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Transverse ligament of atlas ruptured 6 ibid - man, age 39 distinct mark of cord around neck. No othermark of violence. Laceration of larynx and dislocation of odontoidprocess. Hands clinched. Involuntary discharge of semen. Thoracic andabdominal organs normal 7 ibid - man, age 70 mark of cord around the neck, superficialin front, deep behind. Second cervical vertebra dislocated. Tongueslightly protruding.

Creosote and buy a research paper urgently guaiacol sulphonates of each, gr 1. Compound hypophosphites, gr 1 including quinine hypophosphites, gr 1/36 and strychnine hypophosphites, gr 1/256, with iodinized emulsion scott m 30 ”as in the case of iodinized emulsion scott, the advertising makesexaggerated therapeutic claims for the individual constituents of thepreparation and for the heterogeneous mixture of guaiacol and creosotesulphonates, hypophosphites, quinin, strychnin, turpentine, phenol, iodin, “lactated pepsin, ” etc thus, while it is well established thatin guaiacol sulphonate and creosote sulphonate the phenolic constituentis bound so firmly that, when administered, but very little is splitoff in the organism, yet the advertising claims “that the system canbe saturated in a shorter time and with smaller doses of creosote andguaiacol sulphonates than with any other form of these drugs” and that on the false premise that the guaiacol and creosote from these drugswill permeate the tissues of the lungs “they help to clear up thelocal infection and thus aid in returning to normal the diseased mucousmembrane ”in the advertising pamphlet, following a discussion of the effect ofclimate and food in the treatment of the tuberculous, we read. “while admitting the great importance of the foregoing points, we are firmly of the opinion that proper medication is a great aid in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, and, with this in view, we offer to the profession creosotonic scott believing that in it we have a superior preparation for this purpose ”this is unwarranted of course suitable medication to meet specialconditions is proper in the treatment of tuberculosis, but the routineadministration of a complex and irrational mixture such as creosotonic scott is bound to cause inattention to the prime requisites for theproper treatment of the tuberculous-- hygienic surroundings and goodfood creosotonic scott is an irrational mixture, sold under misleading andunwarranted claims it is inadmissible to new and nonofficial remediesfor conflict with rules 1, 6, 8 and 10 -- from the journal a m a , aug 24, 1918 campetrodin and campetrodin no 2 report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe following report on campetrodin and campetrodin no 2 has beenadopted by the council and its publication authorized w a puckner, secretary the following report of the a m a chemical laboratory on“campetrodin” and “campetrodin no 2, ” sold by the a h robinscompany, richmond, va , was submitted to the council by a referee ofthe committee on pharmacology:campetrodin and campetrodin no 2, double strength, are called “ethicalmedicinal specialties” by the a h robins company, richmond, va , which sells them an advertisement in the maryland medical journal december, 1917 contains the following claim for composition. “campetrodin made in two strengths of iodine this preparation is an oleaginous solution of iodine in camphor ”a booklet describing the “specialties” of the robins company containsthe following in reference to campetrodin. “composition. Camphor, iodine element, oleaginous solvent ” from this it appears that thepreparations are claimed to contain elementary free iodine in an“oleaginous solvent ” since free iodin, as is well known, readilycombines with fats, it was decided to determine the form in which theiodin was present in these preparations the examination demonstratedthat both preparations contained but a trace of free iodin on steamdistillation there was obtained from both preparations a distillateamounting to about 35 per cent by volume which had an odor stronglysuggestive of turpentine, while the residue contained the iodin and hadthe characteristics of an iodized fatty oil quantitative determinations indicated that campetrodin containedapproximately 0 03 per cent of free iodin and 1 3 per cent of iodinin combination with the fatty oil campetrodin no 2, double strength, contained approximately 0 03 per cent free iodin and 2 per cent ofiodin in combination with the fatty oil thus, contrary to the published statements, campetrodin is not apreparation of free elementary iodin and campetrodin no 2, doublestrength, does not contain twice as much iodin as campetrodin the report of the chemical laboratory shows that the statements madein regard to the composition of campetrodin and campetrodin no 2are incomplete in essay respects and false in others in view of thelaboratory findings it appears superfluous to inquire into thetherapeutic claims made for the preparations. It is evident, however, that a solution containing practically no free iodin is not, as claimedby the robins company, “adapted for use wherever iodin is indicatedexternally ”it is recommended that campetrodin and campetrodin no 2 be declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because of falsestatements as to chemical composition and therapeutic action, constituting conflicts with rules 1 and 6 the council adopted the recommendation of the referee and authorizedpublication of this