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Richardson906 recommends artificial circulation by injection of vessels, or electric excitation. Jennings907 recommends the same. Richardson908 also considers fully the subject of artificial respiration and electrical excitation. Woillez909 has described and recommended what he calls a spirophore after the removal of a foreign body the irritation remaining may causea sensation as if the body was still lodged death may occur from hemorrhage after its removal post-mortem appearances these are mainly those of asphyxia there may also be evidences ofexternal violence, homicidal or accidental, as of pressure on thechest persistent deformity, flattening of the nose and lips, andexcoriation of these writings may result from forcible closure of mouthand nose the skin and conjunctiva usually show patches of lividity andpunctiform ecchymoses.

Rheumatism:-- proteogen no 2 -- the doctor has one case being treated with no 2 she has improved so rapidly she cannot express her pleasure, and will continue for essay time on the treatments she is a patient who was confined during the time she suffered from a rheumatic illness, and it seemed to affect her mental condition this condition is clearing up also, very much to the pleasure of both patient and doctor -- november 27, 1918 influenza:-- proteogen no 12 -- first day, temperature 102, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12. Second day, temperature 100, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12. Third day, temperature 98 8, gave 1 c c proteogen no 12, and then discharged the case as recovered -- october 31, 1918 asthma:-- proteogen no 4 -- splendid results obtained from a sample of proteogen no 4 three ampoules affected effected?. complete recovery -- october 9, 1918 cancer:-- proteogen no 1 -- mrs b pronounced recovered from cancer by dr o w a , of catlin, after having injections of proteogen no 1 for essay time -- october 4, 1918 eczema:-- proteogen no 5 -- tried no 5 on a patient with eczema, and with happy results have not done anything for him for about five months-- and he is now at his business proteogen no 5 also relieved him of constipation and what he claimed a traumatic stricture of the lower portion of sigmoid flexure he is sure pleased and recommending them to his friends proteogens -- february 17, 1919 syphilis:-- proteogen no 10 -- i am getting such excellent results with the no 10 proteogen for syphilis that i am badly in need of more, as i am treating so thesis paper please send me four dozen c o d -- october 9, 1918 enlarged prostate:-- proteogen no 1 -- have used plantex in four paper, with good results in each case one of them his father, an elderly man -- april 25, 1918 lobar pneumonia:-- proteogen no 12 -- the only case i have used proteogen no 12, was a man who had lobar pneumonia of left lung following influenza after crisis came, patient continued to have slight rise in temperature, cough, and after using 10 doses of your proteogen no 12, temperature was normal, cough very much better, patient began to take on flesh and is still improving -- december 26, 1918 tuberculosis:-- proteogen no 3 -- the doctor writes. The proteogen no 3 sent me worked wonders in my patient the case came under my care when he was too far gone for anything to benefit him a great deal, but the proteogen did for him more than anyone could have expected, yet he died leaving me with a few ampoules to try on the next patient -- september 20, 1918 gonorrheal cystitis:-- proteogen no 11 -- my patient has taken two boxes of your proteogen no 11 given for gonorrheal cystitis of probably two years’ standing and at this writing i consider her almost, if not entirely, cured which i think speaks very highly of your remedy i expect to use more of your preparations in the future -- april 12, 1919 this testimonial, either by clerical error, or because the results were considered remarkable, was repeated elsewhere in the material submitted by the merrell company acute gonorrhea:-- proteogen no 11 -- mr a e r , age 65, weight 140 pounds first attack had had no previous treatment came to me january 2, 1919 had discharge, all acute symptoms, burning, etc gave seventeen injections of proteogen no 11, also mild antiseptic urethral wash discharged on february 15, 1919, clinically cured -- april 11, 1919 epithelioma of buttock -- proteogen no 1 -- i used proteogen no 1 on an epithelioma of buttock essay six months ago with favorable results and no return of symptoms as yet -- april 13, 1919 it is obvious that the proteogen preparations are in conflict withrules 1, 6 and 10, and should not be admitted to “new and nonofficialremedies ” it is recommended that the previous action of thecouncil be allowed to stand and that publication of both reports beauthorized -- from the journal a m a , july 12, 1919 “arsenoven s s ” and “arseno-meth-hyd” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorizes publication of the following report this reportdeclares arsenoven s s of the s s products company and solution ofarsenic and mercury formerly called arseno-meth-hyd of the new yorkintravenous laboratory, inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the council takes this opportunity to repeat its warning against