History

Buying Writing Homework Online


Presseméd belge 65:919, 1913 286 thiroloix and lancien, a. Bull et mém soc méd d hôp deparis 33:197, 1912 287 laurent, m , and bohec, j. Med press and circular 94:461, 1912 288 touche, m. Bull et mém soc méd d hôp de paris 35:451, 1913 the results obtained are fairly concordant the intravenous injectionof the preparation produces but slight disturbance there isleukocytosis, a moderate rise of temperature, and not infrequentlya chill otherwise the substance seems to possess no toxicity theeffects produced on the tumors have almost invariably been describedas encouraging touche, who treated twenty-seven paper in this way andhas described each case in detail, states that under the treatment thesurface of the tumors, if ulcerated, became cleaner and healthier;the tumors became softer. The rate of growth was arrested, and therewas relief of pain and of the accompanying functional disturbances;often, too, there was a gain in weight and an improvement in generalwell-being touche concludes his article with the statement that “it is certainthat the effect is not curative but it is actually palliative ” delbet, on the other hand, states that he has seen no beneficial effects fromthe use of colloidal selenium injected intravenously in the discussionon delbet paper, ledoux-lebard states that he has observed nothingfrom selenium further than the temporary improvement which is shownby almost all cancer paper on the application of any new therapeuticmeasure in one or two instances the claim is made in the literature ofan actual cure of malignant growth through the use of selenium such, for example, is the case described by blumenthal from the clinicaldescription this might have been a cancer of the tongue, and was judgedto have been such in view of the negative wassermann reaction nomicroscopic examination was made arsphenamin was given the patientrecovered it is clear that instances of this type cannot be acceptedas beyond criticism, and it is safe to say that nothing more convincingin the way of actual cure is offered in the rather voluminousliterature on the use of selenium numerous compounds of selenium, essay of them claiming to circulate incolloidal form, have been described, and have been put on the marketfor use in malignant disease such are walker sulpho-selene, andselenio-vanadium, which has been prepared in the form of an ointment byschering and glatz these preparations lay claim to the same palliativeeffects which have been previously described for colloidal selenium of the other metals in colloidal form, chiefly silver and copper havecome into use colloidal silver was first recommended for malignantgrowths by vogel it is obtainable on the market in proprietaryform under the name of fulmargin, and also as electrargol recentlyrohdenburg289 has made a careful study of the effects of colloidalsilver in experimental and in human tumors, and finds that they haveno value colloidal copper has been used in recent times for the samepurpose by gaube du gers and by others i have recently examined theeffects of colloidal copper on malignant tumors in man, and have beenunable to find that it has any therapeutic value furthermore, a studyof the distribution of the copper in tumors obtained at operation or bynecropsy from individuals so treated failed to show that the copper hadbeen deposited therein 289 rohdenburg, h. J m research 26:331, 1915 finally, preparations similar to those used by werner and by caspari inanimals have also been used in human beings in these paper also theauthors have been able to record palliative effects on the tumor, butin no instance cures we have seen that it has been quite impossible to duplicate in humanbeings the therapeutic technic employed in animal experiments wehave seen further that the use of a modified technic in animalexperimentation has never been productive of favorable results evenat the hands of enthusiastic adherents in striking contrast to theseconclusions are the observations made in human therapeutics forevery type of preparation described in the preceding paragraphs, theclaim has been made practically without exception that it exercises amarkedly beneficial effect on malignant diseases in the human being not only are the subjective symptoms alleviated, but also the tumorsappear to become cleaner and softer. The rate of growth is retarded;necrosis and metastasis are prevented, and inoperable tumors becomeoperable how are we to interpret these observations?. how are we toexplain the fact that they are the almost invariable accompanimentof the most diverse methods of treatment?. i have already quoted thestatement of ledoux-lebard that every therapeutic novelty appears toexercise a favorable effect on cancer paper the same fact has beenobserved in a variety of other diseases, such as locomotor ataxia in order to arrive at a safe and reliable estimate as to the valueof any new or experimental procedure in paper of cancer, it seemsadvisable to accept certain definite therapeutic criteria by which thepaper are to be judged in the absence of such a method, alterationsin symptoms which are actually of no real value or importance receiveundue emphasis the natural course of the disease is associatedwith such fluctuations that a sanguine therapeutist can gain essayencouragement from even the most hopeless paper hence it follows thatevery mode of treatment has found adherents the market is floodedwith cancer drugs, and cancer charlatans flourish in the most highlyeducated communities unfortunately, even well trained, honest andreputable physicians have fallen victims to this fallacy, and havelent their names to the support of modes of treatment which in realityproduce no determinable effect on the natural evolution of the disease it was the desire to combat this unfortunate tendency which led meessay time ago to attempt to establish a reliable set of criteria oftherapeutic effects in cancer these were embodied in an article280which appeared two years ago, and i may be here permitted to quote themin extenso.

