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Andalso good to stay all hot defluctions or sharp and salt rheums in theeyes, the cheapest essays to buy online juice being dropped into them, or into the ears it helpsalso other fluxes of humours in the bowels, and the immoderate coursesof women it cools and restrains all other hot inflammations, st anthony fire, scaldings and burnings, the shingles, fretting ulcers, cankers, tettors, ringworms, and the like. And much eases the painsof the gout proceeding from any hot cause the juice also takes awayworts and corns in the hands or feet, being often bathed therewith, andthe skin and leaves being laid on them afterwards it eases also thehead-ache, and distempered heat of the brain in frenzies, or throughwant of sleep, being applied to the temples and forehead the leavesbruised and laid upon the crown or seam of the head, stays bleeding atthe nose very quickly the distilled water of the herb is profitablefor all the purposes aforesaid the leaves being gently rubbed on anyplace stung with nettles or bees, doth quickly take away the pain hound tongue descript the great ordinary hound tongue has thesis long andessaywhat narrow, soft, hairy, darkish green leaves, lying on theground, essaywhat like unto bugloss leaves, from among which rises upa rough hairy stalk about two feet high, with essay smaller leavesthereon, and branched at the tops into divers writings, with a small leafat the foot of every branch, which is essaywhat long, with thesis flowersset along the same, which branch is crooked or turned inwards beforeit flowers, and opens by degrees as the flowers blow, which consistof small purplish red leaves of a dead colour, rising out of the huskswherein they stand with essay threads in the middle it has essaytimes awhite flower after the flowers are past, there comes rough flat seed, with a small pointle in the middle, easily cleaving to any garment thatit touches, and not so easily pulled off again the root is black, thick, and long, hard to break, and full of clammy juice, smellingessaywhat strong, of an evil scent, as the leaves also do place it grows in moist places of this land, in waste grounds, anduntilled places, by highway sides, lanes, and hedge-sides time it flowers about may or june, and the seed is ripe shortlyafter government and virtues it is a plant under the dominion of mercury the root is very effectually used in pills, as well as the decoction, or otherwise, to stay all sharp and thin defluxions of rheum from thehead into the eyes or nose, or upon the stomach or lungs, as alsofor coughs and shortness of breath the leaves boiled in wine saithdioscorides, but others do rather appoint it to be made with water, andadd thereto oil and salt molifies or opens the belly downwards italso helps to cure the biting of a mad dog, essay of the leaves beingalso applied to the wound. The leaves bruised, or the juice of themboiled in hog lard, and applied, helps falling away of the hair, which comes of hot and sharp humours.

“by reason of its unusual potency and relative harmlessness, hydropsin may be employed to great advantage in all paper where it is desirable to increase the volume of urine without injury to the renal structures ”on the basis of the claimed composition, the action of hydropsinmust be essentially that of digitalis or of digitalis and squill consequently, if it possesses “unusual potency, ” it cannot possess“relative harmlessness, ” and vice versa neither digitalis norsquill should be employed “in all paper” of nephritis, even if it is“desirable to cheapest essays to buy online increase the volume of urine ”the composition claimed for hydropsin brands it as an irrationalmixture in which potent drugs are combined with, and more or lesscovered up by, others that are obsolete and inefficient the name, instead of indicating its composition, suggests diseases in which itmay be thoughtlessly and indiscriminately used the claim that thedanger of toxic or cumulative action has been removed, if accepted byphysicians, tends to uncritical use with possible disastrous results hydropsin is ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies because ofconflict with rules 1, 2, 6, 8 and 10 -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 digitalysatum report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has adopted the following report and authorized itspublication w a puckner, secretary digitalysatum is sold in the united states by ernst bischoff company, inc , new york the firm claims that it is a dialysate prepared fromthe juice of freshly gathered digitalis, containing all the activeprinciples, and representing the fresh plant weight for weight it issaid to be standardized physiologically and to contain 12 per cent alcohol sterisol-digitalysatum, intended for injection, appearsto be the “dialysate” without alcohol, diluted with equal writings ofphysiologic sodium chlorid solution the council essay years ago foundboth products ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies becauseof unwarranted therapeutic claims the preparations are still beingadvertised to physicians under claims which imply superiority to allother digitalis preparations for instance. “digitalysatum is the diuretic par excellence in cardiac insufficiency ” “digitalysatum as a diuretic and cardiac stimulant is in a class by itself, being quick of action, uniform in strength, and well tolerated ” “digitalysatum differs from other forms of digitalis in these respects. Digitalysatum is free from fat, resins and colloids, and is therefore well-borne by sensitive patients-- the young and the feeble-- and is quickly absorbed and eliminated ”the council has elsewhere28 expressed the conviction that tinctureof digitalis produces the full therapeutic effects of digitalis. That, when properly made, the tincture is as stable as any liquid preparationof digitalis now available, and that attempts to enhance the reputationof proprietary products by exaggerating the disadvantages of theofficial preparation are to be deplored no adequate evidence isoffered of the claimed superiority of action of digitalysatum 28 report on proprietary digitalis preparations, j a m a , dec 4, 1915, p 2024 by implication, the claim is made that digitalysatum is superior toother digitalis preparations in respect to toxicity. “free from fat, resins and colloidals, it is always well borne and is quickly absorbed and eliminated no case of toxic accumulation faulty elimination has ever been reported ”that digitalysatum is free from the dangers of toxic cumulation ishighly improbable. In fact, it is inconsistent with the statementthat the preparation contains all the constituents found in the freshplant even if instances of cumulative action have not been reportedthis does not prove that such cumulative action does not occur thetincture of digitalis has the systemic side-effects of digitalis in nogreater degree than the various proprietary preparations attempts tocreate the impression that digitalysatum possesses all the virtues ofdigitalis without its chief disadvantage are to be condemned as likelyto lead to incautious use of the preparation these exaggerated claims are in the main made indirectly, but they arenone the less inimical to sound therapy the council therefore declareddigitalysatum ineligible for new and nonofficial remedies and votedthat this report be published -- from the journal a m a , jan 8, 1916 so-called secretin preparations report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorized the following report for publication, and votedto endorse the work of professor carlson discussed therein w a puckner, secretary the council has not accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficialremedies any preparations said to contain secretin or prosecretin astheir active ingredient a report giving the reasons for the rejectionof one the first of the so-called secretin preparations marketed waspublished early last year;29 an article on secretin, based on workundertaken at the request of the council on pharmacy and chemistry, isnow published 3029 secretogen, j a m a , may 1, 1915, p 1518 30 carlson, a j. Lebensohn, j e , and pearlmann, s j. Hassecretin a therapeutic value?. j a m a 66:178 jan 15 1916 lest the appearance of this detailed study of secretin, after therejection of so-called secretin preparations, should be interpreted as manufacturers whose products have been rejected have endeavored tointerpret such action as a case of first condemning a preparation andthen getting the facts, the council methods, and their applicationin this case, may be briefly stated the council maintains that, when a manufacturer places a product on the market, the burden ofproof is on that manufacturer to show that the properties of hisproduct are in accordance with his claims for it as stated in theintroduction to n n r , “it is manifestly impossible for thecouncil to investigate the composition of every complex pharmaceuticalmixture, or to check thoroughly every therapeutic claim. It can giveonly an unbiased judgment on the available evidence ” acting on thisprinciple, the council examined the claims made for secretogen, analleged secretin product manufactured by the g w carnrick company the conclusion was that these claims were in absolute conflict with theavailable evidence as to the action of secretin it is not necessary to review this subject again it will suffice tostate that the claims made for secretogen rest on two fundamentalpropositions. 1 that deficiency of secretin or, rather, ofprosecretin in the intestinal mucosa is a factor in gastro-intestinaldiseases. 2 that secretin given by the mouth is absorbed and producesincreased secretion of the pancreatic and intestinal juices and of thebile from an examination of the evidence available, including thatsubmitted by the manufacturers, the council concluded. “1 no evidencehas been presented that the absence of secretin is a cause ofgastro-intestinal disease 2 there is no evidence that secretin inany form is physiologically active when administered by mouth ” thatthese conclusions were justified is shown again by the review givenby carlson of the literature, much of which was also reviewed in thecouncil previous report since the claims of the carnrick company were not supported by anysatisfactory evidence, no further investigation on the council writingwas necessary to warrant rejection of the product the council didnot undertake to determine, for instance, whether or not secretogenand similar products actually contain secretin.

