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It also helps the jaundice the water, distilled from both leaves and roots, is a singular remedyto wash any place bitten or best place buy research paper online stung by any venomous creature. As alsofor any of the purposes before spoken of, and is very good to wash anyrunning sores or ulcers the decoction of the root in wine being drank, hinders abortion or miscarriage in child-bearing the leaves alsokill the worms in children, and is a great help to them that cannotkeep their water. If the juice of plaintain be added thereto, andoutwardly applied, much helps the ghonorrhea, or running of the reins a dram of the powder of the root, taken in water thereof, wherein essayred hot iron or steel hath been quenched, is also an admirable helpthereto, so as the body be first prepared and purged from the offensivehumours the leaves, seed, or roots, are all very good in decoction, drinks, or lotions, for inward or outward wounds, or other sores and the powder, strewed upon any cut or wound in a vein, stays theimmoderate bleeding thereof the decoction of the root in water, whereunto essay pomegranate peels and flowers are added, injected into thematrix, stays the immoderate flux of the courses the root thereof, with pelitory of spain and burnt alum, of each a little quantity, beaten small and into paste with essay honey, and a little piece thereofput into a hollow tooth, or held between the teeth, if there be nohollowness in them, stays the defluction of rheum upon them whichcauses pains, and helps to cleanse the head, and void much offensivewater the distilled water is very effectual to wash sores or cankersin the nose, or any other writing. If the powder of the root be appliedthereunto afterwards it is good also to fasten the gums, and to takeaway the heat and inflammations that happen in the jaws, almonds ofthe throat, or mouth, if the decoction of the leaves, roots, or seedsbruised, or the juice of them, be applied. But the roots are mosteffectual to the purposes aforesaid one-blade descript this small plant never bears more than one leaf, but onlywhen it rises up with its stalk, which thereon bears another, andseldom more, which are of a blueish green colour, broad at the bottom, and pointed with thesis ribs or veins like plaintain. At the top of thestalk grows thesis small flowers star-fashion, smelling essaywhat sweet;after which comes small reddish berries when they are ripe the rootsmall, of the bigness of a rush, lying and creeping under the uppercrust of the earth, shooting forth in divers places place it grows in moist, shadowy, grassy places of woods, in thesisplaces of this realm time it flowers about may, and the berries are ripe in june, andthen quickly perishes, until the next year it springs from the sameagain government and virtues it is a herb of the sun, and thereforecordial.

Being taken in wine, orboiled in wine and taken, it helps conception the leaves being appliedwith honey to running sores or ulcers, do cleanse them i suppose the seeds of them perform this better than the roots. Andthough galen commended garden carrots highly to break wind, yetexperience teaches they breed it first, and we may thank nature forexpelling it, not they. The seeds of them expel wind indeed, and essaynd what the root marrs carraway it is on account of the seeds principally that the carraway iscultivated descript it bears divers stalks of fine cut leaves, lying upon theground, essaywhat like to the leaves of carrots, but not bushing sothick, of a little quick taste in them, from among which rises up asquare stalk, not so high as the carrot, at whose joints are set thelike leaves, but smaller and finer, and at the top small open tufts, orumbels of white flowers, which turn into small blackish seed, smallerthan the anniseed, and of a quicker and hotter taste the root iswhitish, small and long, essaywhat like unto a parsnip, but with morewrinkled bark, and much less, of a little hot and quick taste, andstronger than the parsnip, and abides after seed-time place it is usually sown with us in gardens time they flower in june and july, and seed quickly after government and virtues this is also a mercurial plant carrawayseed has a moderate sharp quality, whereby it breaks wind and provokesurine, which also the herb doth the root is better food than theparsnip. It is pleasant and comfortable to the stomach, and helpsdigestion the seed is conducing to all cold griefs of the head andstomach, bowels, or mother, as also the wind in them, and helps tosharpen the eye-sight the powder of the seed put into a