juice add a pound and a half ofsugar, and boil it to a syrup gently syrupus e coralliis compositus or syrup of coral compound college take of red coral six ounces, in very fine powder, andlevigated upon a marble, add of clarified juice of lemons, theflegm being drawn off in a bath, sixteen ounces, clarified juice ofbarberries, eight ounces, sharp white wine vinegar, and juice ofwood-sorrel, of each six ounces, mix them together, and put them ina glass stopped with cork and bladder, shaking it every day till ithave digested eight days in a bath, or horse dung, then filter it, ofwhich take a pound and a half, juice of quinces half a pound, sugar ofroses twelve ounces, make them into a syrup in a bath, adding syrup ofclove-gilliflowers sixteen ounces, keep it for use, omitting the halfdram of ambergris, and four grains of musk till the physician commandit culpeper syrup of coral both simple and compound, restore such asare in consumptions, are of a gallant cooling nature, especially thelast, and very cordial, good for hectic fevers, it stops fluxes, therunning of the reins, and the fluor albus, helps such as spit blood, and such as have the falling-sickness, it stays the menses half aspoonful in the morning is enough syrupus cydoniorum or syrup of quinces college take of the juice of quinces clarified six pounds, boil itover a gentle fire till half of it be consumed, scumming it, adding redwine three pounds, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup, to beperfumed with a dram and a half of cinnamon, cloves and ginger, of eachtwo scruples culpeper it strengthens the heart and stomach, stays looseness andvomiting, relieves languishing nature. For looseness, take a spoonfulof it before meat, for vomiting after meat, for both, as also for therest, in the morning syrupus de erysimo or syrup of hedge-mustard college take of hedge-mustard, fresh, six handfuls, the rootsof elecampane, colt-foot, liquorice, of each two ounces, borrage, succory, maiden-hair, of each a handful and a half, the cordialflowers, rosemary and bettony, of each half a handful, annis seeds halfan ounce, raisins of the sun stoned, two ounces, let all of them, beingprepared according to art, be boiled in a sufficient quantity of barleywater and hydromel, with six ounces of juice of hedge-mustard to twopounds and a half, the which, with three pounds of sugar, boil it intoa syrup according to art culpeper it was invented against cold afflictions of the breastand lungs, as asthmas, hoarseness, &c you may take it either with aliquorice stick, or which is better, mix an ounce of it with three orfour ounces of pectoral decoction, and drink it off warm in the morning syrupus de fumaria or syrup of fumitory college take of endive, common wormwood, hops, dodder, hart-tongue, of each a handful, epithimum an ounce and a half, boilthem in four pounds of water till half be consumed, strain it, andadd the juice of fumitory a pound and a half, of borrage and bugloss, of each half a pound, white sugar four pounds, make them into a syrupaccording to art culpeper the receipt is a pretty concocter of melancholy, andtherefore a rational help for diseases arising thence, both internaland external, it helps diseases of the skin, as leprosies, cancers, warts, corns, itch, tetters, ringworms, scabs, &c and it is the betterto be liked, because of its gentleness it helps surfeits exceedingly, cleanses, cools, and strengthens the liver, and causes it to make goodblood, and good blood cannot make bad flesh i commend this receipt tothose whose bodies are subject to scabs and itch if you please you maytake two ounces by itself every morning syrupus de glycyrrhiza or syrup of liquorice college take of green liquorice, scraped and bruised, two ounces, white maiden-hair an ounce, dryed hyssop half an ounce, steep these infour pounds of hot water, after twenty-four hours, boil it till halfbe consumed, strain it, and clarify it, and with honey, penids, andsugar, of each eight ounces, make it into a syrup, adding, before it beperfectly boiled, red rose water six ounces culpeper it cleanses the breast and lungs, and helps continualcoughs and pleurisies you may take it with a liquorice stick, or addan ounce of it or more to the pectoral decoction syrupus granatorum cum aceto. Vulgo, oxysaccharum simplex or syrup of pomegranates with vinegar college take of white sugar a pound and a half, juice ofpomegranates eight ounces, white wine vinegar four ounces, boil itgently into a syrup culpeper look the virtues of pomegranates among the simples syrupus de hyssopo or syrup of hyssop college take eight pounds of spring water, half an ounce of barley, boil it about half an hour, then add the roots of smallage, parsley, fennel, liquorice, of each ten drams, jujubes, sebestens, of eachfifteen, raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce and a half, figs, dates, of each ten, the seeds of mallows and