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Make them into an ointment in a mortar culpeper it is a wholeessay, though troubleessay medicine for scabsand best buy case study essays itch unguentum e plumbo or, ointment of lead college take of lead burnt according to art, litharge, of each twoounces, ceruss, antimony, of each one ounce, oil of roses as much as issufficient. Make it into an ointment according to art culpeper take it one time with another, it will go neer to do moreharm than good unguentum pomatum college take of fresh hog grease three pounds, fresh sheep suetnine ounces, pomewater pared and cut, one pound and nine ounces, damaskrose-water six ounces, the roots of orris florentine grossly bruisedsix drams, boil them in balneo mariæ till the apples be soft, thenstrain it, but press it not and keep it for use. Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it with this. But yet be not too busywith it, for i tell you plainly it is not very safe unguentum amarum or, a bitter ointment college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, bitter almonds, of each one ounce and an half, juice of peach flowers and leaves, andwormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, centaury theless, gentian, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds of coleworts, thepulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grass water a dram andan half, bull gall an ounce and an half, with a sufficient quantityof juice of lemons, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into anointment according to art unguentum apostolorum or, ointment of the apostles college take of turpentine, yellow wax, ammoniacum, of eachfourteen drams, long birthwort roots, olibanum, bdellium, of each sixdrams, myrrh, gilbanum, of each half an ounce, opopanax, verdigris, ofeach two drams, litharge nine drams, oil two pounds, vinegar enough todissolve the gums, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it consumes corrupt and dead flesh, and makes flesh softwhich is hard, it cleanses wounds, ulcers, and fistulas, and restoresflesh where it is wanting unguentum catapsoras college take of ceruss washed in purslain water, then in vinegarwherein wild rhadish roots have been steeped and pressed out, lapiscalaminaris, chalcitis, of each six drams, burnt lead, goat blood, of each half an ounce, quick-silver sublimated an ounce, the juiceof houseleek, nightshade, plantain, of each two ounces, hog greasecleansed three pounds, oil of violets, poppies, mandrakes, of each anounce. First let them sublimate and exungia, then the oils, juices, andpowders, be mixed, and so made into an ointment according to art unguentum citrinum or, a citron ointment college take of borax an ounce, camphire a dram, white coral halfan ounce, alum plume an ounce, umbilicus marinus, tragacanth, whitestarch, of each three drams, crystal, dentalis utalis, olibanum, niter, white marble, of each two drams, gersa serpentaria an ounce, cerusssix ounces, hog grease not salted, a pound and an half, goat suetprepared, an ounce and an half, hen fat two ounces and an half powder the things as you ought to do both together, and by themselves, melt the fats being cleansed in a stone vessel, and steep in them twocitrons of a mean bigness cut in bits, in a warm bath, after a wholeweek strain it, and put in the powders by degrees, amongst which letthe camphire and borax be the last, stir them, and bring them into theform of an ointment unguentum martiatum college take of fresh bay leaves three pounds, garden rue twopounds and an half, marjoram two pounds, mints a pound, sage, wormwood, costmary, bazil, of each half a pound, sallad oil twenty pounds, yellowwax four pounds, malaga wine two pounds, of all of them being bruised, boiled, and pressed out as they ought, make an ointment according toart culpeper it is a great strengthener of the head, it being anointedwith it. As also of all the writings of the body, especially the nerves, muscles, and arteries unguentum mastichinum or, an ointment of mastich college take of the oil of mastich, wormwood, and nard, of each anounce, mastich, mints, red roses, red coral, cloves, cinnamon, wood ofaloes, squinanth, of each a dram, wax as much as is sufficient to makeit into an ointment according to art culpeper this is like the former, and not a whit inferior to it;it strengthens the stomach being anointed with it, restores appetiteand digestion before it was called a stomach ointment unguentum neapolitanum college take of hog grease washed in juice of sage a pound, quick-silver strained through leather, four ounces, oil of bays, chamomel, and earthworms, of each two ounces, spirit of wine an ounce, yellow wax two ounces, turpentine washed in juice of elecampane threeounces, powder of chamepitys and sage, of each two drams, make theminto an ointment according to art culpeper a learned art to spoil people. Hundreds are bound to cursesuch ointments, and those that appoint them unguentum nervinum college take of cowslips with the flowers, sage, chamepitys, rosemary, lavender, bay with the berries, chamomel, rue, smallage, melilot with the flowers, wormwood, of each a handful, mints, betony, pennyroyal, parsley, centaury the less, st john wort, of each ahandful, oil of sheep or bullock feet, five pounds, oil of spike, half an ounce, sheep or bullock suet, or the marrow of either, twopounds.