report -- from the journal a m a , sept 21, 1918 carminzym report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following which explainswhy carminzym was not accepted for new and nonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary carminzym is a tablet sold by fairchild bros and foster, new york each tablet contains, according to claims made, approximately 32 mg of an extract of pancreas, 50 mg sodium bicarbonate, 172 mg preparedchalk, 1 5 mg powdered ipecac and “aromatics q s ” withoutconsidering other possible conflicts with its rules, the council heldthe preparation inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies forconflict with rule 10 which holds that unscientific or useless articlesare not acceptable products the council holds that complex mixtures of remedial agents are, fromevery point of view, inimical to therapeutic progress and therefore tothe public welfare such mixtures are especially objectionable becauseit is impossible accurately to determine the effects which follow thesimultaneous administration of a number of drugs having dissimilaractions. Because the practice of prescribing such mixtures tends todiscourage careful consideration of the special needs of individualpatients without which there can be no rational drug therapy on thecontrary, with the use of such mixture therapeutic treatment becomeshaphazard and mere guesswork the council, appreciating that long established customs cannot bechanged at once, has applied rule 10 concerning the recognition ofmixtures with the greatest leniency compatible with consistency whenthere has been a reasonable doubt concerning the value of a mixtureit has frequently directed that rule 10 should not apply pendingfurther clinical trial of such mixture in no instance has subsequentexperience shown that a strict interpretation of the rule would haveworked hardship or injustice the council feels that there is no longerwarrant for the admission of complex mixtures to new and nonofficialremedies or for the retention of any that have been admitted unlessdefinite evidence of the therapeutic value of such combinations isavailable in accordance with this decision several mixtures nowdescribed in new and nonofficial remedies will be omitted at theexpiration of the three year period for which articles are accepted reverting to the carminzym tablet. When it is desired to obtain theeffects of pancreatic extract by oral administration it must beadministered with a view of preventing its destruction by the gastricfluid with this end in view an antacid should be administered todecrease the acidity of the gastric juice the amount of alkali maybe supplied in the form of any of the official preparations, but theamount must be adjusted to the individual patient for the reason thatno two successive patients are likely to have the same degree ofgastric acidity ipecac has a well defined though limited field of usefulness when itis used, it should be given with a due regard to the amount needed bythe patient and the frequency of the repetition of the dose there isno reason to suppose that any two successive patients will requireipecac and extract of pancreas in a fixed proportion and with equalfrequency as a matter of fact, the amount of ipecac in carminzym is sosmall that no definite therapeutic action can be assigned to it and itsuse in this combination is purely empirical in a word, the employment of mixtures of pancreatic extract, alkalis, ipecac and carminatives in fixed proportion leads to slipshod treatmentand irrational therapeutics carminzym is an irrational mixture the useof which is detrimental to therapy the preceding report was sent to fairchild bros and foster for commentin accordance with the council usual procedure the following replywas received. The long established custom of the use of mixtures of remedial agents rests upon considerations well known and generally accepted this is equally true of combinations of drugs of similar and dissimilar properties the drugs of these combinations, especially those of marked therapeutic action, are well known and used by themselves when indicated in fact, dissimilarity of action is a cause of combination, an essential of synergism drugs classed as similar are by no means alike in action. Laxatives, tonics, carminatives, diuretics are combined with distinct advantage, economy of dose, enhanced effect, potency not obtainable with the single drug your sweeping arbitrary conclusions that complex mixtures of remedial agents are from every point of view inimical to therapeutic progress is not, it seems to us, sustained by fact and experience there is therapeutic progress in the considerate use and observation of combinations as well as in the use of a single drug indeed, in the production of a synthetic chemical substance as a therapeutic agent, the combination of potent and dissimilar elements is worked out to mitigate and correct an objectionable side effect, and promote desirable action as for ourselves, at the very outset in our line of work we quite voluntarily declared our principles and our intentions as opposed to incompatible and therefore unstable or inert combinations of the enzymes. And against the “unnecessary multiplication of preparations”-- see fairchild hand-book of the digestive ferments is not this after all the crux of the whole matter-- does a combination contain the ingredients stated, does it possess the demonstrable properties which are to be attributed to it in consequence of this composition.