poultice, takes away black and blue spots of blows and bruises the herb itself, or with essay of the seed bruised and fried, laid hot in a bag or doublecloth, to the lower writings of the belly, eases the pains of the windcholic the roots of carraway eaten as men do parsnips, strengthen the stomachof ancient people exceedingly, and they need not to make a whole mealof them neither, and are fit to be planted in every garden carraway comfits, once only dipped in sugar, and half a spoonful ofthem eaten in the morning fasting, and as thesis after each meal, is amost admirable remedy, for those that are troubled with wind celandine descript this hath divers tender, round, whitish green stalks, with greater joints than ordinary in other herbs as it were knees, very brittle and easy to break, from whence grow branches with largetender broad leaves, divided into thesis writings, each of them cut in onthe edges, set at the joint on both sides of the branches, of a darkblueish green colour, on the upper side like columbines, and of a morepale blueish green underneath, full of yellow sap, when any is broken, of a bitter taste, and strong scent at the flowers, of four leavesa-piece, after which come small long pods, with blackish seed therein the root is essaywhat great at the head, shooting forth divers longroots and small strings, reddish on the outside, and yellow within, full of yellow sap therein place they grow in thesis places by old walls, hedges and way-sidesin untilled places. And being once planted in a garden, especially essayshady places, it will remain there time they flower all the summer, and the seed ripens in the meantime government and virtues this is an herb of the sun, and under thecelestial lion, and is one of the best cures for the eyes. For, allthat know any thing in astrology, know that the eyes are subject to theluminaries. Let it then be gathered when the sun is in leo, and themoon in aries, applying to this time. Let leo arise, then may you makeinto an oil or ointment, which you please, to anoint your sore eyeswith i can prove it doth both my own experience, and the experience ofthose to whom i have taught it, that most desperate sore eyes have beencured by this only medicine.

526 the lowenthal postgraduate course 527 medical society of the united states 531 the national formulary-- a review of the fourth edition 535 nonspecific protein therapy 536 willard ealon ogden 538 “patents” 542 pharmaceutical barnums 545 the pharmacopeia 546 physician stock in prescription products 548 pituitary gland preparations 549 proprietorship in medicine 550 philip rahtjen and his discoveries 553 sodium cacodylate in syphilis 555 tablets. Dependability of dosage 556 therapeutic evidence. Its crucial test 557 “vaccines in toxic conditions” 560 vitamins. Their distribution 561 the william a webster co and the direct pharmaceutical co 564 yeast 566 briefer paragraphs 570 the propaganda for reform in proprietary medicines writing i reports of the council on pharmacy and chemistry foreword the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council on pharmacy and chemistry was established by theamerican medical association primarily for the purpose of gatheringand disseminating such information as would protect the medicalprofession-- and thus the public-- in the prescribing of proprietarymedicinal articles the council consists of sixteen members, fifteen appointed for a termof five years without pay, and the sixteenth, a secretary, who isalso the director of the chemical laboratory of the american medicalassociation see writing ii at the present time 1921 the membership is. C l alsberg, a m , m d , chief of the bureau of chemistry, u s dewritingment of agriculture, washington, d c c w edmunds, m d , professor of materia medica and therapeutics, university of michigan medical school, ann arbor r a hatcher, ph g , m d , professor of pharmacology, cornell university medical college, new york city a w hewlett, m d , professor of medicine, leland stanford junior university school of medicine, san francisco john howland, m d , professor of pediatrics, johns hopkins university medical dewritingment, baltimore reid hunt, m d , professor of pharmacology, medical school, harvard university, boston w t longcope, a b , m d , new york g w mccoy, m d , director of the hygienic laboratory, u s public health service, washington, d c lafayette b mendel, ph d , sc d , professor of physiological chemistry, sheffield scientific school, yale university, new haven f g novy, sc d , m d , professor of bacteriology, university of michigan medical school, ann arbor w