quinces, gum tragacanth tiedup in a rag, of each three drams, hyssop meanly dryed, ten drams, maiden-hair six drams, boil them together, yet so, that the roots mayprecede the fruits, the fruits the seeds, and the seeds the herbs, about a quarter of an hour. At last, five pounds of water beingconsumed, boil the other three being first strained and clarifiedinto a syrup with two pounds and a half of sugar culpeper it mightily strengthens the breast and lungs, causes longwind, clears the voice, is a good remedy against coughs use it likethe syrup of liquorice syrupus ivæ arthriticæ, sive chamæpityos or syrup of chamepitys college take of chamepitys, two handfuls, sage, rosemary, poleymountain, origanum, calaminth, wild mints, pennyroyal, hyssop, thyme, rue, garden and wild, bettony, mother of thyme, of each a handful, theroots of acorns, birthwort long and round, briony, dittany, gentian, hog fennel, valerian, of each half an ounce, the roots of smallage, asparagus, fennel, parsley, bruscus, of each an ounce, pellitory ofspain, an ounce and a half, stœchas, the seeds of annis, ammi, caraway, fennel, lovage, hartwort, of each three drams, raisins of the sun twoounces, boil them in ten pounds of water to four, to which add honeyand sugar, of each two pounds, make it into a syrup to be perfumed withsugar, nutmegs, and cubebs, of each three drams syrupus jujubinus or syrup of jujubes college take of jujubes, violets, five drams, maiden-hair, liquorice, french barley, of each an ounce, the seeds of mallows fivedrams, the seeds of white poppies, melons, lettice, seeds of quincesand gum tragacanth tied up in a rag of each three drams, boil them insix pounds of rain or spring water till half be consumed, strain it, and with two pounds of sugar make it into a syrup culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup, very available in coughs, hoarseness, and pleurisies, ulcers of the lungs and bladder, as alsoin all inflammations whatsoever you may take a spoonful of it once inthree or four hours, or if you please take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de meconio, sive diacodium or syrup of meconium, or diacodium college take of white poppy heads with their seeds, gathered alittle after the flowers are fallen off, and kept three days, eightounces, black poppy heads so ordered six ounces, rain water eightpounds, steep them twenty-four hours, then boil and press them gently, boil it to three pounds, and with twenty-four ounces of sugar boil itinto a syrup according to art syrupus de meconio compositus or syrup of meconium compound college take of white and black poppy heads with their seeds, fiftydrams, maiden-hair fifteen drams, jujubes thirty, the seeds of lettice, forty drams, of mallows and quinces tied up in a rag, a dram and ahalf, liquorice five drams, water eight pounds, boil it according toart, strain it, and to three pounds of decoction add sugar and penids, of each one pound, make it into a syrup culpeper meconium is nothing else but the juice of englishpoppies boiled till it be thick. It prevails against dry coughs, phthisicks, hot and sharp gnawing rheums, and provokes sleep it is anusual fashion for nurses when they have heated their milk by exerciseor strong liquor no marvel then if their children be froward then runfor syrup of poppies, to make their young ones sleep i would fain havethat fashion left, therefore i forbear the dose. Let nurses keep theirown bodies temperate, and their children will sleep well enough, neverfear syrupus melissophylli or syrup of bawm college take of the bark of bugloss roots, an ounce, the roots ofwhite dittany, cinquefoil, scorzonera, of each half an ounce, theleaves of bawm, scabious, devil-bit, the flowers of both sorts ofbugloss, and rosemary, of each a handful, the seeds of sorrel, citrons, fennel, carduus, bazil, of each three drams, boil them in four poundsof water till half be consumed, strain it, and add three pounds ofwhite sugar, juice of bawm and rose water, of each half a pound, boilthem to a syrup, the which perfume with cinnamon and yellow sanders, ofeach half an ounce culpeper it is an excellent cordial, and strengthens the heart, breast, and stomach, it resists melancholy, revives the spirits, isgiven with good success in fevers, it strengthens the memory, andrelieves languishing nature you may take a spoonfull of it at a time syrupus de mentha or syrup of mints college take of the juices of quinces sweet and between sweet andsour, the juice of pomegranates sweet, between sweet and sour, andsour, of each a pound and a half, dried mints half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, let them lie in steep one day, then boil it half away, and with four pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup according to art:perfume it not unless the physicians command culpeper the syrup is in quality binding, yet it comforts thestomach much, helps digestion, stays