In view of these considerations the council voted that the followingproprietary products be omitted from the next edition buy a research paper urgently of n n r. Glycerole of lecithin lecibrin lecithin solution lecithol neuro-lecithin-abbottand that the general article on “lecithin preparations” be transferredto the annual council reports as a matter of record the report was submitted to the manufacturers their replies wereevidently based on commercial consideration, and called for nomodification in the report the referee recommended that the preceding report be published togetherwith the following extracts from the replies of the manufacturers:from armour and company. “we are selling a good deal of lecithol and it seems to be giving satisfactory results in essay quarters we shall continue to advertise lecithol along the lines we have employed heretofore ”from the abbott laboratories.

It brings forth filth though it lie in the bones, ittakes away salt and sour belchings, though a buy a research paper urgently man be never so licentiousin diet, he shall feel no harm. It hath cured such as have thephthisic, that have been given over by all physicians. It cures suchas have the falling sickness, gouts, and diseases and swellings of thejoints. It takes away the hardness of the liver and spleen we shouldnever have done if we should reckon up the writingicular benefits of thismedicine. Therefore we commend it as a wholeessay medicine for soundnessof body, preservation of health, and vigour of mind thus galen acetum theriacale, norimberg or treacle vinegar college take of the roots of celandine the greater, one ounceand a half. The roots of angelica, masterwort, gentian, bistort, valerian, burnet, white dittany, elecampane, zedoary, of each one dram, of plantain the greater one dram and a half, the leaves of mousear, sage, scabious, scordium, dittany of crete, carduus, of each half anhandful, barks and seeds of citrons, of each half a dram, bole amoniacone dram, saffron three drams, of these let the saffron, hart-horn, dittany, and bole, be tied up in a rag, and steeped with the thingsbefore mentioned, in five pints of vinegar, for certain days by atemperate heat in a glass well stopped, strain it, and add six drams ofthe best treacle to it, shake it together, and keep it for your use acetum theriacale or treacle vinegar college add to the description of treacle water, clove-gilliflowerstwo ounces, lavender flowers an ounce and a half, rose, and elderflower vinegar, of each four pounds, digest it without boiling, threedays, then strain it through hippocrates’ sleeve culpeper see treacle water for the virtues, only this is more cool, a little more fantastical decoctions decoctum commune pro clystere or a common decoction for a clyster college take of mallows, violets, pellitory, beets, and mercury, chamomel flowers, of each one handful, sweet fennel seeds half anounce, linseeds two drams, boil them in a sufficient quantity of commonwater to a pound culpeper this is the common decoction for all clysters, accordingto the quality of the humour abounding, so you may add what simples, orsyrups, or electuaries you please. Only half a score linseeds, and ahandful of chamomel flowers are added decoctum epythimi or a decoction of epithimum college take of myrobalans, chebs, and inds, of each half anounce, stœchas, raisins of the sun stoned, epithimum, senna, of eachone ounce, fumitory half an ounce, maudlin five drams, polipodium sixdrams, turbith half an ounce, whey made with goat milk, or heifermilk four pounds, let them all boil to two pounds, the epithimumexcepted, which boil but a second or two, then take it from the fire, and add black hellebore one dram and an half, agerick half a dram, sal gem one dram and an half, steep them ten hours, then press it stronglyout culpeper it purges melancholy, as also choler, it resists madness, and all diseases coming of melancholy, and therefore let melancholypeople esteem it as a jewel decoctum sennæ gereonis or a decoction of senna college take of senna two ounces, pollipodium half an ounce, gingerone dram, raisins of the sun stoned two ounces, sebestens, prunes, ofeach twelve, the flowers of borrage, violets, roses, and rosemary, ofeach two drams, boil them in four pounds of water till half be consumed culpeper it is a common decoction for any purge, by adding othersimples or compounds to it, according to the