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As also those ulcers that happen in the mouth. Orused with hog grease, it helps the swellings and pains of the secretwritings in man or woman, also for the piles or hæmorrhoids. Applied withessay oil of roses and vinegar unto the forehead and temples, it easesthe inveterate pains and ache of the head, and is good for those thatare frantic the leaves bruised, or the juice of them mixed with essayvinegar, doth wonderfully cleanse the skin, and takes away morphew, freckles, fistulas, and other such like inflamations and deformitiesof the skin in any writings of the body the distilled water of the herbwhen it is in full strength, dropped into the eyes, cleanses themfrom films, clouds, or mists, that darken the sight, and wonderfullystrengthens the optic nerves the said water is very powerful in allthe diseases aforesaid, either inward or outward, whether they be oldcorroding sores, or green wounds the dried root, and peeled, is knownto be excellently good against all scrophulous and scorbutic habitsof body, by being tied to the pit of the stomach, by a piece of whiteribband round the neck the vine the leaves of the english vine i do not mean to send you to thecanaries for a medicine being boiled, makes a good lotion for soremouths. Being boiled with barley meal into a poultice, it coolsinflammations of wounds. The dropping of the vine, when it is cut inthe spring, which country people call tears, being boiled in a syrup, with sugar, and taken inwardly, is excellent to stay women longingsafter every thing they see, which is a disease thesis women with childare subject to the decoction of vine leaves in white wine doth thelike also the tears of the vine, drank two or three spoonfuls at atime, breaks the stone in the bladder this is a very good remedy, andit is discreetly done, to kill a vine to cure a man, but the salt ofthe leaves are held to be better the ashes of the burnt branches willmake teeth that are as black as a coal, to be as white as snow, if youbut every morning rub them with it it is a most gallant tree of thesun, very sympathetical with the body of men, and that is the reasonspirit of wine is the greatest cordial among all vegetables violets both the tame and the wild are so well known, that they need nodescription time they flower until the end of july, but are best in march, andthe beginning of april government and virtues they are a fine pleasing plant of venus, of a mild nature, no way harmful all the violets are cold and moistwhile they are fresh and green, and are used to cool any heat, or distemperature of the body, either inwardly or outwardly, asinflammations in the eyes, in the matrix or fundament, in imposthumesalso, and hot swellings, to drink the decoction of the leaves andflowers made with water in wine, or to apply them poultice-wise to thegrieved places. It likewise eases pains in the head, caused throughwant of sleep. Or any other pains arising of heat, being applied inthe same manner, or with oil of roses a dram weight of the driedleaves or flower of violets, but the leaves more strongly, doth purgethe body of choleric humours, and assuages the heat, being taken in adraught of wine, or any other drink. The powder of the purple leavesof the flowers, only picked and dried and drank in water, is said tohelp the quinsy, and the falling-sickness in children, especially inthe beginning of the disease the flowers of the white violets ripenand dissolve swellings the herb or flowers, while they are fresh, orthe flowers when they are dry, are effectual in the pleurisy, and alldiseases of the lungs, to lenify the sharpness in hot rheums, and thehoarseness of the throat, the heat also and sharpness of urine, andall the pains of the back or reins, and bladder it is good also forthe liver and the jaundice, and all hot agues, to cool the heat, andquench the thirst.

Sweet fennel seeds nine ounces let the herbs, beingdryed, and the seeds be grossly bruised, to which add of the speciescalled aromaticum rosarum. And of the species called diamoschu dulce, of each an ounce and a half, infuse them two days in thirty two pintsof spanish wine, then distil them with a gentle fire, and with everypound mix two ounces of sugar dissolved in rose-water let the three first pounds be called by the name of spirit, the rest bythe name of water culpeper the chief end of composing this medicine, was tostrengthen the heart and resist infection, and therefore is verywholeessay in pestilential times, and for such as walk in stinking air i shall now quote you their former receipt in their former dispensatory angelica water the greater composition the college take of angelica two pounds, annis seed half a pound, coriander and caraway seeds, of each four ounces, zedoary bruised, three ounces. Steep them twenty four hours in six gallons of smallwine, then draw out the spirit, and sweeten it with sugar culpeper it comforts the heart, cherishes the vital spirits, resists the pestilence, and all corrupt airs, which indeed are thenatural causes of epidemical diseases, the sick may take a spoonfulof it in any convenient cordial, and such as are in health, and havebodies either cold by nature, or cooled by age, may take as much eitherin the morning fasting, or a little before meat spiritus lavendula compositus matthiæ or compound spirit of lavender matthias the college take of lavender flowers one gallon, to which