w palmer, b s , m d , bard professor of medicine, columbia university college of physicians and surgeons, new york w a puckner, phar d , secretary of the council, director of the chemical laboratory of the american medical association, chicago l g rowntree, m d , sc d , professor of medicine, mayo foundation, rochester g h simmons, m d , ll d , chairman of the council, editor of the journal of the american medical association, chicago torald sollmann, m d , professor of pharmacology and materia medica, western reserve university school of medicine, cleveland julius stieglitz, ph d , sc d , chem d , professor of chemistry, university of chicago, vice-chairman of the council, chicago at its first meeting in 1905, the council began examining theproprietary and nonofficial medicinal preparations offered tophysicians of the united states, and authorized the publication ofa book new and nonofficial remedies containing descriptions ofthose preparations which were deemed worthy of the consideration ofphysicians it also issued reports reports of the council on pharmacyand chemistry to the medical profession on those preparations whichwere not eligible the council adopted a set of rules by which tomeasure the eligibility of each preparation for admission to new andnonofficial remedies these rules were designed primarily to protectthe public-- through the medical profession-- against fraud, undesirablesecrecy and objectionable advertising in connection with proprietarymedicinal articles the rules originally adopted have been subjectedto revision from time to time to meet changing conditions for theinformation of those who wish to familiarize themselves with the workof the council the rules which are now in force 1921 follow thisintroduction a summary is also to be found in the article, “the workof the council on pharmacy and chemistry, present and future, ” page 12 since 1906, the council has issued new and nonofficial remediesannually in each issue are listed and described the articles thatstand accepted on january 1 of the year of publication the bookdescribes proprietary medicinal articles on the american market thatare found eligible under the rules, and also such nonproprietary, nonofficial articles as give promise of therapeutic usefulness, listingthe acceptable brands articles of a similar character are groupedtogether, and each group is preceded by a general discussion for thepurpose of comparison since 1908, the council has also issued an annual volume, “reportsof the council on pharmacy and chemistry, ” which contains reportson proprietary medicines that were found inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies the reports issued prior to 1916-- and deemed ofsufficient interest to physicians-- were reprinted in the propagandafor reform in proprietary medicines, ninth edition 1916 the moreimportant reports issued from 1916 to 1921, inclusive, are in thisvolume while it is the chief function of the council to investigate and reporton proprietary medicinal preparations, its work has broadened so thatthe council work may now be characterized as a propaganda for therational use of drugs thus, its committee on therapeutic researchencourages the investigation of questions concerning the actionsof drugs these investigations are brought together in the “annualreports of the therapeutic research committee ” the council also has acommittee on medical teaching which has issued the publication “usefuldrugs, ” a concise, but thorough and up-to-date, discussion of the moreimportant drugs in addition, the council appointed a committee toprepare an “epitome of the u s pharmacopeia and national formulary, ”in which are presented those portions of the united states pharmacopeiaand the national formulary that are of interest to physicians and inwhich is given a concise statement of the therapeutic usefulness ofsuch drugs and preparations official rules of the council on pharmacy and chemistry may 1, 1921 introductionthe following rules have been adopted by the council primarily withthe object of protecting the medical profession and the public againstfraud, undesirable secrecy and objectionable advertising in connectionwith proprietary medicinal articles new and nonofficial remedies -- the book new and nonofficial remediescontains a description of proprietary articles which have beenaccepted as conforming to the rules of the council. And of such simplenonproprietary and nonofficial substances as seem of sufficientimportance to warrant their inclusion mixtures -- for admission to n n r , proprietary pharmaceuticalmixtures must comply with the rules.