vomiting, and is as excellenta remedy against sour or offensive belchings, as any is in thedispensatory take a spoonful of it after meat syrupus de mucilaginibus or syrup of mussilages college take of the seeds of marsh-mallows, mallows, quinces, ofeach an ounce, gum tragacanth three drams, let these infuse six hoursin warm decoction of mallows, white poppy seeds, and winter cherries, then press out the mussilage to an ounce and an half, with which, andthree ounces of the aforesaid decoction, and two ounces of sugar, makea syrup according to art culpeper a spoonful taken by itself, or in any convenient liquor, is excellent for any sharp corroding humours be they in what writingof the body soever, phthisicks, bloody-flux, stone in the reins orbladder, or ulcers there. It is excellent good for such as have takenpurges that are too strong for their bodies, for by its slippery natureit helps corrosions, and by its cooling helps inflammations syrupus myrtinus or syrup of myrtles college take of myrtle berries two ounces and an half, sanderswhite and red, sumach, balaustines, barberry stones, red roses, ofeach an ounce and a half, medlars half a pound, bruise them in eightpounds of water to four, strain it, and add juice of quinces and sourpomegranates, of each six ounces, then with three pounds of sugar, boilit into a syrup culpeper the syrup is of a very binding, yet comforting nature, ithelps such as spit blood, all fluxes of the belly, or corrosions ofthe internal writings, it strengthens the retentive faculty, and stopsimmoderate flux of menses a spoonful at a time is the dose syrupus florum nymphæ simplex or syrup of water-lily flowers, simple college take of the whitest of white water-lily flowers, a pound, steep them in three pounds of warm water six or seven hours, let themboil a little, and strain them out, put in the same weight of flowersagain the second and third time, when you have strained it the lasttime, add its weight of sugar to it, and boil it to a syrup syrupus florum nymphæ compositus syrup of water-lily flowers compound college take of white water-lily flowers half a pound, violetstwo ounces, lettice two handfuls, the seeds of lettice, purslain, andgourds, of each half an ounce, boil them in four pounds of clear watertill one be consumed, strain it, and add half a pound of red rosewater, white sugar four pounds, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper they are both fine cooling syrups, allay the heat ofcholer, and provoke sleep, they cool the body, both head, heart, liver, reins, and matrix, and therefore are profitable for hot diseases ineither, you may take an ounce of it at a time when your stomach isempty syrupus de papavere erratico, sive rubro or syrup of erratic poppies college take of the fresh flowers of red poppies two pounds, steepthem in four pounds of warm spring water, the next day strain it, andboil it into a syrup with its equal weight in sugar culpeper the syrup cools the blood, helps surfeits, and may safelybe given in frenzies, fevers, and hot agues syrupus de pilosella or syrup of mousear college take of mousear three handfuls, the roots of lady-mantlean ounce and an half, the roots of comfrey the greater, madder, white dittany, tormentil, bistort, of each an ounce, the leavesof wintergreen, horsetail, ground ivy, plantain, adder tongue, strawberries, st john wort with the flowers, golden rod, agrimony, bettony, burnet, avens, cinquefoil the greater, red coleworts, balaustines, red roses, of each a handful, boil them gently in sixpounds of plantain water to three, then strain it strongly, and when itis settled, add gum tragacanth, the seeds of fleawort, marsh-mallowsand quinces, made into a mussilage by themselves in strawberry andbettony water, of each three ounces, white sugar two pounds, boil it tothe thickness of honey culpeper it is drying and healing, and therefore good for ruptures syrupus infusionis florum pæoniæ or syrup of the infusion of peony flowers college it is prepared in the same manner as syrup ofclove-gilliflowers syrupus de pæonia compositus or syrup of peony compound college take of the roots of both sorts of peony taken up at thefull moon, cut in slices, and steeped in white wine a whole day, ofeach an ounce and an half, contra yerva half an ounce, siler mountainsix drams, elk claws an ounce, rosemary with the flowers on, onehandful, bettony, hyssop, origanum, chamepitys, rue, of each threedrams, wood of aloes, cloves, cardamoms the less, of each two drams, ginger, spikenard, of each a dram, stœchas, nutmegs, of each two dramsand an half, boil them after one day warm digestion, in a sufficientquantity of distilled water of peony roots, to four pounds, in which being strained through hippocrates’ sleeve put four pounds and anhalf of white sugar, and boil it to a syrup culpeper it helps the falling-sickness, and convulsions syrupus de pomis aiterans or syrup of