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Guinea-pig 1 died about three hours after injection, and guinea-pig 2 about two hours after the injection autopsy. Both guinea-pigs showed marked congestion and a moderate degree of exudate in the peritoneum experiment 17 -- toxic and virulent action of eucalyptus -- three normal guinea-pigs were selected for the experiment, as in experiment 16 the injection was made in the pleural cavity guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c and guinea-pig 2 with 1 c c of eucalyptus oil result. Guinea-pig 1 died the following day, and guinea-pig 2 one hour after the injection experiment 18 -- toxic and irritant action of dichloramin-t, 0 5 per cent in chlorcozane -- one guinea-pig was used for each experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c and guinea-pig 2 with 1 c c of dichloramin-t peritoneally result. Both animals became restless immediately after the injection, and died twelve hours after of acute hemorrhagic peritonitis experiment 19 -- effect of chlorlyptus on staphylococcus suspended in salt solution and one of that solution injected into the peritoneum of the guinea-pig -- three guinea-pigs were used for the experiment guinea-pig 1 was injected with 0 5 c c of staphylococcus suspension as control guinea-pig 2 was given the same, and immediately after received 1 c c of chlorlyptus guinea-pig 3 was injected with the same amount, and chlorlyptus was injected twenty-four hours after injection results. Guinea-pig 1 was sick and weak with loss of appetite for essay days, but gradually recovered guinea-pig 2 died over night autopsy. There was a large amount of exudate in the peritoneal cavity, irritation of the intestine, and other signs of acute inflammation a moderate degree of congestion. Spleen not enlarged. Liver showed cloudy swelling and fibrinous exudate. Lungs and heart about normal except for a moderate degree of congestion but no exudate guinea-pig 3 was sick for essay days, but recovered gradually one week after experiment 20 -- effect of chlorlyptus in vivo on staphylococcus -- the experiment was conducted in the same way as in experiment 17, but 2 c c were used instead of 1 c c result. Guinea-pig 1 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension and died over night autopsy showed that the animal died of acute peritonitis the peritoneum showed essay fibrinous exudate and mesenteric vessels guinea-pig 2 was injected with 2 c c of staphylococcus, and eighteen hours after was injected with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the animal died two weeks after injection guinea-pig 3 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension, and twenty-four hours after with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the guinea-pig died ten days after autopsy revealed bronchopneumonia of the left lung and acute miliary abscess in the liver -- from the journal a m a , nov 27, 1920, with additions aquazone oxygen water report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryaquazone is stated by the aquazone laboratories, inc , los angeles, california, to be a supersaturated solution of oxygen in water, carrying approximately five and one-half times as much dissolved oxygenas ordinary water in an advertising booklet, it is suggested thataquazone is of value in the treatment of influenza, pneumonia, typhoid, bright disease and kindred disorders it was also stated thereinthat in the treatment of fevers it lowers the temperature, and thatthe administration of three bottles of aquazone representing 0 033gm -- 1-1/2 grain-- of oxygen is of value for “preventive and tonicpurposes ”the evidence which the aquazone laboratories submitted did not showthat the effects were other than those which might be obtained from theadministration of ordinary potable water the council declared aquazoneinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, because the therapeuticclaims made for it were unwarranted, and because its use is irrationalfor the reason that oxygen given by stomach in this way is of littleor no value -- abstracted from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1920, p 50 coagulen-ciba omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportannouncing the deletion of coagulen-ciba from new and nonofficialremedies w a puckner, secretary coagulen-ciba, a product of the society of chemical industry, basle, switzerland, was admitted to new and nonofficial remedies in 1915 it is stated to be an extract prepared from blood platelets and tocontain thromboplastic substances cytozym, thrombokinase, thrombozymmixed with lactose extensive clinical reports appeared to justify itsacceptance for new and nonofficial remedies with fibrin ferments andthromboplastic substances in 1918, dr arthur d hirschfelder reported to the council that ofa number of specimens of coagulen-ciba examined by him, failed toaccelerate the coagulation time of blood in view of dr hirschfelder findings, the therapeutic researchcommittee of the council invited dr p j hanzlik to undertake anexhaustive investigation of thromboplastic substances, the council, in the meantime temporarily retaining coagulen in new and nonofficialremedies until the investigation was completed the following report on the eligibility of coagulen-ciba was made tothe council by dr hanzlik.