theabuses-- often dangerous-- to which patients are frequently subjectedwhen “intravenous therapy” is employed w a puckner, secretary because of inquiries received, the council took up the consideration ofarsenoven s s and arseno-meth-hyd now sold as solution of arsenicand mercury the preparations having been referred to a committee forconsideration, this committee reported. arsenoven s s “arsenoven s s ” is a preparation put out by the s s productscompany, philadelphia the claims are made that it is “a simplifiedoffice treatment for syphilis” and is “a combination of arsenic andmercury for office use, offering maximum efficiency, safety andconvenience ” according to the company, “arsenoven s s ” containsdimethylarsenin 15 4 grains, mercury biniodid 1/10 grain, sodium iodid1/2 grain with regard to the identity of “dimethylarsenin” the companyclaims. “this product is a compound of cacodylic acid similar tosodium cacodylate but with a more pronounced therapeutic action ” thecommittee recommends to the council that “arsenoven s s ” be declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because of unwarrantedtherapeutic claims arseno-meth-hyd“arseno-meth-hyd, ” is sold by the new york intravenous laboratory, new york city, for the treatment of syphilis it comes in threedosages, 2 gm , 1 5 gm , and 0 7 gm , respectively the claim is madethat “arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm ” contains “2 gm 31 grains of sodiumdimethylarsenate cacodylate, u s p and mercury iodid 5 mg 1/12grain” in 5 c c of solution physicians are told. “in primary and early secondary case administer arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm every sixth day and mercury oxycyanide 008 1/8 grain intravenously between each injection ” “in tertiary paper and those of long standing alternate with intravenous injection of sodium iodid 2 gm ”the following claims are made for the alleged effectiveness and safetyof the cacodylate. “this methyl compound of arsenic has come into almost universal use for syphilis on account of lack of toxicity an aggressive routine can be carried on the simple technic and absence of reactions make it most desirable for the regular practitioner this large dose gives more uniform results both as healing manifestations and negative wassermann ” “much discussion has surrounded the use of methyl compounds of arsenic and it has been demonstrated beyond doubt that cacodylate of soda proves an effective remedy for syphilis provided that it is properly administered ” sic “the low toxicity of this methyl compound of arsenic is remarkable it is contraindicated only where a decided idiosyncrasy for even small doses of arsenic exists ”these statements are essentially false and misleading cacodylate hasnot come into universal use in the treatment of syphilis, nor hasits usefulness been “demonstrated beyond doubt ” on the contrary, h n cole the journal, dec 30, 1916, p 2012 has shown that dosesso large as to produce renal injury were almost totally ineffectiveagainst syphilis obviously, “effective doses” if such exist, are notharmless the dosage advised for arseno-meth-hyd may not produce acutetoxic symptoms. Nevertheless smaller doses have produced nephriticphenomena the “arseno-meth-hyd” treatment includes the intravenousinjection of about 1/4 grain of a mercury salt although this is lessthan the usual dose about 1 grain per week, the mercury is probablymore effective than the cacodylate the committee recommends to the council that, because of theunwarranted therapeutic claims, “arseno-meth-hyd” be held inadmissibleto new and nonofficial remedies the council adopted both reports of the committee and declared“arsenoven s s ” and “solution of arsenic and mercury” “arseno-meth-hyd” inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the committee reports on these two products impel the councilagain to call attention to the undesirable and dangerous abuses towhich “intravenous therapy” lends itself there is a distinct fieldfor the intravenous administration of drugs in those paper in whichimmediate drug action is necessary, or when the medicament is likelyto be changed if absorbed through the ordinary channels unless suchindications exist, however, intravenous administration involves notonly inconvenience and expense to the patient, but what is moreimportant, unnecessary danger the fact that indiscriminate intravenousadministration is peculiarly profitable to certain manufacturing housesmakes it all the more necessary for the medical profession to be on itsguard in this matter in this connection it is well worth while to quote the closingparagraph from an editorial on “intravenous therapy” that appeared inthe journal, nov 11, 1916 it is as true today as when it appeared:“intravenous therapy will be most securely advanced if its employmentis restricted to such well defined fields as those mentioned above these fields can be satisfactorily determined only by a scientificpharmacologic study of the action of these drugs when so administeredin animals, as well as in man, under conditions in which the resultsare carefully controlled the intravenous method is an impressive one, approaching in preparation almost to that which goes with a surgicaloperation the patient is usually interested and impressed by