apples college take four pounds of the juice of sweet scented apples, thejuice of bugloss, garden and wild, of violet leaves, rose water, ofeach a pound, boil them together, and clarify them, and with six poundsof pure sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it is a fine cooling syrup for such whose stomachs areoverpressed with heat, and may safely be given in fevers, for it ratherloosens than binds. It breeds good blood, and is profitable in hecticfevers, and for such as are troubled with palpitation of the heart, itquenches thirst admirably in fevers, and stays hiccoughs you may takean ounce of it at a time in the morning, or when you need syrupus de prasio or syrup of horehound college take of white horehound fresh, two ounces, liquorice, polipodium of the oak, fennel, and smallage roots, of each half anounce, white maiden-hair, origanum, hyssop, calaminth, thyme, savory, scabious, colt-foot, of each six drams, the seeds of annis andcotton, of each three drams, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, fatfigs ten, boil them in eight pounds of hydromel till half be consumed, boil the decoction into a syrup with honey and sugar, of each twopounds, and perfume it with an ounce of the roots of orris florentine culpeper it is appropriated to the breast and lungs, and is afine cleanser to purge them from thick and putrified flegm, it helpsphthisicks and coughs, and diseases subject to old men, and coldnatures take it with a liquorice stick syrupus de quinq radicibus or syrup of the five opening roots college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, parsley, bruscus, sparagus of each two ounces, spring water, six pounds, boil away thethird writing, and make a syrup with the rest according to art, with threepounds of sugar, adding eight ounces of white wine vinegar, towards thelatter end culpeper it cleanses and opens very well, is profitable againstobstructions, provokes urine, cleanses the body of flegm, and is safelyand profitably given in the beginning of fevers an ounce at a timeupon an empty stomach is a good dose syrupus raphani or syrup of radishes college take of garden and wild radish roots, of each an ounce, the roots of white saxifrage, lovage, bruscus, eringo, rest-harrow, parsley, fennel, of each half an ounce, the leaves of bettony, burnet, pennyroyal, nettles, water-cresses, samphire, maiden-hair, of each onehandful, winter cherries, jujubes, of each ten, the seeds of bazil, bur, parsley of macedonia, hartwort, carraway, carrots, gromwell, the bark of the root of bay-tree, of each two drams, raisins of thesun stoned, liquorice, of each six drams, boil them in twelve poundsof water to eight, strain it, and with four pounds of sugar, and twopounds of honey, make it into a syrup, and perfume it with an ounce ofcinnamon, and half an ounce of nutmegs culpeper a tedious long medicine for the stone syrupus regius, alias julapium alexandrinum or julep of alexandria college boil four pounds of rose-water, and one pound of whitesugar into a julep julep of roses is made with damask rose water, inthe very same manner culpeper two fine cooling drinks in the heat of summer syrupus de rosis siccis or syrup of dried roses college make four pounds of spring water hot, in which infuse apound of dried roses, by essay at a time, press them out and with twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper syrup of dried roses, strengthens the heart, comforts thespirits, binds the body, helps fluxes, and corrosions, or gnawings ofthe bowels, it strengthens the stomach, and stays vomiting you maytake an ounce at a time, before meat, if for fluxes.

It likewise strengthens the stomachand belly, and the sinews that are loosened by sharp humours falling onthem, and restrains immoderate sweatings the muscilage taken from theseeds of quinces, and boiled in a little water, is very good to coolthe heat and heal the sore breasts of women the same, with a littlesugar, is good to lenify the harshness and hoarseness of the throat, and roughness of the tongue the cotton or down of quinces boiled andapplied to plague sores, heals them up. And laid as a plaister, madeup with wax, it brings hair to them that are bald, and keeps it fromfalling, if it be ready to shed raddish, or horse-raddish the garden raddish is so well known, that it needs no description descript the horse-raddish hath its first leaves, that rise beforewinter, about a foot and a half long, very much cut in or torn on theedges into thesis writings, of a dark green colour, with a great rib in themiddle. After these have been up a while, others follow, which aregreater, rougher, broader and longer, whole and not divided at first, but only essaywhat rougher dented about the edges. The stalks when itbears flowers which is seldom is great, rising up with essay fewlesser leaves thereon, to three or four feet high, spreading at the topthesis small branches of