quality of the humour youwould have purged, yet, in itself, it chiefly purges melancholy decoctum pectorale or a pectoral decoction college take of raisins of the sun stoned, an ounce, sebestens, jujubes, of each fifteen, dates six, figs four, french barley oneounce, liquorice half an ounce, maiden-hair, hyssop, scabious, colt-foot, of each one handful, boil them in three pounds of watertill two remain culpeper the medicine is chiefly appropriated to the lungs, and therefore causes a clear voice, a long wind, resists coughs, hoarseness, asthmas, &c you may drink a quarter of a pint of it everymorning, without keeping to any diet, for it purges not i shall quote essay syrups fitting to be mixed with it, when i come tothe syrups decoctum trumaticum college take of agrimony, mugwort, wild angelica, st john wort, mousear, of each two handfuls, wormwood half a handful, southernwood, bettony, bugloss, comfrey the greater and lesser, roots and all, avens, both sorts of plantain, sanicle, tormentil with the roots, the buds ofbarberries and oak, of each a handful, all these being gathered in mayand june and diligently dried, let them be cut and put up in skins orpapers against the time of use, then take of the forenamed herbs threehandfuls, boil them in four pounds of conduit water and two pounds ofwhite wine gently till half be consumed, strain it, and a pound ofhoney being added to it, let it be scummed and kept for use culpeper if sight of a medicine will do you good, this is as liketo do it as any i know syrups altering syrups culpeper reader, before we begin with the writingicular syrups, ithink good to advertise thee of these few things, which concern thenature, making, and use of syrups in general 1 a syrup is a medicineof a liquid body, compounded of decoction, infusion, or juice, withsugar or honey, and brought by the heat of the fire, into the thicknessof honey 2 because all honey is not of a thickness, understand newhoney, which of all other is thinnest 3 the reason why decoctions, infusions, juices, are thus used, is, because thereby, first, they willkeep the longer secondly, they will taste the better 4 in boilingsyrups have a great care of their just consistence, for if you boilthem too much they will candy, if too little, they will sour 5 allsimple syrups have the virtues of the simples they are made of, and arefar more convenient for weak people, and delicate stomachs syrupus de absinthio simplex or syrup of wormwood simple the college take of the clarified juice of common wormwood, clarified sugar, of each four pounds, make it into a syrup accordingto art after the same manner, are prepared simple syrups of betony, borrage, bugloss, carduus, chamomel, succory, endive, hedge-mustard, strawberries, fumitory, ground ivy, st john wort, hops, mercury, mousear, plantain, apples, purslain, rasberries, sage, scabious, scordium, houseleek, colt-foot, paul bettony, and other juices notsour culpeper see the simples, and then you may easily know both theirvirtues, and also that they are pleasanter and fitter for delicatestomachs when they are made into syrups syrupus de absinthio compositus or syrup of wormwood compound college take of common wormwood meanly dry, half a pound, red rosestwo ounces, indian spikenard three drams, old white wine, juice ofquinces, of each two pounds and an half, steep them a whole day in anearthen vessel, then boil them gently, and strain it, and by adding twopounds of sugar, boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper mesue is followed verbatim in this. And the receipt isappropriated to cold and flegmatic stomachs, and it is an admirableremedy for it, for it strengthens both stomach and liver, as alsothe instruments of concoction, a spoonful taken in the morning, isadmirable for such as have a weak digestion, it provokes an appetite toone victuals, it prevails against the yellow iaundice, breaks wind, purges humours by urine syrupus de acetosus simplex or syrup of vinegar simple college take of clear water four pounds, white sugar five pounds, boil them in a glazed vessel over a gentle fire, scumming it till halfthe water be consumed, then by putting in two pounds of white winevinegar by degrees, perfect the syrup culpeper that is, only melt the sugar with the vinegar over thefire, scum it, but boil it not syrupus acetosus simplicior or syrup of vinegar more simple college take of white sugar five