Bruise theherbs, boil them in the wine, then strain them, and add the rest, andmake them into a plaister according to art culpeper it is a good plaister to unite the college homework help online skull when it iscracked, to draw out pieces of broken bones, and cover the bones withflesh. It draws filth from the bottom of deep ulcers, restores fleshlost, cleanses, digests, and drys emplastrum cæsarus college take of red roses one ounce and an half, bistort roots, cypress nuts, all the sanders, mints, coriander seeds, of each threedrams, mastich half an ounce, hypocistis, acacia, dragon blood, earthof lemnos, bole-ammoniac, red coral, of each two drams, turpentinewashed in plantain water four ounces, oil of roses three ounces, whitewax twelve ounces, per-rozin ten ounces, pitch six ounces, the juiceof plantain, houseleek, and orpine, of each an ounce, the wax, rozin, and pitch being melted together, add the turpentine and oil, then thehypocistis and acacia dissolved in the juices, at last the powders, andmake it into a plaister according to art culpeper it is of a fine, cool, binding, strengthening nature, excellently good to repel hot rheums or vapours that ascend up to thehead, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown emplastrum catagmaticum the first college take of juice of marsh-mallow roots six ounces, bark ofashtree roots, and their leaves, the roots of comfrey the greater andsmaller with their leaves, of each two ounces, myrtle berries an ounceand an half, the leaves of willow, the tops of st john wort, of eachan handful and an half, having bruised them, boil them together in redwine, and smith water, of each two pound, till half be consumed, strain it, and add oil of myrtles, and roses omphacine, of each onepound and an half, goat suet eight ounces, boil it again to theconsumption of the decoction, strain it again, and add litharge ofgold and silver, red lead, of each four ounces, yellow wax one pound, colophonia half a pound, boil it to the consistance of a plaister, thenadd turpentine two ounces, myrrh, frankincense, mastich, of each halfan ounce, bole-ammoniac, earth of lemnos, of each one ounce, stir themabout well till they be boiled, and made into an emplaister accordingto art catagmaticum the second college take of the roots of comfrey the greater, marsh-mallows, misselto of the oak, of each two ounces, plantain, chamepitys, st john wort, of each a handful, boil them in equal writings of blackwine, and smith water till half be consumed, strain it, and addmussilage of quince seeds made in tripe water, oil of mastich androses, of each four ounces, boil it to the consumption of the humidity, and having strained it, add litharge of gold four ounces, boil it tothe consistence of an emplaister, then add yellow wax four ounces, turpentine three ounces, colophonia six drams, ship pitch ten ounces, powders of balaustines, roses, myrtles, acacia, of each half an ounce, mummy, androsamum, mastich, amber, of each six drams, bole-ammoniacfine flowers, frankincense, of each twelve drams, dragon blood twoounces. Make it into a plaister according to art culpeper both this and the former are binding and drying, theformer rules will instruct you in the use emplastrum cephalicum or, a cephalic plaister college take of rozin two ounces, black pitch one ounce, labdanum, turpentine, flower of beans, and orobus, dove dung, of each half anounce, myrrh, mastich, of each one dram and an half, gum of juniper, nutmegs, of each two drams, dissolve the myrrh and labdanum in a hotmortar, and adding the rest, make it into a plaister according to art if you will have it stronger, add the powders, euphorbium, pellitory ofspain, and black pepper, of each two scruples culpeper it is proper to strengthen the brain, and repel suchvapours as annoy it, and those powders being added, it dries up thesuperfluous moisture thereof, and eases the eyes of hot scaldingvapours that annoy them emplastrum de cerussa or, a plaister of ceruss college take of ceruss in fine powder, white wax, sallad oil, ofeach three ounces, add the oil by degrees to the ceruss, and boil it bycontinual stirring over a gentle fire, till it begin to swell, then addthe wax cut small by degrees, and boil it to its just consistence culpeper it helps burns, dry scabs, and hot ulcers, and in generalwhatever sores abound with moisture emplastrum ex cicuta cum ammoniaco or, a plaister of hemlock with ammoniacum college take of the juice of hemlock four ounces, vinegar, ofsquills, and ammoniacum, of each eight ounces, dissolve the gum in