Provided, the board may grant a license to any person who mayhave practised for a shorter period, on being satisfied by examination, or inquiry, that such person is reasonably buying writing homework online competent and fit. Andfurther provided, that the board may, after examination and inquiry, license persons with a reasonable amount of competence to practisein specified localities, in which no qualified practitioners reside37 any person while employed in actual service in any naval or militaryservice as physician or surgeon may practise medicine, surgery, andmidwifery after having been registered 38 definition - the words “legally qualified medical practitioner” or“duly qualified medical practitioner, ” or any other words importing aperson recognized by law as a medical practitioner or a member of themedical profession, when used in any act of the legislature or legal orpublic document, mean a person registered under this chapter, unless asotherwise provided 39 medical appointments - no person shall be appointed as a medicalofficer, physician, or surgeon in any branch of the public service orany hospital or other charitable institution unless he be registeredunder the provisions of this chapter 40 theories of medicine or surgery - no person otherwise fully qualifiedshall be refused registration, or a license to practise, on account ofhis adopting or refusing to adopt the practice of any writingicular theoryof medicine or surgery in case of such refusal by the board, the writingyaggrieved may appeal to the governor in council, who, on due causeshown, shall issue an order to the board to register the name of suchperson and grant him a license 41 midwives - the act does not prevent competent females from practisingmidwifery 42 fees - to the registrar, for license, $5 11 to the board, each year, for a certificate of practice, $1 s 12 northwest territories college of physicians and surgeons - the members of the medicalprofession are a body corporate under the name of “the college ofphysicians and surgeons of the northwest territories” ord 5 of 1888, s 2 every person registered according to ordinance 11 of 1885 is a memberof the said college and shall be held to be registered under thisordinance from the date of its passage 3, as amended ord 9of 1891-92 every person registered under this law is a member of the college4 council - there is a council of said college elected by the membersfrom the members registered in pursuance of this ordinance s 5, 6, 7 the council appoints among other officers a registrar 26 register, qualification - persons registered under ordinance 11 of 1885are entitled to register under this ordinance 31 the council is required to cause the registrar to keep a register ofthe names of all persons who have complied with this ordinance, andthe rules and regulations of the council respecting the qualificationsrequired from practitioners of medicine or surgery only those personswhose names are inscribed in the register are deemed qualified andlicensed to practise medicine or surgery, except as hereinafterprovided 32 the registrar is required to keep his register correct and to make thenecessary alterations in the addresses or qualifications of personsregistered 33 the council is required to admit on the register. A any person possessing a diploma from any college in great britainand ireland having power to grant such diploma entitling him topractise medicine and surgery, and who shall produce such diploma andfurnish satisfactory evidence of identification. B any member of the college of physicians and surgeons of theprovinces of manitoba, ontario and quebec upon producing satisfactoryevidence of the same and of identification. C any person who shall produce from any college or school ofmedicine and surgery in the dominion of canada requiring a four-years’course of study and sic a diploma of qualification. Provided hefurnish to the council satisfactory evidence of identification, andpass if deemed necessary, before the members thereof, or such examinersas may be appointed for the purpose, a satisfactory examinationtouching his fitness and capacity to practise as a physician andsurgeon, upon payment to the registrar of fifty dollars 34, as substituted by ord 14, 1890, amended by ord 9, 1891-92 powers of council - the members of the council are required to makeorders, regulations, or by-laws for the regulation of the register andthe guidance of examiners, and may prescribe subjects and modes ofexamination, and may make all regulations in respect of examinations, not contrary to the ordinance, that they may deem expedient andnecessary 36 the council may by by-law delegate to the registrar power to admit topractice and to register any person having the necessary qualificationsentitling him to be registered by the council ord 24, 1892, s 4 the council may direct the name of