pounds, white wine vinegar twopounds, by melting it in a bath, make it into a syrup culpeper of these two syrups let every one use which he finds byexperience to be best. The difference is but little they both of themcut flegm, as also tough, hard viscous humours in the stomach. Theycool the body, quench thirst, provoke urine, and prepare the stomachbefore the taking of a vomit if you take it as a preparative for anemetic, take half an ounce of it when you go to bed the night beforeyou intend it to operate, it will work the easier, but if for any ofthe foregoing occasions, take it with a liquorice stick syrupus acetosus compositus or syrup of vinegar compound college take of the roots of smallage, fennel, endive, of eachthree ounces, the seeds of annis, smallage, fennel, of each one ounce, of endive half an ounce, clear water six pounds, boil it gently in anearthen vessel till half the water be consumed, then strain and clarifyit, and with three pounds of sugar, and a pound and a half of whitewine vinegar, boil it into a syrup culpeper this in my opinion is a gallant syrup for such whosebodies are stuffed either with flegm, or tough humours, for it opensobstructions or stoppings both of the stomach, liver, spleen, andreins. It cuts and brings away tough flegm and choler, and is thereforea special remedy for such as have a stuffing at their stomach syrupus de agno casto or syrup of agnus castus college take of the seeds of rue and hemp, of each half a dram, of endive, lettice, purslain, gourds, melons, of each two drams, offleawort half an ounce, of agnus castus four ounces, the flowers ofwater lilies, the leaves of mints, of each half a handful, decoctionof seeds of lentils, and coriander seeds, of each half an ounce, threepounds of the decoction, boil them all over a gentle fire till twopounds be consumed, add to the residue, being strained, two ounces ofjuice of lemons, a pound and a half of white sugar, make it into asyrup according to art culpeper a pretty syrup, and good for little syrupus de althæa or syrup of marsh-mallows college take of roots of marsh-mallows, two ounces, the roots ofgrass asparagus, liquorice, raisins of the sun stoned, of each halfan ounce, the tops of mallows, marsh-mallows, pellitory of the wall, burnet, plantain, maiden-hair white and black, of each a handful, redcicers an ounce, of the four greater and four lesser cold seeds, ofeach three drams, boil them in six pounds of clear water till fourremain, which being strained, boil into a syrup with four pounds ofwhite sugar culpeper it is a fine cooling, opening, slipery syrup, and chieflycommendable for the cholic, stone, or gravel, in the kidneys or bladder syrupus de ammoniaca or syrup of ammoniacum college take of maudlin and cetrach, of each four handfuls, commonwormwood an ounce, the roots of succory, sparagus, bark of caper roots, of each two ounces, after due preparation steep them twenty-four hoursin three ounces of white wine, radish and fumitory water, of each twopounds, then boil it away to one pound eight ounces, let it settle, in four ounces of which, whilst it is warm, dissolve by itself gumammoniacum, first dissolved in white wine vinegar, two ounces, boil therest with a pound and an half of white sugar into a syrup, adding themixtures of the gum at the end culpeper it cools the liver, and opens obstructions both of it andthe spleen, helps old surfeits, and such like diseases, as scabs, itch, leprosy, and what else proceed from the liver over heated you may takean ounce at a time syrupus de artemisia or syrup of mugwort college take of mugwort two handfuls, pennyroyal, calaminth, origanum, bawm, arsmart, dittany of crete, savin, marjoram, germander, st john wort, camepitis, featherfew with the flowers, centaury theless, rue, bettony, bugloss, of each a handful, the roots of fennel, smallage, parsley, sparagus, bruscus, saxifrage, elecampane, cypress, madder, orris, peony, of each an ounce, juniper berries, the seeds oflovage, parsley, smallage, annis, nigella, carpobalsamum or cubebs, costus, cassia lignea, cardamoms, calamus aromaticus, the roots ofasarabacca, pellitory of spain, valerian, of each half an ounce, beingcleansed, cut, and bruised, let them be infused twenty-four hours infourteen pounds of clear water, and boiled till half be consumed, beingtaken off from the fire, and rubbed between your hands whilst it iswarm, strain it, and with honey