thejuice and vinegar, after a due infusion, then strain it into its justconsistence according to art culpeper i suppose it was invented to mitigate the extreme pains, and allay the inflammations of wounds, for which it is very good. Letit not be applied to any principal writing emplastrum e crusta panis or, a plaister of a crust of bread college take of mastich, mints, spodium, red coral, all thesanders, of each one dram, oil of mastich and quinces, of each onedrain and an half, a crust of bread toasted, and three times steepedin red rose vinegar, and as often dried, labdanum, of each two ounces, rozin four ounces, styrax calamitis half an ounce, barley meal fivedrams. Make them into a plaister according to art culpeper i shall commend this for a good plaister to strengthenthe brain as any is in the dispensatory, the hair being shaved off, and it applied to the crown. Also being applied to the stomach, itstrengthens it, helps digestion, stays vomiting and putrefaction ofthe meat there emplastrum e cymino or, a plaister of cummin college take of cummin-seed, bayberries, yellow wax, of each onepound, per-rozin two pounds, common rozin three pounds, oil of dillhalf a pound. Mix them, and make them into a plaister culpeper it assuages swellings, takes away old aches coming ofbruises, and applied to the belly, is an excellent remedy for the windcholic this i have often proved, and always with good success emplastrum diacalciteos college take of hog grease fresh and purged from the skins twopounds, oil of olives omphacine, litharge of gold beaten and sifted, of each three pounds, white vitriol burnt and purged four ounces. Letthe litharge, grease, and oil boil together with a gentle fire, witha little plantain water, always stirring it, to the consistence of aplaister, into which being removed from the fire put in the vitrioland make it into a plaister according to art culpeper it is a very drying, binding plaister, profitable in greenwounds to hinder putrefaction, as also in pestilential sores after theyare broken, and ruptures, and also in burnings and scaldings diachylon simple college take of mussilage of linseed, fenugreek seed, marsh-mallowroots, of each one pound, old oil three pounds. Boil it to theconsumption of the mussilage, strain it, and add litharge of gold infine powder, one pound and an half. Boil them with a little water overa gentle fire always stirring them to a just thickness culpeper it is an exceeding good remedy for all swellings withoutpain, it softens hardness of the liver and spleen, it is very gentle diachylon ireatum college add one ounce of orris in powder to every pound ofdiachylon simple diachylon magnum college take of mussilage of raisins, fat figs, mastich, mallow-roots, linseeds, and fenugreek-seeds, bird-lime, the juice oforris and squills, of each twelve drams and an half, œsypus or oilof sheep feet an ounce and an half, oil of orris, chamomel, dill, of each eight ounces, litharge of gold in fine powder one pound, turpentine three ounces, per-rozin, yellow wax, of each two ounces, boil the oil with the mussilages and juices to the consumption of thehumidity, strain the oil from the faces, and by adding the lithargeboil it to its consistence. Then add the rozin and wax. Lastly, itbeing removed from the fire, add the turpentine, œsypus and birdlime, make of them a plaister by melting them according to art culpeper it dissolves hardness and inflammations diachylon magnum cum gummi college take of bdellium, sagapenum, amoniacum, of each two ounces, dissolved in wine, and added to the mass of diachylon magnum. Firstboil the gums being dissolved, to the thickness of honey culpeper this is the best to dissolve hard swellings of all thethree diachylon compositum, sive emplaistrum e mussilaginibus or, a plaister of mussilages college take of mussilages of the middle bark of elm, marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed, of each four ounces and an half, oil of chamomel, lilies, and dill, of each an ounce and an half, ammoniacum, galbanum, sagapen, opopanax, of each half an ounce, new waxtwenty ounces, turpentine two ounces, saffron two drams, dissolve thegums in wine, and make it into a plaister according to art culpeper it ripens swellings, and breaks them, and cleanses themwhen they are broken it is of a most excellent ripening nature emplaistrum diaphœnicon hot college take of yellow wax two ounces, per-rozin, pitch, of eachfour ounces, oil of roses and nard, of each one ounce, melt themtogether, and add pulp of dates made in wine four