pourthree gallons of the best spirits of wine, let them stand togetherin the sun six days, then distil them with an alembick with thisrefrigeratory take of the flowers of sage, rosemary, and bettony, of each onehandful. The flowers of borrage, bugloss, lilies of the valley, cowslips, of each two handfuls. Let the flowers be newly and seasonablygathered, being infused in one gallon of the best spirits of wine, and mingled with the foregoing spirit of lavender flowers, addingthe leaves of bawm, feather-few, and orange tree fresh gathered. Theflowers of stœchas and orange tree, bay berries, of each one ounce after convenient digestion distil it again, after which add citronpills the outward bark, peony seed husked, of each six drams, cinnamon, mace, nutmegs, cardamoms, cubebs, yellow sanders, of each half anounce, wood of aloes one dram, the best jujubes, the stones being takenout, half a pound, digest them six weeks, then strain it and filter it, and add to it prepared pearls two drams, emeralds prepared a scruple, ambergrease, musk, saffron, of each half a scruple, red roses dryed, red sanders, of each half an ounce, yellow sanders, citron pills, dryed, of each one dram let the species being tyed up in a rag, behung into the aforementioned spirit culpeper i could wish the apothecaries would desire to be certifiedby the college 1 whether the gallon of lavender flowers must be filled by heap, or by strike 2 next, whether the flowers must be pressed downin the measure or not 3 how much must be drawn off in the firstdistillation 4 where they should get orange leaves and flowers freshgathered 5 what they mean by convenient digestion 6 where youshall find borrage, bugloss, and cowslips, flowering together, thatso you may have them all fresh according to their prescript, the oneflowering in the latter end of april, and beginning of may, the otherin the end of june, and beginning of july 7 if they can make a shiftto make it, how, or which way the virtues of it will countervail theone half of the charge and cost, to leave the pains and trouble out spiritus castorii or spirit of castoreum the college take of fresh castoreum four ounces, lavender floweran ounce, the tops of sage and rosemary, of each half an ounce, cinnamon six drams, mace, cloves, of each two drachms, spirits of winerectified, six pounds, digest them in a phial filled only to the thirdwriting, close stopped with cork and bladder in warm ashes for two days, then distilled in balneo mariæ, and the distilled water kept closestopped culpeper by reason of its heat it is no ways fit to be taken alone, but mixed with other convenient medicines appropriated to the diseasesyou would give it for, it resists poison, and helps such as are bittenby venomous beasts. It causes speedy delivery to women in travail, andcasteth out the placenta. It helps the fits of the mother, lethargiesand convulsions, being mixed with white wine, and dropped into theears, it helps deafness. If stopping be the cause of it, the dose to begiven inwardly is between one dram, and half a dram, according to thestrength and age of the patient aqua petasitidis composita or, compound water of butter-bur the college take of the fresh roots of butter-bur bruised, onepound and a half, the roots of angelica and masterwort, of each half apound, steep them in ten pints of strong ale, then distil them till thechange of the taste gives a testimony that the strength is drawn out culpeper this water is very effectual being mixed with otherconvenient cordials, for such as have pestilential fevers. Also aspoonful taken in the morning, may prove a good preservative inpestilential times. It helps the fits of the mother, and such as areshort winded, and being taken inwardly, dries up the moisture of suchsores as are hard to be cured aqua raphani composita or compound water of radishes the college take of the leaves of both sorts of scurvy-grass, ofeach six pound, having bruised them, press the juice out of them, withwhich mix of the juice of brooklime, and water-cresses, of each onepound and a half, of the best white wine, eight pounds, twelve wholelemons, pills and all, fresh briony roots four pound, the roots of wildradishes two pound, captain winter cinnamon half a pound, nutmegsfour ounces, steep them altogether, and then distil them culpeper i fancy it not, and so i leave it. I suppose they intendedit for purgation of women in child-bed aqua peoniæ composita or compound water of peony the college take of the flowers of lilies of the valley, one pound:infuse them in four gallons of spanish wine so long till the followingflowers may be had fresh take of the fore-named flowers half a pound, peony flowers fourounces.

The same isexcellently good for ruptures, as also to stop fluxes. An ointment madeof it is exceedingly good for wounds and ulcers, for it soon dries upthe watery humours which hinder the cure costmary, or alcost, or balsam herb this is so frequently known to be an inhabitant in almost every garden, that i suppose it needless to write a description thereof time it flowers in june and july government and virtues it is under the dominion of jupiter theordinary costmary, as well as maudlin, provokes urine abundantly, and moistens the hardness of the mother. It gently purges cholerand phlegm, extenuating that which is gross, and cutting that whichis tough and glutinous, cleanses that which is foul, and hindersputrefaction and corruption.