thisnew, and, to him, mysterious method there is a psychic element in hisreaction to the injection which is not a factor in his reaction to thesame drug when given by mouth the intravenous injection of a complexmixture would appear to be writingicularly reprehensible little is known, as has been stated, of the results to be expected from intravenoustherapy, even with simple substances the use of complex mixtures willwithout doubt react against the proper use of the method ”after the report on arseno-meth-hyd had been presented to the council, a letter was received from the new york intravenous laboratoryannouncing that the preparation “arseno-meth-hyd” was now called“solution of arsenic and mercury” and expressing a desire to have itsproducts accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies inview of this letter, the committee report on “arseno-meth-hyd” andthe council protest against promiscuous intravenous therapy weresent the new york intravenous laboratory for consideration the reply of the new york intravenous laboratory contained nothingwhich permitted a revision of the preceding report the change of thename of “arseno-meth-hyd” to “solution of arsenic and mercury” meanslittle as the name still does not disclose the important fact that thearsenic is present as sodium cacodylate, nor does it tell the characterof the mercury compound the council voted that “solution of arsenicand mercury” and “arsenoven s s ” be declared inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims advanced for themare unwarranted rule 6 and because the names of these pharmaceuticalpreparations are not descriptive of their composition rule 8 in filing its reply with the council, the new york intravenouslaboratory announced that that document would be circulated to themedical profession this is of course the firm privilege the councilnotes, however, with interest, that the reply is devoted almostentirely to points which were not raised by the council and that itfails to discuss the objections which were actually made the reply constantly confuses the efficiency of cacodylate in anemiaand in syphilis the council report on “arseno-meth-hyd” does notdiscuss or even touch on the question of cacodylates in anemia itis confined to a discussion of the disappointing results obtainedwith cacodylates as such i e , without mercury in the treatmentof syphilis this attempt on the writing of the new york intravenouslaboratory to confuse the issue and to attribute to the councilan opinion that it has never stated or held is an inexcusablemisrepresentation the company in its reply said. “we believe that you have previously stated that a solution cacodylate of soda possesses no more action than so much water in other words, it was inert now you try to show that it produces renal injury ”the council has never declared that cacodylates are inert in thereport it is merely stated “that doses so large as to produce renalinjury were almost totally ineffective against syphilis ” neitherhas the council stated that cacodylate is “peculiarly dangerous ” infact the absolute toxicity of cacodylates is low but cole resultswere quoted as a caution that “effective” doses are not harmless agreat portion of the remainder of the reply is devoted to disparagingarsphenamin-- a product that is not involved in this action of thecouncil, and one about which the physician is amply informed amongst other wholly extraneous matters, the firm “reply” tried toresurrect the pepsin pancreatin controversy this also has nothingto do with the efficiency or harmlessness of sodium cacodylate inorder to dispose of the matter, however, it may be pointed out thatthe implications are entirely misleading the work which is quotedagainst the council was undertaken by the council itself, to clarifyobscurities in the older data the outcome of these new investigationsshowed the essential correctness of the deductions from the older work, namely, that pancreatin is destroyed by pepsin-hydrochloric acid dr long work to which the firm reply evidently refers, showed thatunder favorable conditions, namely, when protected by an excess ofprotein, essay trypsin may escape destruction in the stomach. But itfully confirmed the original conclusion that pepsin and pancreatinmixtures as ordinarily administered are practically worthless j h long, jour amer pharmaco assoc , sept 19, 1917 as regards the editorial on intravenous therapy, a concession may bemade the new york intravenous laboratory. Intravenous injections are nolonger quite as “impressive” as in 1916, but that does not alter thefact that they should be used only when a distinct advantage is to begained -- from the journal a m a , aug 2, 1919 hormotone and hormotone without post-pituitary report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry “hormotone, ” of the g w carnrick company, is advertised as “apluriglandular tonic for asthenic conditions ” “hormotone withoutpost-pituitary” is recommended for use “in neurasthenic conditionsassociated with high blood pressure ” these preparations are sold inthe form of tablets for oral administration the council declares thesepreparations inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because. 1their composition is semisecret rule 1. 2 the therapeutic claimsare unwarranted rule 6.