If not, i hold sugarto be better than honey 5 it is kept in pots, and may be kept a year and longer 6 it is excellent for roughness of the wind-pipe, inflammations andulcers of the lungs, difficulty of breathing, asthmas, coughs, anddistillation of humours chapter x of ointments 1 various are the ways of making ointments, which authors have leftto posterity, which i shall omit, and quote one which is easiest tobe made, and therefore most beneficial to people that are ignorant inphysic, for whose sake i write this it is thus done:bruise those herbs, flowers, or roots, you will make an ointment of, and to two handfuls of your bruised herbs add a pound of hog greasedried, or cleansed from the skins, beat them very well together in astone mortar with a wooden pestle, then put it into a stone pot, theherb and grease i mean, not the mortar, cover it with a paper and setit either in the sun, or essay other warm place. Three, four, or fivedays, that it may melt. Then take it out and boil it a little. Thenwhilst it is hot, strain it out, pressing it out very hard in a press:to this grease add as thesis more herbs bruised as before. Let them standin like manner as long, then boil them as you did the former. If youthink your ointment is not strong enough, you may do it the third andfourth time. Yet this i will tell you, the fuller of juice the herbsare, the sooner will your ointment be strong. The last time you boilit, boil it so long till your herbs be crisp, and the juice consumed, then strain it pressing it hard in a press, and to every pound ofointment add two ounces of turpentine, and as much wax, because greaseis offensive to wounds, as well as oil 2 ointments are vulgarly known to be kept in pots, and will last abovea year, essay above two years chapter xi of plaisters 1 the greeks made their plaisters of divers simples, and put metalsinto the most of them, if not all. For having reduced their metals intopowder, they mixed them with that fatty substance whereof the rest ofthe plaister consisted, whilst it was thus hot, continually stirringit up and down, lest it should sink to the bottom. So they continuallystirred it till it was stiff. Then they made it up in rolls, which whenthey needed for use, they could melt by the fire again 2 the arabians made up theirs with oil and fat, which needed not solong boiling 3 the greeks emplaisters consisted of these ingredients, metals, stones, divers sorts of earth, feces, juices, liquors, seeds, roots, herbs, excrements of creatures, wax, rosin, gums chapter xii of poultices 1 poultices are those kind of things which the latins callcataplasmata, and our learned fellows, that if they can read english, that all, call them cataplasms, because ’tis a crabbed word fewunderstand. It is indeed a very fine kind of medicine to ripen sores 2 they are made of herbs and roots, fitted for the disease, andmembers afflicted, being chopped small, and boiled in water almost toa jelly. Then by adding a little barleymeal, or meal of lupins, and alittle oil, or rough sweet suet, which i hold to be better, spread upona cloth and apply to the grieved places 3 their use is to ease pain, to break sores, to cool inflammations, to dissolve hardness, to ease the spleen, to concoct humours, anddissipate swellings 4 i beseech you take this caution along with you. Use no poultices ifyou can help it that are of an healing nature, before you have firstcleansed the body, because they are subject to draw the humours to themfrom every writing of the body chapter xiii of troches 1 the latins call them placentula, or little cakes, and the greeksprochikois, kukliscoi, and artiscoi. They are usually littleround flat cakes, or you may make them square if you will 2 their first invention was, that powders being so kept might resistthe intermission of air, and so endure pure the longer 3 besides, they are easier carried in the pockets of such as travel;as thesis a man for example is forced to travel whose stomach is toocold, or at least not so hot as it should be, which is most proper, for the stomach is never cold till a man be dead.