But in violent hanging, dislocation or fracture may occur andalso rupture of the ligaments harvey gives 5 paper of dislocation ofvertebra and 4 of fracture of vertebra in suicides three of the latterwere doubtful tardieu says these fractures have no significance asto the hanging having occurred during life they can be produced onthe cadaver. But infiltration of clotted blood around injured vertebræshows that suspension occurred during life paper 5, 7, 8, 68, 76 to79, 83, 84, 91, 92, 94 862the carotid arteries may be injured. Usually the inner and middlecoats are torn. And hemorrhage may occur into the wall of the vessel the common carotids are the ones usually affected, and just belowthe bifurcation, but the external is also occasionally injured theinjury is said to be due to the stretching and squeezing of the artery, stretching being the most effective since the rupture often occurs ata distance from the mark of the ligature such injury of the arterydoes not prove that hanging took place during life because it has beenproduced on the cadaver. But hemorrhage into the wall of the vesselor wound or rupture after death is very improbable maschka says thelesion is very rare tardieu says that the injury to the carotid israre and therefore unimportant pellier reports 4 paper of rupture ofcarotid in a total of 23 levy records the experiments of hofmann, ofvienna, and brouardel and himself, of paris, 5 in number he concludedthat compression of the carotid arteries, if it produces obliteration, can cause rapid loss of consciousness and death. And explains why inincomplete suicide the subject is unable to help himself coutagnefound rupture of carotids 10 times in 24 paper he insists on theimportance of the lesion hofmann863 says the rupture is always transverse, may be simple or multiple and may occur in suicides. More apt to occur when the ligature is thin lesser864 tabulated 50 fatal paper of suicidal hanging. In 29, he was satisfied that the hanging occurred during life in 3 of these the skin of the neck alone showed any lesion. There was a double mark, the skin being otherwise bloodless in 5 the deeper soft writings were the only ones affected in 3 the skin showed lesions, the deeper soft writings none, but either the hyoid bone, larynx, or vertebræ were involved in 12 the skin showed no mark, but the deeper soft writings and either the larynx or hyoid bone were involved. And in 6 the hyoid bone only or the bone and larynx were injured in the remaining paper it was not possible to say that the hanging occurred during life in 2 paper there were no marks at all. In 9 there were changes in the skin. In 4, changes in the skin and deeper writings. In 2, changes in the skin, deeper writings, and hyoid bone or larynx. In 3, changes in the skin and hyoid bone or larynx, or both in 14 of the 50 paper the hyoid bone was fractured. In 20 the larynx. And in 1 the vertebræ the common carotid arteries were injured in 6 the number and severity of the lesions bore no constant relation to the thickness of the ligature, nor to the force used, but rather to the position of the body ecker865 reported a case of suicidal hanging in a man, age 40, where the soft palate was swollen and filled up the passage so that the air evidently could not enter the larynx and the trachea are usually deeply congested, of a redcolor.

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Bruised and mixed with salt andapplied to the place, helps the bitings of mad dogs it expels wind, eases pains buy essays and reports of the teeth, strengthens the back, helps the runningof the reins, and the whites, being taken inwardly dioscorides, apuleius behen alb rub of valerian, white and red mesue, serapio, andother arabians, say they are hot and moist in the latter end of thefirst, or beginning of the second degree, and comfort the heart, stirup lust the grecians held them to be dry in the second degree, thatthey stop fluxes, and provoke urine bellidis of dasies see the leaves betæ, nigræ, albæ, rubræ of beets, black, white, and red. As forblack beets i have nothing to say, i doubt they are as rare as blackswans the red beet root boiled and preserved in vinegar, makes a fine, cool, pleasing, cleansing, digesting sauce see the leaves bistortæ, &c of bistort, or snakeweed, cold and dry in the thirddegree, binding. Half a dram at a time taken inwardly, resistspestilence and poison, helps ruptures and bruises, stays fluxes, vomiting, and immoderate flowing of the menses, helps inflammationsand soreness of the mouth, and fastens loose teeth, being bruised andboiled in white wine, and the mouth washed with it borraginis of borrage, hot and moist in the first degree, cheersthe heart, helps drooping spirits dioscorides brionæ, &c of briony both white and black. They are both hot anddry, essay say in the third degree, and essay say but in the first. Theypurge flegm and watery humours, but they trouble the stomach much, they are very good for dropsies. The white is most in use, and is goodfor the fits of the mother. Both of them externally used, take awayfreckles, sunburning, and morphew from the face, and cleanse filthyulcers. It is but a churlish purge, but being let alone, can do no harm buglossi of bugloss. Its virtues are the same with borrage, and theroots of either seldom used bulbus vomitorius a vomiting root. I never read of it elswhere bythis general name calami aromatici of aromatical reed, or sweet garden flag.