and sugar, of each two pounds, sharpvinegar four ounces, boil it to a syrup, and perfume it with cinnamonand spikenard, of each three drams culpeper it helps the passion of the matrix, and retains it inits place, it dissolves the coldness, wind, and pains thereof. Itstrengthens the nerves, opens the pores, corrects the blood, itcorrects and provokes the menses you may take a spoonful of it at atime syrupus de betonica compositus or syrup of bettony compound college take of bettony three handfuls, marjoram four handfuls anda half, thyme, red roses, of each a handful, violets, stœchas, sage, of each half a handful, the seeds of fennel, annis, and ammi, of eachhalf an ounce, the roots of peons, polypodium, and fennel, of each fivedrams, boil them in six pounds of river water, to three pounds, strainit, and add juice of bettony two pounds, sugar three pounds and a half, make it into a syrup culpeper it helps diseases coming of cold, both in the head andstomach, as also such as come of wind, vertigos, madness. It concoctsmelancholy, it provokes the menses, and so doth the simple syrup morethan the compound syrupus byzantinus, simple college take of the juice of the leaves of endive and smallage, of each two pounds, of hops and bugloss, of each one pound, boil themtogether and scum them, and to the clarified liquor, add four pounds ofwhite sugar, to as much of the juices, and with a gentle fire boil itto a syrup syrupus byzantinus, compound college take of the juices so ordered as in the former, fourpounds, in which boil red roses, two ounces, liquorice half an ounce, the seeds of annis, fennel, and smallage, of each three drams, spikenard two drams, strain it, and to the three pounds remaining, add two pounds of vinegar, four pounds of sugar, make it into a syrupaccording to art culpeper they both of them viz both simple and compoundopen stoppings of the stomach, liver, and spleen, help the ricketsin children, cut and bring away tough flegm, and help the yellowjaundice you may take them with a liquorice stick, or take a spoonfulin the morning fasting syrupus botryos or syrup of oak of jerusalem college take of oak of jerusalem, hedge-mustard, nettles, of eachtwo handfuls, colt-foot, one handful and a half, boil them in asufficient quantity of clear water till half be consumed. To two poundsof the decoction, add two pounds of the juice of turnips baked in anoven in a close pot, and with three pounds of white sugar, boil it intoa syrup culpeper this syrup was composed against coughs, shortness ofbreath, and other the like infirmities of the breast proceeding ofcold, for which if you can get it you may take it with a liquoricestick syrupus capillorum veneris or syrup of maiden-hair college take of liquorice two ounces, maiden-hair five ounces, steep them a natural day in four pounds of warm water, then aftergentle boiling, and strong straining, with a pound and a half of finesugar make it into a syrup culpeper it opens stoppings of the stomach, strengthens the lungs, and helps the infirmities of them this may be taken also either witha liquorice stick, or mixed with the pectoral decoction like syrup ofcoltsfoot syrupus cardiacus, vel julepum cardiacum or a cordial syrup college take of rhenish wine two pounds, rose water two ounces anda half, cloves two scruples, cinnamon half a dram, ginger two scruples, sugar three ounces and a half, boil it to the consistence of a julep, adding ambergris three grains, musk one grain culpeper if you would have this julep keep long, you may put inmore sugar, and yet if close stopped, it will not easily corruptbecause it is made up only of wine, indeed the wisest way is to orderthe quantity of sugar according to the palate of him that takes it itrestores such as are in consumptions, comforts the heart, cherishes thedrooping spirits, and is of an opening quality, thereby carrying awaythose vapours which might otherwise annoy the brain and heart. You maytake an ounce at a time, or two if you please syrupus infusionis florum cariophillorum or syrup of clove-gilliflowers college take a pound of clove-gilliflowers, the whites being cutoff, infuse them a whole night in two pounds of water, then with fourpounds of sugar melted in it, make it into a syrup without boiling culpeper this syrup is a fine temperate syrup. It strengthens theheart, liver, and stomach. It refreshes the vital spirits, and is agood cordial in fevers.