Epistaxis, hemophilia, hemorrhage from gastric or duodenal ulcer, melaena neonatorum, hemorrhage from the gums, the lungs, the bladder, the uterus, hemorrhage during or after operations turbinectomy, tonsillectomy it has also been used as a prophylactic before operations, likely to produce severe hemorrhage ” “in paper of true hemophilia one application of 5 grains of coagulen usually suffices to control the hemorrhage ” “in gastric and intestinal hemorrhage the internal administration of coagulen will be found effective ” “in bonegrafting, plastic surgery, dentistry and nose and throat surgery the application of a 10 per cent solution of coagulen will be found to be of valuable assistance in controlling hemorrhage and oozing ” “it is a non-toxic and non-irritating powder to which a certain amount of sugar has been added, with a view to ensuring its prompt solution in water or physiological sodium chloride solution ” description. “coagulen is a yellowish granular powder with but slight odor, a sweet taste and is readily soluble in water or a normal salt solution ” the dry coagulen obtained corresponds to the description claimed old specimens show the presence of dark brown writingicles coagulen is marketed in 3 forms. 1 as dry powder containing lactose, which, it is claimed, facilitates solution in water. 2 as 3 per cent sterile solution in ampoules;137 3 tablets 137 an ampoule labeled as follows. “coagulen-ciba, 20 c c in sterile solution ready for use to be shaken importé de suisse op no 968” was found to measure only 15 c c another ampoule with the same label and op no 9641 contained considerable sediment methods of study. The alleged thromboplastic activity was tested by the method of howell and a modification of this method by fenger as described in “new and nonofficial remedies ” in the howell method dog or cat blood is used, while beef blood at body temperature is used in fenger method in other respects the methods are essentially the same briefly these consist of noting the acceleration of coagulation time in a mixture of equal writings of serum and the thromboplastic agent to which about an equal writing of oxalate plasma is added under these conditions cephalin causes clotting in about 1 minute or even less as compared with 20 to 30 minutes or more of the control the effects were compared with freshly prepared cephalin and other thromboplastic agents, using saline 0 9 per cent nacl as control the effect of different concentrations was also studied the literature of the manufacturers claims that coagulen is harmless this was tested by making intravenous and subcutaneous injections into guinea-pigs, using saline and cephalin as controls bloods of 4 different species were used, namely, cat, dog, beef and human dog peptonized blood and plasma were also tried the 15 different tests that were made in vitro were carried out with 3 different samples of fresh dry coagulen from manufacturer, 2 old samples one from council on pharmacy and chemistry and one of our own, 3 fresh specimens of sterile solution in ampoules from manufacturer, one old specimen and 4 small ampoules council on pharmacy and chemistry the tablets were not tested since these are made from dry coagulen and the results would hardly be expected to show anything different results. The results obtained may be briefly summarized as follows. 1 0 1 per cent to 5 per cent coagulen did not accelerate the coagulation time of blood and oxalate plasmas in the majority of tests any more than the controls of saline, while 0 1 per cent cephalin was found to shorten the coagulation time from 1/3 to 1/2 2 there was no difference between the behavior of old and fresh specimens 3 no acceleration of coagulation in vitro was observed even with the highest concentrations tried, namely 25 and 50 per cent 4 irrigations made with fresh dry coagulen in solution and sterile solution in ampoules on superficial bleeding from the foot-pads of 3 normal and peptonized dogs and local application to hemorrhages from dissected femoral arteries and bone and liver wounds of 3 dogs showed that coagulen was no more active than normal saline toxicity. Subcutaneous and intravenous injections of different doses of coagulen solutions fresh ampoules and dry coagulen in solution in 8 guinea-pigs produced definite anaphylactoid symptoms with injury to the circulatory and respiratory systems as indicated by cardiac dilatation, abdominal congestion and pulmonary hemorrhages, congestion, distention and essaytimes thrombi on the other hand, the control animals injected with saline and cephalin remained practically unharmed conclusions. The results obtained justify the following conclusions. 1 coagulen is entirely inactive as a thromboplastic and hemostatic agent 2 coagulen is distinctly injurious when injected systemically 3 the claims of hemostatic efficiency and harmlessness for coagulen by the manufacturer appear exaggerated and unjustified recommendations. Because of its uncertain composition, the possible dangers when injected systemically, and its inactivity as a thromboplastic and hemostatic agent when tested by several different methods, coagulen merits no recognition as a therapeutic agent for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies the detail evidences used as the basis of this brief report concerning coagulen will be published shortly in the journal of pharmacology, 138 together with the results with other thromboplastic agents 138 since the report was sent to the manufacturers, the resultshave been published hanzlik, p j , and weidenthal, c m , plasmaand blood clotting efficiency of thromboplastic agents in vitro andtheir stability, j pharmacol and exper therap 14:157 october1919.