ounces, flesh ofquinces boiled in red wine an ounce, then the powders following. Takeof bread twice baked, steeped in wine and dried, two ounces, mastich anounce, frankincense wormwood, red roses, spikenard, of each two dramsand an half, wood of aloes, mace, myrrh, washed aloes, acacia, trochesof gallia moschata, and earth of lemnos, calamus aromaticus, of eachone dram, labdanum three ounces, mix them and make them into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the stomach and liver exceedingly, helpsfluxes, apply it to the places grieved diaphœnicon cold college take of wax four ounces, ship pitch five ounces, labdanumthree ounces and an half, turpentine an ounce and an half, oil of rosesone ounce, melt these, and add pulp of dates almost ripe, boiled inaustere wine four ounces, flesh of quinces in like manner boiled, breadtwice baked often steeped in red wine and dried, of each an ounce, styrax calamitis, acacia, unripe grapes, balaustines, yellow sanders, troches of terra lemnia, myrrh, wood of aloes, of each half an ounce, mastich, red roses, of each an ounce and an half, austere wine asmuch as is sufficient to dissolve the juices, make it into a plaisteraccording to art culpeper it strengthens the belly and liver, helps concoction inthose writings, and distribution of humours, stays vomiting and fluxes emplastrum divinum or, a divine plaster college take of loadstone four ounces, ammoniacum three ounces andthree drams, bdellium two ounces, galbanum, myrrh, of each ten drams, olibanum nine drams, opopanax, mastich, long birthwort, verdigris, of each an ounce, litharge, common oil, of each a pound and an half, new wax eight ounces. Let the litharge in fine powder be boiled withthe oil to a thickness, then add the wax, which being melted, take itfrom the fire, add the gums dissolved in wine and vinegar, strain it, then add the myrrh, mastich, frankincense, birthwort, and loadstone inpowder, last of all the verdigris in powder, and make it into a plasteraccording to art culpeper it is of a cleansing nature, exceeding good againstmalignant ulcers, it consumes corruption, engenders new flesh, andbrings them to a scar emplastrum epispasticum college take of mustard seed, euphorbium, long pepper, of each onedram and an half, stavesacre, pellitory of spain of each two drams, ammoniacum, galbanum, phellium, sagapen, of each three drams, wholecantharides five drams, ship pitch, rozin, yellow wax, of each sixdrams, turpentine as much as is sufficient to make it into a plaster culpeper thesis people use to draw blisters in their necks for thetooth ache, or for rheums in their eyes.

Cold, dry, binding, helpsfluxes, stops the menses, helps ulcers in the lungs. Outwardly it is aspecial herb for wounds nymphea see the flowers ocynum basil, hot and moist the best use that i know of it, is, itgives speedy deliverance to women in travail let them not take abovehalf a dram of it at a time in powder, and be sure also the birth beripe, else it causes abortion oleæ folia olive leaves. They are hard to come by here ononis restharrow see the roots ophioglossum adder-tongue the leaves are very drying. Beingboiled in oil they make a dainty green balsam for green wounds. Takeninwardly, they help inward wounds origanum origany. A kind of wild marjoram. Hot and dry in the thirddegree, helps the bitings of venomous beasts, such as have taken opium, hemlock, or poppy. Provokes urine, brings down the menses, helps oldcoughs. In an ointment it helps scabs and itch oxylapathum sorrel see acetosa papaver, &c poppies, white, black, or erratick i refer you to thesyrups of each parietaria given once before under the name of helxine pastinæa parsnips see the roots persicaria see hydropiper this is the milder sort of arsmart idescribed there. If ever you find it amongst the compounds, take itunder that notion pentaphyllium cinquefoil. Very drying, yet but meanly hot, if atall. Helps ulcers in the mouth, roughness of the wind-pipe whencecomes hoarsness and coughs, &c helps fluxes, creeping ulcers, andthe yellow jaundice. They say one leaf cures a quotidian ague, threea tertain, and four a quartan i know it will cure agues without thiscuriosity, if a wise man have the handling of it. Otherwise a cart loadwill not do it petroselinum parsley see smallage per columbinus see geranium persicarium folia peach leaves. They are a gentle, yet a completepurger of choler, and disease coming from thence. Fit for childrenbecause of their gentleness you may boil them in white wine. Ahandfull is enough at a time pilosella mouse-ear.