any person improperly registeredto be erased from the register and such name shall be erased by theregistrar ord 24, 1892, s 5 forfeiture of rights - if a medical practitioner be convicted of anyfelony or misdemeanor or after due inquiry be judged by the council tohave been guilty of infamous conduct in any professional respect, thecouncil may, if it sees fit, direct the registrar to erase the name ofsuch practitioner from the register, and the name shall be erased ord 5, 1888, s 37, as substituted by ord 24, 1892, s 1 rights of registered persons - every person registered under theordinance is entitled to practise medicine and surgery, includingmidwifery, or any one of them, as the case may be, and to demand andrecover with costs his reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of medical or surgical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patients 38 limitation - a period of one year after the term of professionalservice is established as a limitation to actions for negligence ormalpractice against members of the college 39 register, evidence - the registrar, under the direction of the council, is required to publish a register of the names and residences andthe medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by anycollege or body, of all persons appearing on the register on the dayof publication the register is called “northwest territories’ medicalregister, ” and a copy for the time being, purporting to be so printedand published, is prima facie evidence that the persons thereinspecified are registered according to the act the absence of a namefrom such copy is prima facie evidence that such person is not soregistered in case a person name does not appear on such copy, a certified copyunder the hand of the registrar of the entry of the name of such personon the register is evidence that such person is registered s 40 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights or privileges conferred and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 4 offences and penalties - to practise or profess to practise withoutregistration, for hire or reward, is punishable with a penalty of $10042 to wilfully or falsely pretend to be a physician, doctor of medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assume any title or descriptionnot actually possessed and to which the person is not legally entitledunder this ordinance, is punishable with a penalty of from $10 to $5043, as amended by ord 24, 1892, s 2 to take or use a name or description implying or calculated to leadpeople to infer registration or recognition by law as a physician, surgeon, or licentiate in medicine or surgery is punishable with apenalty of from $25 to $100 44 unregistered persons - no person is entitled to recover for any medicalor surgical advice or attendance or the performance of any operationor medicine which he may have prescribed 45. Nor to beappointed as medical officer, physician, or surgeon in any branch ofthe public service or in any hospital or other charitable institutionnot supported wholly by voluntary contributions, unless registered46 no certificate required from a physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer is registered 47 costs - in prosecutions, payment of costs may be awarded in addition tothe penalty, and in default of payment the offender may be committed tothe common jail for not more than one month 48 burden of proof - in prosecutions, the burden of proof as toregistration is upon the person charged 49 proof - the production of a printed or other copy of the register, certified under the hand of the registrar, for the time being issufficient evidence of all persons registered. A certificate onsuch copy purporting to be signed by any person in the capacity ofregistrar of the council under this ordinance is prima facie evidencethat he is registered without proof of his signature or of his being infact registrar 50 limitation of prosecutions - prosecutions must be commenced within sixmonths from the date of the offence 51 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions where deemedexpedient 52 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant 53 definition - “legally qualified medical practitioner” or “dulyqualified medical practitioner, ” or any other words implying legalrecognition as a medical practitioner or member of the medicalprofession, when used in any law or ordinance, mean a person registeredunder this ordinance 55 homœopathists - homœopathic physicians may be registered under thisordinance on complying with the terms of sec 34 58 fees - to the council from each member annually as the council maydetermine, not more than $2 and not less than $1 35 to the registrar, for registration, $50 56, as substitutedby ord 24, 1892, s 3 nova scotia medical board - there is a provincial medical board consisting ofthirteen