whitish flowers, made of four leaves a-piece;after which come small pods, like those of shepherd purse, but seldomwith any seed in them the root is great, long, white and rugged, shooting up divers heads of leaves, which may be writinged for increase, but it doth not creep in the ground, nor run above ground, and is of astrong, sharp, and bitter taste almost like mustard place it is found wild in essay places, but is chiefly planted ingardens, and joys in moist and shadowy places time it seldom flowers, but when it doth, it is in july government and virtues they are both under mars the juice ofhorse-raddish given to drink, is held to be very effectual for thescurvy it kills the worms in children, being drank, and also laid uponthe belly the root bruised and laid to the place grieved with thesciatica, joint-ache, or the hard swellings of the liver and spleen, doth wonderfully help them all the distilled water of the herb androot is more familiar to be taken with a little sugar for all thepurposes aforesaid garden raddishes are in wantonness by the gentry eaten as a sallad, butthey breed but scurvy humours in the stomach, and corrupt the blood, and then send for a physician as fast as you can. This is one causewhich makes the owners of such nice palates so unhealthful. Yet forsuch as are troubled with the gravel, stone, or stoppage of urine, theyare good physic, if the body be strong that takes them. You may makethe juice of the roots into a syrup if you please, for that use. Theypurge by urine exceedingly ragwort it is called also st james’-wort, and stagger-wort, and stammer-wort, and segrum descript the greater common ragwort hath thesis large and long, darkgreen leaves lying on the ground, very much rent and torn on thesides in thesis places. From among which rise up essaytimes but one, andessaytimes two or three square or crested blackish or brownish stalks, three or four feet high, essaytimes branched, bearing divers such-likeleaves upon them, at several distances upon the top, where it branchesforth into thesis stalks bearing yellow flowers, consisting of diversleaves, set as a pale or border, with a dark yellow thrum in themiddle, which do abide a great while, but at last are turned into down, and with the small blackish grey seed, are carried away with the wind the root is made of thesis fibres, whereby it is firmly fastened into theground, and abides thesis years there is another sort thereof differs from the former only in this, that it rises not so high. The leaves are not so finely jagged, nor ofso dark a green colour, but rather essaywhat whitish, soft and woolly, and the flowers usually paler place they grow, both of them, wild in pastures, and untilledgrounds in thesis places, and oftentimes both in one field time they flower in june and july, and the seed is ripe in august government and virtues ragwort is under the command of dame venus, and cleanses, digests, and discusses the decoction of the herb is goodto wash the mouth or throat that hath ulcers or sores therein. And forswellings, hardness, or imposthumes, for it thoroughly cleanses andheals them. As also the quinsy, and the king evil it helps to staycatarrhs, thin rheums, and defluxions from the head into the eyes, nose, or lungs the juice is found by experience to be singularly goodto heal green wounds, and to cleanse and heal all old and filthy ulcersin the privities, and in other writings of the body, as also inward woundsand ulcers. Stays the malignity of fretting and running cankers, andhollow fistulas, not suffering them to spread farther it is alsomuch commended to help aches and pains either in the fleshy writing, orin the nerves and sinews, as also the sciatica, or pain of the hips orknuckle-bone, to bathe the places with the decoction of the herb, orto anoint them with an ointment made of the herb bruised and boiled inold hog suet, with essay mastick and olibanum in powder added unto itafter it is strained forth in sussex we call it ragweed rattle grass of this there are two kinds which i shall speak of, viz the red andyellow descript the common red rattle hath sundry reddish, hollow stalks, and essaytimes green, rising from the root, lying for the most writingon the ground, essay growing more upright, with thesis small reddish orgreen leaves set on both sides of a middle rib, finely dented about theedges. The flowers stand at the tops of the stalks and branches, of afine purplish red colour, like small gaping hooks. After which comeblackish seed in small husks, which lying loose therein, will rattlewith shaking the root consists of two or three small whitish stringswith essay fibres thereat the common yellow rattle hath seldom above one round great stalk, rising from the foot, about half a yard, or two feet high, and but fewbranches thereon, having two long and essaywhat broad leaves set ata joint, deeply cut in on the edges, resembling the comb of a cock, broadest