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And can also take for granted, that which grows uponoaks, writingicipates essaything of the nature of jupiter, because an oakis one of his trees. As also that which grows upon pear trees, andapple trees, writingicipates essaything of his nature, because he rulesthe tree it grows upon, having no root of its own but why that shouldhave most virtues that grows upon oaks i know not, unless because itis rarest and hardest to come by. And our college opinion is in thiscontrary to scripture, which saith, god tender mercies are overall his works. And so it is, let the college of physicians walk ascontrary to him as they please, and that is as contrary as the eastto the west clusius affirms that which grows upon pear trees to beas prevalent, and gives order, that it should not touch the groundafter it is gathered. And also saith, that, being hung about theneck, it remedies witchcraft both the leaves and berries of misseltodo heat and dry, and are of subtle writings. The birdlime doth molifyhard knots, tumours, and imposthumes. Ripens and discusses them, anddraws forth thick as well as thin humours from the remote writings ofthe body, digesting and separating them and being mixed with equalwritings of rozin and wax, doth molify the hardness of the spleen, andhelps old ulcers and sores being mixed with sandaric and orpiment, it helps to draw off foul nails. And if quick-lime and wine lees beadded thereunto, it works the stronger the misselto itself of the oak as the best made into powder, and given in drink to those that havethe falling sickness, does assuredly heal them, as matthiolus saith:but it is fit to use it for forty days together essay have so highlyesteemed it for the virtues thereof, that they have called it lignumsanctiæ crucis, wood of the holy cross, believing it helps the fallingsickness, apoplexy and palsy very speedily, not only to be inwardlytaken, but to be hung at their neck tragus saith, that the fresh woodof any misselto bruised, and the juice drawn forth and dropped in theears that have imposthumes in them, doth help and ease them within afew days moneywort, or herb twopence descript the common moneywort sends forth from a small threadyroot divers long, weak, and slender branches, lying and running uponthe ground two or three feet long or more, set with leaves two at ajoint one against another at equal distances, which are almost round, but pointed at the ends, smooth, and of a good green colour at thejoints with the leaves from the middle forward come forth at everypoint essaytimes one yellow flower, and essaytimes two, standing each ona small foot-stalk, and made of five leaves, narrow-pointed at the end, with essay yellow threads in the middle, which being past, there standin their places small round heads of seed place it grows plentifully in almost all places of this land, commonly in moist grounds by hedge-sides, and in the middle of grassyfields time they flower in june and july, and their seed is ripe quicklyafter government and virtues venus owns it moneywort is singularlygood to stay all fluxes in man or woman, whether they be lasks, bloody-fluxes, bleeding inwardly or outwardly, or the weakness of thestomach that is given to casting it is very good also for the ulcersor excoriations of the lungs, or other inward writings it is exceedinglygood for all wounds, either fresh or green, to heal them speedily, and for all old ulcers that are of spreading natures for all whichpurposes the juice of the herb, or the powder drank in water whereinhot steel hath been often quenched. Or the decoction of the green herbin wine or water drank, or used to the outward place, to wash or bathethem, or to have tents dipped therein and put into them, are effectual moonwort descript it rises up usually but with one dark green, thick andflat leaf, standing upon a short foot-stalk not above two fingersbreadth. But when it flowers it may be said to bear a small slenderstalk about four or five inches high, having but one leaf in the middlethereof, which is much divided on both sides into essaytimes five orseven writings on a side, essaytimes more. Each of which writings is smalllike the middle rib, but broad forwards, pointed and round, resemblingtherein a half-moon, from whence it took the name. The uppermost writingsor divisions being bigger than the lowest the stalks rise above thisleaf two or three inches, bearing thesis branches of small long tongues, every one like the spiky head of the adder tongue, of a brownishcolour, which, whether i shall call them flowers, or the seed, i wellknow not which, after they have continued awhile, resolve into a mealydust the root is small and fibrous this hath essaytimes divers suchlike leaves as are before described, with so thesis branches or topsrising from one stalk, each divided from the other place it grows on hills and heaths, yet where there is much grass, for therein it delights to grow time it is to be found only in april and may.