regular qualified medical practitioners of not less than sevenyears’ standing, seven nominated and appointed by the governor incouncil, and six by the nova scotia medical society r s , 5th ser , c 24, s 1 the board appoints a secretary who is the registrar of the board3, 4 register, evidence - the registrar is required before the 1st of augusteach year to cause to be printed and published in the royal gazetteof the province, and in such other manner as the board shall appoint, a correct register of the names and residences and medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by any college or body, with thedates thereof of all persons appearing on the register as existing onjune 30th such register is called “the medical register, ” and a copythereof for the time being, purporting to be so printed and published, is prima facie evidence that the persons specified are registeredaccording to this chapter the absence of a name from such copy isprima facie evidence that such person is not so registered in thecase of a person whose name does not appear in such copy, a certifiedcopy, under the hand of the registrar, of the entry of his name onthe register is evidence that such person is registered under theprovisions of this chapter 5 students - no person can begin or enter on the study of physic, surgery, or midwifery, for the purpose of qualifying himself topractise in the province, unless he shall have obtained from theprovincial medical board a certificate that he has satisfactorilypassed a matriculation examination in the subjects specified in thechapter 6 the chapter prescribes the prerequisites to admission to preliminaryexaminations 7, 12 qualification - subject to the exceptions hereinafter, no personcan lawfully practise physic, surgery, or midwifery unless his namebe registered and unless he shall have received from the provincialmedical board a license to practise 8 no person is entitled to be registered or to receive a licenseto practise unless he satisfy the board that he has passed thematriculation or preliminary examination. That after passing suchexamination he has followed his studies during a period not less thanfour years one of which may be under the direction of one or moregeneral practitioners duly licensed. That during such four years hehas attended at essay university, college, or incorporated school ofmedicine in good standing, courses of lectures amounting together tonot less than twelve months on general anatomy, on practical anatomy, on surgery, on the practice of medicine, on midwifery, on chemistry, on materia medica and pharmacy, and on the institutes of medicine orphysiology, and one three-months’ course of medical jurisprudence;that he has attended the general practice of a hospital in whichare not less than fifty beds under the charge of not less than twophysicians or surgeons, for a period of not less than one year or twoperiods of not less than six months each. That he has also attendedtwo three-months’ courses or one six-months’ course of clinicalmedicine, and the same of clinical surgery. That he has, after anexamination in the subjects of the course, obtained a degree or diplomafrom such university, college, or incorporated medical school, or, for want of such degree or diploma, that he has satisfactorily passedan examination in the various branches hereinbefore specified beforeexaminers to be appointed by the provincial medical board. That heis not less than twenty-one years of age. And that he has paid theregistrar twenty dollars the provincial medical board has power, subject to the approval ofthe governor in council, to make such alterations in the foregoingcurriculum as may from time to time be required 9 the last preceding section does not apply to any person in actualpractice duly registered under chap 56 of revised statutes, 3d series;such persons are entitled to be registered and receive a license topractise under this chapter without fee notwithstanding such section, any person on producing to the said board conclusive evidence thathe has passed a matriculation or preliminary examination such as isrequired for persons beginning their medical studies in nova scotia;that he has, before graduating or taking a diploma, studied for atleast four years in the manner provided in sec 9 or pursued whatthe board deem an equivalent course of study, and has passed a finalexamination in the subjects of such course. Or, for the want of any ofsuch requirements, shall have fulfilled such conditions as the boardmay determine and shall pay a fee of twenty dollars, shall be entitledto be registered and to receive a license to practise 10 powers of board - the said board among other powers has the powerto examine all degrees, diplomas, licenses, and other credentialspresented or given in evidence for the purpose of entitling the ownerto practise in nova scotia.