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Bull soc chem , 17 1915, 401 “studies of the decomposition of aspirin determined by titrametricmethods and by conductivity measurements indicate that the reaction isexceedingly complex, ” t and h chem abs , 10, 591 discussionawriting from the proposed revision of the standards for the meltingpoint and limit of salicylic acid in acetylsalicylic acid, theexamination shows that there is no appreciable difference between thevarious brands of acetylsalicylic acid examined, all of them with oneexception acetylsalicylic acid, millikin, 5-grain capsules, purchasedon the open market complying with the tests described in this paper the journal of the american medical association, in past years, hasprotested repeatedly against the monopoly given to the bayer companyfor their “aspirin, ” contending that acetylsalicylic acid aspirinwas not new, and that “aspirin, bayer” was simply a good brand ofacetylsalicylic acid which could be bought in foreign countries atmuch lower prices than here although the patent in the united stateshas expired, “aspirin, bayer” is still being retailed at higher pricesthan other products which are now enjoying the privilege of americanmanufacture mr paul bakewell, 211 in an opinion answering the warning circular ofthe bayer co in reference to the use of the word “aspirin” by firmsother than bayer, argues very ably that acetylsalicylic acid, beforethe patent was granted, meant the impure substance which was not usedtherapeutically, while “aspirin” was designated as the improved product a new article of manufacture, the writingicular acetylsalicylic acid madeunder the hoffman patent and “is the substance now known in pharmacyas aspirin” statement made by an officer of the farbenfabriken ofelberfeld co in u s circuit court, 1909 the products reportedin this paper are with the one exception the same as described inthe hoffman patent, and, in the sense of mr bakewell argument, are“aspirin ” however, it would seem better if the name acetylsalicylicacid, instead of aspirin, were used, especially by physicians intheir prescriptions because 1 it is a generic, scientific name. 2“aspirin, bayer” is sold at higher prices than other products, whereaschemically equivalent products sold under the descriptive name may bepurchased at a lower price finally, the manufacture of acetylsalicylicacid in this country is another example of the fact that americanchemists can produce the drug synthetics, and at the same time makeproducts as good as, if not better than, those of german origin 211 “in the matter of aspirin answer to the warning circular of thebayer co of june 1, 1917, ” by mr paul bakewell, monsanto chemicalworks i express my appreciation to dr w a puckner for his kindinterest -- from the journal of industrial and engineering chemistry, april, 1918 the standardization of commercial bismuth tribromphenate william rabak, ph g , sc b this work was begun in view of a request received by the council onpharmacy and chemistry from the medical section of the council ofnational defense for a report on the quality of bismuth tribromphenate, offered to the government by a certain firm in submitting a specimen of its product, “bismuth tribromphenolate, ”the firm claimed that “it is of high character, matching exactly thegerman product formerly imported into this country, ” and expressed thebelief that it would be found to conform to the standards for thispreparation in new and nonofficial remedies later a second specimenwas received from the same company, with the request that this besubstituted for that first received it was explained that the firsthad been taken from an experimental lot, and that the second, takenfrom the regular factory output, was identical with the first exceptthat it was free from odor because of the more thorough washing towhich it had been subjected accordingly, the examination which isreported below refers to the second specimen only new and nonofficial remedies, 1918, defines bismuth tribromphenate asbasis bismuth tribromphenate having the formula bi c₆h₂br₃o₂oh bi₂o₃, and it is required to yield not less than 49 5 per cent of bismuthoxid the chemical formula requires 46 2 per cent bismuth, or 51 6per cent bismuth oxid, bi₂o₃, and 49 2 per cent tribromphenate, c₆h₂br₃ oh it describes it as a “fine, yellow, nearly odorless andtasteless powder, neutral in reaction, ” and “only slightly soluble inwater, alcohol, chloroform, liquid petrolatum and vegetable oils ” itis required to yield tribromphenol to which a melting point of 95 c is assigned when decomposed by alkali and the alkali tribromphenatedecomposed by acid, the separated tribromphenol purified and dried as the new and nonofficial remedies description appeared looselydrawn-- it had been based on information furnished for the productxeroform when this, because of patent protection, was the only bismuthtribromphenate on the market-- it was decided to include in theexamination also specimens