The entrance of air intothe pleural cavities with collapse of the lungs all tend to causemechanical suffocation either by pressure or by paralysis for deathsin epileptics, see paper 1, 10, 11, 33, and 40 it is best place buy research paper online not necessary that the air-passages should be absolutely closedto cause suffocation the cause of death is more likely to be pure asphyxia, because of theabsence of the complicating pressure of the hand or ligature on thevessels and nerves of the neck, and of fracture of larynx or vertebræ symptoms - foreign bodies889 entering the trachea naturally falltoward the right bronchial tube instead of the left because of thesize and position of the entrance of the right tube if then but onetube is involved, the signs will usually be on the right side. Whereasif the foreign body stop in the larynx or trachea, both sides will beaffected the latter condition is much more dangerous the symptomswould be resonance over the lung with the respiratory murmur writingly orwholly absent. Less mobility. Puerile breathing on the unaffected side in either case there may at first be little disturbance, especiallyif the shape of the foreign body is such as not to greatly interferewith the access of air. Otherwise there may be at once, and almostalways will be after a time, more or less urgent dyspnœa diminution ofthe necessary oxygen may cause convulsions, apoplexy, and other brainsymptoms acute emphysema of the portion of lung not obstructed mayfollow its forcible distention the local effect of the foreign body isan irritation which causes spasm and cough it may be carried upward bythe expirations and downward again by each inspiration inflammationis likely to appear eventually and may involve the lung if theobstruction is not complete there may follow periods of alternation ofgood and bad health, ending perhaps in recovery the foreign body maybe expelled after a greater or lesser interval on the other hand deathmay result from secondary causes in the absence of correct historythe symptoms may lead to a wrong diagnosis and inappropriate treatment;as where a patient whose symptoms resulted from the presence of a pieceof bone in the larynx, was treated for syphilis a foreign body may becoughed up from the lung into the trachea and fall backward into theopposite lung writingial closure of the larynx, most likely caused by a flat orirregular substance, rather than globular, may cause gradual asphyxiawith symptoms of apoplexy, making the diagnosis difficult when a foreign body remains a long time in the larynx, spasmodic coughand croupy breathing usually ensue, expectoration tinged with blood, hoarseness, or complete aphonia, pain, dyspnœa, possibly crepitationand dulness over the lungs the case may end suddenly in death fromclosure of the glottis, or the foreign body may pass into the tracheaand set up a new train of symptoms, or it may be expelled the frequency with which foreign bodies in the pharynx or œsophagusobstruct respiration, and the facility with which they may usually beremoved, suggest a careful examination otherwise the patient may betreated indefinitely for supposed obstruction in the air-passages foreign bodies in the œsophagus have perforated into the trachea, andeven the lungs, heart, and aorta in complete suffocation death will occur in from two to five minutes see remarks under strangulation death may also occur instantaneously the experiments of the committee on suspended animation890 showed that when the trachea of a dog was exposed, incised, and a tube tied in, the average time covered by the respiratory efforts after stopping up the tube with a cork was four minutes five seconds. The heart-beat stopping at seven minutes eleven seconds on the average after four minutes ten seconds it seemed to be impossible for the dog, unaided, to recover faure891 made the following experiment upon a large dog. He fixed a cork in the trachea at first the dog was quiet. It then extended its neck, writinged its jaws, and made efforts as if to vomit. Then tried to walk, but its gait was uncertain. Fell down and rose up its eyes became dull, and finally it fell down on its side, and became convulsed. Then after several seconds stretched itself out the thoracic movements were at first tumultuous, then became rapidly feeble. The heart beating very slowly at the necroscopy the lungs filled the thorax, were full of thick dark blood and emphysematous the blood was black and fluid in the left ventricle and arteries, and in the right cavities and veins resembled molasses liver darkly congested there was no mucus in the trachea and no ecchymosis in the lungs he also p 306 tried the experiment upon a large dog of fastening boards against its thorax and tightening them by means of cords for essay minutes it was quiet, but suddenly it became much agitated, stood upon its hind legs, threw itself against the wall, rolled on the ground, and uttered frightful cries. Finally fell on its side there was no movement of the thorax, but the muscles of the neck