Guinea-pig 1 was sick and weak with loss of appetite for essay days, but gradually recovered guinea-pig 2 died over night autopsy. There was a large amount of exudate in the peritoneal cavity, irritation of the intestine, and other signs of acute inflammation a moderate degree of congestion. Spleen not enlarged. Liver showed cloudy swelling and fibrinous exudate. Lungs and heart about normal except for a moderate degree of congestion but no exudate guinea-pig 3 was sick for essay days, but recovered gradually one week after experiment 20 -- effect of chlorlyptus in vivo on staphylococcus -- the experiment was conducted in the same way as in experiment 17, but 2 c c were used instead of 1 c c result. Guinea-pig 1 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension and died over night autopsy showed that the animal died of acute peritonitis the peritoneum showed essay fibrinous exudate and mesenteric vessels guinea-pig 2 was injected with 2 c c of staphylococcus, and eighteen hours after was injected with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the animal died two weeks after injection guinea-pig 3 was injected with 2 c c staphylococcus suspension, and twenty-four hours after with 1 c c of chlorlyptus the guinea-pig died ten days after autopsy revealed bronchopneumonia of the left lung and acute miliary abscess in the liver -- from the journal a m a , nov 27, 1920, with additions aquazone oxygen water report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryaquazone is stated by the aquazone laboratories, inc , los angeles, california, to be a supersaturated solution of oxygen in water, carrying approximately five and one-half times as much dissolved oxygenas ordinary water in an advertising booklet, it is suggested thataquazone is of value in the treatment of influenza, pneumonia, typhoid, bright disease and kindred disorders it was also stated thereinthat in the treatment of fevers it lowers the temperature, and thatthe administration of three bottles of aquazone representing 0 033gm -- 1-1/2 grain-- of oxygen is of value for “preventive and tonicpurposes ”the evidence which the aquazone laboratories submitted did not showthat the effects were other than those which might be obtained from theadministration of ordinary potable water the council declared aquazoneinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, because the therapeuticclaims made for it were unwarranted, and because its use is irrationalfor the reason that oxygen given by stomach in this way is of littleor no value -- abstracted from reports of council on pharmacy andchemistry, 1920, p 50 coagulen-ciba omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportannouncing the deletion of coagulen-ciba from new and nonofficialremedies w a puckner, secretary coagulen-ciba, a product of the society of chemical industry, basle, switzerland, was admitted to new and nonofficial remedies in 1915 it is stated to be an extract prepared from blood platelets and tocontain thromboplastic substances cytozym, thrombokinase, thrombozymmixed with lactose extensive clinical reports appeared to justify itsacceptance for new and nonofficial remedies with fibrin ferments andthromboplastic substances in 1918, dr arthur d hirschfelder reported to the council that ofa number of specimens of coagulen-ciba examined by him, failed toaccelerate the coagulation time of blood in view of dr hirschfelder findings, the therapeutic researchcommittee of the council invited dr p j hanzlik to undertake anexhaustive investigation of thromboplastic substances, the council, in the meantime temporarily retaining coagulen in new and nonofficialremedies until the investigation was completed the following report on the eligibility of coagulen-ciba was made tothe council by dr hanzlik. Object. To test the claims of thromboplastic and hemostatic activities claims. Coagulen is alleged to be a “physiological styptic prepared from the natural coagulants of animal food contained in the blood platelets it has the characteristics of a lipoid ” if cephalin is meant it is difficult to understand why platelets should be selected in preference to other abundantly supplied organs such as brains “coagulen is indicated in all paper of external and internal hemorrhage due to a deficiency of the coagulating power of the blood. Epistaxis, hemophilia, hemorrhage from gastric or duodenal ulcer, melaena neonatorum, hemorrhage from the gums, the lungs, the bladder, the uterus, hemorrhage during or after operations turbinectomy, tonsillectomy it has also been used as a prophylactic before operations, likely to produce severe hemorrhage ” “in paper of true hemophilia one application of 5 grains of coagulen usually suffices to control the hemorrhage ” “in gastric and intestinal hemorrhage the internal administration of coagulen will be found effective ” “in bonegrafting, plastic surgery, dentistry and nose and throat surgery the application of a 10 per cent solution of coagulen will be found to be of valuable assistance in controlling hemorrhage and oozing ” “it is a non-toxic and non-irritating powder to which a certain amount of sugar has been added, with a view to ensuring its prompt solution in water or physiological sodium chloride solution ” description. “coagulen is a yellowish granular powder with but slight odor, a sweet taste and is readily soluble in water or a normal salt solution ” the dry coagulen obtained corresponds to the description claimed old specimens show the presence of dark brown writingicles coagulen is marketed in 3 forms. 