Very inferior cranial capacity, the maximum in a gorillabeing 550 cubic centimetres, while the minimum in the human species isfrom 970 with a maximum of 1, 500 to 1, 900 centimetres. A low index ofthe foramen magnum. Convexity of the squamo-parietal suture, and largerand more salient canines and incisors the volume of the endocraniumin the female gorilla, like that of the human species, is smallerthan that of the male. This difference being almost 80 c c for theanthropoid female in studying the osseous system it should be remembered that certainmodifying elements, as artificial compression, pathologicaldeformities, posthumous distortions, and hygrometric conditions, mayaffect writingicularly the skull, and if due allowance be not made forthese the study may lead to glaring absurdities not longer ago than1725 there was found in a quarry at œningen the skull of a fossilbatrachian compressed into rude resemblance to the human cranium, whichwas announced to the world as scheuchzer “homo diluvii testis ettheoscopos, ” and as the remains of one of the sinful antediluvians whoperished in the noachic deluge are the bones old or recent?. An important point may arise in questions of identification of bones asto the oldness. Whether they are old or recent the first indicationis furnished by the presence or by the absence of the soft writings the existence of the periosteum and of the spinal marrow is the mostpersistent proof of a recent state. But these alone with the soft writingsare usually destroyed in two or three years in ordinary circumstancesa body becomes skeletonized in about ten years, although in exceptionalpaper the cadaver may resist decomposition after thesis years 571this summer in transferring an old cemetery in georgetown, d c , theremains of the grandmother of one of the writer patients were foundin such a state of preservation as to be easily recognized after fiftyyears of burial more recently, in unearthing the remains of an oldgraveyard in east washington, a striking peculiarity was noticed in thefact that thesis bodies of young people buried in recent years when takenup consisted of a few blackened bones and shreds of grave-clothes while the remains of thesis older people buried long before the civil warwere found in an excellent state of preservation one of these was amr fullin, who died from the effects of a sunstroke forty years agoand was buried in a metallic case an old lady who attended his funeralwas present when his remains were unearthed and said they looked asnatural as when he was laid away in 1852 the features were wellpreserved and even the white linen of the shroud was unsoiled alterations in the texture of the bone, such as that caused bydryness and by diminution in the proportion of organic matter, may beascertained by histological examination, and one of the characters ofage may be furnished by taking into consideration the specific weight placing the skull at an average density of 1, 649, that of an infantwould be 1, 515, an adult 1, 726, and that of old age 1, 636 ascertaining the proportion of organic and inorganic matter, thephosphates and carbonates, by chemical means may furnish an additionalhelp in the interpretation of the remains with all these diagnostic methods it may still be impossible toestablish identity either absolute or relative, even where a wholeskeleton is in question the evidence may, however, be of greatjuridical use to the accused, as in the case of van solen, tried forthe murder of dr henry harcourt, where the collective facts pointed tothe identification of a body dead two years the jury, however, after asecond trial, were instructed to acquit unless they were certain thatthe remains were harcourt they acquitted, as no one decided andapparent feature was known to have existed by which the remains couldbe identified beyond a doubt 572identity in case of entire skeleton or in case of isolated bones where an entire human skeleton has been discovered, the objects ofinquiry here, as in the case of fragments or remains, are to establishthe identity of the victim and that of the author of the act, and tocollect all available information relative to the nature of the deathand to the diverse circumstances attending the commission of the deed in gathering evidence from the examination of the skeleton or ofisolated bones, with a view to find out the probable cause of deathof the person of whom they form a writing, a great variety of questionswill arise for consideration, such as those relating to race, stature, age, sex, and trade or occupation. The exterior signs furnished bydentition. The traces of congenital peculiarity or of injury, and thesigns of disease either hereditary or acquired determination of race the question of race in connection with the subject of identificationis of more than usual importance in the united states, owing to ourmotley population, composed as it is of aboriginal americans, chinamen, negroes, and of europeans and their descendants i well remember thefirst human bones that i saw exhumed they were discovered in diggingthe foundation of a building near a kitchen-midden on one of thetributaries of