of the two brands of bismuth tribromphenateincluded in new and nonofficial remedies, namely, bismuthtribromphenate-merck merck and company and xeroform-heyden theheyden chemical works the merck specimen had been received by thecouncil from merck and company in 1915, while the heyden preparationwas obtained direct from the firm chicago branch in april, 1918 atthis time bismuth tribromphenate-merck could not be obtained from thechicago wholesale houses all three specimens were nearly odorless two of the specimens theresearch council specimen and merck products were of a lemon-yellowcolor, while the heyden preparation was of a grayish color bismuth determinationfour methods for the determination of the bismuth content of thespecimens were tried. A direct ignition to bismuth oxid -- this method was abandonedbecause of the tendency to ignite suddenly during the incineration andthe consequent loss of material b the method of the japanese pharmacopeia, third revised edition, translated by the pharmaceutical society of japan -- the methodconsists in treatment of the product with nitric acid, evaporation andsubsequent heating to bismuth oxid this method also was abandonedbecause of tendency toward sudden ignition with loss of material c the method of kollo apotheker zeitung, 1910, p 99 -- themethod consists in decomposition of the product by heating on waterbath with normal sodium hydroxid solution, with formation of solublesodium tribromphenate and insoluble bismuth hydroxid the bismuthhydroxid is collected on a filter, washed with hot water until a fewdrops of the filtrate no longer turn litmus paper blue, dried andheated to constant weight and weighed as bismuth oxid d a m a method reports a m a chem lab , 1911, p 18 -- this method consists in dissolving the product in hot, stronghydrochloric acid, diluting, filtering and precipitating by saturationwith hydrogen sulphid the bismuth sulphid obtained is dissolved innitric acid and from the solution obtained the bismuth is precipitatedby addition of an excess of ammonium hydroxid and ammonium carbonate the precipitate is collected and converted to bismuth oxid by heat the following tabulation shows the results obtained by methods “c” and“d”:table 1 -- bismuth content of bismuth tribromphenate gm of gm of per cent method salt bi₂o₃ of bi₂o₃ no 1 research council spec c 2 1312 1 1754 55 1 no 1 research council spec d 0 5151 0 2772 50 03 no 2 merck & company c 2 0287 1 2543 61 8 no 2 merck & company d 0 5064 0 2634 52 01 no 3 heyden chem works c 2 0472 1 6020 78 2 no 3 heyden chem works d 0 5227 0 3546 67 8it is seen from the tabulation that the results obtained by the kollomethod method c are higher than those by the sulphid method methodd and that duplicate determinations show a rather wide variation theresults by the sulphid method are essaywhat lower than those by thekollo method, but duplicates agree fairly well in view of the factthat the kollo method will give excessive results if impurities suchas talcum, etc , are present and in consideration of the satisfactoryresults obtained in previous work with the sulphid method, the figuresobtained by this method are taken as indicative of the bismuth contentof the specimens examined calculating the per cent of bismuth oxidobtained to bismuth bi, the following values are obtained. Bismuth tribromphenolate, research council specimen. Bismuth, 44 8 per cent bismuth tribromphenate-merck, merck & co. Bismuth, 46 6 per cent xeroform, heyden chemical works. Bismuth, 60 7 per cent total tribromphenolthe content of tribromphenate radical, c₆h₂br₃o-, was determined bythe method of kollo apotheker zeitung, 1910, p 99 it consists intitrating the filtrate of the bismuth oxid determination of kollo, described under “c” bismuth determinations, with normal hydrochloricacid, using phenolphthalein as an indicator the cubic centimetersof normal alkali consumed multiplied by the theoretical factor 0 331gives the weight of tribromphenol combined and free contained in thespecimen the following results were obtained:table 2 -- determination of total tribromphenol in bismuth tribromphenate gm tribromphenol gm of calculated from per cent salt theoretical of total taken factor tribromphenol no 1 research council spec 1 7817 1 0592 59 44 no 2 merck & co 0 9743 0 5627 57 75 no 3 heyden chem works 2 0440 0 4303 21 04 uncombined tribromphenolthe definite chemical formula given in new and nonofficial remediesfor bismuth tribromphenate and the statement that it is “only slightlysoluble in alcohol ” requires the absence of uncombinedtribromphenol, but no method for its detection or determination isprovided in the u s patent 516, 358 expired march 13, 1911, issued to brunorichard seifert, assignor to dr f von heyden, for “phenol bismuthcompound” the freedom from uncombined tribromphenol was provided for bythe direction to wash with alcohol the product obtained in the swiss pharmacopeia the permissible content of uncombinedtribromphenol is limited thus.