and belly were in full and rapid action, dry and sonorous rles were heard, and a large quantity of mucus appeared at the nose and mouth the movements grew feebler, the respirations infrequent, and at the end of thirty-four minutes it was dead the necroscopy showed the blood black and thick. Heart relaxed. Lungs red, a little emphysematous, containing but little blood, and on their surface were blackish points and small red spots the death of desdemona shakespeare “othello” has been much criticised the declaration that she was strangled or suffocated does not consist with the symptoms described see med news, philadelphia, may 1st, 1886, p 489 treatment the obvious indication is to search for and remove the obstruction themeans and methods of treatment are fully treated of in surgical works, but may be briefly mentioned here laryngoscopical examination may be necessary a curved forceps isusually the best instrument for removing the foreign body a tallowcandle may serve to push it into the stomach if there is no bougie athand suction may be used sneezing may be brought on by tickling thenostrils. Coughing by tickling the glottis. Vomiting by irritating thefauces, or by emetic. The body of the subject may be inverted and inthis position the fauces may be tickled, or fingers may be passed backinto the pharynx johnson892 says that at the moment of inversion thepatient should try to take a deep inspiration. This opens the glottisand facilitates the expulsion of the foreign body the inspiratorycurrent has no appreciable effect in retarding the movement of theforeign body in the direction of gravity noble recommends inversion of the body in new-born infants in whichasphyxia may be supposed to be due to anæmia of the brain tracheotomyor laryngotomy may be necessary it may be necessary to administeroxygen foreign bodies like beards of grass and fish-heads can bewithdrawn only with difficulty because of their sharp projections intense suffering and dyspnœa in a robust subject may necessitatevenesection generally speaking it is better to bring up the foreignbody than to push it down into the stomach beveridge suggests toblow into the ear, to induce a reflex action and cause expulsion ofthe foreign body cold affusions, artificial respiration, galvanism, frictions of the limbs, artificial heat, stimulants by mouth andrectum, may one or all be needed hamilton893 says that it is useless to expect good results fromelectricity if five minutes have elapsed since life appeared to beextinct.

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Com- | | | | | | | plained of | | | | | | | last one | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |considerable | | | | | | | tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |not so much as | now after so | | | | | | previously | thesis injec- | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 | | tions -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 4 | 36| ♂ | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain |no tenderness | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay tender- | | | | | | | ness | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |could not sleep|essay tender- | | | | | | at night | ness. Slight | | | | | | | induration -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 | 32| ♂ | 6/20/16 | 3 | 20 |essay pain |no induration | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 25 |essay pain | | | | | |minims| | | | | 6/23/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain |no induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |worse pain | | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |worse than any |slight tender- | | | | | | |ness -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 6 | 20| ♂ | 6/ 8/16 | 1 | 1/6 |very little | | | | 6/10/16 | 1 | 1/5 |very little | | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |very little | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/4 |bothered more | | | | | | | than others | | | | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 |quite a little |still essay | | | | | | pain | soreness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/4 |considerably |very little | | | | | | less pain than| tenderness | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | with prepar- | | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | ation 2 | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 7 | 30| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |little pain |none | | | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/4 |no pain | | | | 6/14/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay pain | | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |not so much |no tenderness | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |very little |only slight | | | | | | pain | amount of | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | induration | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | | | | 6/22/16 | 2 | 1/4 |essay pain |essay little | | | | | | | induration | | | 6/24/16 | 2 | 1/4 |considerable |essay indura- | | | | | | pain | tion | | | 6/25/16 | 1 | 1/4 |“fine” |slight indura- | | | | | | | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 8 | 28| ♂ | 6/13/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward | | | 6/15/16 | 2 | 1/5 |little pain |little pain | | | | | | | afterward -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 9 | 28| ♀ | 6/17/16 | 2 | 1/5 |essay complaint |very little | | | | | | of pain | induration | | | 6/18/16 | 2 | 1/5 | fairly severe | | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |essay pain. Says|very slight | | | | | | these have | induration | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | hurt very much| | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | less than | | | | | | | others | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10 | 37| ♂ | 6/12/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 1/4 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/15/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no symptoms |none | | | 6/16/16 |arseno-| | | | | | |benzol | | | | | | 6/17/16 | 3 | 1/5 |“much less pain|none | | | | | | than biniodid | | | | | | | or grey oil” | | | | 6/18/16 | 3 | 1/5 |no complaint |none | | | 6/19/16 | 3 | 1/5 |says he is over|essay indura- | | | 6/20/16 | 3 | 1/4 | it in one hour| tion at site | | | 6/21/16 | 3 | 1/4 | | of injection -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 11 | 30| ♀ | 6/11/16 | 1 | 20 |considerable. |considerable | | | | |minims| not so much | pain and | | | 6/12/16 | 2 | 20 | | tenderness on | | | | |minims| | palpation | | | | | | | over area | | | 6/13/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |indurated area | | | | |minims| | at pt of | | | | | | | each | | | | | | | painful | | | 6/14/16 | 1 | 25 |not much pain |slight indura- | | | | |minims| | tion -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- * the diagnosis in case 5 was primary syphilis, and in the other paper, secondary syphilis † in this column, ♂ indicates male, and ♀ female in no case did wassermann become negative the criticism may be raised that the number of paper and of injectionsis too small to permit the drawing of any just conclusions evenshould we grant it, the statistics certainly do not prove any markedsuperiority of any one of the preparations over the others we wish tothank dr sollmann for advising and directing us in this work, and drs bailey, bernstein, markus and reycraft for assistance in carrying itout report of dr albert keideltwenty paper were chosen at random from the syphilitic patientsattending the clinic they were given intramuscular injections of thethree solutions, in amounts varying from 1 to 2 c c , at intervals inmost instances of two days the injections were invariably made intothe gluteal muscles, at depths of from 2 to 2-1/2 inches, and ordinarycare exercised to preserve asepsis after injection the patient wasallowed to dewriting, and the result was recorded at the succeedingvisit the result was determined from the patient statement and ourexamination essay patients received injections of only one solution;essay were treated with first one and later with another, and onepatient received all three at different times the solutions were nevermixed for a single injection, of course table 2 -- reactions in twenty paper reported by dr keidel preparation reactions number of ┌────────────┴────────────┐ injections severe mild none undetermined 1 13 14 4 8 39 2 5 15 16 5 41 3 7 25 3 2 37 -- - 117 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- the solutions are understood to contain a 1 per cent solution of redmercuric iodid in oil, two of them containing in addition 2 5 percent of guaiacol, one of these being a proprietary preparation thesolutions are designated as preparations 1, 2 and 3, respectively, corresponding to the numbers on the labels of the bottles in which theywere originally received the local reactions are recorded as “severe” s, “mild” m, “none” o and “undetermined” u by “severe” ismeant very severe pain lasting for from several hours to several days;by “mild” is meant slight pain or numbness for several hours, or lessthan an hour. “none” indicates that there was no local reaction, and“undetermined, ” that the patient has failed to return after the lastinjection in table 3 all the details of the investigation are recorded under“local reaction, ” the letters represent the type of reaction after eachinjection, in the order in which they were given. When two solutionswere used in the same case, the letters represent the reactionsfollowing the solution opposite which they stand in the fifth columnthe plus and minus symbols indicate the wassermann reaction. Plusindicates a completely positive, and minus a completely negativereaction when there is only one sign, it refers to the reaction at theend of treatment. When there are two, to the reaction before and after the seventh column shows the clinical result at the end of treatment;when no note is