Yet must it be done with discretion, for it isvery quick and piercing, and therefore but a little must be taken at atime there is also another oil made by insolation in this manner. Takewhat quantity you will of the flowers, and put them into a strong glassclose stopped, tie a fine linen cloth over the mouth, and turn themouth down into another strong glass, which being set in the sun, anoil will distil down into the lower glass, to be preserved as preciousfor divers uses, both inward and outward, as a sovereign balm to healthe disease before-mentioned, to clear dim sights, and to take awayspots, marks, and scars in the skin rhubarb, or rephontic do not start, and say, this grows you know not how far off. And thenask me, how it comes to pass that i bring it among our english simples?. For though the name may speak it foreign, yet it grows with us inengland, and that frequent enough in our gardens. And when you havethoroughly pursued its virtues, you will conclude it nothing inferiorto that which is brought out of china, and by that time this hath beenas much used as that hath been, the name which the other hath gottenwill be eclipsed by the fame of this. Take therefore a description atlarge of it as follows:descript at the first appearing out of the ground, when the winteris past, it hath a great round brownish head, rising from the middleor sides of the root, which opens itself into sundry leaves one afteranother, very much crumpled or folded together at the first, andbrownish. But afterwards it spreads itself, and becomes smooth, verylarge and almost round, every one standing on a brownish stalk of thethickness of a man thumb, when they are grown to their fulness, andmost of them two feet and more in length, especially when they grow inany moist or good ground. And the stalk of the leaf, from the bottomthereof to the leaf itself, being also two feet, the breadth thereoffrom edge to edge, in the broadest place, being also two feet, of asad or dark green colour, of a fine tart or sourish taste, much morepleasant than the garden or wood sorrel from among these rise up essay, but not every year, strong thick stalks, not growing so high as thepatience, or garden dock, with such round leaves as grow below, butsmall at every joint up to the top, and among the flowers, which arewhite, spreading forth into thesis branches, consisting of five or sixsmall leaves a-piece, hardly to be discerned from the white threads inthe middle, and seeming to be all threads, after which come brownishthree square seeds, like unto other docks, but larger, whereby itmay be plainly known to be a dock the root grows in time to be verygreat, with divers and sundry great spreading branches from it, of adark brownish or reddish colour on the outside, having a pale yellowskin under it, which covers the inner substance or root, which rindand skin being pared away, the root appears of so fresh and lively acolour, with fresh coloured veins running through it, that the choicestof that rhubarb that is brought us from beyond the seas cannot excelit, which root, if it be dried carefully, and as it ought which mustbe in our country by the gentle heat of a fire, in regard the sun isnot hot enough here to do it, and every piece kept from touching oneanother will hold its colour almost as well as when it is fresh, andhas been approved of, and commended by those who have oftentimes usedthem place it grows in gardens, and flowers about the beginning andmiddle of june, and the seed is ripe in july time the roots that are to be dried and kept all the yearfollowing, are not to be taken up before the stalk and leaves bequite turned red and gone, and that is not until the middle or end ofoctober, and if they be taken a little before the leaves do spring, orwhen they are sprung up, the roots will not have half so good a colourin them i have given the precedence unto this, because in virtues also ithath the pre-eminence i come now to describe unto you that which iscalled patience, or monk rhubarb. And the next unto that, the greatround-leaved dock, or bastard rhubarb, for the one of these may happilysupply in the absence of the other, being not much unlike in theirvirtues, only one more powerful and efficacious than the other andlastly, shall shew you the virtues of all the three sorts garden-patience, or monk rhubarb descript this is a dock bearing the name of rhubarb for essaypurging quality therein, and grows up with large tall stalks, setwith essaywhat broad and long, fair, green leaves, not dented at all the tops of the stalks being divided into thesis small branches, bearreddish or purplish flowers, and three-square seed, like unto otherdocks the root is long, great and yellow, like unto the wild docks, but a little redder. And if it be a little dried, shews less store ofdiscoloured veins than the other does when it is dry great round-leaved dock, or bastard rhubarb descript this has divers large, round, thin, yellowish green leavesrising from the root, a little waved about the edges, every onestanding upon a reasonably thick and long brownish footstalk, fromamong which rises up a pretty big stalk, about two feet high, withessay such high leaves growing thereon, but smaller.