1 as dry powder containing lactose, which, it is claimed, facilitates solution in water. 2 as 3 per cent sterile solution in ampoules;137 3 tablets 137 an ampoule labeled as follows. “coagulen-ciba, 20 c c in sterile solution ready for use to be shaken importé de suisse op no 968” was found to measure only 15 c c another ampoule with the same label and op no 9641 contained considerable sediment methods of study. The alleged thromboplastic activity was tested by the method of howell and a modification of this method by fenger as described in “new and nonofficial remedies ” in the howell method dog or cat blood is used, while beef blood at body temperature is used in fenger method in other respects the methods are essentially the same briefly these consist of noting the acceleration of coagulation time in a mixture of equal writings of serum and the thromboplastic agent to which about an equal writing of oxalate plasma is added under these conditions cephalin causes clotting in about 1 minute or even less as compared with 20 to 30 minutes or more of the control the effects were compared with freshly prepared cephalin and other thromboplastic agents, using saline 0 9 per cent nacl as control the effect of different concentrations was also studied the literature of the manufacturers claims that coagulen is harmless this was tested by making intravenous and subcutaneous injections into guinea-pigs, using saline and cephalin as controls bloods of 4 different species were used, namely, cat, dog, beef and human dog peptonized blood and plasma were also tried the 15 different tests that were made in vitro were carried out with 3 different samples of fresh dry coagulen from manufacturer, 2 old samples one from council on pharmacy and chemistry and one of our own, 3 fresh specimens of sterile solution in ampoules from manufacturer, one old specimen and 4 small ampoules council on pharmacy and chemistry the tablets were not tested since these are made from dry coagulen and the results would hardly be expected to show anything different results.

“the fact that elarson represents a lipoid-like chemical combination of arsenic buying writing homework online has an important bearing upon its absorption and utilization in the system there is good reason to believe that when arsenic is administered in a stable, lipoid-like combination, as in elarson, it is more readily taken up by the cells and more completely utilized than when given in the customary manner ” “as regards the behavior of elarson in the system, it has been shown that its active constituent, chlorarseno-behenol, is almost completely absorbed in this form, probably as a chlor-behenolate of sodium or potassium ”as a matter of fact, joachimoglu found that very little arsenic wasabsorbed when elarson was given to dogs and rabbits. Most of it wasrecovered from the feces. Only traces were found in the liver andkidneys and none in the blood and brain the absence from the latterorgans shows that the lipoid solubility does not obtain in the body itis claimed in the circular that elarson has the advantage over fowlersolution “in that it is free from any irritating action upon thegastro-intestinal tract”. It is stated that as thesis as sixty tabletshave been given to dogs daily without any toxic effects joachimoglu, on the other hand, found powdered elarson to be very irritating tothe gastro-intestinal tract. Also that the dog could not stand sixtytablets at all gar nicht vertragen, such doses causing vomiting, diarrhea and intestinal hemorrhages. On repeated administration thesymptoms became progressively more severe joachimoglu also found that, compared on the basis of arsenic content, elarson, given intravenously, is from ten to twelve times as poisonous as arsenic trioxid elarsonis recommended for the class of paper in which fowler solution isused to sum up. None of the special claims made for elarson-- the arseniccontent, ready absorbability, freedom from irritating action on thegastro-intestinal tract and its alleged better adaptation for continuedadministration-- have been substantiated. On the contrary, they havebeen disproved as well as the theory of its mode of absorption proposedby fischer and klemperer furthermore, joachimoglu found that when itactually got into the circulation intravenous injection in the formin which fischer and klemperer supposed it to be absorbed, it was fromten to twelve times as toxic as arsenic trioxid the council voted to omit elarson from new and nonofficial remediesbecause it is sold under unproved and consequently unwarranted claimsand because it is an unscientific and relatively useless article elarson has not been shown to have advantages over fowler solution;on the contrary, in essay respects at least, it is inferior -- fromreports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1919, p 75 iodiphos report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrya report which appears below was sent charles l heffner forconsideration no reply having been received, the council authorizedits publication w a puckner, secretary iodiphos, marketed by charles l heffner, brooklyn, n y , is declaredto contain ferric citro-iodine, 6 grains.