next to the stalk, and smaller to the end the flowers growat the tops of the stalks, with essay shorter leaves with them, hoodedafter the same manner that the others are, but of a fair yellow colour, or in essay paler, and in essay more white the seed is contained inlarge husks, and being ripe, will rattle or make a noise with lyingloose in them the root is small and slender, perishing every year place they grow in meadows and woods generally through this land time they are in flower from midsummer until august be past, essaytimes government and virtues they are both of them under the dominion ofthe moon the red rattle is accounted profitable to heal up fistulasand hollow ulcers, and to stay the flux of humours in them, as alsothe abundance of women courses, or any other fluxes of blood, beingboiled in red wine, and drank the yellow rattle, or cock comb, is held to be good for those thatare troubled with a cough, or dimness of sight, if the herb, beingboiled with beans, and essay honey put thereto, be drank or dropped intothe eyes the whole seed being put into the eyes, draws forth any skin, dimness or film, from the sight, without trouble, or pain rest harrow, or cammock descript common rest harrow rises up with divers rough woody twigshalf a yard or a yard high, set at the joints without order, withlittle roundish leaves, essaytimes more than two or three at a place, of a dark green colour, without thorns while they are young. Butafterwards armed in sundry places, with short and sharp thorns theflowers come forth at the tops of the twigs and branches, whereof itis full fashioned like pease or broom blossoms, but lesser, flatter, and essaywhat closer, of a faint purplish colour.

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Medical record 88:226, 1915 “alcohol and therapeutics”. Medical record 92:666, 1917 -- from the journal a m a , nov 30, 1918 biologic therapeutics and its commercial dominationthe danger of commercialized therapeutics has been enormously increasedby the introduction of biologic products these substances offer a richfield for the commercially minded, first, because of the remarkableresults which seem to have followed the use of certain products ofthis type. Second, because the field is new and the mode of actionof these substances not readily understood and, third-- and mostimportant-- because, by the very nature of the problems involved, fewphysicians are well informed concerning them the influenza epidemic oflast year was widespread and fatal in character it stimulated earnestresearch in methods of prevention and cure we were all in a frameof mind to grasp at any straw here and there essay worker would cry“eureka”-- only to be disappointed when his product was actually put tothe test however, there were more than enough manufacturers ready toplace any product on the market with specious claims that could notbe positively denied vaccines, serums, proteins-- all were advancedwith such glowing statements as to their properties that only thosephysicians who kept their feet firmly on solid ground could resistthe appeal now we have had another epidemic-- mild, it is true-- butthe memories of last year make the average physician ready to acceptanything which promises hope, and the manufacturers “make hay while thesun shines ” physicians have been and are being deluged with literatureon the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza so far as we know, fewpublications have contained any word of warning on these matters oneexception has just come to notice. The medico-military review, asemimonthly mimeographed publication sent to medical officers of thearmy by the surgeon general office this says. You are reminded that so far a comprehensive analysis of results obtained by the use of monovalent and polyvalent vaccines in the prevention of influenza has not demonstrated their value much carefully controlled experimental work is now being carried out on this subject both in civil institutions and in the army, and any worthwhile advances will be reported in the review from time to time if a prospective vaccine is developed, it will be prepared at the army medical school for general distribution and all medical officers will be duly notified the general use of the present commercial polyvalent protective against influenza is not considered desirable numerous telegrams and other requisitions are being received for influenza vaccine in view of the fact that no prophylactic influenza vaccine is available, such requisitions should be discontinued -- editorial from the journal a m a , feb 14, 1920 capell uroluetic test u s marine hospital, chicago to the editor:-- a member of the consultant staff of this hospital recently referred to us a “doctor” h f matthews, who was supposed to give demonstrations of a new test for syphilis-- “capell ‘uroluetic’ test ” the test was to be made of the urine of the patient the