No heart-beatrecognizable. No respiration. No reflex action galvanism failed toarouse any muscular action the details are too numerous to give all ofthem there was reduplication of heart-sounds for several days, due tointerference with pulmonary circulation she recovered both bodily andmental health 45 richards. Indian med gaz , 1886, xxi , p 78 - man, age 20;suicide. Was cut down and lived for four days 46 kite. Univ med mag , 1888-89, i , p 475 - man, age 69. Suicide 47 terrier. Prog méd , 1887, vi , pp 211-214 - two men, age 29 and25, insane attempted suicide by hanging both resuscitated 48 nobeling. Aertz intellig -bl , 1884, xxxi , p 213 - twosuicides by hanging. Men, ages 24 and 40 49 ritter. Allg wien, med zeit , 1886, xxxi , p 375 - soldier, found hanging cut down in ten minutes artificial respirationapplied.

Ifit is marketed under a name which is in any way protected, or ifits manufacturer claims for it any unusual therapeutic qualities proprietary mixtures which are marketed in conformity with therules are listed in the appendix of the book under the names of therespective manufacturers such proprietary mixtures are not admittedto the body of the book, save in the exceptional paper cited in thepreceding paragraph nonproprietary mixtures of official substances -- since the ingredientsof such mixtures do not require consideration by the council, andsince the mixtures are not open to the proprietary abuses which callfor the work of the council, it is not necessary that they should beinvestigated by the council the physician must judge whether suchmixtures should be directed to be prepared by the pharmacist, orwhether he is justified in ordering a ready-made preparation if hedecides to use a ready-made, nonproprietary preparation, he must judgefor himself whether it is marketed in accordance with the rules itshould, however, be remembered that the application of a trade name toany substance makes it proprietary explanation of rule 1. Compositionsecrecy objectionable -- it is not only the right but also the duty ofthe physician to know the essential composition of what he prescribes;the council cannot compromise on this proposition vehicles and preservatives -- in the case of mixtures, not only thepotent ingredient, but also the general character of the vehicle, thepresence of alcohol, and the identity of preservatives, or of any othersubstance, whether added or present as an impurity, must be stated ifthese can under any circumstances affect the therapeutic action ofthe article this, as a rule, does not mean the publication of tradesecrets, such as flavors or the details of the working formula trade secrets -- furthermore, trade secrets will not be received asconfidential by the council, since it accepts information only withthe distinct understanding that this may be freely published, at itsdiscretion inspection of factories -- the council does not accept invitations toinspect factories. Its concern is with the finished products on the other hand, the council requires that the information becomplete and accurate as to medicinal ingredients unofficial constituents -- unofficial constituents of proprietarymixtures must be presented by the manufacturer in the regular way andmust be acted on by the council before the preparations containing themcan be accepted fraud -- when it appears that a manufacturer has made a deliberatelyfalse statement concerning a product, he is asked to furnish anexplanation. And if this is not satisfactory, the product will not beaccepted, even if the false statement is subsequently corrected oromitted testimonials -- the foregoing paragraph applies not only to statementsmade to the council, but also to statements furnished to physicians bythe manufacturer or his agents, even when these statements are in theguise of testimonials explanation of rule 2.

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The proteogen no 3 sent me worked wonders in my patient the case came under my care when he was too far gone for anything to benefit him a great deal, but the proteogen did for him more than anyone could have expected, yet he died leaving me with a few ampoules to try on the next patient -- september 20, 1918 gonorrheal cystitis:-- proteogen no 11 -- my patient has taken two boxes of your proteogen no 11 given for gonorrheal cystitis of probably two years’ standing and at this writing i consider her almost, if not entirely, best buy case study essays cured which i think speaks very highly of your remedy i expect to use more of your preparations in the future -- april 12, 1919 this testimonial, either by clerical error, or because the results were considered remarkable, was repeated elsewhere in the material submitted by the merrell company acute gonorrhea:-- proteogen no 11 -- mr a e r , age 65, weight 140 pounds first attack had had no previous treatment came to me january 2, 1919 had discharge, all acute symptoms, burning, etc gave seventeen injections of proteogen no 11, also mild antiseptic urethral wash discharged on february 15, 1919, clinically cured -- april 11, 1919 epithelioma of buttock -- proteogen no 1 -- i used proteogen no 1 on an epithelioma of buttock essay six months ago with favorable results and no return of symptoms as yet -- april 13, 1919 it is obvious that the proteogen preparations are in conflict withrules 1, 6 and 10, and should not be admitted to “new and nonofficialremedies ” it is recommended that the previous action of thecouncil be allowed to stand and that