  • top essay writing websites
  • process analysis essay example
  • the help essays
  • where is the best place to buy research papers
  • short essay format
  • personal memoir essay examples
  • obesity in america essay
  • how to write a 3 page essay
  • where can i buy business plan pro
  • purchase essay online
  • buy cheap college essays online
  • cv writing service online
  • essay spanish
  • apa format for essay
  • non plagiarized us writers
  • cheap essay help online
  • ut austin essay word limit
  • college writing services
  • please write my essay for money
  • how to write essay outline
  • doctoral thesis writing services

The conditions in which gray glycerine tonic is asserted to beespecially efficient buying writing homework online are described on the label of the bottle and theoutside wrapper, in popular terms, more or less typical of “patentmedicine” exploitation, such as “catarrhal conditions, ” and “stomachderangements ” similar statements are contained in the leafletaccompanying the trade package for instance. “it is, therefore, an effective, reliable tonic in nervous exhaustion, general debility, impoverished conditions of the blood and nervous system, bright disease, diseases of the liver, disorders of the urinary organs, etc ” “it is an unexcelled restorative in that very common class of paper in which there is no positive organic disease, but the patient complains that he ‘does not feel well’ or ‘is out of sorts ’”here are essay of the claims made in other advertising matter. “all stages of bronchitis are rapidly improved by the use of gray glycerine tonic comp this remedy has a direct tonic influence upon the circulation of the respiratory mucous membrane. It relieves congestion and restores tone to weakened blood vessels ” “ improves the appetite, gives valuable aid to the digestive and absorptive processes, and reinforces cellular nutrition in ways that insure a notable gain in vitality and strength ” -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - | in gastro-intestinal catarrh | | | | -- and other afflictions of the stomach and bowels characterized | | by muscular weakness and glandular insufficiency-- there is no | | remedy more prompt and effective in its action than | | | | gray's glycerine tonic comp | | | | under its systematic administration the appetite is restored, | | the alimentary processes greatly improved, the nutrition | | promoted and every vital function throughout the body given a | | new and substantial impetus as the digestive and assimilative | | functions are restored to their normal efficiency, a notable | | increase in the restorative and recuperative powers of the body | | naturally follow | | | | the purdue frederick co | | 135 christopher street, new york city | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - mention illinois medical journal when writing to advertisers illustration. This appeared in a journal owned and controlled by thesecond largest state medical association of the country even granting that gentian may improve the appetite, how absurd itis to claim that this mixture “relieves congestion, ” “restores toneto weakened blood vessels, ” “gives aid to the absorptive processes, ”“reinforces cellular nutrition, ” or increases vitality!. Neither the composition of gray glycerine tonic nor the clinicalevidence warrants the belief that it has any therapeutic value otherthan that due to the psychic effect of the bitter drug gentian physicians who have prescribed it have done so because of theadvertising this nostrum has been kept so constantly before the eyesof medical men that they think of gray glycerine tonic when theycannot remember the official drugs that may be indicated in the case the moral is that liberal advertising will sell anything it is recommended that gray glycerine tonic comp be declared noteligible for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies on account ofconflict with rules 1, 6, 8 and 10 editorial note -- an old practice in hospitals-- happily now practicallyobsolete-- was to have certain stock mixtures prepared in bulk amongthese there was usually a so-called tonic mixture, used in a more orless haphazard manner when nothing in writingicular seemed indicated sucha stock mixture was used in the state hospital for the insane at utica, n y , during the thesis years that dr john p gray was superintendent from the early fifties to the early eighties, although it is verydoubtful whether he originated the mixture after the death of dr gray-- so the story runs-- one of his sons, with a writingner, formed thefirm of purdue frederick company, and began the exploitation of theelder dr gray name, in connection, presumably, with this stockpreparation as indicated in the council report, gray glycerinetonic comp -- and what an absurd name!. -- is simply a mixture of ordinarydrugs, requiring no skill whatever in compounding if there is aphysician living who cannot write a prescription offhand as good asthis formula, that physician