the chesapeake bay the apparent oldness of the bonesand the finding of stone arrow-heads, tomahawks, and fragments ofaboriginal pottery in the immediate vicinity were additional accessoryfacts that strengthened the presumption of the bones being those of achoptank indian roughly speaking, there is not much trouble in recognizing theplatycnemic tibiæ of the mound-builder, the skull of a flathead indian, an inca skull, a negro skull, or even the skull peculiar to the lowerorder of irish in thesis very old skulls a considerable portion of hair is often foundattached this of course may lend assistance in the matter of raceidentity a few years since i undertook at the smithsonian institutiona series of micro-photographs of the structure and arrangement of hair, with a view to race classification as suggested by professor huxley various specimens of hair from the yellow races were compared withthat of fair and of blue-eyed persons, with the hair of negroes, withreindeer hair, and with the hair-like appendage found on the fringyextremity of the baleen plates in the mouth of a “bowhead” whale theexperiments, though far from satisfactory, were sufficiently conclusiveto enable one to recognize approximately the horse-like hair of essay ofthe yellow races, that of the negro, and that of a blond caucasian beyond the forementioned characteristics, the task of race recognitionfrom observation of the skull is one of great difficulty and perplexitywith illusory results a considerable experience of several years withthe large collection of skulls in the army medical museum enables me tospeak advisedly on this point 573although the technical procedures of craniometry require specialmeasurements and employ an arsenal of special instruments, the resultsare far from conclusive as regards the determination of human types time and space do not permit the mention even in epitome of thevarious methods most relied upon by trained craniologists among theoldest operations of cephalometry, as well as the most incomplete, is the measurement of the so-called facial angle, which is employedto distinguish the skull of a lower order of animal from that of thenegro and the white man this angle, acute in the skulls of the loweranimals, approaches a right angle as we ascend the zoological scale;being from 30° to 65° in the various apes. 75° in the mongolian. About70° in the negro, and between 80° and 90° for whites the prognathous projecting jaws of the negro cranium are distinctive, as well asthe shape of the nasal opening, which in the black is an equilateraltriangle, while it is isosceles in the white the books usually speakof the eskimo skull as pyramidal, which in point of fact is not true inspection and examination of a large collection of eskimo craniahas changed and greatly modified essay of the previous notions of theconventional eskimo skull from more than one hundred, collected in thevicinity of bering strait, 574 i find that the skulls present veryconsiderable variations among themselves. Essay being brachycephalic, others dolichocephalic in thesis the facial angle is 80°, and inone instance 84°, which exceeds that observed by me in thesis germanskulls nor is the prominence of the zygomatic arches such a constantdifference in the configuration as to justify one in speaking of theskull as pyramidal on the contrary, in thesis of the specimens linesdrawn from the most projecting writing of the zygomatic arch and touchingthe sides of the frontal bone, instead of forming a triangle on beingelongated, might, like the asymptotes of a parabola, be extended toinfinity and never meet the index of the foramen magnum in theseskulls is about the same as that of european crania the internalcapacity shows marked difference, the cubic contents of the endocraniumaveraging that of the french or germans as essay modern writers lay great stress on the measurement of thecranial capacity, not only as an aid to race identification, but as anadjunct in the study of the criminal and insane classes, it may not beamiss to give the salient facts relative thereto it is admitted that the cranial capacity may vary with the intellectualstate, hydrocephalic skulls, of course, being excluded microcephalicadults give a figure inferior to that of gorillas, essay being as lowas 419 c c andaman islanders and autochthonous australians appear, inrespect to cranial capacity, to be most badly off the capacity of anandaman has been found as low as 1, 094 c c. While that of australians autochthonous and of essay american tribes show an average capacityof 1, 224 c c in the normal as well as in their deformed crania thecranial capacity increases in the yellow races and attains its maximumin the white races in the middle european race 1, 500 c c may beaccepted as the average. 1, 750 c c is the maximum, and anything aboveis macrocephalic. While the minimum is 1, 206 c c , which is rather toolow than too high according to topinard nomenclature of the cranialcapacity, macrocephalic in the adult european male are those havinga capacity of 1, 950 c c and above. A large skull is one of 1, 950 to1, 650 c c. Average or ordinary, 1, 650 to 1, 450 c c.