publication of both reports beauthorized -- from the journal a m a , july 12, 1919 “arsenoven s s ” and “arseno-meth-hyd” report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council authorizes publication of the following report this reportdeclares arsenoven s s of the s s products company and solution ofarsenic and mercury formerly called arseno-meth-hyd of the new yorkintravenous laboratory, inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the council takes this opportunity to repeat its warning against theabuses-- often dangerous-- to which patients are frequently subjectedwhen “intravenous therapy” is employed w a puckner, secretary because of inquiries received, the council took up the consideration ofarsenoven s s and arseno-meth-hyd now sold as solution of arsenicand mercury the preparations having been referred to a committee forconsideration, this committee reported. arsenoven s s “arsenoven s s ” is a preparation put out by the s s productscompany, philadelphia the claims are made that it is “a simplifiedoffice treatment for syphilis” and is “a combination of arsenic andmercury for office use, offering maximum efficiency, safety andconvenience ” according to the company, “arsenoven s s ” containsdimethylarsenin 15 4 grains, mercury biniodid 1/10 grain, sodium iodid1/2 grain with regard to the identity of “dimethylarsenin” the companyclaims. “this product is a compound of cacodylic acid similar tosodium cacodylate but with a more pronounced therapeutic action ” thecommittee recommends to the council that “arsenoven s s ” be declaredinadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because of unwarrantedtherapeutic claims arseno-meth-hyd“arseno-meth-hyd, ” is sold by the new york intravenous laboratory, new york city, for the treatment of syphilis it comes in threedosages, 2 gm , 1 5 gm , and 0 7 gm , respectively the claim is madethat “arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm ” contains “2 gm 31 grains of sodiumdimethylarsenate cacodylate, u s p and mercury iodid 5 mg 1/12grain” in 5 c c of solution physicians are told. “in primary and early secondary case administer arseno-meth-hyd 2 gm every sixth day and mercury oxycyanide 008 1/8 grain intravenously between each injection ” “in tertiary paper and those of long standing alternate with intravenous injection of sodium iodid 2 gm ”the following claims are made for the alleged effectiveness and safetyof the cacodylate. “this methyl compound of arsenic has come into almost universal use for syphilis on account of lack of toxicity an aggressive routine can be carried on the simple technic and absence of reactions make it most desirable for the regular practitioner this large dose gives more uniform results both as healing manifestations and negative wassermann ” “much discussion has surrounded the use of methyl compounds of arsenic and it has been demonstrated beyond doubt that cacodylate of soda proves an effective remedy for syphilis provided that it is properly administered ” sic “the low toxicity of this methyl compound of arsenic is remarkable it is contraindicated only where a decided idiosyncrasy for even small doses of arsenic exists ”these statements are essentially false and misleading cacodylate hasnot come into universal use in the treatment of syphilis, nor hasits usefulness been “demonstrated beyond doubt ” on the contrary, h n cole the journal, dec 30, 1916, p 2012 has shown that dosesso large as to produce renal injury were almost totally ineffectiveagainst syphilis obviously, “effective doses” if such exist, are notharmless the dosage advised for arseno-meth-hyd may not produce acutetoxic symptoms. Nevertheless smaller doses have produced nephriticphenomena the “arseno-meth-hyd” treatment includes the intravenousinjection of about 1/4 grain of a mercury salt although this is lessthan the usual dose about 1 grain per week, the mercury is probablymore effective than the cacodylate the committee recommends to the council that, because of theunwarranted therapeutic claims, “arseno-meth-hyd” be held inadmissibleto new and nonofficial remedies the council adopted both reports of the committee and declared“arsenoven s s ” and “solution of arsenic and mercury” “arseno-meth-hyd” inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies the committee reports on these two products impel the councilagain to call attention to the undesirable and dangerous abuses towhich “intravenous therapy” lends itself there is a distinct fieldfor the intravenous administration of drugs in those paper in whichimmediate drug action is necessary, or when the medicament is likelyto be changed if absorbed through the ordinary channels unless suchindications exist, however, intravenous administration involves notonly inconvenience and expense to the patient, but what is moreimportant, unnecessary danger the fact that indiscriminate intravenousadministration is peculiarly profitable to certain manufacturing housesmakes it all the more necessary for the medical profession to be on itsguard in this matter in this connection it is well worth while to quote the closingparagraph from an editorial on “intravenous therapy” that appeared inthe journal, nov 11, 1916 it is as true today as when it appeared:“intravenous therapy will be most securely advanced if its employmentis restricted to such well defined fields as those mentioned above these fields can be satisfactorily determined only by a scientificpharmacologic study of the action of these drugs when so