should either go back to a medical schoolor change his vocation there is, and can be, no excuse for prescribingsuch a ready-made mixture, for every cross-roads drugstore has theingredients and any pharmacist worthy of the name could compound it among the scores of nostrums that disgrace the medical professionof this country, none is more typical of all that is inimical toscientific medicine, to the medical profession and above all to thepublic-- for, after all is said, it is the public that ultimately ishumbugged -- from the journal a m a , july 10, 1915 tongaline and ponca compound report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council, having considered “tongaline, ” “tongaline tablets, ”“tongaline and lithia tablets, ” “tongaline and quinine tablets” and“ponca compound tablets, ” found these preparations ineligible for newand nonofficial remedies and authorized publication of the followingreport w a puckner, secretary tongalinetongaline mellier drug co , st louis is a fancy name given to whatis essentially a sodium salicylate mixture the air of mystery createdby the name permits the manufacturers to make claims for the productwhich would be ludicrous if the medical profession was fully conversantwith the very ordinary character of the preparation tongaline receives its name from tonga, an inert, long-discardedmixture of various barks and herbs said to be gathered and preparedby fiji islanders its constituents evidently tend to vary withthe collector the history of the introduction of this indefinitecombination of simples is thus given in the journal, may 10, 1913 “a supply of the crude drug was carried to england by a man who had lived for a short time in the fiji islands and it was placed in the hands of a retail house in london this occurred about 1879 in 1880, two english physicians of repute published laudatory articles on the therapeutic value of tonga in neuralgia and rheumatism this created a demand for the drug which extended to the united states ”time showed that tonga was inert therapeutically, and authoritieson pharmacology now no longer notice it as the council previouslyreported, 12 the indefinite character of the mixture should, alone, be sufficient to exclude it from practical therapeutics during thetemporary popularity of tonga, the proprietary mixture tongaline wasput on the market for physicians’ use by the mellier drug company, st louis in this, tonga was named as the active ingredient thecommercial interests thus involved have faithfully nourished and keptalive the “tonga” myth 12 reports of the council on pharm and chem , 1912, p 40 in a recent advertising booklet, “the therapeutic properties ofthe ingredients of tongaline, ” the virtues of tonga, blue cohosh, colchicum, jaborandi and salicylic acid are discussed the label of arecently purchased bottle reads. “tongaline contains tonga, cimicifuga racemosa, salicylate of sodium the salicylic acid being made from pure natural oil colchicum and pilocarpin ”it will be noticed that tongaline is “made from the pure, natural oil ”in fact, the statement is repeated in red ink, in large letters runningacross the face of the label, thus emphasizing the alleged importanceof this assertion in this connection it is only necessary to recallthat it has been proved clinically, chemically and physiologically thatthere is absolutely no difference between the salicylic acid made fromthe natural oil and the synthetic the formula was thus commented on in the article previously quoted fromthe journal. “tongaline is essentially a preparation of sodium salicylate, the mellier drug company realized the impossibility of creating any marked demand for a nostrum unless it had essay real drugs in it-- hence the presence of the salicylates what the actual composition of tongaline is, no one but the manufacturers know at one time the following was given as the formula. Fluid tonga 30 grains extract of cimicifuga racemosa 20 grains sodium salicylate 10 grains pilocarpin salicylate 1/100 grain colchin salicylate 1/500 grain “these amounts refer to the quantity of drugs in each fluidram of the preparation whether the nostrum still has this composition we do not know, but assuming that it has, it is quite evident that sodium salicylate is the essential and active ingredient ”the therapeutic indications given on the label of the bottle are. “rheumatism, neuralgia, grippe, gout, nervous headache, sciatica, lumbago, malaria, tonsillitis, heavy colds, excess of uric acid, and wherever the use of the salicylates is indicated ”in a recent booklet this semisecret salicylate mixture is recommended, not only in conditions in which salicylates are indicated, but alsocombined with aconite for rheumatic fever, with benzoate of soda inthe treatment of “grippe, ” with potassium bromid in nervous headaches, with gelsemium, glycerin and whisky for “heavy colds, ” with ammoniumchlorid, stramonium and cimicifuga in “rheumatic dysmenorrhea, ” andeven with mercury biniodid as a treatment of syphilitic eruptions!.