Inclysters they help roughness and fretting of the entrails, bladder, or fundament. And so they do being boiled in water, and the decoctiondrank, as i have proved in the bloody flux majorana see amaracus mandragora mandrakes fit for no vulgar use, but only to be used incooling ointments marrubium, album, nigrum, fœtidum marrubium album, is common horehound hot in the second degree, anddry in the third, opens the liver and spleen, cleanses the breast andlungs, helps old coughs, pains in the sides, ptisicks, or ulceration ofthe lungs, it provokes the menses, eases hard labour in child-bearing, brings away the placenta see the syrups marrubium, nigrum, et fœtidum black and stinking horehound, i taketo be all one hot and dry in the third degree. Cures the bitings ofmad dogs, wastes and consumes hard knots in the fundament and matrix, cleanses filthy ulcers marum herb mastich hot and dry in the third degree, good againstcramps and convulsions matricaria feverfew hot in the third degree, dry in the second;opens, purges. A singular remedy for diseases incident to the matrix, and other diseases incident to women, eases their travail, andinfirmities coming after it. It helps the vertigo or dissiness of thehead, melancholy sad thoughts. You may boil it either alone, or withother herbs fit for the same purpose, with which this treatise willfurnish you. Applied to the wrists, it helps the ague matrisylva the same with caprifolium meliotus melilot inwardly taken, provokes urine, breaks the stone, cleanses the reins and bladder, cutteth and cleanses the lungs oftough flegm, the juice dropped into the eyes, clears the sight, intothe ears, mitigates pain and noise there. The head bathed with thejuice mixed with vinegar, takes away the pains thereof. Outwardly inpultisses, it assuages swellings in the privities and elsewhere mellissa balm hot and dry. Outwardly mixed with salt and applied tothe neck, helps the king-evil, bitings of mad dogs, venomous beasts, and such as cannot hold their neck as they should do. Inwardly it isan excellent remedy for a cold and moist stomach, cheers the heart, refreshes the mind, takes away griefs, sorrow, and care, instead ofwhich it produces joy and mirth see the syrup galen, avicenna mentha sativa garden mints, spear mints are hot and dry in thethird degree, provoke hunger, are wholeessay for the stomach, stayvomiting, stop the menses, help sore heads in children, strengthen thestomach, cause digestion. Outwardly applied, they help the bitings ofmad-dogs. Yet they hinder conception memtha aquatica water mints. Ease pains of the belly, head-ache, andvomiting, gravel in the kidnies and stone methastrum horse-mint i know no difference between them and watermints mercurialis, mas, fœmina mercury male and female, they are both hotand dry in the second degree, cleansing, digesting, they purge wateryhumours, and further conception mezereon spurge-olive, or widdow-wail a dangerous purge, better letalone than meddled with millefolium yarrow meanly cold and binding, an healing herb forwounds, stanches bleeding. And essay say the juice snuffed up the nose, causeth it to bleed, whence it was called, nose-bleed. It stops lasks, and the menses, helps the running of the reins, helps inflammations andexcoriations of the priapus, as also inflammations of wounds galen muscus mosse is essaything cold and binding, yet usually retains asmatch of the property of the tree it grows on. Therefore that whichgrows upon oaks is very dry and binding serapio saith that it beinginfused in wine, and the wine drank, it stays vomiting and fluxes, asalso the fluor albus myrtus myrtle-tree the leaves are of a cold earthly quality, dryingand binding, good for fluxes, spitting and vomiting of blood. Stop thefluor albus and menses nardus see the root nasturtium, aquaticum, hortense water cresses, and garden-cresses garden-cresses are hot and dry in the fourth degree, good for thescurvy, sciatica, hard swellings, yet do they trouble the belly, easepains of the spleen, provoke lust dioscorides water-cresses arehot and dry, cleanse the blood, help the scurvy, provoke urine and themenses, break the stone, help the green-sickness, cause a fresh livelycolour nasturtium alhum, thlaspie treacle-mustard hot and dry in the thirddegree, purges violently, dangerous for pregnant women outwardly it isapplied with profit to the gout nicorimi tobacco it is hot and dry in the second degree, and ofa cleansing nature. The leaves warmed and applied to the head, areexcellently good in inveterate head-aches and megrims, if the diseasescome through cold or wind, change them often till the diseases be gone, help such whose necks be stiff.

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On onestupefied by liquor or narcotic poison. Or by thesis combined against oneperson paper are reported where injuries were inflicted or poison given, andthe subject was afterward hanged to avert suspicion most of thesepaper are those of murder either by strangulation or suffocation paper64, 65, 67, 68, 69, 70, 74 essaytimes hanging is accidental children and even older personsplay at hanging successfully taylor mentions the case of a boy whowitnessed a hanging and afterward tried the experiment himself toascertain the sensation, and caused his own death tardieu882 relates the case of a man, t , age 37, of small stature, feeble constitution, very thin, of sinister face, eyes hollow but lively, cunning nose and mouth, who meeting a man aged 81, learned that he had essay trouble with his leg and promised to cure him the old man lived alone t told him to buy a strong cord as thick as his little finger and one and one-half yards long, and keep the whole thing a secret t would see him at his room at 7 p m the old man became suspicious and had t arrested the investigation showed that already t had made away with three old men by hanging, who were known to be opposed to suicide their bodies showed no trace of violence two others had escaped when the cord was passed around their necks tardieu gives a number of paper of suicidal hanging which were falselyattributed to criminal violence, in which the pressure of publicopinion joined to circumstances improperly explained by inexpertphysicians caused deplorable judicial errors illustrative paper suicide 1 harvey. Indian med gaz , 1876, xi , p 2 - man, age 30 foundhanging by turban to bars of cell door.