Further studies on theinfluence of the ductless glands on the pancreas, arch int med , may, 1910, p 466 digestive disturbances -- secretin for digestive disturbance was firstused chemistry homework help websites in the “acid duodenal medication” of enriquez 75 this consistedin the giving of tartaric acid in thick keratin capsules, the acid notbeing liberated until the duodenum was reached, where it provoked theformation of secretin “the secretin mechanism, ” he says, “is probablycapable of pathologic disturbance as would result, for example, withdiminished acidity of chyme, disturbance of the normal motility ofthe stomach or pylorus, or diminished prosecretin in the mucosa sucha condition would produce disturbance of the pancreatic, biliary andintestinal secretions, and interfere with intestinal movements, witha clinical syndrome of intestinal dyspepsia as a result, among thechief and most constant symptoms of which would be constipation ”“the acid duodenal medication” was submitted to wide clinical use, and very favorable results in certain obstinate paper of constipationwere reported in regard to “diminished prosecretin in the mucosa, ”wentworth76 has claimed that in infantile atrophy such is thecondition, but sweet and pemberton77 have found that the difficultyof preparing secretin from human duodenums is such as to renderwentworth findings inconclusive 75 enriquez. Bull du lab de biol appliq 2, no 2-no 8, 1904 76 wentworth, a h. The cause of infantile atrophy, j a m a , july 20, 1907, p 204 77 sweet, j e , and pemberton, ralph. Experimental observations onsecretin, arch int med , february, 1908, p 231 beveridge78 suggests the use of secretin in a pyloric stenosis, b pancreatic insufficiency, c hepatic stimulation and cirrhosisof the liver d to stimulate peristalsis in colonic stasis, e ingastro-enterostomy and short-circuiting of the intestines he claimsto have used it in over a hundred paper with “brilliant results, ”and cites four typical histories the g w carnrick company, whichmanufactures “secretogen, ” an alleged secretin preparation, cites anumber of authorities79 as also recommending secretin for digestivedisorders harrower, who is or was connected with the carnrick company, in clinical journals80 has ardently advocated the use of secretin fora large number of maladies 78 beveridge. Am med 20:255, 1914 79 lockwood, g r. Diseases of stomach, 1913, chapter on achylia bassler, anthony. Am jour gastro-enter , 1914. Kemp, r c. Diseasesof stomach, intestine and pancreas, 1912 reed, boardman. Am jour gastro-enter , october, 1912 ewald therapie der gegenwart, 1915, p 5 reports favorable results with secretogen in one of thirteenpaper 80 harrower.

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Also all chemistry homework help websites running scabs and manginess are healedby the powder of the dried root, or the juice thereof, but especiallyby the fine white hardened juice the distilled water of the rootworks the same effects, but more weakly. The root bruised and appliedof itself to any place where the bones are broken, helps to draw themforth, as also splinters and thorns in the flesh. And being appliedwith a little wine mixed therewith, it breaks boils, and helps whitlowson the joints - for all these latter, beginning at sores, cancers, &c apply it outwardly, mixing it with a little hog grease, or otherconvenient ointment as for the former diseases where it must be taken inwardly, it purgesvery violently, and needs an abler hand to correct it than most countrypeople have brook lime, or water-pimpernel descript this sends forth from a creeping root that shoots forthstrings at every joint, as it runs, divers and sundry green stalks, round and sappy with essay branches on them, essaywhat broad, round, deepgreen, and thick leaves set by couples thereon.