made, it means that there was no change noted in theeighth column are noted any objective results observed at the time ofexaminations of the patients the injections were made and the result charted by dr e l zimmermann, of my staff, under my directions andsupervision -- abstracted in the journal a m a , feb 24, 1917 table 3 -- details of investigation by dr keidel | | | | total |dura- |effect | | | case|no |prepar-| local | amount | tion | on | type of | result | general | | ation |reaction |solution| of |wasser-| case | | remarks | | | | given, |treat-| mann | | | | | | | c c | ment | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 3 | 2 | ooo | 3 | 6 da | |latent | | 2 | 5 | 2 | mosms | 5 6 | 9 da | |gummas |marked | 3 | 7 | 1 | mmm. | 9 5 | 3 mo |- to |latent | improve- | | | | others u| | | | | ment | | 3 | 2 | uuu | | | | | | 4 | 1 | 2 | u | 0 75 | | |latent | | 5 | 4 | 1 | sssm | 4 4 | 9 da | - |gummas | |after 4th | | | | | | | | | injection, | | | | | | | | | developed | | | | | | | | | diarrhea. | | | | | | | | | melena 6 | 9 | 1 |ooumsosmu| 9 1 | 1 mo | - |latent | | 7 | 2 | 3 | mm | 3 8 | 2 da | |latent | |well | | | | | | | | | tolerated 8 | 7 | 2 | oooomou | 9 6 |17 da | to |primary |primary | | | | | | | | | healed | 9 | 4 | 1 | smmu | 5 5 | 9 da | |gumma |improved | 10 | 3 | 3 | mss | 3 | 6 da | |palmar |markedly | | | | | | | | syphilis;| improved | | | | | | | | tertiary | | 11 | 7 | 3 | msmmmmm | 10 6 |13 da | to |latent | | 12 | 3 | 2 | mmo | 5 4 |14 da | |secondary |rash |developed | 2 | 1 | sm | | | | papular| disap- | toxic ery- | | | | | | | | pearing | thema on | | | | | | | | | thighs | | | | | | | | | cleared up | | | | | | | | | on stopping | | | | | | | | | hgcl₂ and | | | | | | | | | under local | | | | | | | | | treatment 13 |10 | 3 | mmmmmmmm| 12 6 |20 da | to |secondary |rash |small | | | mmu | | | | lichen | not | induration | | | | | | | syph | improved | following | | | | | | | | | injection | | | | | | | | | of 1 2 c c 14 | 6 | 2 | oomsmm | 7 2 |17 da | to |old | |responded to | 2 | 1 | sm | | | | cerebro- | | doses of | | | | | | | spinal | | 1 c c with | | | | | | | syphilis | | salivation. | | | | | | | | | fever after | | | | | | | | | injection | | | | | | | | | of 1 2 c c 15 | 4 | 1 | soms | 4 2 | 7 da | to |secondary |no | | | | | | | | condyl- | improve- | | | | | | | | omas | ment | 16 | 9 | 3 |omommsmso| 10 4 |12 da | |secondary |pustules |slight | 2 | 2 | so | | | | pustular| dried up;| gingivitis | | | | | | | syph | headache | following | | | | | | | | and fever| dose of | | | | | | | | gone | 1 5 c c 17 | 5 | 1 | ssmsu | 13 3 |18 da | to |tertiary. |general | | 2 | 2 | ms | | | | aortitis | condition| | 2 | 3 | ms | | | | | improved | 18 | 4 | 2 | oomm | 9 5 |13 da |- to |latent | | | 2 | 1 | mm | | | | |markedly | | | | | | | | | improved | 19 | 2 | 3 | mu | 2 5 | 5 da | |gumma | | 20 | 5 | 2 | mmmmo | 9 |14 da | to |latent |marked |small | 2 | 3 | ms | | | | | general | induration | | | | | | | | improve- | following | | | | | | | | ment | no 3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- corpora lutea soluble extract, parke, davis & co report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfollowing inquiries, the council took up for consideration “corporalutea soluble extract, ” marketed by parke, davis & co in the form ofampules and proposed for hypodermic administration the report whichappears below was submitted to the council by a committee, and wasadopted by the council corpora lutea soluble extract was declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies, and publication of thereport authorized w a puckner, secretary corpora lutea soluble extract has not been submitted by themanufacturer the information of the referee is based, therefore, onthe claims made in the trade package, and on the statements in theprice list these show that the product is essentially secret andclaims made for the actions and uses of the preparation do not makeclear the essentially experimental status of the article, and aretherefore misleading conflict with rule 1 -- no definite statement of composition appearsbeyond the indefinite claim that it is an aqueous solution of “solublecorpora lutea extract, ” each ampule corresponding to 0 2 gm ofdesiccated gland how these soluble products are obtained, whether theyrepresent all the water-soluble principles, or whether essay have beeneliminated, are questions that are not answered yet such informationis essential to intelligent and scientific use, for, as there is nomethod of standardization, the method of preparation is the only markof identity for instance, we do not know at this time whether proteinshave anything to do with the supposed value of corpora lutea it is, therefore, essential to know whether or not the proteins have beeneliminated conflict with rule 6 -- the circular in the package advises thehypodermic use of this extract, not only in functional amenorrheaand the ordinary reflex consequences of physiologic or artificialmenopause, but also in.