above mentioned consultant was under the impression that the said “doctor” matthews was a graduate physician “doctor” matthews came to the hospital according to the appointment made by the consultant, and proceeded to give his demonstration several of the junior officers and interns were present to witness it he was asked questions in an attempt to determine the scientific status of the test which he was demonstrating his answers were always vague and indefinite and not clothed in scientific words we became suspicious of him, and he was asked if he was a graduate physician he admitted that he was not he was further asked if he had studied chemistry and bacteriology. He stated that he had in 1888 inquiry was made as to where. He replied that it was at the university of illinois he was further asked if he was familiar with the wassermann reaction he stated that he was not this man is going around representing himself as a physician who has a new test which he claims is superior to, and more delicate than, the wassermann test. Yet he knows nothing whatever of the technic of the wassermann reaction in one case, we gave him the same specimen of urine in four different containers he read a different degree of reaction for each of them in other words, in a specimen from the same patient, his four different tests showed, respectively, a , a , a and a reaction it occurred to me that it might be well to inform you of this man methods, as he told us that he had been to a good thesis institutions, and i am sure he will soon start a plan to systematically force his pseudoscientific test on credulous physicians everywhere j o cobb, m d , senior surgeon in charge the propaganda dewritingment has in its files a business card reading:“capell laboratories, room 1510 masonic temple, chicago dr h f matthews, special representative ” capell laboratory has itsheadquarters in omaha, and is apparently conducted by dr w l capell, who, for thesis years, seems to have been more or less interested inproprietary medicines essay years ago he was connected with a concernknown as “acneine pharmacal company, ” which, apparently, was dissolvedessay time in 1910. And soon thereafter a new company was organizedknown as the leroy drug company in 1917 w l capell was connectedwith the capell, cameron co , inc , of lincoln, neb , which wasselling “capell uroluetic test”, “capell treatment for syphilis”and other remedies the “treatment for syphilis” was said to be “painless, pleasant, harmless, efficacious, and requires usually from 30 to 90 days only to eradicate the disease ”the name of the treatment is “mercarodin”-- earlier it was called“camit”-- and it is now being sold from “capell laboratory, ” omaha in addition, capell laboratory sells acneine, which apparently isthe same product that was sold in 1906 and 1907 under the name of“sambu-co” by the holtman-stringer co of omaha and later was put outby the acneine pharmacal company of omaha while capell laboratory sells proprietary remedies, it is the“uroluetic test” which the concern now seems to be featuring theclaims made for this are. “this test requires no expert knowledge, is inexpensive, and can be made in a few minutes, and is so plain that it cannot be mistaken ”the idea of being able to determine the absence or presence of syphilisby a simple color test of the urine is a fascinating one the presentreliable diagnostic tests are, as capell laboratory so plausiblyemphasizes, essaywhat involved, and call for rather delicate technic but there are no short-cuts to knowledge a physician who ordered capell uroluetic test essay weeks ago receivedwith the bill the letter that follows. It is given not so much for whatit says, as for how it says it it is copied verbatim et literatim. “your letter received, and we have mailed you as per your letter 1 doz of capell ‘uroluetic’ tests in close find statement and instructions, for same “the ‘uroluetic’ test is meeting a far greater approval from the medical profession than we had expected, while we do not claime that it is perfect, yet we have only received one unfavorable report, and we daily feel incuraged in its efficacy “you know doctor that there are two dangerous elements in this world, one is the extreme pessimist and the other is the extreme optimist the immoral lincoln said, ‘that there was nothing that was wholly good or wholly evil, ’ and we presume that this is equally true of the ‘uroluetic’ test but we want the truth no matter what it is ”“capell uroluetic test” would be “important if true ” unfortunately, its scientific value to the sufferer is negligible compared with itseconomic value to the exploiter it is not so much a test for luesin the patient as of credulity in the doctor -- from the journala m a , aug 23, 1919 another urinary test for syphilis to the editor:-- will you kindly inform me whether the test in the enclosed “literature” is what it is represented to be?.