administeredin animals, as well as in man, under conditions in which the resultsare carefully controlled the intravenous method is an impressive one, approaching in preparation almost to that which goes with a surgicaloperation the patient is usually interested and impressed by thisnew, and, to him, mysterious method there is a psychic element in hisreaction to the injection which is not a factor in his reaction to thesame drug when given by mouth the intravenous injection of a complexmixture would appear to be writingicularly reprehensible little is known, as has been stated, of the results to be expected from intravenoustherapy, even with simple substances the use of complex mixtures willwithout doubt react against the proper use of the method ”after the report on arseno-meth-hyd had been presented to the council, a letter was received from the new york intravenous laboratoryannouncing that the preparation “arseno-meth-hyd” was now called“solution of arsenic and mercury” and expressing a desire to have itsproducts accepted for inclusion in new and nonofficial remedies inview of this letter, the committee report on “arseno-meth-hyd” andthe council protest against promiscuous intravenous therapy weresent the new york intravenous laboratory for consideration the reply of the new york intravenous laboratory contained nothingwhich permitted a revision of the preceding report the change of thename of “arseno-meth-hyd” to “solution of arsenic and mercury” meanslittle as the name still does not disclose the important fact that thearsenic is present as sodium cacodylate, nor does it tell the characterof the mercury compound the council voted that “solution of arsenicand mercury” and “arsenoven s s ” be declared inadmissible to new andnonofficial remedies because the therapeutic claims advanced for themare unwarranted rule 6 and because the names of these pharmaceuticalpreparations are not descriptive of their composition rule 8 in filing its reply with the council, the new york intravenouslaboratory announced that that document would be circulated to themedical profession this is of course the firm privilege the councilnotes, however, with interest, that the reply is devoted almostentirely to points which were not raised by the council and that itfails to discuss the objections which were actually made the reply constantly confuses the efficiency of cacodylate in anemiaand in syphilis the council report on “arseno-meth-hyd” does notdiscuss or even touch on the question of cacodylates in anemia itis confined to a discussion of the disappointing results obtainedwith cacodylates as such i e , without mercury in the treatmentof syphilis this attempt on the writing of the new york intravenouslaboratory to confuse the issue and to attribute to the councilan opinion that it has never stated or held is an inexcusablemisrepresentation the company in its reply said. “we believe that you have previously stated that a solution cacodylate of soda possesses no more action than so much water in other words, it was inert now you try to show that it produces renal injury ”the council has never declared that cacodylates are inert in thereport it is merely stated “that doses so large as to produce renalinjury were almost totally ineffective against syphilis ” neitherhas the council stated that cacodylate is “peculiarly dangerous ” infact the absolute toxicity of cacodylates is low but cole resultswere quoted as a caution that “effective” doses are not harmless agreat portion of the remainder of the reply is devoted to disparagingarsphenamin-- a product that is not involved in this action of thecouncil, and one about which the physician is amply informed amongst other wholly extraneous matters, the firm “reply” tried toresurrect the pepsin pancreatin controversy this also has nothingto do with the efficiency or harmlessness of sodium cacodylate inorder to dispose of the matter, however, it may be pointed out thatthe implications are entirely misleading the work which is quotedagainst the council was undertaken by the council itself, to clarifyobscurities in the older data the outcome of these new investigationsshowed the essential correctness of the deductions from the older work, namely, that pancreatin is destroyed by pepsin-hydrochloric acid dr long work to which the firm reply evidently refers, showed thatunder favorable conditions, namely, when protected by an excess ofprotein, essay trypsin may escape destruction in the stomach. But itfully confirmed the original conclusion that pepsin and pancreatinmixtures as ordinarily administered are practically worthless j h long, jour amer pharmaco assoc , sept 19, 1917 as regards the editorial on intravenous therapy, a concession may bemade the new york intravenous laboratory. Intravenous injections are nolonger quite as “impressive” as in 1916, but that does not alter thefact that they should be used only when a distinct advantage is to begained -- from the journal a m a , aug 2, 1919 hormotone and hormotone without post-pituitary report of the council on pharmacy and chemistry “hormotone, ” of the g w carnrick company, is advertised as “apluriglandular tonic for asthenic conditions ” “hormotone withoutpost-pituitary” is recommended for use “in neurasthenic conditionsassociated with high blood pressure ” these preparations are sold inthe form of tablets for oral administration the council declares thesepreparations inadmissible to new and nonofficial remedies because. 1their composition is semisecret rule 1.